HOST FAMILY ORIENTATION PACKAGE
Table of Contents
HOST FAMILY ORIENTATION PACKAGE .................................................................................................... 1
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM OFFICE STAFF .............................................................................................. 2
SCHOOL CONTACTS................................................................................................................................... 2
GENERAL PROGRAM INFORMATION.......................................................................................................... 3
HOST FAMILY GENERAL INFORMATION.................................................................................................... 6
PROGRAM PROCEDURES.......................................................................................................................... 14
MEDICAL INSURANCE ............................................................................................................................... 15
ACTIVITIES................................................................................................................................................ 18
CONDUCT WITH RESPECT TO HOSTING STUDENTS.............................................................................. 19
Safety ................................................................................................................................................... 19
Relationship protocols........................................................................................................................ 19
Helpful ideas AND SUPPORT for students and families .................................................................. 20
Written Work ....................................................................................................................................... 20
English Language Development......................................................................................................... 21
Other Ideas for Helping Your International Student....................................................................... 21
Topics for Discussion........................................................................................................................... 22
Tutors, Academic Assistance & Translation Services...................................................................... 22
Host parents’ check list ..................................................................................................................... 23
TRAVELLING OUT-OF-DISTRICT.............................................................................................................. 23
Summer Vacation Extension Protocol............................................................................................... 24
Travel to the United States (USA) Protocol ..................................................................................... 24
STUDENT TRAVEL REQUEST FORM......................................................................................................... 25
TERMINATION FROM PROGRAM RELEASE WAIVER (PARENT/GUARDIAN FORM)................................. 26
TRAVEL TO THE USA RELEASE WAIVER (HOST PARENT FORM)............................................................ 27
TRAVEL TO THE USA RELEASE WAIVER (PARENT/GUARDIAN FORM)................................................... 29
STUDENT & HOST FAMILY “HOMEWORK” ............................................................................................. 30
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM OFFICE STAFF
Mr. Steve Knight, District Principal
Email: steve.knight@sd71.bc.ca
Mr. Colin Guiguet, Manager of Marketing/Recruiting
Email: colin.guiguet@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Youn Hee Edmonds, Host Family Coordinator
Email: younhee.edmonds@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Amy Ho, Host Family Cultural Coordinator
Email: amy.ho@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Darcy Weiman, Activities/Medical/Out of District Travel
Email: darcy.weiman@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Heather Douglas, Administrative Assistant
Email: heather.douglas@sd71.bc.ca
SCHOOL CONTACTS
SCHOOL NAME ROLE EMAIL
G.P. Vanier Secondary Ms. Helen Oliphant ESL/ISPST Teacher helen.oliphant@sd71.bc.ca
250-338-9262 Mr. Brian McAskill Vice Principal brian.mcaskill@sd71.bc.ca
Joelle Hamilton Admin Assistant joelle.hamilton@sd71.bc.ca
Highland Secondary Ms. Jamie McCance ESL/ISPST Teacher jamie.mccance@sd71.bc.ca
250-339-5525 Mr. Rob Grantham Vice Principal rob.grantham@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Ruth Whyte Admin Assistant Ruth.whyte@sd71.bc.ca
Lake Trail Secondary Ms. Michelle Beaulieu ESL Teacher michelle.beaulieu@sd71.bc.ca
250-334-3168 Mr. Dean Patterson Principal dean.patterson@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Lorraine Edward Admin Assistant lorraine.edward@sd71.bc.ca
M. R. Isfeld Secondary Ms. Victoria Mulrooney ESL/ISPST Teacher victoria.mulrooney@sd71.bc.ca
250-334-2428 Mr. Gerald Fussell Vice Principal gerald.fussell@sd71.bc.ca
Ms. Brenda Hunt Admin Assistant brenda.hunt@sd71.bc.ca
GENERAL PROGRAM INFORMATION
Thank you very much for participating in our International Program as host parents. Some of the
students’ best memories will be of their experiences with a Canadian family. Our host families
provide much of the backbone of our program.
Students have come to Comox Valley for many reasons, from many cultures and from many
socio-economic backgrounds.
In anticipation of some of the many questions you have, the following are points of information:
A. The District sets the host family fee each year. Under no circumstances are private
arrangements authorized unless the District Principal gives approval.
B. All Host parents are paid by the School District accounting office on the first Thursday of
each month.
C. When the Host Family Supervisor decides upon student placement, she carefully considers
the needs of both the student and the host family. However, the needs of the student are
paramount and we reserve the right to change a student if necessary, as we determine.
D. The District Principal is the Custodian of each student on behalf of the school district and
has ultimate authority for their care while they are studying in our District.
E. The issue of telephones arises every year. Some families limit the use of a telephone to the
hours before 10 p.m. We ask you to be aware that for students from Asia, this may be the
only time when they can reach their families. We suggest that you encourage your students
to buy telephone cards and facilitate their purchase.
F. Another issue is the use of computers and Internet. Computer use is a fact of life. Its use
needs to be monitored. If concerns arise, then contact the Host Family Supervisor who will
alert the District Principal if a reasonable solution can’t be negotiated. The issue of students
accessing internet pornography sites is not a myth. It happens. Be diligent and inform the
District Principal immediately if this is a concern.
G. Students may have questions or concerns about their course schedules. Please do not deal
with course concerns (unless it is to alert us). Students are here for many reasons.
Scheduling decisions are complicated and demand careful attention. The designated school
counselor or program coordinator has the knowledge about the International Program
Graduation Program to assist the student to make informed decisions. Please do, however,
take an active interest in your student’s progress in classes. If attitude, attendance or 
tardiness becomes a problem, then contact the designated school administrator. Inform the
District Principal if the problem continues even after the school has acted on them.
H. If a student needs to miss school because of illness, then please inform the school which the
student attends. It is also your responsibility to monitor your student re: tardiness and
attendance. Contact the classroom teacher or school contact/counsellor directly if you are
concerned.
Safety is an important concern with parents, students and others. Students will be
instructed about these issues, but it would be a good idea for you to review safety
procedures with your students, both for your home, for example, fire escape routes, and in
the community, (without alarming them unduly).
I. If you become concerned about any safety issue involving your student, then please inform
us. This includes student breaking curfew and the use of alcohol or drugs, which of course is
strictly prohibited. If you become aware that your student has used alcohol or illegal drugs,
it is your responsibility to inform the District Principal immediately. Curfew issues initially
go to the Host Family Supervisor.
A more delicate matter has to do with relationships that inevitably form with some students.
It is important to keep us informed if you suspect your student is becoming involved in a
serious personal relationship so that the student can be counseled appropriately.
J. If the situation with a student in your home becomes difficult, then it is important to inform
us. Sometimes students will request to change their host family. While we do not like to
make changes, we also have to respect the fact that some relationships just don’t work. In
some cases, there may be problems of personalities. There could be sibling rivalry, which is
affecting the tone of the house. Contact the Homestay Supervisor.
K. Please do NOT telephone the District Principal at home unless there is an emergency AND
you are unable to reach the Homestay Supervisor.
L. You have gone through a selection process as host families. However, this does not
guarantee continued placement of students with your family each year. We try to place
students appropriately, and that may change from year to year depending upon the
applications we receive.
M. Students will not generally show you their report card. It is your responsibility to ask to see
it, and to attend Parent/Teacher interviews. If you have questions about your student’s
progress, contact the school counsellor.
N. There can be travel to the USA for international student provided the release waivers are
completed and the criteria for supervision are satisfied. Contact the office at least two
months before the proposed trip.
O. We get many requests for students (and supported by you the host family) to stay and
holiday after the program is over. We now have a waiver protocol in place that permits your
student to extend their stay at the termination of the educational program – typically
shortly after Canada Day each year . In this scenario, the student is no longer the
responsibility of School District 71. As a result, there are two waivers that need to be
completed, one by the student’s natural parents and one by you if you are agreeing to host a
student. We require two months notice for this request.
P. Please respect the religious beliefs and background of your student. For example, if you
have a practicing Roman Catholic student it would be best to inquire if they wish to attend a
youth group at a Catholic church, not the church of your faith if it is different from theirs.
Some natural parents are adamant about the place of worship for their child.
Q. You are not required to host the parents or other family members of your student should
they come for a visit. If you find it awkward to discuss this with the parents, please advise
us and we will assist you. However, if you do wish to host the parents/relatives, please
understand the amount of extra work this may entail is at your own expense.
HOST FAMILY GENERAL INFORMATION
This information is intended to address the broad range of concerns of homestay parents.
1. Why do foreign students come to British Columbia?
Students come for a variety of reasons:
• as a member of an exchange program
• for a one-year intensive English program
• to become more fluent in English, which will lead to greater employment opportunities in
their home countries
• to achieve BC Graduation because they have not succeeded in more competitive
education systems in their own countries
• to achieve BC Graduation in order to enter university in North America because university
places are limited in their home countries
• to experience Canadian culture and lifestyle
• the desire to experience life abroad
• their parents have sent them
Suggestions: Talk to your student about her/his reasons for coming. Help to set academic
goals and language goals based on those reasons. Help to make a plan, which will lead to
success in achieving the goals.
2. What is a homestay parent expected to provide?
As a home-stay parent you are expected to provide essentially what you would normally
provide for your own family:
• a private bedroom
• three wholesome meals a day and snacks as required
• a quiet, adequately lit and heated study space
• hot water and facilities for daily bathing
• laundry (you may expect a student to do their own laundry if you wish)
• emotional support if the student suffers from homesickness, difficulties at school, etc.
• academic support (help with homework if possible, communication with teachers, attendance at
parent-teacher-student interview, etc.)
• inclusion of the student in family outings, trips to restaurants, special occasions, recreational
activities
• access to the common living areas of the house
Before Students Arrive:
First Impressions are important. Therefore, please adapt your cleaning schedule to have
everything done the day of your student’s arrival.
Recommended Check List:
a. Vacuum and tidied up common space.
b. Windows, toilet, sink, shower stall, bathtub and floors
c. Clearing space in the bathroom cupboard for student’s personal space.
d. Hand soap, toilet paper, a clean bathtub mat, bath towel
e. Check for cobwebs
f. Clean Carpet-if it is dirty
g. Check drawers and closets to ensure it is ready for the students
h. Hangers in the closet
i. Checking light bulbs
j. Check for bedding
Suggestions:
• Early in the homestay, have a conversation with your student about expectations (yours
and the student’s).
• Reach a mutual agreement about the amount of computer use and telephone time the
student can have.
• Discuss how much interaction the student and the family will have and the kinds of
activities in which you will participate together.
• Discuss these issues regularly. Situations change as the student’s understanding of our
culture develops and as their English improves.
3. What kinds of things should the student pay for?
• clothes
• school supplies and extra-curricular lessons or activities
• toiletries
• all long distance phone calls. Many students arrange to have their own phone, in which
case they also pay the installation fees and monthly bills. Others buy phone cards.
• medicines and medications of all kinds
• any dental work
• haircuts or other personal services
• personal entertainment and expenses (If your family is going out for dinner or to a movie
you should pay for the student. If the student chooses to eat in a restaurant or go to a
movie with friends, the student should pay.)
• costs associated with participation in school-sponsored activities such as graduation
ceremonies, school dances, trips other than those specific to the international program,
extra-curricular sports, costs related to individual certification, etc.
• stamps, books, magazines, CD’s, posters, etc.
• costs related to renewal of student study permits and airplane tickets home
• grad fees, yearbook fees
Suggestions: Please discuss this list with your student.
4. What kinds of expenses does the program cover?
The fees that students pay cover the following:
• all tuition
• medical insurance fees
• some activities arranged by the International Program Staff.
Students must either rent or buy their own instrument if they take band, pay for their
yearbook, grad fees, and extra-curricular trips or any other school sponsored trips that
are deemed as enrichment and are therefore optional.
Suggestions: Discuss this with your student so that expectations are clear.
5. What problems can I expect at the start?
Students may suffer from several overlapping conditions for the first few weeks or in some
cases, even months:
• Culture Shock: Culture shock is what people experience when they are suddenly
immersed in a culture which is different from their own. “Culture” means the largely
unwritten patterns of behavior that govern the lives of a particular group of people.
• Culture shock comes from the realization that basic assumptions about life and familiar
ways of behaving are no longer appropriate or useful.
• Remember that your student is struggling with the following new (and in many cases,
strange) things: language, climate, community, customs, food, home, family, behaving
and ways of showing emotions. It is worth noting that if you as a host family have had
little experience in another culture, then you may experience some culture shock
yourselves.
• Jet lag: most students have traveled through several time zones to reach the Comox
Valley. They may suffer from the effects of jet lag for up to two weeks, including
sleeping problems, drowsiness at the wrong time of day, loss of appetite, general
fatigue, and disorientation.
• Homesickness: many students have left their family, friends and pets for the first time,
and they are far away. Natural feelings of homesickness may be further exacerbated by
culture shock.
• Loneliness: students may feel very alone in this strange new situation. They may feel like
outsiders in the community, in the school, even in your home. Limited English ability may
contribute to their feelings of isolation.
• Teenage mood swings: even though they come from another country, they are still
teenagers dealing with the physical and emotional changes that all teenagers go through. 
All of the above may exhibit themselves in any of the following ways: quiet, unresponsive,
withdrawn behaviour, crying spells, isolation from the family (long periods alone in the
bedroom), lack of appetite, despondent behaviour, depression, anger, anxiety, moodiness,
lethargy, stress related headaches or stomach upset.
Suggestions:
• If you suspect that your student is suffering from any of the above conditions, talk about
it, explaining that it is perfectly normal, that it will get better in time, and that you
would like to help.
• Plan some outings or activities together.
• Encourage your student to phone and write parents. Ask about the family and life in the
home country.
• Look at photographs together.
• Plan topics of evening conversations.
• Develop the habit of watching a weekly TV show together or taking walks together.
• Help the student build an active and busy life in this community.
• Help her/him develop friendships with people of a similar age.
• Talking through difficult times can lead to a closer and more caring relationship.
• Card games or Board games are a great way to engage your student in an activity where
she must speak English
• Your student will receive a comprehensive Orientation Package which will outline
information they will need about medical issues, manners, Canadian culture, how to
survive in a host family. Ask to see the package and go over it with them to insure that
they understand. There is a lot of information, so you may want to do slowly, over
several weeks.
6. What kinds of rules should I have for the student?
The student should be expected to follow whatever rules you have for other members of
your household. The following are suggestions, some of which you may choose to adjust for
the age of your student.
Students should:
• Be at home on school nights, unless participating in an organized activity e.g. swimming
lessons, study groups, etc. ISP Program guideline for curfew Sunday-Thursday is 10pm.
• Obey an age-appropriate curfew for weekend nights – ISP Program guideline for curfew is
12am Friday and Saturday. (If you haven’t had experience parenting a teen and need
some guidelines, contact the Host Family Supervisor.)
• Let you know where they are at all times.
• Respect your rules regarding smoking.
• Refrain from using or buying drugs or alcohol.
• Attend school every day that school is in session unless they are ill.
• Ask ahead of time if they need rides to special events, or if they wish to have friends
overnight, etc.
• Complete and submit a travel request form, available
at http://www.sd71.bc.ca/international/host_families.php , for travel out of the CV
school district. Please note: five days’ notice is expected for travel from CV. Students
will not be given permission to go away together for overnight trips without appropriate
adult supervision.
• Assist with some duties in the home. Many students are not used to doing chores. They
may often come from families that hire household help. You will need to demonstrate
the tasks that you would like them to do. For example, if you wish your student to do
their own laundry, you will need to demonstrate how to use your machines.
Homestay parents should:
• Feel free to limit the number of overnight” sleep-overs,” or camping trip, which are so
popular as a weekend activity. Never allow your student to attend these events without
checking that there will be adequate supervision by adults, and age appropriate
activities.
• Not leave the student alone overnight; appropriate adult supervision must be arranged if
you are away. Check with the Host Family Supervisor if you plan to be away.
• Inform the school if the student is ill.
• Never allow students to leave the community overnight without carefully checking to
ensure where the student is going and what adult supervision will be. Insure that the ‘out
of district’ travel form is completed 5 days prior to the event.
• Never allow students to drive the family car.
• Make additional rules as necessary: showers/bathing, table manners, other manners, use
of household appliances, laundry, bringing friends home, etc.
• Immigration Canada does not permit secondary school age students to hold jobs while in
Canada.
• Students may participate in work experience through their school program.
Suggestions:
• Discuss your rules early and often, making sure that the student understands.
• Deal with a few rules at a time.
• Reach mutual agreement about as many rules as possible.
• Explain the reasons for your rules.
• Enforce your rules…do not let the student get away with breaking them.
• Be fair and firm.
• Establish reasonable consequences for breaking rules. 
7. What about food/manners?
Canadian food can be a problem for international students at first. Certainly the food you
serve in your home will be different from the food they are used to. People worldwide
derive great comfort from the familiar and favourite foods. Eating times, table manners, and
methods of serving and presenting food will also be different for the student. Most students
adjust quickly to a Canadian diet but some take longer than others. Also table manners can
vary greatly in other cultures. If your student displays manners inappropriately to your
expectations, you will need to explain and demonstrate the proper Canadian behaviour.
Suggestions:
• Give your student a tour of the kitchen and the refrigerator, naming items and
explaining what they are for.
• Ask the student what different items are found in the cupboard and refrigerator at
home. Talk about favourite foods and what is eaten at mealtimes at home.
• Take the student food shopping with you, especially to a large food store where various
ethnic foods are available.
• Ask the student what he would like to take to school for lunch. Encourage the student to
prepare a favourite dish so that you can try it and learn to cook it.
• Have a good variety of fresh fruits and vegetables on hand.
• Rice is an important part of Asian diets. If your student wants rice every day, please
provide it, even for breakfast.
• If your student is to make their own lunch, then you will have to demonstrate how to
make a sandwich, pack the leftovers, and show them any other items that they may
include in their lunch package.
8. What if my student gets sick?
Please refer to the section on Medical Insurance.
Suggestions:
• During the first few weeks take your student to meet the family doctor.
• Discuss the doctor’s position regarding billing during the first three months and inform
the doctor that the student is living with you.
• If the student has met the doctor before getting ill, the situation will be much more
relaxed when there is a medical problem.
• Discuss illness with the student in one of your early conversations.
• Ask the student what kinds of medical problems have occurred in the past and what the
usual treatments are.
• Explain your approach to treatment of common illnesses.
• Please note: students will often bring with them, non-prescription medication for
common ailments, such as headaches, stomach upset, etc. If students want to use from
their home country, it’s o.k.
• If problems persist, they should consult a physician. If a student needs a translator for a
medical issue, please contact the Home Stay Manager to arrange this service.
9. How can I best prepare my family and myself for the homestay experience?
It’s a good idea to discuss the expectations of all family members before the student arrives.
Children may think that the student will be like a new brother or sister or that they will
become best friends. In fact this doesn’t happen very often.
Sharing the same home does not guarantee that your own children and the student will have
anything in common with each other. An honest discussion about the difficulties of forming a
cross-cultural friendship, with the added barrier of language, can save disappointment later
on.
The more you learn about the country and culture that your student comes from, the better
able you will be to understand and support him. You should, at the very least, have an idea
of where the country is and what kind of an environment your student likely comes from.
Suggestions:
• Prepare a welcome for your student: a sign, a gift, flowers, or any small gesture of
welcome.
• Visit the library and take out some books about the country your student comes from.
• If you have the books on hand when the student arrives they can be the basis of
conversation about the country.
• Make a list of things to talk about and things to do during the first few days and weeks.
Talk to an experienced homestay parent.
10. What should I do during the first few days?
• Keep the student busy but also arrange for some time alone to compensate for jet lag
fatigue.
• Encourage a phone call home soon after arrival.
• Speak to the parents yourself saying how pleased you are to have their son or daughter
with you; even if they don’t understand English, they will appreciate the gesture.
• Introduce your student to extended family members, neighbours and close friends.
• Write down names to help him remember them.
• Take the time to learn the correct pronunciation of your student’s name.
• Discuss how you would like the student to address you and other family members.
• Teach your student the phone number, how to use the phone and phone book, how to use
a pay phone and how to call home collect, and give him your emergency numbers.
• Help arrange for a personal phone, if one is wanted.
• Take her to the post office and explain how to buy stamps and send packages.
• Take the student to the bank rather than carrying much money or leaving it at home. If
your student has a cash withdrawal card help them learn how to use it and be sure to
impress the importance of never telling anyone the PIN number.
• Show girls where they can buy personal supplies and discuss how you would like them to
dispose of sanitary items in your home.
• Visit local points of interest and make sure the student knows the route from your home
to school.
• Go over school information and discuss the plans and the times for getting to school.
• Ask the student what they would like to do.
• Provide the student with a transit schedule and go over it with them.
• Take the student on a bus ride yourself to show them the route in your neighborhood.
• Relax! Focus on making the student comfortable and your own feelings of nervousness
and anxiety will disappear.
• Celebrate small milestones right away (the end of the first week, the first month, etc.).
• Establish a pattern of daily conversation. Have the student help to make a list of
conversation topics to get through the first few weeks.
PROGRAM PROCEDURES
1. To facilitate communication and to ensure that the program operates smoothly, we ask you to
follow these procedures:
• If you need to contact the District Principal, please call during office hours, at Lake Trail
Secondary School, Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. (Ph: 703-2904). At times, the
District Principal will be away on School District business. The Administrative Assistant will
then direct your concern to the appropriate staff person.
• If you have issues involving student accounts, host family payments, medical insurance
issues, or for general information, contact the Administrative Assistants, Heather Douglas
at heather.douglas@sd71.bc.ca or Darcy Weiman darcy.weiman@sd71.bc.ca . We prefer to
use e-mail and her mail is checked frequently.
EXCEPTIONS: If there is an emergency, then obviously it is important to contact the Host
Family Supervisor immediately. If she is unavailable, you will be notified by e-mail and
given alternative contact information.
• If you need to contact the Host Family Supervisor, and the matter is not urgent, email
Younhee Edmonds at younhee.edmonds@sd71.bc.ca For more urgent issues, telephone 218-
9605, Monday—Friday between 9:00am and 1:00pm or between 6:00 and 8:00pm. Please do
not contact Youn Hee after 8:00 pm or on weekends unless there is an emergency that either
involves or impacts your homestay student. Please leave a detailed message if Younhee is not
immediately available and she will return your call shortly.
These are emergencies:
• A health emergency (including an accident),
• A student is missing
• An emergency has arisen in your family or in the student’s family at home,
These are examples of situations which are not considered emergencies:
• A student is not obeying host family rules,
• A student is missing class,
• A student is late for curfew.
We ask you to use common sense in dealing with these issues.
2. If you and your student have issues, then please follow these directions:
• If a student is missing school, is late, or is not completing homework, then please contact the
school or the teacher. If the problem persists, that is the time to call the District Principal.
• If a student is not obeying host family rules, contact the Host Family Supervisor during office
hours.
3. Please be aware of the following considerations regarding our roles in dealing with host families
and students:
• If the student becomes ill at school, then instruct your student to inform the vice-principal,
counselor or secretary, who will inform you or take the student to the clinic if you are not
available.
• If the student must stay home for illness, then please inform the school directly. The
International Office does not need to be informed if a student must miss a day of school,
unless there is an emergency.
• Please have your student direct any serious health or safety concerns to the District Principal
or Home Stay Supervisor.
• The issue of health and safety for students is paramount. When in doubt, err on the side of
caution. If you are not sure about a situation, please inquire.
MEDICAL INSURANCE
There are two walk in medical clinics in the Comox Valley that have direct billing available to
CVISP international students. Always take your international student to one of these medical
clinics and present the students Guard.Me insurance card.
Comox Valley Medical Clinic
3199 Cliffe Avenue
Courtenay, BC V9N 2L9
Phone: 250.334.1512
Fax: 250.334.1597
Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 9:00am – 8:00pm
Friday to Saturday 9:00am – 6:00pm
Washington Park Medical Clinic
757 Ryan Road
Courtenay, BC V9N 3R6
Phone: 250.334.9241
Fax: 250.897.0225
Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:00am – 8:00pm
Friday to Saturday 9:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday 9:00am – 5:00pm
Guard.Me: is third party insurance provided to all international students. Most students will be
covered on a Guard.Me medical policy for their entire length of stay in our program.
BC Medical Services Plan (MSP): is obtained for students who study in BC for more than one full
school year AND are in the graduation program. Students become eligible for coverage after
completing a waiting period that normally consists of the balance of the month of arrival plus
two months. For example: A student arrives on August 27 will have completed the waiting
period and be covered under MSP on November 1. These students will be covered by Guard.Me
during the waiting period.
• Some students will arrive with private travel insurance from their home country.
• Students must keep their medical cards or policy information with them at all times.
• Students must present their medical cards (MSP or Guard.Me) at the time of a doctor’s
visit. Students on MSP pay no fees for a visit to the doctor. Students on private
insurance including Guard.Me, have to pay the doctor’s office ($75.00 - $100.00) per
visit. These students may then make a claim for reimbursement. Our office or your host
family can help make a claim.
Be aware that a visit to emergency at the hospital is a minimum of $750.00 no matter what
level of service is received. In many cases going to a doctor’s clinic is faster than going to
the hospital, and it is always less expensive. Only use the Hospital Emergency Room in life
threatening cases.
• Medical insurance plans do not pay for medicine. Students who need medicine will be
given a prescription. Prescriptions can be purchased at a pharmacy. Students who are
covered under the Guard.Me plan can make a claim for prescription costs and receive
reimbursement.
Visit http://www.guard.me/studentguard/index.php for more information on Guard.Me’s
standard policy, claim forms, and general information.
Procedure to follow under Guard.Me:
1. In the case of a medical emergency, take the student to a hospital. Phone the Guard.Me
number on the insurance card immediately and follow instructions.
2. If the student is ill and needs to visit the clinic, take the student to the clinic. The student
will be billed immediately. Have the student pay this bill. Telephone the contact number on
the insurance card. The contact person at the insurance office will issue a claim form, which
must be completed and submitted if the student is to be reimbursed.
3. After the necessary forms have been completed, the student will submit them to the
insurance office and then will receive payment.
Frequently Asked Questions About Medical Insurance:
1. What conditions are covered?
This coverage applies to emergencies only and does NOT take the place of regular health care
and does not cover pre-existing medical conditions. It does not cover dental care or prescription
medication.
2. What happens if my student becomes sick?
Take the student to the appropriate treatment centre. Then, inform the Host Family Supervisor.
If the illness is serious, inform the District Principal immediately.
3. Other expenses?
Any extraordinary expense, including out of area transportation, which is over and above that
covered through insurance, is the responsibility of the student.
ACTIVITIES
Caution:
• Extreme sports, such as bungee jumping, paragliding, etc, are not permitted. When participating
in activities ON the water, such as boating, kayaking, river tubing, etc, students must wear life
jackets. Note: We have on file an approved activity waiver form for each student.
• Students may not participate in trampoline activities. This advice comes from BC Ministry of
Education, Risk Management branch. An accident could lead to litigation.
• Students may not participate in surfing unless they participate in a Surfing School program which
has liability insurance, accompanies students in the water, and prepares for the activity with a
safety lesson. Also, students must be able to swim.
• Students should only swim in locations where a certified life-guard is present.
• Please ensure that students wear helmets when cycling. It’s the law in BC, but not in many other
countries.
Activities in General:
• Some of the international students’ best experiences have to do with participation in activities
both in the school and in the community.
• Many new students need encouragement to participate in activities because of shyness, because
of language difficulties or because the concept of participation is new to them.
• The schools offer many possibilities for extra-curricular activities such as sports or clubs. Please
encourage your student to become involved.
• The community also provides a host of activities available to your people. Again, we encourage
you to help your student become involved.
• Our host parents can help by volunteering to coordinate an activity that may involve a small or
large group of students.
• The idea is not to have large group activities, but instead to offer a variety of small-scale events
which would help to “break the ice” for everyone.
• There may be several ‘official’ International Program activities arranged by program staff, in
which all international students are expected to participate.
CONDUCT WITH RESPECT TO HOSTING STUDENTS
As Host Parents, you are the responsible adult, NOT the best friend of the student. You are expected to
act '‘in a kind and judicious'’ manner with respect to your dealings with your student.
Some International students come from cultures where physical punishment is allowed and common in
their homes and in their classrooms. Some students may expect this type of punishment if they disobey
our rules in the host family or in their class. However, just as it is forbidden and unlawful to use any
type of corporal punishment on a child by a teacher, we must caution you that the same rules apply to
host parents of an international student in any situation. Physical discipline is not permitted under any
circumstances.
A primary responsibility of the host parent is to care for the student and to keep the District Principal
informed about the welfare of the student. That includes informing us of behaviour of other students
which may impact on your student and in making us aware of potentially dangerous or inappropriate
personal relationships.
Issues with respect to hosting students include:
Safety
1. As host parents, you must be aware that safety is key. Students must be properly supervised at all
times. Students should not be left alone overnight for any reason. We will arrange for care of your
student in situations where an emergency arises. If you plan to be away, make certain your student
stays with an adult who has been approved by this Program.
2. Do not allow your student to be ‘wandering at large’ at night, especially alone. The key is to make
certain you know where your student is at all times.
3. If a student asks to participate in a ‘sleep over’, then make certain to check the particulars with the
adult supervisors at the other home.
Relationship protocols
As you know, different cultures have different protocols about personal space. We ask you to “be
smart”. For your own protection, take a very careful approach to hugging, touching or showing affection
to your student. Actions are easily misinterpreted by young people and others around you.
Examples:
• Japanese students rarely have a warm, physically demonstrative relationship with their natural
parents. Therefore, be cautious in demonstrating physical affection until you are sure of your
relationship with the student.
• Latin students are very demonstrative, as a general rule. Again, you must take a cautious approach.
• Some European and Latin American students often greet each other with hugs and kisses on the
cheek; this is normal. In fact, many of these students consider Canadians ‘cold’ because they do not 
demonstrate this open affection. (Do not misinterpret overt signs of friendliness as being any more
than that.)
• If we receive any kind of information about ‘inappropriate conduct’ by anyone, adult or student, in
relation to an International Program student, then we must investigate immediately. This is a legal
requirement.
Please note these points:
• Adults should remember to dress appropriately while in the company of students.
• Adults should not use ‘sexually suggestive’ language or tell off-colour jokes in front of students.
• Overt or excessive displays of affection in public are completely inappropriate.
• Some older teen-aged students may want a warm family relationship with their host family.
• Some students may just want room and board and personal privacy. Asian students, in particular,
often do not want anything other than a ‘formal’ relationship with their host family.
• There are always exceptions, and the attitude varies with each individual. Don’t take it personally if
your student prefers the more formal relationship. Each student is different.
• Under no circumstances serve alcoholic beverages to your International Program high school student
in your home. Sometimes, we will serve our own older teens a drink on special occasions such as
Xmas dinner. Your international student cannot be afforded this “adult” privilege. This rule is for
your own protection. It’s not legal to provide any kind of alcoholic beverage, to your student, even in
your own homes
If you have any questions or concerns, we encourage you to seek answers or advice from the
District Principal or the Host Family Supervisor.
Helpful ideas AND SUPPORT for students and families
Written Work
Let them work on their own unless they request help. In other words, help them only if they ask.
Do not correct too much of their written work. The teachers need to see their mistakes because the
lessons are often based on what they need to know. If their work comes in with no mistakes, then the
teachers have no knowledge of the student’s real skill level in the subject area or written English.
If they ask you how to say a certain expression, by all means tell them, but don’t go through and correct
their whole paper/assignment.
If they ask how to spell a word you have two choices:
1. Give them the first 3 letters and have them look it up in a dictionary.
2. Tell them how to spell it.
(Use method #1 only some of the time. It can be very frustrating.)
Students should do their own work … they should have done 99% of written work themselves.
Don’t write on their work. If you want to demonstrate a word, do it on scrap paper.
Encourage them to write thank you notes to anyone who has done something special for them, perhaps
someone who has taken them to see a movie or boating for a day.
English Language Development
Watch a television program together and discuss it. Watching the same program every week is a good
idea. In this way, the students hear consistent language. Here Are Examples Of Questions To Ask For
Discussion.
What did you think of Sam? Why?
What do you think Sam should have done?
When might someone in (Korea, Japan, etc.) do this?
When is it not good to do this?
What do you think he meant by that?
What did he mean?
How is this same …?
What causes this?
What do you think will happen next?
What is going to happen next?
Why did she do that?
Watch the evening news together and discuss it. Ask questions which require more than yes or no for an
answer. Examples of open-ended questions are:
What do you think about …?
How does …. work?
What is the reason for …?
Tell me about …. ?
Why do you think … acted that way?
What would you do if …. ?
Please explain that to me.
Other Ideas for Helping Your International Student
1. Try to talk to students as much as possible at the dinner table or after supper before homework
time. Please speak slowly and clearly.
2. Engage in open-ended conversations.
3. Encourage students to have a study time each evening. (New students should have a minimum of
one hour of homework per night.) If you find your student has no homework, please phone the
teacher. Sometimes students don’t understand the assignment, or it’s too difficult for them.
4. Students who have little English language ability are enrolled in a program of studies that will
include electives, such as art or drama, where there may be no homework. In this case,
encourage the student to do some extra vocabulary development by encouraging them to read
magazines, comic books, watch English-language television, etc.
5. Encourage them to talk to Canadian students/people as much as possible.
6. Be open and non-judgmental in discussions. This attitude encourages students to express their
point of view.
Topics for Discussion
The student’s native country
Education
The student’s family Canada
One province of Canada A T.V. sitcom A movie
Festivals in the student’s country Holidays and special celebrations
in Canada
Teenagers
Sports Music Favourite pastimes
Economics of student’s country Politics of student’s country Food, Beverages, Meals
Customs Leisure activities in BC (hiking, kayaking, canoeing, camping,
hockey, skating etc.
Tutors, Academic Assistance & Translation Services
During the school year, your student may request or require the assistance of an academic tutor.
Do not employ a tutor who cannot provide a recent ‘Criminal Record’ check. The Comox Valley
Teacher’s Association, CVTA, will provide the program with an updated list of available tutors early in
the school year. You should also contact the counselor/Vice Principal to assist you.
If you need to use an interpreter or native language tutor, check with the International Office for these
services - you may require this support in emergency situations, or for a difficult host family issue. 
Host parents’ check list
This list may help you deal with some of the issues you will face as you accept a student into your home.
Please make sure you complete this list and that you contact the office if you have concerns.
1. I have given my student an orientation to the neighbourhood and the community.
2. Bus routes and schedules have been explained.
3. A bank account is set up
4. Curfew rules discussed
5. Information about security in the home (students require a key)
6. Safety issues discussed
7. Emergency contacts provided
8. House ‘rules’ discussed and understood
9. Leisure activities have been outlined
10. Travel rules discussed
11. Health insurance discussed
12. Medical procedures discussed
13. Telephone and e-mail rules discussed
14. Food concerns discussed
15. School schedules and concerns addressed
TRAVELLING OUT-OF-DISTRICT
Safety is our major concern. As legal Custodian of each international student in our program, we take
our responsibility for their care seriously.
When our students are in school or with their host families, we feel confident that they are safe. When
students leave our district, travel to other cities or stay with people outside our program, it is our
responsibility to insure their safety and know their whereabouts.
• Students who plan to travel out of district with their host family for more than three (3) nights
must submit an Student Travel Request (STR) for approval.
• Students who plan to travel out of district without their host family, for any length of time, must
submit and Student Travel Request Form for approval.
Anytime a student leaves our district:
1. The Student Travel Request (STR) must be completed by the student and a host parent.
2. Host Parents need to verify the information and consent to the arrangements.
3. Completed forms must be faxed or delivered to the International Program Office at Lake Trail
School and approved before travel takes place. (Fax: 250-897-1496)
4. Forms not received at least five (5) working days prior to intended departure may not be
approved. Travel out of district without the Programs arrival will result in disciplinary action.
The accompanying Student Travel Request may be photocopied. Additional forms are also available
online at http://www.studyinbritishcolumbia.com/forms/out_of_district.pdf
Summer Vacation Extension Protocol
Legal protocol is in place that permits students to extend their stay beyond the program end date: June
30. Termination from Program Release Waiver Forms require execution by the student’s natural parents
releasing SD71 of its responsibility and by the host parents that are assuming responsibility of said
student. Contact the Program office for more information on this process. Please note: Two (2) months’
notice is required.
Travel to the United States (USA) Protocol
Protocol is in place to allow students to travel to the USA. Travel to the United States of America:
Release Waiver forms require execution by the student’s natural parents and by the host parents who
are assuming responsibility. Contact the Program office for more information on this process. Please
note: Two (2) months’ notice is required.
STUDENT TRAVEL REQUEST FORM
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. THIS PORTION TO BE COMPLETED BY STUDENT:
STUDENT NAME:
DESTINATION:
DATES OF TRAVEL: Departure________________________________Return
Purpose (explain the reason for the trip -be specific):
Travel (details including way of travel, times, drivers, etc. please attach copies of any tickets and
itineraries) :
Accommodation (details including name, address and contact numbers for where you will be staying
and the adults (over 25) who will be responsible for you.. contact numbers:
THIS PORTION TO BE COMPLETED BY HOMESTAY:
I have telephoned the above accommodation and confirmed adult (25 years or older) supervision and the
arranged travel
plans: Yes  No  and, I approve of this travel: Yes  No 
Homestay parent (please print):
Homestay parent signature:
OFFICE USE ONLY:
Date Received: Approved: Yes  No 
Notified on: by Email  Phone  Initials
To be completed by all International Program students at least five (5) working days prior
to an anticipated trip away from the Comox Valley.
STUDENTS WHO LEAVE OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT WITHOUT ADVANCE PERMISSION MAY BE
SUBJECT TO DISCIPLINE. LAST MINUTE REQUESTS MAY NOT BE APPROVED
TERMINATION FROM PROGRAM RELEASE WAIVER (HOST PARENT FORM)
Student Name
Last First Middle
I/we, the undersigned Host Family parent(s) of the above referenced student, hereby acknowledge(s) and
fully understand(s) that upon our exchange student’s termination from the School District 71 Comox Valley
International Student Program, the school district and its employees have no further responsibility for the
safety or welfare of this student. I/we also understand and agree upon termination from the School District
71 program:
1. that should this student continue to live with me in order to holiday (or to continue to live) in the
Comox Valley, I/we assume full responsibility for her/his safety and welfare.
2. that any remuneration for hosting said student is arranged between the student’s parents and
ourselves and does not involve School District 71.
3. that School District 71 will no longer sponsor this student as an exchange student participant and has
an obligation to report his/her termination from the program to all appropriate government
agencies, including but not limited to Immigration and other regulatory departments. Such reporting
usually results in withdrawal of the student’s host country resident visa if s/he is holding one.
4. that this student will automatically be cancelled from all program-sponsored health insurance
coverage.
5. to release School District 71 and its employees, agents, directors and attorneys/solicitors from any
and all liability damages or injuries incurred by this student from the date of his/her termination.
6. to indemnify and hold harmless School District 71, its employees, agents, directors,
attorneys/solicitors and insurers from any and all claims, expenses and attorney fees arising in
connection with any damage or injury to this student from and after the date of termination from
the program.
agreed and accepted this _______ day of ____________, 20_____.
Host Parent 1 (full name) Host Parent 1 (signature)
Host Parent 2 (full name) Host Parent 2 (signature)
In the case of this student, the termination from the School District 71 program will occur on
the:
______________ day of ___________________, 20____.
TERMINATION FROM PROGRAM RELEASE WAIVER (PARENT/GUARDIAN FORM)
Student Name
Last First Middle
I/we, the undersigned legal guardian(s) or parent(s) of the above referenced student hereby acknowledge(s)
and fully understand(s) that upon my son’s/daughter’s termination from the School District 71 Comox
Valley International Student Program, the school district and its employees have no further responsibility
for the safety or welfare of my son/daughter. I/we also understand and agree upon termination from the
School District 71 program:
1. that School District 71 will no longer sponsor my son/daughter as an exchange student participant
and has an obligation to report his/her termination from the program to all appropriate government
agencies, including but not limited to Immigration and other regulatory departments. Such
reporting usually results in withdrawal of the student’s host country resident visa.
2. that my son/daughter will automatically be cancelled from all program-sponsored health insurance
coverage.
3. to release School District 71 and its employees, agents, directors and attorneys/solicitors from any
and all liability damages or injuries incurred by my son/daughter from the date of his/her
termination.
4. to indemnify and hold harmless School District 71, its employees, agents, directors,
attorneys/solicitors and insurers from any and all claims, expenses and attorney fees arising in
connection with any damage or injury to my son/daughter from and after the date of termination
from the program.
agreed and accepted this _______ day of ____________, 20_____.
Parent or Legal Guardian 1 (full name) Parent or Legal Guardian 1 (signature)
Parent or Legal Guardian 2 (full name) Parent or Legal Guardian 2 (signature)
In the case of my son/daughter, the termination from the School District 71 program will occur on the
______________ day of ___________________, 20____. S/he will be living with the following adults:
Full Names: __________________________________ ______________________________________
Address:
Phone: Email:
TRAVEL TO THE USA RELEASE WAIVER (HOST PARENT FORM)
Student Name ____________________________________________________________________
Last First Middle
I/we, the undersigned host parent(s) of the above referenced student take full supervision responsibility of
said student to travel to the USA as outlined below. As a result, and knowing this is an extraordinary
situation, we release the School District 71 Comox Valley International Student Program, the school
district and its employees from any responsibility for the safety or welfare of this student. I/we also
understand and agree that prior to and upon leaving Canada and the School District 71 program:
1. we verify that the student was not pressured to participate in this trip;
2. we will ensure that the natural parents and/or guardians of this student have sent their original copy
of the notarized release waiver to the District Principal;
3. we release School District 71 and its employees, agents, directors and attorneys/solicitors from any
and all liability damages or injuries incurred by this student during the entire period of this travel; and
4. we indemnify and hold harmless School District 71, its employees, agents, directors,
attorneys/solicitors and insurers from any and all claims, expenses and attorney fees arising in
connection with any damage or injury to our student during the entire period of this travel.
agreed and accepted this _______ day of _________________, 20____.
________________________________________________ ________________________________
Host Parent 1 (full name) Host Parent 1 (signature)
________________________________________________ ________________________________
Host Parent 2 (full name) Host Parent 2 (signature)
Notarized area:
In the case of our family trip with this student, the planned itinerary to the USA from the School District 71
program is as follows:
Destination: Adult(s) responsible for our
child at the destination:
Date leaving: Flight(s):
Date returning: Flight(s):
Hotel: Address: Contact information:
TRAVEL TO THE USA RELEASE WAIVER (PARENT/GUARDIAN FORM)
Student Name ____________________________________________________________________
Last First Middle
I/we, the undersigned legal guardian(s) or parent(s) of the above referenced student hereby give permission
for our child to travel to the USA as outlined below. As a result, and knowing this is an extraordinary
situation, we release the School District 71 Comox Valley International Student Program, the school
district and its employees from any responsibility for the safety or welfare of our son/daughter. I/we also
understand and agree that upon leaving Canada and the School District 71 program:
1. we will ensure that our son/daughter has additional travel health insurance coverage;
2. we release School District 71 and its employees, agents, directors and attorneys/solicitors from any
and all liability damages or injuries incurred by my son/daughter during the entire period of this
travel; and
3. we indemnify and hold harmless School District 71, its employees, agents, directors,
attorneys/solicitors and insurers from any and all claims, expenses and attorney fees arising in
connection with any damage or injury to my son/daughter during the entire period of this travel
agreed and accepted this _______ day of _________________, 20____.
________________________________________________ _______________________________
Parent or Legal Guardian 1 (full name) Parent or Legal Guardian 1 (signature)

________________________________________________ _______________________________
Parent or Legal Guardian 2 (full name) Parent or Legal Guardian 2 (signature)
Notarization area:
In the case of our son/daughter, the planned itinerary to the USA from the School District 71 program is as
follows:
Destination: Adult(s) responsible for our
child at the destination:
Date leaving: Flight(s):
Date returning: Flight(s):
Hotel: Address: Contact information:
STUDENT & HOST FAMILY “HOMEWORK”
Student name ________________________ (Student, please tell your host family how to say
your name correctly.)
Family name _________________________ (Family, please tell your student what they should
call each person in your home.)
Student: Please ask these questions of your homestay family and write the answer in the space
provided. After that, please keep it handy at your homestay.
1. What time should I get up?
Will you wake me or should I use an alarm clock?
2. Do I make my own breakfast or will you make it for me?
This is what I eat for breakfast in my home:
What may I have for breakfast in my homestay?
3. I need a bag lunch for school each day.
Do I make my own lunch or will you make it for me?
This is what I am used to eating at lunch during the school week:
What foods may I have for my school lunch?
4. Please tell me and show me how I will get to and from school.
What time do you want me to come home from school?
5. What time do we eat dinner? I am used to eating at this time:
What can I do to help you to prepare dinner or to clean up after?
These are the foods that I like to eat:
These are the foods that I do not like to eat:
These are foods that I cannot eat:
May I come with you when you shop for groceries?
May I prepare a meal for your family sometime?
6. Who does the laundry? When? How?
Where can I hang wet clothes?
7. When may I shower or take a bath? Which bathroom do I use?
How long may I take for my shower or bath?
Please show me how to use the shower/bath and where to place bathroom
garbage.
8. Please tell me about using the telephone. Which phone should I use for local calls?
When may I make calls? When may I receive calls?
How long may I stay on the line?
I know I need to use a prepaid phone card to make long distance calls. Where can I
buy one?
9. What time does everyone go to bed?
10.What chores would you like me to do?
11.Are there any special rules for your home?
12.Could you please show me your home on a map?
Could you please show me where my friends live in homestay?
13.Where can I buy stamps?
...personal items?
...gifts to take home?
14.Where can I do my banking, cash traveler’s cheques, etc.?
15.May I use your computer?
...to play games?
...to send and receive e-mail?
...to do homework?
16.May I invite my friends over?
May I visit them?
17.I would like you to know this about me:
18.Is there anything else that you would like to know about me?
19.Is there anything that you would like to tell me about you or your family?
20.I would like to know this about you or your family:
 davido.extraxim@gmail.com