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Novi Community Schools
Title III: English as a Second Language (ESL) Program
For English Learners (ELs)
DISTRICT HANDBOOK
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Novi Community Schools
Title III: ESL Program Handbook
Table of Contents
I. Introduction........................................................................................................................................4
II. Definition of EL.................................................................................................................................5
III. Legal Responsibilities
A. Title I & Title III Requirements...................................................................................................6-7
B. Federal Law .................................................................................................................................8
IV. Procedures
A. Registration/Identification of ELs................................................................................................9
B. Initial Assessment of ELs............................................................................................................9
C. Eligibility for ESL Services.........................................................................................................11
D. Exiting from Title III: ESL Program. ..........................................................................................11
E. Monitoring FLEP Students .........................................................................................................11
F. Placement in ESL Program & Program Description ...................................................................12-13
G. Parental Notification ................................................................................................................... 14
H. ELLs who are Struggling Learners..............................................................................................15
I. Student Folder Content and CA-60..............................................................................................15
V. Staff
A. Role of ESL Teachers (Literacy Specialists)...............................................................................16
B. Role of Mainstream General Education Teacher.........................................................................16-17
C. Role of Special Services Staff......................................................................................................17
D. Role of Office Staff .....................................................................................................................17
VI. Parental Communication
A. Parental Communications/Interpreter Services............................................................................18
B. Parent Advisory Committee.........................................................................................................19
C. Code of Conduct ..........................................................................................................................19
D. School Board Policy for Handling Complaints related to ESL Program.....................................19
VII. Personnel Practices
A. Posting..........................................................................................................................................20
B. Professional Development/Inservice ...........................................................................................20
VIII. Program Evaluation ...........................................................................................................................20
APPENDIX A — Registration Form with Home Language Survey.............................................................21
APPENDIX B — Parental Notification Letters ............................................................................................22-36
APPENDIX C — Descriptions at English Language Proficiency Levels.....................................................37-40
A. TABLE A – Michigan Levels – 2005 to 2013.............................................................................37-39
B. TABLE B – WIDA Performance Definitions – 2013..................................................................40
APPENDIX D — Glossary/Definitions.........................................................................................................41-45
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APPENDIX E - Guidelines............................................................................................................................46
APPENDIX F – Exit Criteria.........................................................................................................................47
 English Learners with Disabilities......................................................................................48
APPENDIX G – Consideration for ESL Program Exit and Monitoring Form ............................................49-50
APPENDIX H – Flowchart – Entrance and Exit in ESL program …………………………………...........51
APPENDIX J – Student Profile Form ...........................................................................................................52
APPENDIX K – IB Language Policy – Grades 9-12 ....................................................................................53-59
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I. INTRODUCTION
Mission Statement
In partnership with parents and community, the Novi Community School District is to ensure
that all students construct the knowledge and develop the skills and the attitudes necessary
for a lifetime of learning and participation in a diverse, competitive and changing world.
The Novi Community School District seeks to provide every child, regardless of national origin or
native language, quality, and meaningful educational instruction. Consequently, students who are
English Learners (ELs) are provided instructional services through an English as a Second Language
(ESL) program, which is designed to meet their unique needs.
The Novi Community School District has prepared this handbook of program policies and procedures to
ensure that the Title III: ESL Program in the district is consistent throughout the district.
The information contained herein has been compiled using the following sources:
Jacqueline Moase-Burke
Consultant, ESL /Bilingual Education, Oakland Schools
Michigan Department of Education
Office of School Improvement
Title III Director’s Guide
The following staff members are acknowledged for their efforts in developing this handbook:
2011-2012:
R J Webber, Assistant Superintendent of Academics
Evalicia R. Smith, Title I/Title III coordinator
Shannon Hadley, ESL teacher
Kristy Hubenschmidt, ESL teacher
Andrea Kohls, ESL teacher
Susan Vanlinthout, ESL teacher
2013-14:
R J Webber, Assistant Superintendent of Academics
Evalicia R. Smith, Title I/ESL coordinator
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II. DEFINITION OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELLs)
NCLB Definition of a "Limited English Proficient" Student
A limited English proficient (LEP) is described according to the federal government definition
used in NCLB and in Michigan is referred to as English learners (ELs). The EDFACTS 2011
publication provides additional guidance on the interpretation of the ESEA/NCLB law.
The term ―Limited English Proficient‖, when used with respect to an individual, means an
individual:
1. Who is age 3-21;
2. Who is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary school or secondary school;
3. Who was not born in the United States or show native language is a language other than English;
a. Who is a Native American or Alaska native, or a native resident of the outlying areas;
and
b. Who comes from an environment where a language other than English has had a
significant impact on the individual’s level of English language proficiency; or
c. Who is migratory, whose native language is a language other than English, and who
comes from an environment where a language other than English is dominant and
4. Whose difficulties in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language may be
sufficient to deny the individual –
a. The ability to meet the State’s proficient level of achievement on State assessments
described in section 1111 (b)(3);
b. The ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is
English; or
c. The opportunity to participate fully in society.
NCLB/ESEA Title IX, Sec. 9101, (B) (25)
To be classified as LEP, an individual must meet the criteria of 1, 2, 3, and 4 in the definition
above. To meet the criteria of 3, an individual can meet the criteria of a, b, or c. If the criterion
to meet 3 is a, then the individual must meet the b and c as well. To meet the criteria for 4, an
individual must be denied one of the three listed below 4 (a or b or c).
EDFACTS, 2011
The term Limited English Proficient (LEP) and English Learner (EL) are used interchangeably
throughout this document. LEP is the term used in federal and state legal documents. EL is a
common alternate meant to counter the negative connotations of Limited English Proficient.
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III. LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
A. Title I & Title III
PROGRAMS OF ENGLISH LEARNERS
Title I, Part A, Section 1111: State Plans
Title III Section 3116: Local Plans
English Learner provisions are included under Title I and Title III of NCLB/ESES. Title I
outlines the state standards, assessment, annual yearly progress, and other accountability
requirements for EL students. Title III provides funding to state and local education agencies that
are obligated by NCLB/ESEA to increase the English proficiency and core academic content
knowledge of Limited English Proficient students. Under this title, local school districts decide
on the method of instruction to be used to teach EL students English, but requires that
instructional programs to be scientifically proven to be effective to achieve the state academic
standards.
State education agencies, school districts and schools must:
 Academic Assessments of English Language Proficiency – Each state plan shall
demonstrate that local educational agencies in the state will, beginning not later than
school year 2002-2003, provide for an annual assessment of English proficiency
(measuring students’ oral language, reading, and writing skills in English‖ of all students
with limited English proficiency in the schools served by the state educational agency.
(NCLB/ESEA Title I, Section 1111, (b) (7))
 Each local plan shall also contain assurances that –
o The eligible entity annually will assess the English proficiency of all children with
limited English proficiency participating in programs funded under this grant;
o The eligible entity has based its proposed plan on scientifically based research on
teaching limited English proficient children;
o The eligible entity will ensure that the programs will enable children to speak,
read, write and comprehend the English language and meet challenging State
academic content and student academic achievement standards.
o The eligible entity is not in violation of any State law, including State
constitutional law, regarding the education of limited English proficient children,
consistent with Sections 3126 and 3127.
(NCLB/ESEA Title III, Section 3116, (d) (2-5)
 Ensure that EL students, including immigrant children and youth, develop English
proficiency based on state expectations, and meet the same academic content and
achievement standards that all children are expected to meet.
 Provide parental notification as to why their child is in need of placement in a specialized
language instruction program.
 Test at least 95% of those students identified as EL in reading/language arts and math,
and by 2006 in science, required by all public school students in the state. The assessment
should be designed to provide information on the proficiency of EL students to master
English.
 Report the tests scores of EL students as one of the subgroups to be disaggregated, and as
part of the state, district and school test scores for all of the students.
 Involve EL parents in the decision-making process of Title III programs and activities at
both the state and local levels. 
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WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Title III funds are to be used to provide supplemental language instruction educational programs,
to meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards. These
programs may make use of both English and the child’s native language to enable the child to
develop and attain English proficiency, but school districts are required to ―use approaches and
methodologies based on scientifically-based research.‖ Each school or district using Title III
funds must implement an effective means of outreach to parents of EL children. They must
inform parents about how they can be active participants in assisting their children to learn
English, achieve at high levels in core academic subjects and meet State standards.
Title III Schools and School Districts Must:
 Describe in their Title III application to the state how the district has consulted with
teachers, researchers, administrators, and parents, and others in developing their
ESL/Title III plan.
 Inform parents of a child identified for participation in an ESL/Title III program within
30 days after the beginning of the school year. For a child who enters school after the
beginning of the school year, the school must inform parents within two weeks of the
child's placement in such a program.
 Communicate with parents in an understandable and uniform format, which means
communicating the same information to all parents, and in a method that is effective.
Title III Funds May Be Used for the Following School District and/or School Activities:
 English Instruction beyond the school day
 Staff training and professional development
 Remedial tutoring, tutorials, and/or youth counseling
 Technology acquisition
 Parent Involvement
 Summer programs
What Academic Information Does Your School District Have to Track About Their EL
Students?
 Must report the district’s EL students' results from the English Language Proficiency
Assessment (ELPA) and WIDA ACCESS ;
 How many EL students are attaining proficiency by the end of each school year;
 Show what percentage of the district’s EL students:
o Are making progress in English proficiency;
o Have achieved English proficiency; and
o Have transitioned out of the EL program, meaning that they are no longer in EL
classrooms and are proficient enough to achieve academically in English.
Assessments Required of EL Students:
1. All EL students must be included in the state assessment required of all students.
Inclusion in this assessment must begin immediately when the student enrolls in school,
and no exemptions are permitted on the basis of English proficiency. For a student who
has entered the U.S. Education system for the first time in any state, the student is given
an exemption from the English Language Arts portion of the state assessment for the first
(1st) year in U.S. Education system as long as the student has participated in the state 
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English Language Proficiency assessment or English Language Proficiency screener
(ELPA, ELPA ISI, W-APT, WIDA ACCESS)
2. Districts must annually assess EL students on their English language proficiency to
determine how proficient they are in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and this
proficiency data must be sent to the state for compilation. Each state is required to set
annual measurable objectives for school districts in moving EL students toward English
proficiency.
B. Federal Law
There exists a substantial body of Federal law which establishes the rights of the LEP student
and which define the legal responsibilities of school districts serving these students.
Administrators and school boards who are responsible for local policies and programs can turn
for guidance and direction to this body of law. It includes the following:
1868 Constitution of the United States, Fourteenth Amendment
―... No State shall ... deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.‖
1964 Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
―No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin be denied
the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal
financial assistance."
Two U.S. Supreme Court rulings, one interpreting the Fourteenth Amendment and one
interpreting the Civil Rights Act of 1964, have exercised considerable influence over the
educational rights of language minority students. These cases may be summarized as follows:
1974 Lau v. Nichols
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a school district’s failure to provide English language
instruction to LEP students denied them meaningful opportunity to participate in the district’s
educational program in violation of Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Court further noted
that equality of opportunity is not provided by giving the LEP student the same facilities, text
books, teachers, and curriculum which non-LEP students receive.
1982 Plyler v. Doe
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits
states from denying a free public education to undocumented immigrant children regardless of
their immigrant status. The Court emphatically declared that school systems are not agents for
enforcing immigration law and determined that the burden undocumented aliens may place on an
educational system is not an accepted argument for excluding or denying educational service to
any student. 
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IV. PROCEDURES
The following procedures are established for the Novi Community School District to meet the
requirements of Title I and Title III.
A. Registration/Identification Using Home Language Survey
The Home Language Survey approved by the Michigan Department of Education (APPENDIX
A) is included in the Novi Community School District registration form. It is completed at the
time of registration for all students Grades K-12. The school secretary or the counseling
secretary is responsible for ensuring that a home language survey is completed for all students at
the time of enrollment. The completed registration forms shall be placed in student's permanent
(CA-60) files.
If a student is identified as speaking a primary or home language other than English on the Home
Language Survey, and is therefore potentially eligible for ESL services, the ESL teacher in the
building of attendance will be notified. The ESL staff will arrange for a prompt assessment of the
student to determine eligibility for ESL services.
B. Initial Assessment for Program Eligibility
Within ten school days of enrollment, a student who is identified as potentially eligible on the
Home Language Survey must be assessed to determine if he/she is eligible for ESL/Title III
program services. Assessments determine a student’s language skills in listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and comprehending English using the WIDA ACCESS during the testing
window beginning February through the end of March or WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (WAPT)
from April until February when the WIDA ACCESS testing window begins again.
All Pre-K students qualify as LEP based on identifying a language other than English on the Home
Language Survey. This applies to school-based, non-profit programs that support children ages 3 to 5
years old. The Novi Community Schools offers a preschool program where students with limited
English proficiency are encouraged to participate. This program is tuition-based and is offered through
our Community Education department.
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Performance Definitions (Language Proficiency Levels)
The following chart WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) shows level of proficiency
correlated to the WIDA Standards Levels 1-6. The following chart may assist you to determine
the level of the student’s proficiency and the student’s placement into grade level or courses with
appropriate ESL language and academic support. All ESL language and academic support are
part of the Novi Community School District Alternative Language Program.
TABLE A
WIDA ACCESS
[ELPA Score]
Performance
Definitions
[Proficiency Levels]
W-APT score
[ELPA screener]
Multiple indicators
(May be used to understand EL proficiency)
Entering
[Basic (B)]
1
Entering
[Basic (B)]
Attendance
Student Background Survey
Literacy – MLPP
Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment
Writing sample (Grades 1-12):
 Native language and English
MEAP (Grades 3-9)
MME/ACT (Grade 11)
PLAN/EXPLORE
Classroom teacher input
Emerging
[Low Intermediate
(LI)]
2 Emerging
[Low Intermediate
(LI)]
Attendance
Student Background Survey
Literacy – MLPP
Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment
QRI
Writing sample (Grades 1-12): English
MEAP (Grades 3-9)
MME/ACT (Grade 11)
NWEA(K-10)
PLAN/EXPLORE
Classroom teacher input
Developing
[High Intermediate
(HI)]
3 Developing
[High Intermediate
(HI)]
Attendance
Student Background Survey
Literacy – MLPP
Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment
QRI
Writing sample (Grades 1-12): English
MEAP (Grades 3-9)
MME/ACT (Grade 11)
NWEA(K-10)
PLAN/EXPLORE
Classroom teacher input
Expanding
[Proficient
(P)]
4 Expanding
[Proficient
(P)]
Literacy – MLPP
Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment
QRI
Writing sample (Grades 1-12): English
MEAP (level 3-4)
MME/ACT (Grade 11)
NWEA(K-10)
PLAN/EXPLORE
Classroom teacher input
GPA in core classes
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Bridging/Reaching
[Advanced
Proficiency
(AP)]
5/6 Bridging/Reaching
[Advanced Proficient
(AP)]
Literacy – MLPP
Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment
QRI
Writing sample (Grades 1-12): English
MEAP (level 1-2)
MME/ACT (Grade 11)
NWEA(K-10)
PLAN/EXPLORE
Classroom teacher input
GPA in core classes
Monitored
FLEP
FLEP Monitored
FLEP
(No WIDA ACCESS
testing)
Monitored for two years:
Every marking period
Attendance
GPA
Progress reports
Yearly:
MEAP
MME/ACT
NWEA(K-10), PLAN, EXPLORE
In-district assessments
C. Eligibility for ESL/Title III Alternative Language Program Services
A student qualifies for the alternative language program if he/she demonstrates English language
proficiency or demonstrates ability as defined by WIDA Performance Definitions Level 1,2, 3, 4,
or 5. For a student scoring at or above Level 5 (Bridging/Reaching Advanced Proficient) to
continue receiving Title III-ESL support services, the district takes into account additional
multiple academic criteria as noted in the chart.
D. Exiting from ESL/Title III Alternative Language Program Services
A student must meet all of the protocol requirements as outlined in the Michigan Department of
Education (MDE) Office of Field Services, Special Populations Unit English Learner Program
Entrance and Exit Protocol 2012. A student who scores Bridging/Reaching Advanced
Proficiency (AP) and meets the additional standardized and curriculum-based assessments
identified by the district may be exited from the ESL/Title III programming through a
placement team review process and monitored for two (2) years. Students in Kindergarten or
Grade 1 who score Bridging/Reaching Advanced Proficiency (AP) are not automatically exited
from the ESL Program. The student must also demonstrate proficiency on standardized indistrict
assessment (listed in Table A ).This student is also exited from the program in the
SRSD/MSDS and considered FLEP (Formerly Limited English Proficient) for two years. Criteria
used to exit a student will be placed in the student’s CA 60.
E. Monitoring Formerly Limited English Proficient Students (FLEP)
The placement team who reviews the criteria for a student to exit from the program also
determines if the student needs support services during the transition to the general education
program. Additionally, an ESL teacher is designated to monitor the student’s progress (such as
grades, attendance, and standardized test scores). The ESL teacher assesses the student’s
progress
If, during the monitoring, it appears that the student is not succeeding in the general education
program, the staffing team will meet to determine if further assessment of the student is
warranted, if the student will be reentered into the ESL/Title III program, or if other services are
appropriate.
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A record of the monitoring as well as any placement changes resulting from the monitoring will
be placed in the student’s CA-60 and ESL files.
F. Placement in ESL/Title III Alternative Language Program
Novi Community Schools provides an instructional program to meet the language and academic
content needs of English Learners (ELs) enrolled in the district. The instructional needs of
students at different levels of language proficiency and prior schooling are met differently.
Below is the guide for ESL program instruction described by level of language proficiency.
Novi Community Schools ESL/Title III program provides language and academic content
support to EL students through:
 English as a Second Language Instruction (K**-12)
 Sheltered Content Classes (Grade 7: ESL Science 7, ESL Social Studies 7, ESL ELA 7;
Grade 8: ESL Science 8, ESL US History, ESL ELA 8)
 Sheltered Content Class Grades 9-12 Health, Biology, Earth Science, Civics, Economics,
U.S History, World History, English 9, English 10, English 11 and English 12
Program Description – (all times listed are approximate depending on the availability of the highly qualified
ESL staff)
Level 1:
Elementary (Grades K-4): 90-480 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Meadows (Grades 5-6): 90-480 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Middle School (Grades 7-8): 250 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Up to 3750 minutes per week from
Sheltered Content Classes
High School (Grades 9-12): 260 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Up to 3750 minutes per week from
Sheltered Content Classes
Level 2:
Elementary (Grades K-4): 90-480 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Meadows (Grades 5-6): 90-480 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Middle School (Grades 7-8): 250 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Up to 3750 minutes per week from
Sheltered Content Classes
High School (Grades 9-12): 260 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Up to 3750 minutes per week from
Sheltered Content Classes 
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Level 3:
Elementary (Grades K-4): 90-480 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Meadows (Grades 5-6): 90-480 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Middle School (Grades 7-8): 250 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Up to 3750 minutes per week from
Sheltered Content Classes
High School (Grades 9-12): 260 minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Up to 3750 minutes per week from
Sheltered Content Classes
Level 4:
Elementary (Grades K-4): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
Meadows (Grades 5-6): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
Middle School (Grades 7-8): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
Teacher consultation for Sheltered Content Classes
High School (Grades 9-12): 260 minimum- 780 maximum minutes per week
ESL Teacher
Sheltered classes
Level 5/6:
Elementary (Grades K-4): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
Meadows (Grades 5-6): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
Middle School (Grades 7-8): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
High School (Grades 9-12): Teacher consultation
ESL Teacher
** K ESL instruction is programmed on a case by case basis
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G. Parental Notification - See APPENDIX B
Novi Community Schools must inform parents of an English Learners (ELs) student identified
for participation in the district's Title III program.
 no later than 30 days after the beginning of the school year for students who enter at the
start of the school year.
 within the first two weeks (10 school days) of attendance for children who have not been
identified as English Language Learners (ELs) prior to the beginning of the school year.
Title III School Districts Must Inform Parents of:
 The reasons for identifying their child as being limited English proficient and for placing
their child in a language instruction educational program for LEP students;
 The child’s current level of English proficiency, including how the level was assessed
and the status of the child’s academic achievement;
 The method of instruction that will be used in the program, including a description of all
language programs;
 How the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the child;
 How the program will help the child learn English and meet academic achievement
standards;
 How the program will meet the objectives of an individualized education program for a
child with a disability;
 The program exit requirements, including when the transition will take place and when
graduation from secondary school is expected; and
 The parents' rights, including written guidance that (A) specifies the right to have their
child immediately removed from a language instruction educational program upon
request, (B) describes the options that parents have to decline to enroll their child in such
a program or to choose another program or method of instruction, if available, and (C)
assists parents in selecting among various programs and methods of instruction, if more
than one program or method is offered.
School Districts are required to notify parents of student academic failure:
Local school districts are required to provide notice to the parents of EL children participating in
a Title III program of any failure of the program to help the child make progress on annual
measurable achievement objectives. This notice is to be provided no later than 30 days after this
failure occurs and must be provided in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent
realistic, in a language that the parent can understand. The Novi Community Schools has met
annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAOs) for 2012-13. 
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H. ELs who are Struggling Learners
When indicators suggest that an English Learner (EL) is having difficulties attaining linguistic,
academic and social expectations, which are unrelated to the student’s English Language
Proficiency, the student will be referred to the school Student Support Team (SST) for
intervention strategies. Periodic reviews will be conducted to determine the success or failure of
the strategies. Novi Community Schools has an established procedure for referring students for
special education evaluations. These special intervention strategies must be utilized to determine
what further strategies may be necessary. These special intervention strategies must be utilized to
ensure that a student is not referred for formal Special Education Multidisciplinary Team
evaluations when the lack of academic progress is primarily related to language background or a
need for more ESL/Title III support services. In the event the various strategies are not
successful, the student may be referred for a special education evaluation. The student may
require an evaluation administered in his/her native language.
I. Student Folder Contents and CA-60
Each ESL student will have a folder maintained by the ESL teacher at the building. The folder
will contain:
• Home language survey APPENDIX A
• Parent notification letter APPENDIX B
• Sample of student’s schedule for ESL services
• Scores from WIDA ACCESS, WIDA Alternative ACCESS, W-APT, or ELPA/ ELPA
Initial Screener
• Student Profile Form (for Students moving from or across elementary or to middle school
and from middle school to high school)
• FLEP Monitoring records
• Record of placement decisions (Description of program for individual student,
including type and amount of alternative program services)
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 V. STAFF Roles
A. ESL Teachers
The ESL teacher is certified at his/her grade level and has an ESL endorsement. The ESL teacher
has primary responsibility for providing English language instruction to the EL. The ESL teacher
also shares the responsibility with mainstream general education teachers for ensuring that the
EL receives content instruction while learning English.
The ESL teacher supports the instruction of the mainstream class by enhancing the content
language development using ESL, sheltered and/or content specific instruction taught in English.
The ESL teacher is responsible for language development and content specific instructional
support.
ESL teacher:
• provides content instruction and language development;
• assumes the same functions as the mainstream teacher when s/he is the teacher of record
in the classroom;
• meets regularly with the mainstream teacher to determine the academic needs of LEP
students enrolled in his/her classes;
• teaches basic survival skills to the most limited English proficient students;
• assists general education staff about culture and language of the EL and the family;
• provides the mainstream teacher with the cultural and linguistic background of the
language minority students in the class;
• works collaboratively with staff to develop curriculum;
• identifies, assesses, teaches, and counsels each EL; and
• provides staff development on English language instruction and cultural awareness.
The ESL teacher plays an essential role in the instruction of EL students.
B. Role of Mainstream General Education Teacher
The mainstream teacher into whose class the student is enrolled has primary responsibility for
the instruction of the EL. The student spends a significant part of the day in the mainstream
classroom with this teacher and classmates. Because of this, the mainstream teacher is
responsible for the delivery of the curriculum to ALL students in his/her class. The mainstream
teacher does not accomplish this alone.
The mainstream teacher and ESL staff collaborate to determine:
• what should be taught;
• how the mainstream class content should be supported by ESL staff;
• what the essential concepts in the lessons are;
• how lessons should be modified;
• how to modify assessment effectively; and
• how to assess achievement.
In addition, the mainstream teacher:
• is a full partner with the ESL staff in educating ELs in his/her class;
• demonstrates sensitivity and awareness of cultural and linguistic differences;
• individualizes instruction to meet the needs of each student;
• uses visuals/hands-on activities to facilitate learning;
• provides materials for the ESL staff that support the mainstream instruction;
• helps ELs make friends and be part of the social interaction in the classroom;
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• promotes intercultural discussion; and,
• suggests the type of help the EL needs to be successful in his/her class to the ESL
teacher.
C. Role of Special Services Staff
Special Services staff members are essential for the success of LEP students in elementary,
middle, and high schools in Novi Community Schools. Counselors, social workers and
curriculum support personnel are very new phenomena for many ELs and their families. The role
of the special services staff needs to be explained to bilingual parents and students so that the
bilingual families will have a complete understanding of that person’s role in the school and will
be able to utilize his/her expertise. This explanation takes place during each of the Newcomers
Parent Information meetings led by the Title III Community Liaisons.
Support Staff for LEP students:
• works in conjunction with the ESL/Bilingual and mainstream staff to provide
appropriate scheduling of students;
• needs to develop an awareness of the culture and language abilities of language
minority students;
• provides social and academic guidance to help LEP students become familiar with school
culture and academic opportunities;
• has current language proficiency assessment accessible; and,
• provides academic information to parents/guardians.
D. Role of Office Staff
The Office personnel are the initial contact with new families into the Novi Community Schools.
It is their responsibility to determine possible ESL program eligibility during the completion of
the Home Language Survey in the enrollment process. They often act as the main liaison with
ESL staff within the school and across the district.
Office Staff for LEP students:
• administers the Home Language Survey during enrollment process to determine next
steps in the ESL program qualifications;
• notifies ESL teacher, classroom teacher, transportation, food services of newly enrolled
students and begins the initial screening for eligibility into ESL program.
• ensures SRSD/MSDS information for LEP students is accurate for district reporting
(ESL/Title I coordinator)
18
VI. PARENTAL COMMUNICATION
A. Parental Communication/Interpreter Services
Parents of limited English proficient students will receive notices of school programs and
activities impacting their child's education.
Many bilingual parents need interpreters (translators) to participate in school activities such as
registering students and parent/teacher conferences. Certainly, the more informed parents are the
more likely it is that they will be able to support their child’s learning. However, many teachers
and administrators may be unfamiliar with using an interpreter and may consequently be
reluctant to make routine use of the parents’ native languages. The following suggestions may
facilitate successful communication when using an interpreter:
Prior to the Meeting
1. Accurately determine the parents’ native language prior to the meeting and identify an
interpreter (may be an adult family member) who is fluent in that language. Note that it may
be important to determine the particular dialect of the family to use an interpreter who can
easily communicate.
2. Send notices for school meetings and conferences home in English. Keep a generic file of
these notices with blanks for times and dates.
3. Talk with the interpreter prior to meeting parents to clarify his/her role. In most cases,
interpreters should not be active participants in the conversation. Rather, they should simply
translate the participant’s statements. The teacher or administrator should make it clear to
parents at the beginning of the conference that this is the role the interpreter will play. In
situations where it is appropriate for interpreters to be active in the conversation, the teacher
or administrator should explicitly invite the interpreter to join in the discussion.
4. Prepare for the meeting by talking with the interpreter about the anticipated content that will
be discussed. In this way, interpreters can clarify vocabulary and school terms that may not
be familiar.
5. Do not rely on children to interpret for their parents. This reverses the roles in families —
parents feel like children and children feel like they have more authority than they should. It
is also difficult for most children to translate and children are very reluctant to translate
anything negative about themselves to parents. Do not put them in this role.
During the Meeting
1. Show respect to parents by addressing them directly and allowing the interpreter to simply
interpret your words. Sit so that you speak directly to the parents rather than to the
interpreter. Often, it works well to place the interpreter to your side rather than between you
and the parent.
2. Speak at a normal rate and volume.
3. Keep the group limited to a small number of people. Introduce each person and the role each
plays in relation to the child.
4. Stop periodically and ask if there are any questions.
5. Support your statements with examples of student work that parents can take with them and
examine further.
6. Do whatever you can to encourage parents’ further school visits and participation in school
activities.
Following the Meeting
Clarify any confusing interactions with the interpreter. Ask for feedback and suggestions on the
interpreting process from the interpreter.
19
B. Parent Advisory Committee
The district will send notification of ESL Parent Coalition Meetings. If possible, we will send the
letter in the parents' native language or place phone calls by bilingual Title III Community
Liaison to remind parents. The ESL Parent Coalition Meetings are an excellent way to develop
rapport and solicit questions and suggestions regarding student progress in our schools. It also
serves as a strong base for an International/Multicultural Task Force. A roster is maintained of
parents who attend these meetings and minutes and agendas are shared through email listserv
services. The Novi Community Schools supports a Community Liaison K-4 and a Community
Liaison 5-12 for our Japanese community. As our ESL population changes and language needs
alter, the Novi Community Schools is committed to provide language support to the community
in all languages with translators and interpreters.
C. Code of Conduct
The Code of Conduct/Student Handbook is translated into Japanese and available to parents on
the Novi Schools District website at:
http://www.novi.k12.mi.us/academics/esl/japanesedocs/
D. School Board Policy for Handling Complaints related to ESL Program
2240 - CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES - The Board of Education believes that the
consideration of controversial issues has a legitimate place in the instructional program of the
schools.
Properly introduced and conducted, the consideration of such issues can help students learn to
identify important issues, explore fully and fairly all sides of an issue, weigh carefully the values
and factors involved, and develop techniques for formulating and evaluating positions.
Controversial issues related to the program may be initiated by the students themselves provided
they are presented in the ordinary course of classroom instruction and it is not substantially
disruptive to the educational setting.
The Board recognizes that a course of study or certain instructional materials may contain
content and/or activities that some parents find objectionable. If after careful, personal review of
the program lessons and/or materials, a parent indicates to the school that either content or
activities conflicts with his/her religious beliefs or value system, the school will honor a written
request for his/her child to be excused from particular classes for specified reasons. The student,
however, will not be excused from participating in the course or activities mandated by the
State and will be provided alternative learning activities during times of parent requested
absences. These excused activities include participation in mandated State assessments
such as WIDA ACCESS, WIDA Alternate ACCESS and W-APT or WIDA MODEL.
The Superintendent shall develop administrative guidelines for dealing with controversial issues
in an objective and balanced manner.
A parent/guardian has the right to deny services or exit his/her child from the ESL
Program at any time. In the case that this occurs, the parent/guardian must be informed
both in writing and orally – in a language comprehensible to him/her – about the specific
accommodations and support that the student will lose after exiting the program. 
20
VII. PERSONNEL PRACTICES
A. Postings
The Novi Community Schools will, when seeking new applicants for all content area positions,
actively recruit those people speaking the language of our student population. This is
recommended for all vacancies, not just ESL or bilingual positions.
B. Professional Development/In-service
ESL staff meets regularly to update knowledge and skills, obtain additional training, and share
information and materials.
ESL staff have the opportunity to attend conferences and in-services inside and outside the
district.
Training for regular education teachers on ESL issues is provided by the Title I/ESL coordinator
during the Professional Development sessions offered in the Novi Community Schools Shoulder
Series.
VII. PROGRAM EVALUATION
A written evaluation of the Novi Community Schools ESL Program will be completed every two
years by the Office of Academics. A presentation on the data findings and conclusions will be
shared with the Novi Board of Education in August and at the annual Fall Parent ESL District
meeting in September of the year when the data is analyzed. The complete report will be found
on the district website at http://www.novi.k12.mi.us/academics/esl/ .
21
APPENDIX A
HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY
1. Is your child’s native language a language other than English?
2. Is the primary language used in your child’s home or environment a language other than English?
22
APPENDIX B
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
Kindergarten Parental Notification
 Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
During the enrollment process, you completed a home language survey indicating a second
language other than English is spoken in the home or is used by your child. Newly enrolled
students were screened using the WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) to place students in
the ESL program.
As a kindergarten student, ________________ qualifies as an English learner in the Novi
Community Schools ESL program. Below you will see what type of services are available for your
child in this program. Please see the attached Individual Student Report for your child’s W-APT
scores.
Test Used: _____ W-APT _____ ELPA Spring (if retained)
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 1- Basic (B) (Entering/Emerging – Low)
Service: ESL support is performed through total immersion in the kindergarten
classroom. Your child may receive additional support with the ESL
teacher.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 2- Low Intermediate (LI) (Emerging/Developing – Low/Medium)
Service: ESL support is performed through total immersion in the kindergarten
classroom. Your child may receive additional support with the ESL teacher.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 3- High Intermediate (HI) (Developing - Medium)
Service: ESL support is performed through total immersion in the kindergarten
classroom. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
23
____ Level 4- Proficient (P) (Expanding – Medium/High)
Service: ESL support is performed through total immersion in the kindergarten
classroom. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
Program Description:
____ Monitored
____ In collaboration with special education IEP team
Title III/ESL Instruction: English is used as the language of instruction for speaking, reading,
writing and comprehension, and assistance in other subjects are given in English and/or the
native language.
Classroom English Instruction: Students are instructed in English at all times; native language
is not used. The instructional goal is to meet grade appropriate academic achievement standards
for grade promotion and graduation.
The Novi Community Schools believes ESL support is an essential part of your child’s education.
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext.______. If you wish to refuse ESL
support for your child, please contact your child’s ESL teacher at e-mail addresses.
Respectfully,
_____________-ESL teacher
_____________-Principal
24
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
Grade 1 - Parental Notification
 Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
During the enrollment process, you completed a home language survey indicating a second
language other than English is spoken in the home or is used by your child. Newly enrolled
students were screened using the WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) to place students in
the ESL program.
As an entering first grade student, ________________ qualifies as an English learner in the Novi
Community Schools ESL program. We use the Kindergarten W-APT tool as your child has
recently completed kindergarten expectations and has not received Grade 1 content instruction.
Below you will see the type of services available for your child in this program. Please see the
attached Individual Student Report for your child’s W-APT scores.
Test Used: _____ Kindergarten W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 1- Basic (B) (Entering/Emerging – Low)
Service: Your child will receive additional support with the ESL teacher.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 2- Low Intermediate (LI) (Emerging/Developing – Low/Medium-Mid)
Service: Your child will receive additional support with the ESL teacher.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 3- High Intermediate (HI) (Developing – Medium-Mid)
Service: ESL support is performed through total immersion in the classroom.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 4- Proficient (P) (Expanding – Medium-Mid/High)
Service: ESL support is performed through total immersion in the classroom.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 5 – Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging – High/Exceptional)
Service: ESL support is not necessary at this time
25
Program Description:
____ Monitored
____ in collaboration with special education IEP team
Title III/ESL Instruction: English is used as the language of instruction for speaking, reading,
writing and comprehension, and assistance in other subjects are given in English and/or the
native language.
Classroom English Instruction: Students are instructed in English at all times; native language
is not used. The instructional goal is to meet grade appropriate academic achievement standards
for grade promotion and graduation.
The Novi Community Schools believes ESL support is an essential part of your child’s education.
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext.______. If you wish to refuse ESL
support for your child, please contact your child’s ESL teacher at e-mail addresses.
Respectfully,
_____________-ESL teacher
_____________-Principal
26
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
1
st
- 4
th Grade Parental Notification
Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
The ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) is a test that is mandated by the State of
Michigan for all K-12 students from bilingual homes. It is used to assess students in reading,
writing, listening, speaking, and comprehension of the English language. The Michigan ELPA test
was administered in the spring, 2013. If students entered Novi Community Schools between April
and June, an ELPA screener assessment was used. Students enrolled between August 1 to the
present were screened using the WIDA ACCESS placement test (W-APT) to offer students
placement in the ESL program.
Your child ______________________________ has been selected to enroll in the ESL (English as a
Second Language) program based on his/her test scores along with other district level language
and academic achievement tests. Please see the test results as described in the attached Individual
Student Report.

Test Used: _____ ELPA ____ ELPA Screener ______ W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 1- Basic (B) (Entering/Emerging)
Service: Your child will receive 90-480 minutes of ESL service per week from the
building ESL teacher. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 2- Low Intermediate (LI) (Emerging/Developing)
Service: Your child will receive 90-480 minutes of ESL service per week from the
building ESL teacher. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 3- High Intermediate (HI) (Developing)
Service: Your child will receive 60-300 minutes of ESL service per week from the
building ESL teacher. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
27
____ Level 4- Proficient (P) (Expanding)
_____Service: Your child is receiving continued support by classroom teacher in
collaboration with the ESL teacher and will need to participate in the Spring
WIDA ACCESS testing.
_____Service: Your child is not recommended for continued ESL support but will
need to participate in Spring WIDA ACCESS testing.
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging)
_____ Service: Your child is receiving continued support by classroom teacher in
collaboration with the ESL teacher and will need to participate in Spring WIDA
ACCESS testing..
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging/Reaching)
 Your child is recommended by teacher for exit from the ESL program.
Program Description:
____ ESL Classroom Instruction
____ Monitored
____ In collaboration with special education IEP team
Title III/ESL Instruction: English is used as the language of instruction for speaking, reading,
writing and comprehension, and assistance in other subjects are given in English and/or the
native language.
Classroom English Instruction: Students are instructed in English at all times; native language
is not used. The instructional goal is to meet grade appropriate academic achievement standards
for grade promotion and graduation.
The Novi Community Schools believes ESL support is an essential part of your child’s education.
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext._______. If you wish to refuse
ESL support for your child, please contact your child’s ESL teacher at email
address@novi.k12.mi.us
Respectfully,
__________________________________-ESL teacher
__________________________________-Principal
28
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
5
th and 6th Grade Parental Notification
Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
The ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) is a test that is mandated by the State of
Michigan for all K-12 students from bilingual homes. It is used to assess students in reading,
writing, listening, speaking, and comprehension of the English language. The Michigan ELPA test
was administered in the spring, 2013. If students entered Novi Community Schools between April
and June, an ELPA screener assessment was used. Students enrolled August 1 to the present were
screened using the WIDA ACCESS placement test (W-APT) to offer students placement in the
ESL program.
Your child ______________________________ has been selected to enroll in the ESL (English as a
Second Language) program based on his/her test scores along with other district level language
and academic achievement tests. Please see the test results as described in the attached Individual
Student Report.

Test Used: _____ ELPA ____ ELPA Screener ______ W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 1- Basic (B) (Entering/Emerging)
Service: Your child will receive 90-480 minutes of ESL service per week from the
building ESL teacher. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 2- Low Intermediate (LI) (Emerging/Developing)
Service: Your child will receive 90-480 minutes of ESL service per week from the
building ESL teacher. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 3- High Intermediate (HI) (Developing)
Service: Your child will receive 60-300 minutes of ESL service per week from the
building ESL teacher. Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
29
____ Level 4- Proficient (P) (Expanding)
_____Service: Your child is recommended for continued support by the classroom
teacher in collaboration with the ESL teacher and will need to participate in the
Spring WIDA ACCESS testing.
_____Service: Your child is not recommended for continued ESL support but will
need to participate in Spring WIDA ACCESS testing.
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging)
_____ Service: Your child is recommended for continued support by the
classroom teacher in collaboration with the ESL teacher.
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging/Reaching)
 Your child is recommended by teacher for exit from the ESL program.
Program Description:
____ ESL Classroom Instruction
____ Monitored
____ In collaboration with special education IEP team
Title III/ESL Instruction: English is used as the language of instruction for speaking, reading,
writing and comprehension, and assistance in other subjects are given in English and/or the
native language.
Classroom English Instruction: Students are instructed in English at all times; native language
is not used. The instructional goal is to meet grade appropriate academic achievement standards
for grade promotion and graduation.
The Novi Community Schools believes ESL support is an essential part of your child’s education.
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext._______. If you wish to refuse
ESL support for your child, please contact your child’s ESL teacher at email
address@novi.k12.mi.us
Respectfully,
__________________________________-ESL teacher
__________________________________-Principal
__________________________________-Principal
30
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
7
th and 8th Grade Parental Notification
Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
The ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) is a test that is mandated by the State of
Michigan for all K-12 students from bilingual homes. It is used to assess students in reading,
writing, listening, speaking, and comprehension of the English language. The Michigan ELPA test
was administered in the spring. If students enter Novi Community Schools between May and
March, the ELPA screener was used. Students enrolled August 1 to the present were screened
using the WIDA ACCESS placement test (W-APT) to offer students placement in the ESL
program.
Your child ______________________________ has been selected to enroll in the ESL (English as a
Second Language) program based on his/her scores on the ELPA/ELPA screener/W-APT test
along with other district level language and academic achievement tests. Please see the test results
as described in the attached Individual Student Report.

Test Used: _____ ELPA ____ ELPA Screener _____ W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 1- Basic (B) (Entering/Emerging)
Service: Your child will receive a minimum of 250 minutes from the building ESL
teacher and up to 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom instruction. Your child will
take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 2- Low Intermediate (LI) (Emerging/Developing)
Service: Your child will receive a minimum of 250 minutes from the building ESL
teacher and up to a maximum of 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom instruction.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 3- High Intermediate (HI) (Developing)
Service: Your child will receive a minimum of 250 from the building ESL teacher
and up to 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom instruction. Your child will take
the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
31
____ Level 4- Proficient (P) (Expanding)
Services: Your child may receive up to 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom
instruction and progress is monitored by the counselors and the ESL teacher.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging)
Your child is recommended by ESL teacher for continued support. Your child will
take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
Service:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging/Reaching) on W-APT screener and
 recommended by teacher for exit from the ESL program.
Program Description:
____ ESL Classroom Instruction
____ Sheltered Content Support (7-12)
____ Monitored
____ In collaboration with special education IEP team
Title III/ESL Instruction: English is used as the language of instruction for speaking, reading,
writing and comprehension, and assistance in other subjects are given in English and/or the
native language.
Classroom English Instruction: Students are instructed in English at all times; native language
is not used. The instructional goal is to meet grade appropriate academic achievement standards
for grade promotion and graduation.
The Novi Community Schools believes ESL support is an essential part of your child’s education.
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext.______. If you wish to refuse ESL
support for your child, please contact your child’s ESL teacher at e-mail address@novi.k12.mi.us.
Respectfully,
_____________-ESL teacher
_____________-Principal
32
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
9
th and 12th Grade Parental Notification
Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
The ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) is a test that is mandated by the State of
Michigan for all K-12 students from bilingual homes. It is used to assess students in reading,
writing, listening, speaking, and comprehension of the English language. The Michigan ELPA test
was administered in the spring. If students enter Novi Community Schools between May and
March, the ELPA screener was used. Students enrolled August 1 to the present were screened
using the WIDA ACCESS placement test (W-APT) to offer students placement in the ESL
program.
Your child ______________________________ has been selected to enroll in the ESL (English as a
Second Language) program based on his/her scores on the ELPA/ELPA screener/W-APT test
along with other district level language and academic achievement tests. Please see the test results
as described in the attached Individual Student Report.

Test Used: _____ ELPA ____ ELPA Screener _____ W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 1- Basic (B) (Entering/Emerging)
Service: Your child will receive a minimum of 250 minutes from the building ESL
teacher and up to 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom instruction. Your child will
take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 2- Low Intermediate (LI) (Emerging/Developing)
Service: Your child will receive a minimum of 250 minutes from the building ESL
teacher and up to a maximum of 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom instruction.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 3- High Intermediate (HI) (Developing)
Service: Your child will receive a minimum of 250 from the building ESL teacher
and up to 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom instruction. Your child will take
the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
33
____ Level 4- Proficient (P) (Expanding)
Services: Your child may receive up to 3750 minutes of sheltered classroom
instruction and progress is monitored by the counselors and the ESL teacher.
Your child will take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging)
Your child is recommended by ESL teacher for continued support. Your child will
take the WIDA ACCESS test in the spring.
Service:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____ Level 5- Advanced Proficient (AP) (Bridging/Reaching) on W-APT screener and
 recommended by teacher for exit from the ESL program.
Program Description:
____ ESL Classroom Instruction
____ Sheltered Content Support (7-12)
____ Monitored
____ In collaboration with special education IEP team
Title III/ESL Instruction: English is used as the language of instruction for speaking, reading,
writing and comprehension, and assistance in other subjects are given in English and/or the
native language.
Classroom English Instruction: Students are instructed in English at all times; native language
is not used. The instructional goal is to meet grade appropriate academic achievement standards
for grade promotion and graduation.
The Novi Community Schools believes ESL support is an essential part of your child’s education.
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext.______. If you wish to refuse ESL
support for your child, please contact your child’s ESL teacher at e-mail address@novi.k12.mi.us.
Respectfully,
_____________-ESL teacher
_____________-Principal
34
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
Kindergarten Parental Notification
 Date:
Dear Parents:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
During the enrollment process, you completed a home language survey indicating a second
language other than English is spoken in the home or is used by your child. Newly enrolled
students were screened using the WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) to place students in
the ESL program.
Your child ______________________________ scored successfully on the W-APT and
demonstrated academic proficiency in English literacy. He/She will not require additional
support in English. Please see the attached Individual Student Report for your child’s scores.
Test Used: _____ W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 5- (Exceptional)
Additional ESL support is not necessary at this time
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext.______.
Respectfully,
_____________-ESL teacher
_____________-Principal
35
Novi Community Schools
English Language Learning (ELL)
1
st
- 12th Grade Parental Notification
Dear Parents: Date:
The Novi Community Schools is committed to providing instructional and enrichment programs
that will meet the needs of all students in our schools. In accordance with the educational goals of
this district, we have developed a program of academic instruction that addresses the special
language needs of our students.
During the enrollment process, you completed a home language survey indicating a second
language other than English is spoken in the home or is used by your child. Newly enrolled
students were screened using the WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) to place students in
the ESL program.
Your child ______________________________ scored successfully on the W-APT as well as
demonstrated grade level academic proficiency on state and local assessments. You child will not
require additional support in English. Please see the attached Individual Student Report for your
child’s scores.

Test Used: _____ W-APT
Level of English Proficiency:
____ Level 5/6 - Bridging/Reaching
If you have any further questions, please call 248-449-1212, ext.______.
Respectfully,
_____________-ESL teacher
_____________-Principal
36
Novi Community Schools
Request for English Language Development
Program Withdrawal/Denial of Enrollment
Date: _________________________
Dear Parents:
You have indicated that you do not want your child enrolled in an English language development
program or that you would like a change in your student’s English language development
program or placement. Although we are offering a program we feel is the most appropriate for
your child’s level of English proficiency, you have the right to request removal of your child from
the program or decline to enroll your child in such a program.
Please note that refusal of services does not exclude your child from demonstrating English
language proficiency as measured by the WIDA ACCESS (Assessing Comprehension and
Communication in English State-to-State for English Language Learners). Your child will
participate in the administration of the WIDA ACCESS test in February/March of this academic
year. It will be your responsibility to assist your child in their academic English language
development at home. Your child’s classroom teacher and other Novi Community School district
staff will work with you to promote his/her English language development.
Thank you.
Novi Community Schools
Request for English Language Development
Program Withdrawal/Denial of Enrollment
I,_____________________________(parent/guardian)of________________________ (student) have
been informed of my right to decline to have my child enrolled in the English language
development program offered by the school or district. I request the following action be taken on
behalf of my child.
________ Withdraw my child from the program offered by the school.
I understand that my child will need to take the WIDA ACCESS (Assessing Comprehension and
Communication in English State-to-State for English Language Learners) in the spring until s(he)
demonstrates advanced proficiency in English as well as academic grade level proficiency in state
and local assessments.
______________________________________________ ______________________
Signature of Parent/Guardian Date
37
APPENDIX C
Descriptions of English Language Proficiency Levels
To meet the instructional needs of English Learners (ELs) in Michigan, five (5) levels of English
language proficiency have been used to more accurately describe student proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading, and writing skills. Included in Table A is a general description of the characteristics
of ELs at each level of proficiency. In 2012, Michigan joined the WIDA Consortium changing the levels
of English language proficiency following the WIDA 2012 Amplified Standards. Table B provides the
WIDA Performance Definitions at the six (6) levels of English proficiency used by all WIDA
Consortium members.
TABLE A
Federal NCLB
Categories of
English
Proficiency
Michigan English
Proficiency Levels Description of English Learners (ELs)
BASIC
(B)
Level 1A
Students with limited formal schooling
Level 1A includes students whose schooling has been interrupted for a
variety of reasons, including war, poverty or patterns of migration, as
well as students coming from remote rural settings with little prior
opportunity for sequential schooling. These students may exhibit some
of the following characteristics: pre- or semi-literacy in their native
language; minimal understanding of the function of literacy;
performance significantly below grade level; lack of awareness of the
organization and culture of school. (TESOL, 1997, p.21) Because these
students may need more time to acquire academic background
knowledge as they adjust to the school and cultural environment,
English language development may also take longer than ELL
beginning students at Level 1B. Level 1A students lack sufficient
English literacy for meaningful participation in testing even at the most
minimal level.
Recently arrived student (less than 30 days) These students have not
been assessed with the Michigan English Language Proficiency Test or
other tests used for placement.
Level 1B
Beginning (Pre-production and early production)
Students initially have limited or no understanding of English. They
rarely use English for communication. They respond non-verbally to
simple commands, statements and questions. As their oral
comprehension increases, they begin to imitate the verbalization of
others by using single words or simple phrases, and begin to use
English spontaneously.
At this earliest stage these students start to construct meaning from text
with non-print features (e.g., illustrations, graphs, maps, tables). They
gradually construct more meaning from the words themselves, but the
construction is often incomplete.
They are able to generate simple written texts that reflect their
knowledge level of syntax. These texts may include a significant
amount of non-conventional features, invented spelling, some
grammatical inaccuracies, pictorial representations, surface features and
rhetorical features of the native language (i.e., ways of structuring text
from native language and culture) (TESOL, 1999, p.20).
38
LOW
INTERMEDIATE
(LI)
Level 2
Early Intermediate (Speech emergent)
Students can comprehend short conversations on simple topics. They
rely on familiar structures and utterances. They use repetition, gestures,
and other non-verbal cues to sustain conversation.
When reading, students at this level can understand basic narrative text
and authentic materials. They can use contextual and visual cues to
derive meaning from texts that contain unfamiliar words, expressions
and structures. They can comprehend passages written in basic
sentence patterns, but frequently have to guess at the meaning of more
complex materials. They begin to make informed guesses about
meaning from context. They can begin to identify the main idea and
supporting details of passages.
Students can write simple notes, make brief journal entries, and write
short reports using basic vocabulary, and common language structures.
Frequent errors are characteristic at this level especially when student
try to express thoughts that require more complex language structures.
(State of Virginia, pp. 4-9)
HIGH
INTERMEDIATE
(HI)
Level 3
Intermediate
At this level students can understand standard speech delivered in most
settings with some repetition and rewording. They can understand the
main ideas and relevant details of extended discussions or presentations.
They draw on a wide range of language forms, vocabulary, idioms, and
structures. They can comprehend many subtle nuances with repetition
and/or rephrasing. Students at this level are beginning to detect affective
undertones and they understand inferences in spoken language. They
can communicate orally in most settings.
Students can comprehend the content of many texts independently.
They still require support in understanding texts in the academic content
areas. They have a high degree of success with factual information in
non-technical prose. They can read many literature selections for
pleasure. They can separate main ideas from supporting ones. They can
use the context of a passage and prior knowledge to increase their
comprehension. They can detect the overall tone and intent of the text.
Students can write multi-paragraph compositions, journal entries,
personal and business letters, and creative passages. They can present
their thoughts in an organized manner that is easily understood by the
reader. They show good control of English word structure and of the
most frequently used grammar structures, but errors are still present.
They can express complex ideas and use a wide range of vocabulary,
idioms, and structures, including a wide range of verb tenses. (Virginia,
pp. 11-14)
39
PROFICIENT
(P)
Level 4
Transitional Intermediate
At this level students’ language skills are adequate for most day- to-day
communication needs. Occasional structural and lexical errors occur.
Students may have difficulty using and understanding idioms, figures of
speech and words with multiple meanings. They communicate in
English in new or unfamiliar settings, but have occasional difficulty
with complex structures and abstract academic concepts.
Students at this level may read a wide range of texts with considerable
fluency and are able to locate and identify the specific facts within the
texts. However, they may not understand texts in which the concepts
are presented in a de-contextualized manner, the sentence structure is
complex, or the vocabulary is abstract. They can read independently,
but may have occasional comprehension problems.
They produce written text independently for personal and academic
purposes. Structures, vocabulary and overall organization approximate
the writing of native speakers of English. However, errors may persist
in one or more of these domains (listening, speaking, reading, and
writing). (TESOL, 1999, p. 21)
ADVANCED
PROFICIENCY
(AP)
Level 5
Monitored (Advanced Proficiency)
Students at this advanced level have demonstrated English proficiency
as determined by state assessment instruments (English Language
Proficiency Test - ELPT). They are expected to be able to participate
fully with their peers in grade level content area classes. The academic
performance of these students is monitored for two years as required by
federal law.
40
TABLE B - WIDA Performance Definitions
At the given level of English language proficiency, English language learners will process, understand,
produce or use:
6- Reaching
 Specialized or technical language reflective of the content areas at
grade level
 A variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in
extended oral or written discourse as required by the specified grade
level
 Oral or written communications in English comparable to Englishproficient
peers
5-Bridging
 Specialized or technical language of the content areas
 A variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in
extended oral or written discourse, including stories, essays or reports
 Oral or written language approaching comparability to that of
English-proficient peers when presented with grade level material
4-Expanding
 Specific and some technical language of the content areas
 A variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in oral
discourse or multiple, related sentences or paragraphs
 Oral or written language with minimal phonological, syntactic or
semantic errors that do not impede the overall meaning of the
communication when presented with oral or written connected
discourse with sensory, graphic or interactive support
3-Developing
 General and some specific language of the content areas
 Expanded sentences in oral interaction or written paragraphs
 Oral or written language with phonological, syntactic or semantic
errors that may impede the communication, but retain much of its
meaning, when presented with oral or written, narrative or expository
descriptions with sensory, graphic or interactive support
2-Emerging
 General language related to the content areas
 Phrases or short sentences
 Oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic
errors that often impede the meaning of the communication when
presented with one- to multiple-step commands, directions, questions,
or a series of statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support
1-Entering
 Pictorial or graphic representation of the language of the content
areas
 Words, phrases or chunks of language when presented with one-step
commands, directions, WH-, choice or yes/no questions, or
statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support
 Oral language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that
often impede meaning when presented with basic oral commands,
direct questions, or simple statements with sensory, graphic, or
interactive support
41
APPENDIX D – Glossary/Definitions
Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) refers to a student’s social English language skills.
Research indicates that a student takes 1-3 years to acquire functional social language skills. (Cummins,
1981)
Bilingual Paraprofessional
A bilingual paraprofessional provides support services to the LEP student. Language proficiency must
demonstrate in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension both the English language and
the native language for which s/he provides support services.
Bilingual Teacher
A Bilingual teacher is required to be certified in the area of instruction and in addition have a bilingual
endorsement. This teacher may provide bilingual or ESL instruction or support services to the ELLs.
Frequently, this teacher will provide consultative services to the regular classroom teacher.
CA-60 File
This file is kept in the school office and is the official record of the student. It contains: birth certificate,
immunization records, registration documents, standardized test scores, report cards, and other official
school documents.
CALP
Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) refers to the English language skills necessary to
function successfully in an academic/school environment. Research indicates that it takes a student from
3-7 or more years to acquire such academic language skills. (Cummins, 1981)
Co-Teaching
Co-teaching is defined as having an ESL/Bilingual teacher assist in the instruction for content area
classes whenever there is a significant population of ELLs in the building.
Content-based Language Development Programs
Content-based Language Development programs group ELs from different languages together in classes
where teachers use English as the medium for providing content area instruction. Teachers modify
classroom language to the proficiency level of the students.
ELs (English Learners)
ELs refers to students whose first language is not English, and encompasses both students who are just
beginning to learn English (often referred to as limited English proficient or LEP) and those who have
already developed considerable proficiency. The term underscores the fact that, in addition to meeting
all the academic challenges that face their monolingual peers, these students are learning English.
ELPA
The English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA) is the annual assessment that measures English
language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension for EL in Michigan. It
is administered in the spring.
ELPA Screener
The English Language Proficiency Assessment Screener (ELPA Screener) is a short version of the
ELPA used to measures English language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing and
comprehension for EL in Michigan for newly arrived students in a school district. It is administered after
the ELPA window from May through mid-March.
ESEA Title III
42
Title III is an entitlement program under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The purpose of
Title III, Part A, is to help ensure that children and youth who are limited English proficient, Native
American and/or immigrants, attain English language proficiency, develop high levels of academic
attainment in English, and meet the same challenging academic standards that all children are expected
to meet. Title III funds are directed to states and eligible local districts or consortia through a formula
grant allocation to:
 Develop high-quality language instruction educational programs
 Assist SEAs, LEAs and schools to build their capacity to establish, implement, and sustain
language instruction and development programs
 Promote parental and community involvement
 Hold SEAs, LEAs, and schools accountable for increases in English proficiency and core
academic content knowledge of limited English proficient children by:
 Demonstrated improvement in the English proficiency of limited English proficient children
each fiscal year; and
 Adequate yearly progress for limited English proficient children, including immigrant children
and youth, as described in section 1111(b)(2).
ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction is used to teach English language components
(grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation) and language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and
comprehension) as well as content areas.
ESL Programs
ESL programs emphasize learning English for both social and academic purposes. English is the
language of instruction.
ESL Class Period
A student receives ESL instruction during a regular class period, often grouped by English language
proficiency levels.
ESL Instruction
ESL is defined as a structured language acquisition program designed to instruct a student in the English
language (speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending) and core academic content.
ESL Resource Center
Students from several classrooms come together for English language and academic content instruction.
The resource center concentrates ESL materials and staff in one location.
ESL Teacher
An ESL teacher is required to be certified and have specific training in ESL instruction. The ESL
teacher may provide ESL instruction or support services to LEP students and may provide consultative
services to regular classroom teachers.
FLEP Students
Formerly Limited English Proficient (FLEP) student has been exited from Title III/ESL program
because:
The student has scored advanced proficient on the ELPA and is performing on grade level in multiple
district assessments.
Inclusion
An EL is placed in general education and may receive tutorial support or receive service through a team
approach.
Placement Team
The following staff should be part of the team working with ESL students:
43
 Classroom Teacher
 ESL Teacher
 Principal
 Others as needed
The ESL teacher assigned to the building will provide instructional support and materials.
When concerns arise regarding a student’s program, curriculum, and placement, the team outlined above
will address these issues at a SST (Student Support Team) meeting. The Novi Community Schools Title
III/ESL supervisor will be notified when a Student Support Team for an EL is planned or when a
particular student’s problem persists after interventions have been implemented as recommended by the
Student Support Team.
W-APT
W-APT stands for the WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test. It is an English language proficiency "screener"
test given to incoming students who may be designated as English language learners. It assists educators
with programmatic placement decisions such as identification and placement of ELs. The W-APT is one
component of WIDA's comprehensive assessment system.
WIDA
WIDA stands for World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment. WIDA advances academic
language development and academic achievement for linguistically diverse students through high
quality standards, assessments, research, and professional development for educators
WIDA ACCESS for ELLs
ACCESS for ELs (Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English State-to-State for English
Language Learners) is a secure large-scale English language proficiency assessment given to
Kindergarten through 12th graders who have been identified as English learners (ELs). It is given
annually in WIDA Consortium member states to monitor students' progress in acquiring academic
English.
WIDA Alternative ACCESS for ELLs
ACCESS for ELLs test items are written from the model performance indicators of WIDA's five English
Language Proficiency (ELP) standards:
 Social & Instructional Language
 Language of Language Arts
 Language of Mathematics
 Language of Science
 Language of Social Studies
Test forms are divided into five grade-level clusters:
 Kindergarten
 Grades 1-2
 Grades 3-5
 Grades 6-8
 Grades 9-12
Within each grade-level cluster (except Kindergarten), ACCESS for ELLs consists of three forms: Tier
A (beginning), Tier B (intermediate), and Tier C (advanced). This keeps the test shorter and more
appropriately targets each students' range of language skills
44
The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs is an assessment of English language proficiency (ELP) for students in
grades 1 -12 who are classified as English language learners (ELLs) and have significant cognitive
disabilities that prevent their meaningful participation in the ACCESS for ELLs® assessment. The No
Child Left Behind Act (NCLB; 2001) requires that all students identified as ELLs be assessed annually
for English language proficiency, including students who receive special education services. The
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; 2004) also mandates that students with disabilities
participate in state-wide and district-wide assessment programs, including alternate assessments with
appropriate accommodations, when it is documented in their Individualized Education Plan (IEP). For
this reason, WIDA created the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs to meet federal accountability requirements
and to provide educators with a measure sensitive to English language proficiency growth of ELLs with
significant cognitive disabilities.
Alternate Language Proficiency Levels
The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs aligns with the WIDA Alternate English Language Proficiency levels.
These levels were designed to expand upon Level P1 - Entering, by increasing the sensitivity of the
measure for students who have significant cognitive disabilities. The alternate ELP levels give students a
chance to demonstrate progress within Level P1.
Alternate Model Performance Indicators (AMPIs)
The test is based on Alternate Model Performance Indicators (AMPIs), which provide expectations of
what students should be able to process and produce at a given Alternate ELP level. To accommodate
the three Alternate ELP levels (i.e., Initiating, Exploring, Engaging), AMPIs were developed for each
language domain, standard, and grade-level cluster.
 language function (e.g., indicate, match, locate),
 example topic (e.g., text elements), and
 form of support (e.g., sensory, graphic, interactive).
9-12 Language of
Science
Level A1
Initiating
Level A2
Exploring
Level A3
Engaging
Reading
AMPI
Attend to labeled
pictures related to
science
Match pictures with
science vocabulary
words
Locate single
components of data
from everyday
sources represented in
tables
Example
Alternate
Assessment
Activities
Teacher presents student
with labeled pictures of
weather conditions.
Student attends to the
pictures by
demonstrating eye gaze,
making sounds, etc.
Teacher presents
student with three
pictures depicting
weather conditions.
Student matches the
pictures to the correct
words (e.g., sun,
cloud, snow).
Teacher presents
student with weather
forecast from
newspaper and asks
―What day will it be
rainy?‖ Student
indicates correct day.
AMPIs for Grade-Level Cluster 9 -12 in the Standard of Language of Science in the Domain of Reading.
English Language Development Standards
Test items are written from AMPIs and MPIs from four of WIDA’s ELD standards:
 Social & Instructional Language
 Language of Language Arts
 Language of Mathematics
 Language of Science
45
Test Section Standards Number of Tasks Range of Levels
Listening SIL, LoMA, LoSC, LoLA 9 A1-A3 and P1-P2
Reading SIL, LoMA, LoSC, LoLA 9 A1-A3 and P1-P2
Speaking
Part A
LoMA, LoSC 8 A1-A3 and P1-P2
Part B
Writing
Part A
Part B SIL, LoSC, LoLA 10 A1-A3 and P1-P3
Part C
Language Domains
Each test form assesses the four language domains of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing.
Grade-Level Clusters
Test forms are divided into the following grade-level clusters:
 Grades 1-2
 Grades 3-5
 Grades 6-8
 Grades 9-12
The Alternate Model Performance Indicators are currently being revised to align with the Common Core
Essential Elements and WIDA’s 2012 Amplification of the ELD Standards. Once the AMPIs are
revised, the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs test forms will be modified to reflect the updated framework.
46
APPENDIX E
GUIDELINES
 Most students should be placed in an age-appropriate classroom. Even if the student has not
attended school before, the social nature of schooling cannot be ignored. It is important to place
students with their peers and allow them to interact naturally. Exceptions may include students
who have not attended school for more than a year.
 A student should be placed in classrooms that utilize the most interactive methods of teaching.
English Learners (ELs) need to listen, speak, read, and write in meaningful contexts to acquire
English. Teachers who rely mainly on lecture, memorization, and worksheets may be least
appropriate for second language learners.
 Paraprofessionals may work directly with a student in the ESL classroom and the general
classroom in conjunction with the classroom teacher. In this way, paraprofessionals have a better
understanding of what, why, and how content material is being studied and can provide support
that is directly connected to classroom goals.
 Previous schooling is considered. The academic background of students varies greatly. Some
students may have studied advanced algebra while others may never have attended school.
 All students need time to learn how to interact in an American school setting. Consideration is
given to having the ESL staff explicitly teach about the culture and language of schools.
 Initial placement decisions for the middle and high school student should take into account
native language literacy skills, previous schooling, interests and goals, and opportunities within
classes for hands-on interactive learning. While a student is often placed in physical education,
art, and music classes, when taught appropriately with the support of ESL teachers or other
content area classes such as science and math may be crucial to maintaining student's interest in
school.
 Consideration is given to alternative means of assessment for the LEP student. Portfolio
assessments that include a broad range of student work, teacher observations, and even audio and
videotapes of the student's work will offer a vision of student's progress over time. The
placement team recognizes that every test is a language test; the student may understand content
but be unable to decipher a multiple-choice test. Finally, the Student Support Team assists
teachers in inventing ways of allowing the student to demonstrate what he/she has learned
without using complex English.
 The placement team encourages the LEP student's involvement in extra-curricular activities at all
grade levels. A student learns English and feels connected to school when he/she is playing
soccer, acting in the school play, preparing something for a bake sale, or singing in the choir.
The LEP student needs to be invited to participate.
 Additional standardized and curriculum-based assessments inform the decision of the team.
Criteria used to exit a student will be placed in the student’s CA 60.
47
APPENDIX F
EXIT CRITERIA
A student in grade K-2 will exit the ESL program when:
1. He/she receives Level 5/6 Bridging/Reaching score on WIDA ACCESS or Advanced
Proficient (AP) score on ELPA
AND
2. The child is performing at grade level on Norm Referenced local assessments (NWEA,
Fountas & Pinnell)
AND
3. The child is performing at grade level (teacher input and grades).
A student in grades 3-12 will exit the ESL Program when:
4. He/she receives Level 5/6 Bridging/Reaching score on WIDA ACCESS or Advanced
Proficient (AP) score on ELPA
AND
5. He/she meets or exceeds the standards on the State Standardized and Norm Referenced local
assessments (NWEA, Fountas & Pinnell)
AND
6. The child is performing at grade level (teacher input and grades).
Additionally, an EL Student Team [(consisting of the child’s teacher(s), a highly qualified ESL Teacher,
ESL/Title I coordinator]
After considering the student’s grades, standardized assessment scores, teacher observations and
the student’s input (when appropriate), may recommend that a student be exited from the ESL
program with consideration of at least two of the following criteria:
a. Extent and nature of prior educational ESL services and social experiences [the child’s
instructional and assessment accommodations have been appropriate for an appropriate
length of time]
b. Level of proficiency in English for the child’s grade according to appropriate local, state
and national criterion-referenced standards
c. Grades from the current year or previous years
d. Determination and documentation that the deficit is not due to a language interference
A parent/guardian has the right to deny services or exit his/her child from the ESL Program at
any time. In the case that this occurs, the parent/guardian must be informed both in writing and
orally – in a language comprehensible to him/her – about the specific accommodations and
support that the student will lose after exiting the program.
48
English Learners with Disabilities
1/8/2009
Some English Learners also have disabilities which impact the acquisition of a second language. For
these students, decisions regarding ESL services and test administration must be made on a case-by-case
basis, as appropriate to the individual needs of the student.
1. Based on the home language survey at the time of registration, new students with a language other
than English in their background will be assessed using the ELPA/ISI or state initial screener, typically
within 10 school days of enrollment.
2. The results of the ELPA/ISI determine student participation in the ESL program. It shall also be
considered by the IEP Team when determining a) the impact of limited English proficiency on special
education eligibility decisions and b) how the student will participate in the ELPA.
3. ESL services for students with disabilities shall be based upon a service plan developed jointly by the
ESL teacher and the student’s special education case coordinator. The service plan promotes a
coordinated approach to service delivery for English Language Learners with disabilities. The service
plan may include direct and/or indirect services from the ESL teacher. The plan should include an
analysis of the ESL and IEP goals overlap/intersect, and how each service provider might
support/reinforce the goals of the other service provider. The service plan will address where the
student’s ESL needs will be addressed.
4. A student with a disability may be eligible for exemption from the ELPA battery if the disability
prohibits meaningful participation in the assessment. Exemptions, which are limited to only the most
extreme cases, are considered and presented at the state level. For such students, the special education
case coordinator and the ESL teacher at the building may jointly submit a request for ELPA exemption
to be reviewed by the office of Student Services and the State of Michigan Office of Educational
Assessment and Accountability (OEAA). The parents would be notified of the proposed exemption and
asked to provide consent during the IEP.
APPENDIX G:
CONSIDERATION FOR PROGRAM EXIT
To be completed for all EL Students considered for Program Exit
Student: Student ID#:
Teacher/Counselor: Grade:
Reviewer’s Name: Date of Review:
ELPA Screener:
Overall Proficiency: __________
Remarks: ___________________________________________________________________________________________
ELPA Overall
Listening ________ Speaking ________ Reading ________ Writing ________
Comprehension _________
Classroom Teacher Observation: (Complete with classroom teacher)
Does student score advanced proficient? (circle one) YES NO
Area(s) of identified support: __________________________________________________________________
Is student working at grade level in:
Reading ________ Writing ________ Math ________ Science ________
Social Studies ________ Other ________
If no, is the below-level performance due to language interference?
If yes, attach documentation (test scores, report card, exit review).
Standardized Tests:
Test(s) Name: _____________________________________________________________________________
Score: ____________
Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________________________________
State Assessment Results:
Does the student meet benchmarks/standards in test areas? (circle one) YES NO
If no, in what area(s) is the student deficient?
NOTE: It must be determined that the EL student did not meet the benchmark due to language interference in order for the
state assessment results to be considered as a criteria to retain the student in the ESL Program.
What are the service recommendations?
1. ____ Continue in the ESL program
2. ____ Exit ESL program – monitor for 2 years
Teacher/Counselor Signature Date
Reviewer’s Signature Date
Title III ESL/Bilingual Handbook 50
10/18/13
Home Language Survey Date: ______________
Original Language Test Date: ______________
EL Student
Two-Year
Post-ESL Service Evaluation
Enrollment Date: _________________
Placement Date: __________________
Reclassification Date: ______________
Student Name: Student ID:
DOB: Grade: District/School:
Assessment Performance
First Year of Monitoring
(1st academic year after
exit date).
SS = Scale Score
ELA SS: __________
MEAP Date: _______
Met Standard? Y N
MLPP Scores on
Grade Level? Y N
MATH SS: ________
MEAP DATE: _____
Met Standard? Y N
Classroom
Performance on Grade
Level Y N
SCIENCE SS: ________
MEAP Date: __________
Met Standard? Y N
Classroom Performance
on Grade Level
Y N
SOC STUD SS: ________
MEAP Date: __________
Met Standard? Y N
Classroom Performance on
Grade Level
Y N
Second Year of
Monitoring (2nd academic
year after exit date).
SS = Scale Score
ELA SS: __________
MEAP Date: _______
Met Standard? Y N
MLPP Scores on
Grade Level? Y N
MATH SS: ________
MEAP DATE: _____
Met Standard? Y N
Classroom
Performance on Grade
Level Y N
SCIENCE SS: ________
MEAP Date: __________
Met Standard? Y N
Classroom Performance
on Grade Level
Y N
SOC STUD SS: ________
MEAP Date: __________
Met Standard? Y N
Classroom Performance on
Grade Level
Y N
First Year Post-Program
Monitoring Year: ___________
Subject Current Grade Signatures:
______________________________________________
Parent/Guardian
______________________________________________
School Administrator:
______________________________________________
Other
Teacher Comments:
ELA
Math
Science
Social Studies
Other content:
Recommendations:
 Reclassification/Re-entry (occurs when it is determined that students
lack of success is due to cognitive academic language).
 Continue in regular program.
Additional interventions (cognitive, linguistic, affective):
Second Year Post-Program
Monitoring Year: ___________
Subject Current Grade Signatures:
______________________________________________
Parent/Guardian
______________________________________________
School Administrator:
______________________________________________
Other
Teacher Comments:
ELA
Math
Science
Social Studies
Other content:
Recommendations:
 Reclassification/Re-entry (occurs when it is determined that students
lack of success is due to cognitive academic language).
 Continue in regular program.
Additional interventions (cognitive, linguistic, affective):
Title III ESL/Bilingual Handbook 51
10/18/13
Appendix H – Flowchart – Entrance and Exit in ESL Program
Title III ESL/Bilingual Handbook 52
10/18/13
Appendix J – Student Profile Form
Student: _________ Student UIC#: _______ ______________
Reviewers Name: ______ Date __
Reviewers Name: Date __
Reviewers Name: Date __
Reviewers Name: Date __
Most recent WIDA ACCESS, WIDA Alternative ACCESS, WIDA MODEL or W-APT scores:
Domain Raw Score
Yr._______
Prof
Level
Raw Score
Yr. _______
Prof.
Level
Raw Score
Yr. _______
Prof.
Level
Raw Score
Yr. ______
Prof.
Level
Speaking
Writing
Listening
Reading
Grade
Adjusted
Composite
ESL Classroom Teacher Observation:
Is student demonstrating progress in English language development performance as measured by WIDA ACCESS, WIDA
Alternative ACCESS, WIDA MODEL and/or W-APT:
Year: ___________ Year: ___________ Year: ___________ Year: ___________
Reading Y N Reading Y N Reading Y N Reading Y N
Writing Y N Writing Y N Writing Y N Writing Y N
Speaking Y N Speaking Y N Speaking Y N Speaking Y N
Listening Y N Listening Y N Listening Y N Listening Y N
If no, list any observations made in order to document student’s English language delay?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
DF
K-4
NW
K-4
OH
K-4
PV
K-4
VO
K-4
NM
5-6
MS
7-8
HS
9-12
DF
K-4
NW
K-4
OH
K-4
PV
K-4
VO
K-4
NM
5-6
MS
7-8
HS
9-12
DF
K-4
NW
K-4
OH
K-4
PV
K-4
VO
K-4
NM
5-6
MS
7-8
HS
9-12
DF
K-4
NW
K-4
OH
K-4
PV
K-4
VO
K-4
NM
5-6
MS
7-8
HS
9-12
Title III ESL/Bilingual Handbook 53
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Appendix K – IB Language Policy - Grade 9-12
Novi Community School District
Novi High School’s Language Policy for International
Baccalaureate
Title III ESL/Bilingual Handbook 54
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Introduction to Language Policy
International Baccalaureate (IB) World Schools are required to have a written language policy. This
document includes provisions for second language teaching and mother-tongue language support that
meets the needs of students and reflects the principles of the program. At Novi High School, the IB
Diploma Program Language Policy sets out the philosophy and aims of language teaching and learning.
This document reviews the currently available options in Group 1 and 2, links directly to the Novi
Community School District English Language Learner Program, and addresses our support for mothertongue
languages.
Language Philosophy
At Novi High School language learning, learning through language, and learning about language is a
cornerstone of all learning. We use language to construct meaning, inquire about the world, and share
understanding with others. Authentic language learning crosses all disciplines and promotes critical
thinking. Students are equipped and empowered to use strategies, or learning tools, to engage in inquirybased
learning. Using these tools, students read, listen, and view in order to comprehend texts of all
kinds. They write, speak, and present to navigate the complexity of ideas they encounter within all
disciplines. The following ten beliefs about language learning anchor and guide our instructional
practices:
1. Language acquisition is a life-long process connected to intellectual, emotional, and social
growth.
2. Language learning requires decision-making and reflects upon one’s knowledge of language
usage.
3. Language learning communities are local, regional, national, and international. All spheres of
language interaction are interrelated.
4. Language learning in the mother-tongue maintains cultural identity.
5. Language proficiency in one language transfers to learning other languages and other content.
6. Language usage allows students to communicate learning for personal, public, and academic
reasons.
7. Language usage produces intended and unintended messages.
8. Language learning is both natural and unnatural, but language acquisition, in general, is
progressive.
9. Language is a social construct and is a foundation for all learning.
10. Language learning fosters equity and builds community.
The following chart elaborates on the implications of this philosophy for teaching and learning.
Beliefs about language… Implications for students and
learning…
Implications for teaching…
1. Language acquisition is a life-long
process connected to intellectual,
emotional, and social growth.
Students are language learners who
strive to understand their own language
learning needs within and beyond the
classroom.
Teachers are language teachers who
strive to recognize and serve the diverse
language needs of all students within
and beyond their classrooms.
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2. Language learning requires
decision-making and reflects upon
one’s knowledge of language
usage.
Students strive to choose and use the
appropriate language skills and
strategies that fit various contexts to the
best of their ability.
Teachers strive to scaffold such
decision-making opportunities using
language learning methods that are
research-based.
3. Language learning communities
are local, regional, national, and
international. All spheres of
language interaction are
interrelated.
Students are aware that, while they are
a part of a local community and culture,
understanding other cultures and
communities provides opportunities for
empowerment and empathy, and raises
global consciousness.
Teachers are aware that, while they are
a part of a local community and culture,
understanding other cultures and
communities provides opportunities for
empowerment and empathy, and raises
global consciousness.
4. Language learning in the mothertongue
maintains cultural identity.
Students will seek to maintain the
mother-tongue to preserve identity,
often preferring the mother-tongue
when complexity or challenge
increases.
Teachers value the mother-tongue of
the student, knowing that language
serves as an extension of culture and
must be valued as a part of a student’s
identity.
5. Language proficiency in one
language transfers to learning other
languages and other content.
Students’ particular language strengths
will help them learn new languages and
can help them when learning new
content in any discipline.
Teachers seek out the native-language
strengths of students to help them learn
new languages to make use of these
strengths when engaging students in
disciplinary learning.
6. Language usage allows students to
communicate learning for personal,
public, and academic reasons.
Students seek real purposes and
audiences when producing spoken or
written messages within all disciplines.
Language usage changes when reasons
for communicating change.
Teachers provide real purposes and
audiences when teaching students to
craft spoken or written messages within
all disciplines. Language usage changes
when reasons for communicating
change.
7. Language usage produces intended
and unintended messages.
Students use language to the best of
their ability and seek descriptive
feedback. When purpose and audience
are present in a language task, intended
messages tend to surface, while
unintended messages are recognized
and addressed to improve learning.
Teachers expect students to
approximate language usage and offer
descriptive feedback. When purpose
and audience are provided in a
language task, intended messages tend
to surface, while unintended messages
are recognized and addressed to
improve learning.
8. Language learning is both natural
and unnatural, but language
acquisition, in general, is
progressive.
Students realize that people come to
oral language more naturally, often
learning to speak and listen through
informal rehearsal, repetition, and use –
especially when younger. Reading and
writing, as social constructs, are quite
unnatural. So deliberate or more formal
rehearsal and use is necessary for
growth.
Teachers realize that students come to
oral language more naturally, often
learning to speak and listen through
informal rehearsal, repetition, and use –
especially when younger. Reading and
writing, as social constructs, are quite
unnatural. So deliberate or more formal
modeling and guidance is necessary for
growth.
9. Language is a social construct and
is a foundation for all learning
Students engage in meaningful social
interaction to learn language, to learn
through language, and to construct
knowledge about language to better
communicate.
Teachers provide meaningful
interaction to help students learn
language, learn through language, and
construct knowledge about language to
better communicate.
10. Language learning fosters equity
and builds community.
Students seek equity throughout the
school community by exploring
cultures and languages. When possible,
they seek out relationships with peer
representatives from those cultures, and
commit to deep learning of the other
language.
Teachers foster equity throughout all
aspects of the school community
through the exploration of cultures and
languages. When possible, they help
students build relationship with peers
from other cultures, and commit to
deep learning of the other languages.
Classroom Instructional Beliefs
Opportunity to communicate is essential for language growth. With opportunity comes a need for
explicit or deliberate language instruction to ensure achievement. The design of the environment is 
Title III ESL/Bilingual Handbook 56
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equally important to meet this end. In Novi, language instruction that reflects the language philosophy
tends to look as follows:
When Writing, Speaking, and Presenting
are Taught
When Reading, Listening, and Viewing are
Taught
 Students have opportunities to create and
discuss topics that matter to them.
 Audience and purpose for papers and
presentations are specifically identified in
assignments.
 Most of a teacher's time is spent in class
teaching or scaffolding writing, speaking,
and presentation skills and strategies.
 Students are given writing and presentation
models, assignments, and strategies to
guide different writing or presentation
tasks.
 Students reflect on significant growth—or
lack of it—in specific writing, speaking, and
presenting skills.
 Students are encouraged to revise, edit, and
improve—and to correct drafts and then
resubmit.
 Students learn language conventions in
context of writing, presenting ideas, and
engaging in authentic discourse.
 Students think about what they write and
present through brainstorming, quickwriting,
role-playing, discussion or other
prewriting activities.
 Students and teachers are excited about
what students write and present and make
efforts to display and publish student work.
 Students have opportunities to self-select
texts that meet curricular and personal
needs.
 Purposes for reading, listening, and viewing
are specifically identified in assignments.
 Most of a teacher's time is spent in class
teaching reading, listening, and viewing
skills and strategies that help students learn
and comprehend the content.
 Students are modeled reading, listening,
and viewing strategies to guide different
learning tasks related to texts, discourse,
and discipline as appropriate.
 Students reflect on significant growth—or
lack of it—in specific reading, listening, and
viewing skills within varied contexts.
 Students are encouraged to reread, listen or
view again, to self-monitor, and fix-up in
order to improve comprehension.
 Students think about what they read, listen
to, or view by connecting, questioning,
inferring, visualizing, determining
importance, and synthesizing before,
during, and after reading.
 Students and teachers are excited about
what students read, listen to, or view and
make efforts to engage student in
substantive conversation.
 Discourse and dialogue is at the heart of all
learning surrounding ideas and texts.
Aims or Outcomes of Instruction
 Empower students to learn and use language effectively, appropriately, accurately and
confidently.
 Develop students’ language skills when listening, reading, viewing, and when speaking, writing,
and visually representing.
 Empower students to develop and use language skills for varied purposes and within a variety of
contexts.
 Promote the appreciation, understanding, and analysis of literary and nonliterary texts from all
cultures.
 Encourage students to explore language as a way of understanding differing perspectives of
people from other cultures.
 Develop students’ awareness of the role of language in other areas of the curriculum and to other
ways of knowing.
 Provide an opportunity for enjoyment, creativity, and intellectual stimulation through knowledge
of language and literature. 
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Professional Development
At Novi High School, teachers and administrators seek out professional development in language
learning. The district also provides literacy coaches and an ESL facilitator to lead this professional
development on-site to help staff implement best practices related to language instruction within their
own classrooms. Areas of continuous improvement include:
 Consistent and integrated comprehensive literacy framework, aligned with best practices
(research-based), within all disciplines, including models of instruction surrounding
o word study methods and strategies to build background knowledge and lay foundations
for learning.
o reading comprehension methods and strategies to improve textual understanding.
o writing methods and strategies to improve process and production.
o discourse strategies and techniques to engage students in dialogue to deepen the inquiry.
o digital literacies and tools that enhance language learning.
 Attending training or workshop sessions to ensure delivery and implementation of practices
listed provided by coaches internally and sought externally when appropriate.
 Collaboration and reflection about language acquisition and literacy achievement across and
within courses and across grade levels
 Deliberate, systematic teacher-to-teacher, or peer observations, intended to share and improve
instruction.
IB Language Offerings and Sequence of Courses
 5 World Languages
French
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
German
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
AP
Culture/
Communication
1 Semester each
(Spanish &
French only)
IB SL 1
IB SL 2
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English Language Learner Program
The Novi Community School District seeks to provide every child, regardless of national origin or native
language, quality, and meaningful educational instruction. Consequently, students who are English Learners
(ELs) are provided instructional services through an English as a Second Language (ESL) program, which is
designed to meet their unique needs.
The Novi Community School District has prepared this handbook of program policies and procedures to
ensure that the Title III: ESL Program in the district is consistent throughout the district.
English Language
Arts
required curriculum
9th grade
English
Language Arts
10th Grade
English
Language Arts
11th Grade
English
Language Arts
IB English
Langauge A
HL 1
AP English
Language
12th Grade
English
Language Arts
IB English
Language A
HL 2
AP English
Literature
English Language electives offered -
see course catalog for listings
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For a comprehensive view, refer to the following document:
Novi Community Schools
Title III: English as a Second Language (ESL) Program
For English Language Learners (ELLs)
DISTRICT HANDBOOK
2010 – 2011
http://www.novi.k12.mi.us/teachlearn/curriculum/WebPages/ELL_%20handbook_10-11.pdf
 Development and Maintenance of Mother-Tongue
 Supporting All Students’ Mother Tongue/ Inclusion and Equity for ELLs
Communication with Parents and Guardians
(Needs Articulating) Notes:
 ELL students are evaluated using ELPA ISI once enrolled and identified as having a second
language.
Language Policy Review
(Needs Articulating)
 Account for coming ab insio
 Account from for self-taught A1 other language (besides English)
Other sections needed / desired?
Contributing Authors
Nick Kalakailo
Date: 06.06.2010
 davido.extraxim@gmail.com