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OFFICE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
GRADES K-12 LANGUAGE ALLOCATION POLICY
SUBMISSION FORM
2013-14 TO 2014-15 SCHOOL YEARS
DIRECTIONS: This submission form assists schools with gathering and organizing the quantitative and qualitative information necessary
for a well-conceived school-based language allocation policy (LAP) that describes quality ELL programs. This is a two-year plan on how
schools will support ELLs’ linguistic and academic needs. This LAP form is a part of the school’s CEP. Agendas and minutes of LAP
meetings should be kept readily available on file in the school. Also, when preparing your school’s submission, provide extended responses
in the green spaces. Spell-check has been disabled in this file, so consider typing responses to these questions in a separate file before
copying them into the submission form. For additional information, hold your cursor over the .
A. School Information 
B. Language Allocation Policy Team Composition  NOTE: The following staff members should be on the LAP team: principal, assistant
principal (where applicable), at least one bilingual teacher from each subject area (where there is a bilingual program), at least one ESL teacher, and one parent.
Principal Mrs. Thea Pallos Assistant Principal Mrs. Peggy Mouzakitis
Coach Mrs. Sharon Schachar Coach type here
ESL Teacher Mrs. Shakila Ahmed Guidance Counselor Mrs. Olga Papadapoulos
Teacher/Subject Area Mr. Jose Guerrero Parent Mr. Jason Greene
Teacher/Subject Area Mrs. Grace Masiello Parent Coordinator Mrs. Anita O'Brein
Related Service Provider Mr. Petros Chalkitis Other type here
Network Leader(Only if working with the LAP team) type here Other type here
C. Teacher Qualifications
Please provide a report of all staff members’ certifications referred to in this section. Press TAB after each number entered to calculate sums
and percentages.
Number of certified
ESL teachers currently teaching in
the ESL program.
14
Number of certified
bilingual teachers not currently
teaching in a bilingual
program
4
Number of teachers who hold both content
area and ESL certification 16
Number of certified
bilingual teachers currently teaching
in a bilingual program
0
Number of certified
NLA/foreign language
teachers
0
Number of teachers who hold both a
bilingual extension and ESL certification 2
Number of certified ESL teachers
not currently teaching in the ESL
program
0
Number of teachers currently
teaching a self-contained ESL class
who hold both a common branch
license and ESL certification
0
Number of special education teachers with
bilingual extensions 0
D. Student Demographics
Total number of students in school
(Excluding Pre-K) 601
Total number of ELLs
142
ELLs as share of total student population
(%) 23.63%
District 30 Borough Queens School Number 234
School Name P.S.234 Queens
Part I: School ELL Profile
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A. ELL Programs
This school offers (check all that apply):
Transitional bilingual education program Yes No If yes, indicate language(s):
Dual language program Yes No If yes, indicate language(s):
Provide the number of classes for each ELL program model at your school. For all-day programs (e.g., Transitional Bilingual Education,
Dual Language, and Self-Contained ESL), classes refer to a cohort of students served in a day. For push-in ESL classes, refer to the separate
periods in a day in which students are served. Departmentalized schools (e.g., high school) may use the self-contained row.
ELL Program Breakdown
K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Tot
#
Transitional
Bilingual Education
(60%:40%  50%:50% 
75%:25%)
0
Dual Language
(50%:50%)
0
Freestanding ESL
Push-In 2 1 2 1 1 0 7
Pull-out 2 1 1 1 1 6
Total 4 2 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
B. ELL Years of Service and Programs
Number of ELLs by Subgroups
All ELLs 148 Newcomers (ELLs receiving
service 0-3 years) 113 ELL Students with
Disabilities 15
SIFE 8
ELLs receiving service 4-6
years
35
Long-Term
(completed 6+
years)
Enter the number of ELLs by years of identification and program model in each box. Enter the number of ELLs within a subgroup who are
also SIFE or SWD. 

ELLs by Subgroups
ELLs
(0-3 years)
ELLs
(4-6 years)
Long-Term ELLs
(completed 6 years)
All SIFE SWD All SIFE SWD All SIFE SWD Total
TBE 0
Dual Language 0
ESL 113 8 35 0 148
Total 113 8 0 35 0 0 0 0 0 148
Number of ELLs who have an alternate placement paraprofessional: 4

This school serves the following
grades (includes ELLs and EPs)
Check all that apply
K 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Part II: ELL Demographics
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C. Home Language Breakdown and ELL Programs
Transitional Bilingual Education
Number of ELLs by Grade in Each Language Group
K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 TOTAL
SELECT ONE 0
SELECT ONE 0
SELECT ONE 0
TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
*EP=English proficient student
Dual Language (ELLs/EPs*)
K-8
Number of ELLs by Grade in Each Language Group
K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 TOTAL
ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP
SELECT ONE
0 0
SELECT ONE
0 0
SELECT ONE
0 0
TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dual Language (ELLs/EPs)
9-12
Number of ELLs by Grade in Each Language Group
9 10 11 12 TOTAL
ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP ELL EP
SELECT ONE
0 0
SELECT ONE 0 0
SELECT ONE
0 0
TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
This Section for Dual Language Programs Only
Number of Bilingual students (students fluent in both languages): Number of third language speakers:
Ethnic breakdown of EPs (Number):
African-American: Asian: Hispanic/Latino:
Native American: White (Non-Hispanic/Latino): Other: 
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Freestanding English as a Second Language
Number of ELLs by Grade in Each Language Group
K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 TOTAL
Spanish 20 6 14 7 11 7 65
Chinese 1 1 2
Russian 0 0
Bengali 6 8 10 1 2 2 29
Urdu 1 1 2 1 5
Arabic 6 3 5 4 7 25
Haitian 0 0
French 0 0
Korean 0 0
Punjabi 1 0 1
Polish 2 0 2
Albanian 1 1
Other 4 5 1 2 1 13
TOTAL 40 25 32 14 15 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 143
Assessment Breakdown
Enter the number of ELLs for each test, category, and modality. Data should reflect latest results of current students in your school.
OVERALL NYSESLAT* PROFICIENCY RESULTS (*LAB-R FOR NEW ADMITS)
K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 TOTAL
Beginner(B) 18 7 5 2 4 5 41
Intermediate(I) 8 4 10 3 5 1 31
Advanced (A) 14 17 16 10 9 10 76
Total 40 28 31 15 18 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 148
NYSESLAT Modality Analysis
Modality
Aggregate Proficiency Level K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
LISTENING/
SPEAKING
B
I
A
P
READING/
WRITING
B
I
A
P
Part III: Assessment Analysis
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NYS ELA
Grade Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Total
3 8 6 0 1 15
4 11 5 0 0 16
5 15 5 0 0 20
6 0
7 0
8 0
NYSAA Bilingual (SWD) 0
NYS Math
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Total
Grade English NL English NL English NL English NL
3 7 1 5 1 4 2 20
4 6 1 9 2 1 19
5 18 4 2 1 25
6 0
7 0
8 0
NYSAA Bilingual
(SWD) 0
NYS Science
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Total
English NL English NL English NL English NL
4 0 0 4 0 9 2 1 1 17
8 0
NYSAA
Bilingual
(SWD)
0
New York State Regents Exam
Number of ELLs Taking Test Number of ELLs Passing Test
English Native Language English Native Language
Comprehensive English
Integrated Algebra
Geometry
Algebra 2/Trigonometry
Math
Biology
Chemistry
Earth Science
Living Environment
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New York State Regents Exam
Number of ELLs Taking Test Number of ELLs Passing Test
English Native Language English Native Language
Physics
Global History and
Geography
US History and
Foreign Language
Government
Other
Other
NYSAA ELA
NYSAA Mathematics
NYSAA Social Studies
NYSAA Science
Native Language Tests
# of ELLs scoring at each quartile
(based on percentiles)
# of EPs (dual lang only) scoring at each quartile
(based on percentiles)
Q1
1-25 percentile
Q2
26-50 percentile
Q3
51-75 percentile
Q4
76-99 percentile
Q1
1-25 percentile
Q2
26-50 percentile
Q3
51-75 percentile
Q4
76-99 percentile
ELE (Spanish Reading
Test)
Chinese Reading Test
After reviewing and analyzing the assessment data, answer the following:
1. Describe what assessment tool your school uses to assess the early literacy skills of your ELLs (e.g., ECLAS-2, EL SOL, Fountas and
Pinnell, DRA, TCRWP). What insights do the data provide about your ELLs? How will this data help inform your school’s instructional
plan? Please provide any quantitative data available to support your response.
The Foutas and Pinnell Literacy assessment program is an assessment designed to help teachers determine the progress in literacy
development in children from grades K-5 . The Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System is a formative reading assessment
comprised of 58 high-quality, original titles, or “little books” divided evenly between fiction and nonfiction. The assessment measures
decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension skills for students in kindergarten through 5th grade. The set of books, recording
forms, and other materials serve as an assessment tool for the teachers, literacy specialists, and clinicians to use in determining students’
developmental reading levels for the purpose of informing instruction and documenting reading progress. The Fountas & Pinnell
Benchmark Assessment System spans grades kindergarten through 5th grade and are aligned with the A-Z book levels of the Fountas
& Pinnell Leveled Text. The Benchmark System: 1represents levels A-N on the Fountas & Pinnell Text
Gradient and encompasses grades kindergarten through grade, 2. Benchmark System 2 represents levels L-Z and encompasses
grades 3 through 5. The Benchmark Assessment System books are both “vertically aligned” (they become more difficult as a reader
progresses through the levels) and “horizontally aligned” (at each level the fiction and nonfiction books are written at similar
levels of difficulty. The activities include individual administered and group administered activities designed to measure each child’s
progress in Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Reading and Oral Expression, and Listening levels. Each level provides benchmarks that
correspond to a specific grade and term. For example, Level A- levels correspond to the beginning of Kindergarten Grade while a
level E corresponds to the end of kindergarten and beginning of first grade. . Each activity benchmark corresponds to an expected
level of performance by midyear and end-of-year, at each grade level. The Class Record Sheet contains a place to record results of
every strand and its sub-skills for each student. The Class Record Sheet enables teachers to quickly see the level each student has
achieved in each strand. The Spelling Class Record Sheet lists each of the spelling conventions. It enables teachers to quickly see the
spelling conventions mastered by each student and those areas in which more instruction is needed. The Decoding Class Record Sheet
shows the decoding conventions the child has mastered and those in which further instruction is needed. If a child does not master an
Individual Activity he/she reassessed on those sub-skills not mastered during the subsequent assessment periods until mastery is
achieved.
 The NYSESLAT and LAB-R ESL assessment are also utilized to determined the ELL students levels of english proficiency.
An evaluation of the NYSESLAT and LAB-R scores, of the currently enrolled ELL students, is conducted with a focus in 2 distinct areas: 
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The scores for NYSESLAT were analyzed through the scale score model provided by the NY Department of Education. Through this
model we were able to determine the level of proficiency in reading and writing components as well as the listening and speaking
components for each individual child who had been assessed through the NYSESLAT. The LAB-R score for incoming students were also
analyzed to determined the English profficiency level of the incoming students.
2. What is revealed by the data patterns across proficiency levels (on the LAB-R and NYSESLAT) and grades?
 The data analysis indicates that as a whole the ELL students are performing better in the listening and speaking components of the
NYSESLAT. The numbers indicate that a majority of the students are either at an advanced or intermediate level in these two
components. This pattern is supported throughout the grades. The lower grades show weakness in the reading and writing components.
The upper grades show improvement in the reading and writing components but these two areas remain the weakest for the entire ELL
population. Focus, for students, will be given on more practice in the reading and the writing areas. Our data shows that second
grade students were the most successful in acquiring the skills needed to become proficient. Over 75% of students tested in grade 2
scored proficient, the remaining students made significant gains in receiving advanced levels of proficiency. However, in grades 3, 4
and 5, students struggled and level gains were significantly less. Only 15% of students received a proficient score. Although gains
were made, several students remained at an intermediate level (about 30%). About 50% of student were able to reach an advanced
level. In grades K and 1, about 25% of students were able to obtain a proficient score. 62% of students received an advanced
level.
The LAB_R results indicate that a majority of the students tested are scoring at a proficient level. About 85% of the students attending
a pre-kindergarten program were able to obtain a profient level while the 15% that did not were able to obtain an advanced leve
of proficiency. The rest of the population of students tested obtained score at levels appropriate to the exposure to English. The
students tested and not achieving proficiency 45% reached a beginning level. 35% reached advanced and 20% reached an
intermediate level of proficiency. The Hispanic student not achieving profiency were tested in their native language. 90% of these
students achieved proficiency in spanish.
3. How will patterns across NYSESLAT modalities—reading/writing and listening/speaking—affect instructional decisions? How does
your school use information about Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives? What does the data reveal? (see SED memo and AMAO
tool)
The development of lessons and the materials utilized to teach, ELL students, will be based on the trends and indicators the data
analysis yields. As indicated by the data trends the main focus will be but not limited to, reading and writing. Differentiated
instruction lessons will be implemented to address the needs of ELL students in the four modalities; reading, writing, listening and
speaking. New Technologies such as the promethean boards and laptop carts will serves as tools in the implementation and
obtainment of these goals. Additionally phonics and the Open Court curriculum will be utilized to supplement the reading and writing
programs. Emphasis will also be given to developing and adding more ESL strategies to the lessons being taught. The ESL components
of the Ready Gen reading series as well as supplemental ESL materials will be utilized as useful tools in the achievement of these
goals. The students will also be supported individually through conferencing between teacher and student. Additionally after school
programs through Title III will serve as additional support for ELL students in need of academic remediation and or enrichment.
4. For each program, answer the following:
a. What are the patterns across proficiencies and grades? How are ELLs faring in tests taken in English as compared to the
native language?
b. Describe how the school leadership and teachers are using the results of the ELL Periodic Assessments.
c. What is the school learning about ELLs from the Periodic Assessments? How is the native language used?
The patterns across the curriculum indicate that on the ELA test the ELL population of students is scoring at a lower level than the
general population of students. In the third grade out of 15 student that were tested, 8 scored a level 1, 6 scored a level 2 and 1 scored a
level 4. In the fourth grade out of 16 student tested 11 scored a level 1 and 5 scored a level 2. In the 5th grade out of 20 students
tested15 scored a level 1 and 5 scored a level 2. The pattern through the grades indicate a need for immediate intervension to remediate
the ELL students performance in English Language Arts. More focus will be placed in giving the ELL students ampple opportunities to
participate in curriculum areas with the use of ESL stragegies. Native language libraries are incorporated into each classroom in order to
support the ELL students who can benefit from having native language literature and materials as a support for their learning. Additionally
the ELL department has obtained and utilizes english -native language dictionaries to support these students in their learning and
assessment.
The leadership team utilizes the ESL periodic assessment data to determine the needs of ELL students to determine the type of
intruction and methodologies that would better serve the ELL population of students. The data is analyzed and the information is used to
locate the areas of need for the ELL students. These areas are then targetted and smart, regurous, ESL, goals are set in our CEP.
The teachers are also provided with the periodic assessment results and they utilize it to measure the students progress and to find
areas of need for each individual ELL student. The teachers is then equipped to differentiate instruction for individual students or groups of 
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students having similar needs. Additionally the teachers analyze the type of question being asked to identify trends and create lessons that
would support students in these areas of study. The teachers and the leadership team have open channels of communication to share their
thoughts and determinations of how to address the needs of the ELL population of students. Parents are provided with translation and
interpretation, to their native language, during workshops and meetings aimed at helping them and their children in the learning process
and all educational activities.
5. Describe how your school uses data to guide instruction for ELLs within the Response to Intervention (RtI) framework (for grades K-5).
(see RtI Guide for Teachers of ELLs.)
At PS 234Q The data of different assessments is analyze to determined the best approach to meet our students educational needs.
The ELL students in our school are afforded the same opportunities as all other students. The data gathered for these students is
analyzed and is utilized to determine the individual needs of each ELL students. Once these needs are determined our school:
• Provides ongoing and research-based professional development to teachers and other school personnel on how to implement the
RTI framework and inclussion of ELL students.
• The more that personnel know about the development of oral language, early literacy, students' home language, contextual
considerations, and the cultural background of students, the better informed they will be in making appropriate decisions about
interpreting screening and assessment results and in designing appropriate interventions.
• Fully credentialed ESL teachers are provided continuously acquire new knowledge regarding best practices in ESL.
• General education teachers regularly participate in professional development focused on meeting the needs of ELLs.
 All students, especially ELL's, are included and highlighted in the RTI plan for intervention.
6. How do you make sure that a child’s second language development is considered in instructional decisions?
When placing ELLs into classes to better instruct them, we as educators, consider a variety of factors.
First, we utilize the data at hand to determine previous education within the U.S. and/or the home country.
Secondly, we determine the students levels of literacy proficiency in English and in the first language.
Thirdly, we determine how much support is there at home for first language literacy and/or English development.
Additionally, we consider that prospective teachers know how to use effective teaching strategies for ELLs.
Furthermore, we make sure that the prospective teachers understand the second language acquisition process and know what to
expect at different levels of English proficiency.
We also plan on going PDs to assure extra support for ELL students as well as their teachers in utilizing the ESL strategies .
When considering instructional programs for ELLs, be aware that some subjects are good for ELLs to take with peers and Englishspeaking
role models. ELLs can benefit in regular classrooms when math, science, art, P.E., and music teachers use ELL-friendly
strategies for teaching content areas. These strategies increase comprehension, learning, and interaction through modeling, acting out,
gesturing, showing diagrams, and engage in hands-on activities and experiments.
Yet, some language areas and subjects need special attention because they depend mostly on language – like reading, writing, and
social studies. Possibilities for instruction include using the support of bilingual aides, an ESL teacher, a resource teacher, a content area
teacher with ESL training, a pull-out class, or a combined grade level class (in which ELLs can be placed at a lower level at first and
then moved up as they gain proficiency in English).
.
7. For dual language programs, answer the following:
a. How are the English-proficient students (EPs) assessed in the second (target) language?
b. What is the level of language proficiency in the second (target) language for EPs?
c. How are EPs performing on State and City Assessments?
Paste response to questions here:
8. Describe how you evaluate the success of your programs for ELLs (e.g. meeting AYP for ELLs, etc.).
The success of our ESL program is determined through the achievement of meeting the goals we have set for our ELL students. This ,
while maintaining a clear and focussed mission on how to better educate this population of students. The success in achieving our goals
is done through data analysis of different assessments that determine english proficiency. These assessments indicate the progress our
students are making towards achieving English proficiency. The NYSESLAT results, for the spring 2013, indicate that about 25% of the
students tested scores a proficient level while about 50% scored an advanced level. These scores are a clear indication of the success
in achieving the goals we have set for our program and students. The ELA data indicates that the ELL population is in need of extra
support to obtain better results in this area. The data indicates tha about 80% of this population scored at level one of mastery. The
remaining 19% score at a level 2 or 3 while 1% achieved a level 4. The data at hand will be utilized in the planning and creation of
lessons to focus on individual needs of students. The number of students achieving proficiency as well as those that show increased
proficiency is a clear indicator of the success of theESL program being implemented. Administrators also focus on the classroom
environment as well as the inclusion of ELL students in all academic, social and enrichment activities PS 234 has to offer. The level of
parent involvement and participation in both school activities related to their children's education is another indicator of the ESL
program success. We also focus on having highly qualify ESL lisensed teachers at the fore front in educating ELL students. Providing ESL 
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students with the most highly qualified profesionals to provide instruction in their classrooms is another good indicator of our program
success. Highly qualified profesionals help our program in achieving the set goals in aiding these students in achieving english
proficiency as quickly as possible while obtaining a world class education in all areas of study.
Describe how you identify English Language Learners (ELLs) in your school. Answer the following:
1. Describe the steps followed for the initial identification of ELLs. These steps must include administering the Home Language
Identification Survey (HLIS) which includes the informal oral interview in English and in the native language, and the formal initial
assessment. Identify the person(s) responsible, including their qualifications, for conducting the initial screening, administering the
HLIS, the LAB-R (if necessary), and the formal initial assessment. (Refer to ELL Policy Brief and EPIC.)
 At PS 234Q the registration process of incoming students is conducted by trained school personnel including a certified teacher.
The parents are provided with all the proper documentation which includes a Home Language Identification Survey, to be
completed. In the process of HLIS completion our licensed professional, Shakila Ahmed or Jose Guerrero, conduct an interview with
the parent in order to insure the correct completion of this document. Mrs. Ahmed is a certified ESL teacher who speaks Bengali as
well as Urdu. Mr. Guerrero is a certified ESL teacher who speaks spanish. The HLIS is provided in English and most of the major
languages spoken by our school population. The interviewer is a professional who is able to speak the language of the parent
being interviewed. Either Mr. Guerrero or Mrs Ahmed are present to conduct the interview or to assist in the process. If such a
professional is not available the school makes all the efforts to provide the parent with proper and correct translation. This assures,
the parent has a clear understanding of what the HLIS is and how it must be completed.
After the completion of the HLIS, the ESL coordinator, Mr. Jose Guerrero or Mrs. Shakila Ahmed, makes a determination if the child
requires assessment in English. If the determination is positive, the child is then tested utilizing the LAB-R exam which determines
English proficiency. This initial assessment determines the placement of the students and is conducted within 10 days of the students’
registration. The students that are determined not to be proficient in English are then identified as eligible for placement in one of
the three program choices provided the New York City Department of Education. The students who are hispanic and do not achieve
a proficient level are a then tested in spanish to determine their proficiency in this language.
2. What structures are in place at your school to ensure that parents understand all three program choices (Transitional Bilingual, Dual
Language, Freestanding ESL)? Please describe the process, outreach plan, and timelines.
The ELL Program at PS 234 (with the NYSESLAT scores at hand and including the incoming Kindergarten) consists of approximately
148 students for the 2013-2014 school year. Program selection for the incoming students was based on the Home Language
Identification Surveys and the results of the LAB-R assessment for incoming students. The students identified as speakers of other
languages and who are not yet proficient in English were selected for placement. The rest of the students, who are currently in the
program and did not achieve a proficiency level in NYSESLAT were also selected for placement. The parents of these students are
contacted and then provided with a letter giving them the opportunity to have their children continue in the current program or
select another option. The surveys and parents data are reviewed every year in order to identify the need for other programs such
as Bilingual, Dual Language and Free Standing ESL to aide and enrich the needs of the students. The first parent orientation takes
place within the first10 school days to insure an early and proper placement of the ELL students. At this orientation the parents
determine which program they would like to place their children in.
1. At the parent orientation, the parents are informed of the different program models available in the school district. In this
workshop parents are asked to complete a form where they indicate their choices, in order of preference, the program that they
deem appropriate for their child. A video is shown to the parents to clarify the choices they have and what their rights are. This
video is presented in the major languages spoken by our school population and translation is provided to parents that request it.
The ESL coordinator also provides time for one on one interviews, with parents, to further explain the process. Translation is also
provided when requested by the parents. The program selection forms are provided in the language the parent is most familiar
with and understands. After the parents make their selection, the ESL department tallies the choices made by the parents.
2. The parent orientation is offered a second time and parents, who did not attend orientation, are sent 2nd and 3rd notices
indicating the importance of these orientations. The letters are translated to the most dominant languages to assure full
understanding by the parents of how important their input is in selecting the correct program for their children. In P.S.234Q the
majority of parents indicated the ESL program model as their first choice. A nominal number of parents requested the Spanish,
Part IV: ELL Identification Process
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Arabic, and Bengali bilingual education program model, yet this number does not meet the legal criteria to create a bilingual class.
Follow up orientations a conducted to insure parent participation. Additionally, parents are contacted by phone to inform them
about the importance of program selection, for their children, and their attendance to the orientation.
3. Once the parents select the model they prefer, those selecting bilingual are invited to meet with the ESL coordinator. The ESL
coordinator informs them about the options available to them. They could opt to transfer the child to a school where the selected
model is available. They are also informed that they could sign a transfer option letter where they can opt to keep the child within
one of the programs available in the school. This, however, is procedure only until the number of parents selecting their program of
choice reaches the number necessary to create a class utilizing the requested model.
4. If after the school makes all efforts to contact the parents and they still do not attend the orientations. Their failure to contact the
school within the allotted period of time results in the placement of these students in a Transitional Bilingual Program. The parents
are informed of this placement in writing and through phone calls. Parents of ELL students who are currently enrolled in the ESL
program and who do not reach proficiency level in the NYSESLAT, are contacted through a letter informing of them of the results.
They are then instructed on what their choices are in the entitlement letter. The parents could request to have the student continue in
the current program. They also have the option of meeting with the ESL coordinators to discuss a change of program. The students,
whose parents fail to return the entitlement letters and who fail to contact the school, will place in the default program. The default
program for ELL students is the Transitional Bilingual Program. The parents are then informed of this decision through the mail and
or phone contact.
3. Describe how your school ensures that entitlement letters are distributed and Parent Survey and Program Selection forms are returned,
and secured/stored. (If a form is not returned, the default program for ELLs is Transitional Bilingual Education as per CR Part 154
[see tool kit].)
The parents of continuing ELL students are invited to an orientation in which they are informed of the choices of programs for their
children and their entitlement to choose the program they believe would best serve their children's needs. Mrs Shakila Ahmed and
Mr. Jose Guerrero, two dually lisenced pedagogues, give the parents an explonation of the 3 programs available to them. The
parents of ELL students deemed ELLs as per their NYSESLAT score for that particular year. The parents are given the opportunity to
switch the program their child is in or to have the child continue in the same program offerred the previous year. The letters are
distributed at this meeting and then collected to be tallied. The parents of students not attending this meeting are then contacted by
phone, mail or email to inform them of their children status as an ELL and the need for them to be informed of their right to select
the program they deem appropriate to their children in reaching english proficiency. The parents either choose to come in to sigh
the entitlement letter or prefer to receive it by mail, after having been informed of what it is and what it means. The letters are
made available in the native language of the parent's preference. The parents' choices are then recorded and placement is of all
ELL students is acomplished.. The students are placed accordingly as per the parents requests . The entitlement letters as well as all
other ELLs. documents are filed within the ESL department's files binders. The original parent language survey is placed back into
the child's permanent records while copies are maintained in locked file cabinets. These cabinets are located in the ESL
department's office. The original program choice letters, entitlement letters and copies of the home language surveys are
maintained within these locked cabinets as well.
4. Describe the criteria used and the procedures followed to place identified ELL students in bilingual or ESL instructional programs;
description must also include any consultation/communication activities with parents in their native language.
The programs at P.S. 234 Q have been aligned with parents’ requests. The program selection forms and entitlement letters were
tallied and the results concluded that the ESL model was selected by the majority of the parents. This resulted in the establishment
of ESL classes in grades K – 5. This continues to be the trend at PS 234Q. In the past few years over, 90% of the parents have
made the ESL program the requested method for instructing the ELL population of PS 234Q. The 10 % requesting other programs
have been informed of their rights and choices. Most of these parents have elected to sign a transfer option letter after meeting
with the ESL coordinator and receiving the proper information in the language they understand. The materials are made available
in the languages that are most prevalent in our school population as well as other languages that are requested by the parents as
needed. PS 234 also provides translation services at all parent orientations as well as any meetings or workshops presented.
Furthermore, PS 234 maintains open channels of communication with parents through correspondance as well as telephones and the
internet. Parents are made aware of. Once the process is complete the parents are informed of the placement for their children
through letters distributed by mail or through other home school communication. The letters are translated and sent in the language
chosen by the parents as the preferred language of communication between home and school. These letters are then filed in the ESL
department's locked cabinets as proof that the parents' choices were utilized and tended to by the programs of their choice.
5. Describe the steps taken to administer all sections of the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test
(NYSESLAT) to all ELLs each year. 
Page 11
Mrs Shakila Ahmed and Mr. Jose Guerrerol become familiar with the ATS reports identifying ELL students and their vital
information. They review the information to assure it is accurate. We maintain checklist and updated them weeklyto assure the
current ELL students in the school accounted for and included in all the necessary testing. This is record maintanance is done from the
beginning of the year and is continued through out the year as enrollment is open for incoming students. ATS is updated and new list
are obtained weekly. These lists are utilized to track the students's LAB-R and NYSESLAT data so that you can track your ELLs' for
testing as well as their progress.
The NYSESLAT test is ordered in the fall-winter of each year.according to the quanteties of ELL students in the our school. All the
modalities are ordered to assure that all students are tested in each of the four modalities. The speaking part materials are receive
first and secure and non-secure materials. for the Speaking, through session of NYSESLAT to schools. Schools must open cartons that
contain materials and a packing slip immediately to verify quantities. We Notify the
Borough Assessment Implementation Director (BAID) of any problems or the need for additional test materials. the SHRINKWRAPPED
is not opened. The materials are then handed to a school official to securely store it in a secure, locked facility.
 In April we begin to ADMINISTER the Speaking session of the NYSESLAT. All scoring of the through Speaking session of this test
must be completed by suggested date(of the current year). Answer documents are not needed during the Speaking session. Scores
may be recorded on the Speaking Score Sheet or a class roster and transcribed onto the answer documents during the scoring
session. The SED (UPS) DELIVERS secure and non-secure test materials for our school. These are the Listening, Reading, and Writing
sessions of the NYSESLAT. The Schools must open cartons (which contain a packing slip) immediately to verify quantities. Notify the
BAID of any problems or the need for additional test materials. A school supervisor must reseal cartons and place in a secure,
locked facility. By the end of April DAPS DELIVERS (Deluxe Courier) answer documents to schools and overage to the Borough
Assessment Office (BAO). PS 234Q adheres to all the instructions and directions as per the memorandums sent by the NYS
Department of Education and NYC DOE.
Administration of the NYSESLAT Grades K-5,Listening, Reading, & Writing, is conducted per sessions, according to the NYSESLAT
Manual for Administrators and Teachers. All security measures and time limits must be strictly observed. SED suggests that schools
administer the subtests in the following sequence: Listening, Reading, and Writing. Completed Reading and Listening answer
documents are to be by RETURNED to the locations indicated..
• Schools DELIVER completed answer documents in sealed packages with a Test Material Security Form to the BAID.
6. After reviewing the Parent Survey and Program Selection forms for the past few years, what is the trend in program choices that
parents have requested? (Please provide numbers.) Are the program models offered at your school aligned with parent requests? If no,
why not? How will you build alignment between parent choice and program offerings? Describe specific steps underway. 
In P.S.234Q the majority of parents (about 91% of parents) indicated the ESL program model as their first choice. A nominal
number of parents requested the Spanish, Arabic, and Bengali bilingual education program model as well as a Dual Language
Program, yet this number does not meet the legal criteria to create a bilingual or a dual language class. Follow up orientations a
conducted to insure parent participation. Additionally, parents are contacted by phone to inform them about the importance of
program selection, for their children, and their attendance to the orientation.
Once the parents select the model they prefer, those selecting bilingual or dual language are invited to meet with the ESL
coordinator. The ESL coordinator informs them about the options available to them. They could opt to transfer the child to a school
where the selected model is available. They are also informed that they could sign a transfer option letter where they can opt to
keep the child within one of the programs available in the school. This, however, is procedure only until the number of parents
selecting their program of choice reaches the number necessary to create a class utilizing the requested model.
If after the school makes all efforts to contact the parents and they still do not attend the orientations. Their failure to contact the
school within the allotted period of time results in the placement of these students in a Transitional Bilingual Program. The parents
are informed of this placement in writing and through phone calls. Parents of ELL students who are currently enrolled in the ESL
program and who do not reach proficiency level in the NYSESLAT, are contacted through a letter informing of them of the results.
They are then instructed on what their choices are in the entitlement letter. The parents could request to have the student continue in
the current program. They also have the option of meeting with the ESL coordinators to discuss a change of program. The students,
whose parents fail to return the entitlement letters and who fail to contact the school, will place in the default program. The default
program for ELL students is the Transitional Bilingual Program. The parents are then informed of this decision through the mail and
or phone contact. 
Page 12
A. Programming and Scheduling Information
1. How is instruction delivered? (see The Practitioners’ Work Group for Accelerating English Language Learner Student Achievement: Nine Common
Features of Successful Programs for ELLs)
a. What are the organizational models (e.g., departmentalized, push-in [co-teaching], pull-out, collaborative, self-contained)?
b. What are the program models (e.g., block [class travels together as a group], ungraded [all students regardless of grade are in
one class], heterogeneous [mixed proficiency levels], homogeneous [proficiency level is the same in one class])?
The programs at P.S. 234 Q have been aligned to a stand alone esl program with the models implemented being the push in and
the pullout along with ELL integrated classrooms..
In the ESL integrated classes the students are grouped heterogeneously with non -ELL students and are instructed by a dually
certified common branch/ESL teachers. The students are then provided with allotted time of 360 minutes of ESL instruction,
within the classroom, for students reaching a beginning and intermediate level. The students reaching an advanced level
receive 180 minutes of ESL instruction. These students receive instruction within their grade levels and in accordance with the
New York State mandates.Generally our ELL student population has been diminishing do to many of them becoming proficient
at all grade levels.The lower number of ELL students per grade called for ELL students to be grouped and placed in an
integrated grouped classroom model where ESL instructional strategies are employed.
In the Push-In model, the classes are serviced in both heterogeneous and homogeneous groups. In the grades where the numbers
allow for advanced students to be homogeneously grouped, a dually certified common branches/ ESL teacher pushes in for
180 minutes of ESL instruction. In the groups that are heterogeneously grouped, a dually certified common branches/ESL
teacher pushes in to provide 360 minutes of ESL instruction allotted for beginners and intermediate students as per the
Mandated Time Allocations.
In the Pull out program:
In the situation where more than one class has ELL students in them and the teachers are not ESL certified, a qualified certified
pedagogue pulls out these students and provides them with allocated periods of ESL instruction according to their levels of
proficiency in English as per the NYSESLAT or LAB-R scores.
 To assure that the mandated number of instructional minutes is provided according to proficiency level P.S. 234 Q carefully
analyzes the LAB-R and the NYSESLAT scores. The scores are used to identify the beginners, intermediate, and advanced
students. Then, the number of minutes of ESL instruction is allotted as required by the New York State mandates.The student are
then placed in classes that comply with the individual needs of each ELL student. Certified pedaguodes are then assigned to
teach these classes and instruct the students according to the determination made for placement and time allocation.
The Push-In Program and self-contained model are the primary models for instructing ELL students at P.S. 234 Q. There are 6 selfcontained
ESL classes in grades K – 5th. Otherwise, students are serviced by push in teachers for the duration of time required
based on their English proficiency levels. At P.S. 234Q, 85% of the ELL population is serviced through the Self contained
Part V: ELL Programming
Page 13
model while the remaining 15% are serviced through the ESL push-in model.
 PS 234Q establishes instructional programs that are based on sound research and have the characteristics of successful
programs. The goal of the ESL program is to develop students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing proficiency so that ESL
student performance is equivalent to that of their comparable native English-speaking peers in all the content areas. Test score
distributions of ESL students and native English speakers, initially quite different at the beginning of their school years, should
be equivalent by the end of their
school years as measured by on-grade-level tests of all school subjects administered. Furthermore the ESL program delivered, at
PS 234Q, is tailored to students’ levels and needs. A variety of ESL strategies are implemented in all ESL models used at P.S.
234 Q. Among the strategies are scaffolding, Total Physical Response, strategic grouping, the use of visual and audio aides,
the use of graphic organizers, labeling objects, opportunities for oral language development, hands-on activities, and
modeling writing and reading. These strategies are also incorpated in teaching content areas to the ELL population of students
by the same certified professional providing the ESL services.
The ELL students are also afforded the instruction in ELA as the rest of the student population. This include all the components being
taught to general education classes. ELL students are immersed in literacy to assure a balanced education and followed the
mandated allocated units of ELA intruction.
 The ELL students identified as Spanish speakers are provided with the Spanish LAB-R to determine their level of proficiency in
their native language. The ELL population of students is also provided with native language libraries in all the classrooms at
PS 234. This to provide the academic support the ELL students need as they work to achieve proficiency in english. During
testing the students are provided with glossaries in their native language as well as translation services when required.
2. How does the organization of your staff ensure that the mandated number of instructional minutes is provided according to
proficiency levels in each program model (TBE, Dual Language, ESL)?
a. How are explicit ESL, ELA, and NLA instructional minutes delivered in each program model as per CR Part 154 (see table
below)?
 To assure that the mandated number of instructional minutes is provided according to proficiency level P.S. 234 Q carefully
analyzes the LAB-R and the NYSESLAT scores. The scores are used to identify the beginners, intermediate, and advanced students.
Then, the number of minutes of ESL instruction is allotted as required by the New York State mandates. The beginning and
intermediate students receive the mandated time of 360 minutes while the advanced students receive the mandated time of 180
minutes. The student are then placed in classes that comply with the individual needs of each ELL student. Certified pedaguodes
are then assigned to teach these classes and instruct the students according to the determination made for placement and time
allocation.
The Push-In Program and integrated ELL model are the primary models for instructing ELL students at P.S. 234 Q. There are 8 push
in ESL classes and 6 pull out ESL classes in grades K – 5th. Otherwise, the students are serviced in an integrated classroom by a
dually certified teacher.
3. Describe how the content areas are delivered in each program model. Please specify language, and the instructional approaches and
methods used to make content comprehensible to foster language development and meet the demands of the Common Core Learning
Standards.
Instructional support in the content areas is provided for ELLs through the use of different resources. For math the Go Math
curriculum is used from grades K-5. Math manipulative and hands on lessons are used to scaffold ELL’s learning. In each lesson
vocabulary is simplified and lessons are modified to ensure students’ understanding. For literacy, we have adopted the Teachers
College Writing Workshop Model and the Ready Gen reading series. Included within the Ready Gen series are an ESL component
along with spelling, grammar and practice workbooks that support the students learning. Each classroom also maintains leveled
libraries and native language libraries. In addition, we have other literacy supplies such as the Avenues series, the Skills books
series, Practice Basic Skills in English series, Language Patterns and Usage series, and SRA series. To supplement the Treasure
Chest reading series is maintain and implemented during the 371/2 minutes period. The ELL students are also provided the
opportunity of participating in a Social Studies and Science test preparation program as well as a Math test preparation program.
Additionally the ELL population is supported through after school programs design to enhance their language skills as well as their
content area skills. . The English as a Second Language (ESL) program, at PS 234Q, has been designed to meet these unique
language needs of ELL students. By addressing the unique language needs of ESL students, the program enables these students to
have the same opportunity to attain the academic success as their native English-speaking peers. The ESL program has been
designed to provide a comprehensive program of instruction so that ESL students can attain the goals and benchmarks as set forth
in the National Core Standards as well as the New York State standards. The specific goals of the ESL program are: 1) to provide
ESL students with equal opportunity and access to services so that they may become fully proficient in English and 2) to ensure that
ESL students reach full educational parity with comparable native-English speakers by the time they reach the end of their school 
Page 14
career.
4. How do you ensure that ELLs are appropriately evaluated in their native languages throughout the year?
The ELL students whose home language is spanish and do not reach proficiency in english as per the LAB-R assessment are
evaluated in their native language within 10 days of entering the New York City school system. Students with languages other than
spanish are not required to be test in their native language. Although this is the case PS 234Q makes an effort to reach out to any
staff member and the child's family to determine if the student has academic abilities in their native language. This determination is
taken into consideration when the student is placed in the program. The classrooms at PS 234 have been equipted with native
language libraries in an effort to support our students learning and academic abilities that will later be transferred to their second
language.
5. How do you ensure that ELLs are appropriately evaluated in all four modalities of English acquisition throughout the year?
Assessment of the ESL population is both formal and informal and is ongoing throughout the year. The ESL teachers, often in
conjunction with their regular classroom teachers, administer these assessments. The Fountas and Pinell assessment system is utilized
as the initial classroom assessment to determine the ELL students levels in literacy. This include the four modalities of language which
include reading, writing, speaking and listening. The ESL teachers are in frequent contact with their core academic teachers to
evaluate both academic and social progress that in turn informs their teaching practice. The Fountas and Pinell assessment is done 3
times per year. The NYSESLAT is administered to ALL ELL students and the results of this test determine their level of services for
the following year.
The ESL teacher closely monitors the ELL students’ academic progress. This is done through frequent contact with the core teachers
who work with the ESL. Students in K-5 also take a series of NYS assessments such as the periodic assessment. These scores are also
used by the ESL teacher to help determine the progress in the core subjects. A meeting with the core teachers is scheduled in order
to review the overall performance of the ELL. The NYSESLAT is the culminating assessment used to determine progress in English
thatis used to determine placement for the following year.
6. How do you differentiate instruction for ELL subgroups?
a. Describe your instructional plan for SIFE.
b. Describe your plan for ELLs who have been in US schools less than three years (newcomers)..
c. Describe your plan for ELLs receiving service 4 to 6 years.
d. Describe your plan for long-term ELLs (completed 6+ years).
e. Describe your plan for former ELLs (in years 1 and 2 after testing proficient).
Plan for Sub-groups intructional differentiation.
A. Our plan for SIFE ELLS ensures proper placement and additional support in order to ease their transition. The SIFE students are
informally assessed in order to identify their current proficiency level. Once a student’s level has been determined, they are placed in a
class accordingly. Support is given through either a self contained ESL classroom, or through the help of the ESL push-in teacher. These
teachers use a variety of strategies which includes but is not limited to the use of the Open Court phonic series, vocabulary building,
grammar and comprehension skills through the Reading for Concepts series, the Treasure Chest Reading series which provides the ELL
students with additional support to master the English language and SRA for the development of specific reading and language skills. The
ELL population is also supported through the use of the ESL component of Reading Streets which is the current reading program utilized at
PS 234Q. ELL students are exposed to a variety of learning materials that include listening, speaking, reading and writing through the use
of the Language/Learning LAB. SIFE students are given priority consideration for placement in the after school program. The ELL students
will be attending an extra 50 minutes Tuesday and Wednesdays, which will be utilized to provide extra instructional support.
B. Plan for Newcomers( ELLs).
The ELL newcomers are given the opportunity to participate in the after school programs and Inquiry program. This provides them
with more exposure to the English language. While receiving more individualized attention by the teachers, as the groups are smaller. In
addition, these children will continue attending an extra 37½ minutes, which will be utilized to provide extra instructional support. Within
the regular schedule, the teachers provide the students with individualized instruction to help the student with lessons that address their level
of proficiency. The newcomers are placed within ESL classrooms that provide the proper setting for language development. Students are
able to interact with other students of different English proficiency levels. The variance of levels in the classroom allows the teacher to group
the students strategically. These students are also provided with books and other necessary materials to scaffold their learning. These
include the Avenues series, Language Patterns and Usage series, Write Away Skills Book and the Treasure Chest Reading Series. Through
the use of these series, the students develop vocabulary, grammar and other language skills. These students are also given the opportunity
to read books and respond to them in their native languages (when available). The classroom libraries are being enhanced with books in
languages other than English. This allows the newcomers to continue developing their skills in the native language which will eventually be
transferred to the second language. At the same time, this methodology keeps their interest level high and builds their self-esteem. 
Page 15
The ESL licensed teachers provide professional development to teachers working with the ELLs. They are provided with information
on how to make the transition of the newcomers into a new culture and language smoother.


C. Plan for 4-6 years ELLS.
The population of ELLs in the program for 4-6 years is identified and provided with the necessary support to aide in reaching their
goal of English language proficiency. Once identified, these students are provided with intervention services designed to differentiate
instruction to their individual needs. Intervention specialists conduct pre-testing for the diagnosis of the students needs which are then
addressed through small group settings and goal based instruction of these needs. The specialists then conduct post testing to determine
achievement of the goal and the course to be followed for further intervention. These students are also giving ample opportunities to
participate in enrichment activities such as music, art and drama during and after school. This provides the setting students to interact with
the general population of students and receive additional support in language development.
D. Plan for Long Term ELLs.
The number of students in the long term ELL category at P.S. 234 Q is minimal. Our plan for these students is to provide them with
extra support in the classroom. They are provided with intervention services which include extra practice in reading, writing and test taking
skills. They are exposed to higher learning critical thinking activities through project based team teaching by ESL and mainstream classroom
teachers. They are also invited to the After School Program and Saturday Academy for ELLs. Within these programs they are provided
with reinforcement in the four modalities of learning. The ESL teachers utilize computers and other forms of technology to provide the
students with different language practice materials. The use of technology enhances the strategies use and also increases the interest level
of the ELL students. Long term ELLs will also be included in the extra 37½ minutes, which will be utilized to provide extra instructional
support.
Plan for former ELLs 1 to 2 years
Former ELL students meet the definition for a student that scored proficient in the 4 modalities of English as per NYSESLAT. At PS
234Q these students are afforded the opportunity to receive additional support by being placed in classrooms where dually licensed
teachers, CB and ESL, provide ESL instruction to ELL and Former ELL students. These Students are also given the opportunitty to participate in
after school programs designed for ELL students. Additionally, these students receive suport with materials that are appropriate and helpful
in continuing to develop their academic language skills in English. Additionally the formen ELL students are afforded time extension
accomodations for state tests such ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies.
7. What instructional strategies and grade-level materials do teachers of ELL-SWDs use that both provide access to academic content
areas and accelerate English language development?
PS 234 takes pride in providing our students with the most up to date learning tools. Firstly all the pedagogues servicing these
students are provided with a copy of the IEP for the particular students. The teachers become familiar with the goals and needs of
the students and plan accordingly utilizing the data obtained through the various assessment tools. The ESL services are determined
throgh the NYSESLAT or LAB-R scores. For the last 3 years, all the classrooms in our school have been equipped with Promethean
Boards. This tool will be utilized to develop and conduct lessons that will address the learning styles of all students through
differentiated instruction. At the same time data is obtained and then analyzed to assure the development of new goals as the
student progresses. Furthermore the students have access to laptop computers that served as tools for the teacher to address the
needs of the individual students. The four modalities of ESL Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening are addressed through
differentiated lessons. These and other technologies are utilized to enhance teaching throughout the core curriculum and as
additional support for ELL and general education students. Two additional laptop computer carts have been added to our
increasing collection to further support our student population, in their learning, with the latest technology.
8. How does your school use curricular, instructional, and scheduling flexibility to enable diverse ELL-SWDs to achieve their IEP goals
and attain English proficiency within the least restrictive environment?
The programs offered at PS 234Q for ELL students are aligned to the New York State ESL standards. All the materials and lessons
are developed to be age appropriate as well as level appropriate for the individual needs of the students. The ELL students are
also supported by various specialists who provide IEP services for those children who are identified to have special needs. They
also receive guidance and other services when necessary. Translation services are also provided as the individual cases might
require. 
Page 16
Courses Taught in Languages Other than English 
NOTE: This section refers to classes/subject areas in which the language of instruction is English and another language which all students in the class
speak. Do not include:
 classes that are taught in English using books in the native language
 heritage classes
 foreign language (LOTE) classes
Class/Content Area Language(s) of Instruction Class/Content Area Language(s) of Instruction
Native Language Arts:
Social Studies:
Math:
Science:
NYS CR Part 154 Mandated Number of Units of Support for ELLs, Grades K-8
Beginning Intermediate Advanced
ESL instruction for all ELLs as required under
CR Part 154
360 minutes
per week
360 minutes
per week
180 minutes
per week
ELA instruction for all ELLs as required under
CR Part 154
180 minutes
per week
FOR TBE /DL PROGRAMS:
Native Language Arts 45 minutes per day 45 minutes per day 45 minutes per day
NYS CR Part 154 Mandated Number of Units of Support for ELLs, Grades 9-12
Beginning Intermediate Advanced
ESL instruction for all ELLs as required under
CR Part 154
540 minutes
per week
360 minutes
per week
180 minutes
per week
ELA instruction for all ELLs as required under
CR Part 154
180 minutes
per week
FOR TBE /DL PROGRAMS:
Native Language Arts 45 minutes per day 45 minutes per day 45 minutes per day
Native Language Usage and Supports
The chart below is a visual representation designed to show the variation of native language usage and supports
across the program models. Please note that native language support is never zero.
Native Language Usage/Support Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE)
100%
75%
50%
25%
Dual Language
100%
75%
50%
25%
Page 17
Freestanding ESL
100%
75%
50%
25%
TIME BEGINNERS INTERMEDIATE ADVANCED
TBE and dual language programs have both native language arts and subject areas taught in the native language; ESL has
native language supports. 
Page 18
B. Programming and Scheduling Information--Continued
9. Describe your targeted intervention programs for ELLs in ELA, math, and other content areas (specify ELL subgroups targeted).
Please list the range of intervention services offered in your school for the above areas as well as the language(s) in which they are
offered.
At P.S. 234, we are currently implementing Response to Intervention which includes the ELL population of students. Being that this
year we shifted to a model where our ELL population is integrated within the general population of students. This affords equal
access to the core curriculum in all subject areas. The RTI model aims at identifying students who are in need of extra support in
addition to the core instruction. All students , including Ells and its subgroups are intitally assessed utilizing a universal screener to
determine the students individual needs. They are then provided with tailored instruction as necessary according to the tier that the
data indicates they should be placed in. In ELA , the RTI model is implemented by an ESL licensed pedagogue who provides
targeted instruction to individual or small group of students who have the same or similar needs. This is done within each tier of
instruction in the RTI model. In Math, ELL students who are also identified as being at risk, receive targeted instruction by an ESL
certified pedagogue who modifies the lessons as necessary to meet the students individual needs according to the tier the data
indicates they should be placed in.
10. Describe the effectiveness of your current program and how it is meeting the needs of your ELLs in both content and language
development.
Currently our school is implementing a model where ELL students are placed in a general education classroom where the ESL
services are provided either through a dually licensed CB/ESL pedagague who provides the mandated ESL services to the ELL
students within the classroom or a pull out/push in model where the ESL certified pedagogue provides these services. This model is
proving successful because when ELL's seem to be struggling, we devise a plan of instruction that addresses the individual need of
the student where they continue to receive core curriculum instruction while also being supported by the use of modified lessons
which address their needs. The Fountas and Pinell assessment system is utilized to determine the progress the ELL students are
making in literacy and language development. This is assessment is done three times a year but is also on going through classroom
lessons and teachers assessments. Additionally the ELL students language development is assessed two times a year through the NY
State Periodic assessments. The data obtained is analyzed and then used in determining the areas of need for individual students
Targetted instruction is then provided to all the ELL students. .
11. What new programs or improvements will be considered for the upcoming school year?
We are currently considering supplementing professional development to include strategies that will help teachers in providing
targeted instruction to ELL students within all areas of study within the RTI model. For example, we will provide teachers with the
knowledge of each Tier in RTI and how to assess, identify and place each student in the appropriate Tier. Furthermore, teachers
wil be taught to select the right intervention according to the specific students' needs.
12. What programs/services for ELLs will be discontinued and why?
Self- contained classrooms have been discontinued because ELLS were not being afforded the opportuniites to fully participate in
all educational aspects available at PS 234. As per the mandate, ELL's should be provided ample opportunities to equally
participate in all academic, social and extra curriculur activities. The ELA and Math State Test results were not satifactory for our
ELL polution and the expectations PS 234 has is to give all students the opportunity to achieve and obtain score at on beyond State
as well as national expections through the CCLS. This change will provide ELL students the opportunity to be exposed to all
academic and social facets necessary in developing their skill and knowledge in all areas. This will ultimately lead into high
performing ELL students in all areas of study as well as in their social life.
13. How are ELLs afforded equal access to all school programs? Describe after school and supplemental services offered to ELLs in your
building.
This year and every year, ELL students are included in all after school programs which offer test preparation, extra curiiculur and
enrichment activities. Additionally , ELLS are able to participate in the dance/drama classes as well as art and other programs
offered by PS 234. Furthermore PS 234Q has adopted the integrated classroom where ELLs are placed within a classroom with the
general population of students where they are afforded the opportunity to participate in all the academic, social and extracurricular
activities PS 234Q has to offer. These classes are serviced by either dually licensed teachers or have licensed teachers
pushin to service the ELL students in these classrooms..
14. What instructional materials, including technology, are used to support ELLs (include content area as well as language materials; list
ELL subgroups if necessary)?
PS 234 has installed a promethean board in every classroom in order to provide teachers with a technological tool which allows
them access to an infinite amount of information. This allows for the implementation of highly effective lessons inclusive of visual,
auditory, TPR, and hands on activities. Furhermore, PS 234 has purchased computer carts which includes a lap top for each student
within a classroom.This use of technology is geared toward helping our students, including ELLS, to be college and career ready.
15. How is native language support delivered in each program model (TBE, Dual Language, and ESL)?
The ELL students identified as spanish speakers are provided with the Spanish LAB-R to determine their level of proficiency in their 
Page 19
native language. The ELL population of students is also provided with native language libraries in all the classrooms at PS 234. This
to provide the academic support the ELL students need as they work to achieve proficiency in english. During, content area, testing
the students are provided with glossaries in their native language as well as translation services when required.
16. Explain how the required services support, and resources correspond to ELLs’ ages and grade levels?
 At PS 234, teaching strategies, questioning, and routines are strategically differentiated so that all learners, including students
with disabilities and ELLS, have multiple entry points, supports, and extensions into the curricula according to grade and language
levels. New understandings are built on previous understandings .For example, an intermediate ELL student who understands how to
compose sentences is getting ready to create paragraphs. Therefore, the ELL instructor modifies the lesson to provide this student
with support in paragraph writing/formation.
17. Describe activities in your school that assist newly enrolled ELL students before the beginning of the school year. Please include
activities for new ELLs who enroll throughout the school year.
At PS234Q the parents of in coming ELL students are provided with an orientation and school tour of our facilities. Parents are also
inform of our the various available at our school. Our parent coordinator as well as the school nurse also provide workshops through
out the year where parents of new ELL student receive information of activities and programs ,in the school and neighborhood,
whick can benefic their children educationally and socially. This to assure the exposure of these students to cultural and educatinal
activities in this road of language acquisition.
18. What language electives are offered to ELLs?
Language electives are not applicable to PS 234Q yet we offer the ELL students the opportunity to select reading and other
materials in their native languages as we have provided each classrooms in our school with native language libraries.
19. For schools with dual language programs:
a. How much time (%) is the target language used for EPs and ELLs in each grade?
b. How much of the instructional day are EPs and ELLs integrated? What content areas are taught separately?
c. How is language separated for instruction (time, subject, teacher, theme)?
d. What Dual Language model is used (side-by-side, self-contained, other)?
e. Is emergent literacy taught in child’s native language first (sequential), or are both languages taught at the same time
(simultaneous)?
Paste response to questions here: 
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C. Professional Development and Support for School Staff
1. Describe the professional development plan for all ELL personnel at the school. (Please include all teachers of ELLs.)
2. What professional development is offered to teachers of ELLs (including ESL and bilingual teachers) in supporting ELLs as they
engage in the Common Core Learning Standards?
3. What support do you provide staff to assist ELLs as they transition from elementary to middle and/or middle to high school?
4. Describe the minimum 7.5 hours of ELL training (10 hours for special education teachers) for all staff (including non-ELL teachers)
as per Jose P.
The ESL department offers Professional development to school’s staff. During this training the staff is provided with information on
how ELL students are identified and placed. ESL teachers will also conduct training, for assistant principals, paraprofessionals, guidance
counselors, secretaries, parent coordinator and teachers working with ELLs to provide them with the knowledge of implementing ESL
strategies in their classroom. In addition they will be trained in utilizing the ESL components of the Ready Gen and the Treasure Chest
series. During these professional development sessions, additional training is provided to teachers to enhance teaching the content areas
to ELL students while incorporating the Common Core Standards in their lessons..
P.S.234 Professional Development Program will focus on providing teachers with scaffolding and differentiated instruction
strategies for teaching English Language Learners. A tremendous focus will be placed on techniques best used to prepare ELLs to meet
and exceed the NYC and NYS performance and learning standards as well as increasing achievement scores on city and statewide
tests. The ESL teachers in the After School Program, as well as monolingual teachers will receive the training necessary to ensure the use
of ESL strategies within the programs and all areas of interaction with ELL students. Participating teachers will be paid the trainee rate
and teacher trainers will be paid at the per session rate. These sessions will be facilitated by ELL licensed personnel and administrators.
The teachers will receive 12 hours of ESL training and will meet and exceed the 7.5 hours mandated by the NYS Education Department.
The participating teachers and other staff members will receive 6 sessions of professional development during days of allocated in
the school calendar. The staff members attending these sessions will receive certificates and agendas indicating their participation and
the number of hours obtained. The ESL department will maintained a record of attendance signed by the participating members.
Additionally copies of the agenda will be filed.
Topics that will be addressed during these professional development sessions are as follow:
1. Two 2-hour professional development sessions will be devoted to Scaffolding across the Disciplines: Types of Scaffolding.
2. One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to Differentiated Instructional Strategies and implementation
of the CCLS in each area of studies.
3. One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to the strategies needed to prepare ELLs to meet the city
and state standards and to gain a clear understanding of the NYSESLAT.
4. One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to the instructional strategies needed to increase Native
Language literacy skills and to prepare for the ELE.
5. One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to mathematical instructional strategies to develop and
enhance students’ skills and performance on the city and state assessments.Paste response to questions 1-3 here
6. Eight 2 hour sessions of professional development in ELL RTI.
Additionally our teachers will be instructed to focus and increase the cognitive language skills of ELL students. This along with
vocabulary development in english and the content areas. The aim of this approach being the smooth transition of these students to the
higher level of education in Junior high school as well as high school. The ELL students then be able to function without any difficulties in
the new setting.
The parcipating staff members will also be trained in preparing the students in transitioning from elementary school to middle
school. Classroom trips will focus in visiting middle schools to give the students exposure to their future educational environment.
Additionally the staff will be exposed to activities aimed at preparing the students as well as their parents in selecting an appropriate
middle school.
The teachers participating in these professional development are provided with certificates indicating their participation and the
number of hours of PD received. The provider of the PD also maintains records of the participating teachers and the hours accumulated
by each individual teacher in the ESL files binder.
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D. Parental Involvement
1. Describe ELL parent involvement in your school. Include specific activities that foster parental involvement for parents of ELLs.
2. Does the school partner with other agencies or Community Based Organizations to provide workshops or services to ELL parents?
3. How do you evaluate the needs of the parents?
4. How do your parental involvement activities address the needs of the parents?
Parent/community involvement:
PS 234 begins parent participation with a parent orientation meeting. For this meeting we send out letters in different languages.
During the meeting videos are shown in different languages to the parents to facilitate discussion of different program options
offered. Pamphlets, in different languages outlining the program options including Bilingual, Accelerated Academic English Model
and Dual Language/Two-Way Model, are distributed. Translators are provided to assist the parents to better understand the
program options and any other questions needing to be answered. Orientations for parents are held twice a year. One is held in
the fall and another is held in the spring. During the year the parents of new comers are also provided with similar information
and orientation in English and the native language as identified in the home language survey. Most of the translations are done
by certified teachers in our school who speak a second language or by translators provided by the Department of Education.
Translation services are provided to parents during the registration process in order to have them understand and complete the
necessary forms including the home language survey.
ESL classes for parents and adult members of the community are offered, during the school week, throughout the year. Parentteacher
conferences are scheduled and conducted twice a year. Additional individual conferences are held according to student
needs in order to collaborate in enhancing children’s language acquisition needs. Parents are also able to visit their children's
classrooms and teachers during the first Thursday of the month. Parents are able to observe lessons and their children's
participation within the classroom setting.
The parent coordinator in collaboration with the ESL department, conduct a series of workshops geared towards giving them an
understanding on how to help their children become better learners. The workshops include Literacy through the Arts. Ijn this
workshops children and their parents are invited to participate in activities designed to bring awareness of how parent and child
can practice literacy skills while doing fun activities. Another workshop conducted is the Homework Help. In this workshop parents
are given the opportunity to be trained, along side their children, in helping their child with homework. Additional workshop include
the introduction to the Ready Gen Curriculum as well as the Go math curriculum. The programs are explained to parents and are
adviced on what the expectations are and the role they should play in the implementation of these curriculums. Other workshops,
such as Getting Your Child Ready for the NYSESLAT, provide the parents with knowledge about the testing procedures and how
their children can become better at taking tests.
All the workshop notices are distributed in different languages and translation is also provided at the workshops. Community
Based Organizations hold workshops throughout the year to provide fire safety, health insurance coverage and library use
instruction to the parents and children. The organization Inside Broadway cooperates with PS 234Q to bring theater productions
geared towards the development of speaking, acting, reading, writing as well as listening skills. Another partner organization is
Ballet Tech. This organization promotes dancing, singing as well as other academic skills. Children participate and sometimes
selected to attend classes at their organization's headquarters. An additional organization is St. Johns University. St Johns provides
PS 234Q with the strategic training of teachers to provide intruction to ELL students. The parent coordinator also holds PTA
meetings monthly. Within these meetings ELL students are able to participate and receive awards such as student of the month
among others. Multicultural activities such as Dessert Night and Family Night Dinner are held every year to enable the ELL
community to come in contact with the other communities in the neighborhood. Boys and Girls Club offers homework assistance and
provide child-care and recreation to the students. Math and Literacy workshops are offered where the ELL parents are invited to
attend to learn how to assist their children and be actively involved with their child’s learning process. With these efforts, the
school, parents and the community are able to work together towards increasing the enhancement and well being of the student
population.
PS234Q takes provide in trying to provide parents with support and assistant necessary to make their childrens' learning
experience successful, challenging and fun. Through the language surveys we identify the preferred language of communication
from school to home as requested by them when filing these forms. Additionally, at SLT meetings, the parents have input in
selecting the type of workshops that would benefit parents the most in assisting them in supporting their childrens' education.
Furthermore our parent coordinator conducts surveys that inform us of the concerns and needs parents might have. Through this
communication we were able to develop the Homework Help workshops through which parents are trained in helping their children
with their homework. Additionally we conducted the Ready Gen and Go Math workshops to address the parents concern with the
new curriculum and CCLS alignment. On going home-school communication is a policy at PS 234Q and the doors are open to the
development of other workshops and activities that help to support the ELL students' educational needs and assist their parents in
supporting this effort.
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E. Additional Information
Please include any additional information that would be relevant to your LAP and would further explain your program for ELLs. You may
attach/submit charts. This form does not allow graphics and charts to be pasted.
Paste response to question here:
Part VI: LAP Assurances
Page 23
School Name: School DBN:
Signatures of LAP team members certify that the information provided is accurate.
Name (PRINT) Title Signature Date (mm/dd/yy)
Principal
Assistant Principal
Parent Coordinator
ESL Teacher
Parent
Teacher/Subject Area
Teacher/Subject Area
Coach
Coach
Guidance Counselor
Network Leader
Other
Other
Other
Other

2013-2014
COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL PLAN
(CEP)
UPDATED 2014-2015
School Name: P.S. 234
DBN (i.e. 01M001): 30Q234
Principal: DORA DANNER
Principal Email: DDANNER@SCHOOLS.NYC.GOV
Superintendent: DR. P. COMPOSTO
Network Leader: NANCY DI MAGGIO
School Leadership Team (SLT) Signature Page
Use this page to identify SLT members and confirm their participation in the development of this Comprehensive
Educational Plan (CEP), which includes goals and action plans, a summary of Academic Intervention Services (AIS),
and the Parent Involvement Policy (PIP). The signatures of SLT members indicate their participation in the development
of the CEP and serve as confirmation that consultation has occurred to align funding in support of educational
programs. The SLT must include an equal number of parents and staff and have a minimum of 10 and a maximum of
17 members, in accordance with the Chancellor’s Regulation A-655, available on the NYC DOE Web site.
Directions:
1. List each SLT member in the left-hand column on the chart below. Specify any position held by the team
member, e.g., Chairperson, SLT Secretary and the constituent group represented, e.g., parent, staff, student, or
CBO. Core mandatory SLT members are indicated by an asterisk*.
2. Ensure that SLT members review this document and sign in the right-hand column in blue ink. If an SLT
member does not wish to sign this plan, he/she may attach a written explanation in lieu of his/her signature**.
3. Add rows as needed to ensure that all SLT members are listed.
4. The original copy, along with any written communications pertaining to this page, is to remain on file in the
principal’s office and be made available upon written request.
5. Names of SLT members must be added to this form for posting. The signed original document must be
maintained on file at the school.
Name Position and Constituent Group
Represented Signature
Dora Danner *Principal or Designee
Sonya Gimondo *UFT Chapter Leader or
Designee
Rebecca Staley *PA/PTA President or Designated
Co-President
DC 37 Representative, if
applicable
Student Representative (optional
for elementary and middle
schools; a minimum of two
members required for high
schools)
CBO Representative, if applicable
Peggy P. Mouzakitis Member/ Assistant Principal
Donna Jackson Member/ Paraprofessiona
Giovanna Trotta Member/ PTA Co-President
Domenica Cresta Member/ PTA 
Awatef Ibrahim Member/ PTA
Christie Karalekis Member/(PTA)
Carmela Riconda Member/ Teacher Chair
**Signature of constituent only indicates participation in the development of the CEP, not approval. Note: If for any
reason a SLT member does not wish to sign this plan, he/she may attach an explanation in lieu of his/her signature
which must be maintained on file at the school with the original SLT signature page.
Comprehensive Education Plan (CEP) Requirements
Which Schools Need to Complete the CEP?
All Reward, Recognition, In Good Standing and Local Assistance Plan (LAP) schools should identify and submit annual goals and
action plans in consultation with their School Leadership Team (SLT).
 Explicitly delineate the school’s plan for annually increasing student performance through comprehensive instructional
programs and services as well as the plan for enhancement of teacher and leader effectiveness.
 Address how the school will use its full range of resources (which may include but is not limited to Title I, Title II, and/or Title III,
1003(a) and/or 1003(g) School Improvement, Race to the Top, School Innovation or local funds) to support improvement efforts
for the identified sub-group(s) on the identified accountability measures.
 Develop the CEP in consultation with parents, school staff, the School Leadership Team (SLT), and others in accordance with
the requirements of Chancellor’s Regulations A-655 to provide a meaningful opportunity for stakeholders to participate in the
development of the plan and comment on the CEP before it is approved.
 Align the identified goals to the strategies and activities in your Parent Involvement Policy (PIP). The PIP template is provided
on pages 12 and 13. Your school is encouraged to use the template as it is provided, or align it in accordance with your
school’s goals, or replace it entirely with a Parent Involvement Policy created by your school that meets federal requirements.
You may use or amend relevant sections of your PIP so they directly align to the parent involvement activities that support each
goal and action plan. All schools should cite strategies to increase parent involvement that align to the goal when applicable.
Title I schools should reference these strategies and activities in the school’s Title I Parent Involvement Policy (PIP).
Guidance for Developing Completing the Annual Goals and Action Plan Section
Goal setting for the CEP is done in collaboration with the school community to support student achievement and the implementation
of school-wide goals as well as document how your school is meeting Federal, State, and City regulations. For SY 2013-14 when
developing their goals, schools should do the following:
 Identify a minimum of three and a maximum of five annual goals.
 Align their goals with the current citywide instructional expectations.
 Develop goals that are “SMART” - specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound.
 Conduct a needs assessment of your school
 Use quantitative and/or qualitative data in providing the rationale for each goal.
 Cite sources that contributed to the rationale such as the Progress Report, Quality Review, School Survey, state and school
assessment results, attendance records, inquiry team work, etc. to form the basis of your needs assessment.
 Cite the strategies and activities within each goal and action plan requires your school to in your Parent Involvement Policy
(PIP) that will be implemented to achieve the goal identified. The PIP template is provided on pages 12 and 13. Your school is
encouraged to use the template as it is provided, or align it in accordance with your school’s goals, or replace it entirely with a
Parent Involvement Policy created by your school that meets federal requirements. You may use or amend relevant sections of
your PIP directly to respond to the parental involvement section of each goal and action plan.
 Enumerate the strategies and activities that will be implemented to achieve each goal.
 Identify all fund sources that will be used for the completion of each activity.
 List the projected timeline for completion of each activity, including the start and end date of each activity.
 Describe the programmatic details and resources that will be used for each instructional strategy and activity described for each
goal. Do not include the cost for each line-item-expenditure for the strategies and activities listed within the action plans. 
School Receiving Title I Funds
School Wide Program (SWP) and Targeted Assistance (TA) Schools receiving Title I funds are required to complete the Title I
Information Page located on page 11 of the CEP.
CEP Checklist
All Schools
Indicate using an “X” in the box to the left of each section that the section has been completed
X School Leadership Team Signature Page
X
Action Plans 1 – 5 (At least 3 of 5 Action Plans with the following elements)
 Annual Goal
 Comprehensive Needs Assessment
 Instructional Strategies section, A-E for each new strategy or activity that supports the goal
 Budget & Resource Alignment section (indicating all funding sources)
X Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
X Title I Plan (Only for schools receiving Title I funding)
X Parent Involvement Policy (PIP)
Goal and Action Plan #1
Use this template to identify an annual goal. Respond to each section to indicate strategies and activities in support of accomplishing this goal.
Annual Goal #1
Describe a goal you have identified for the year. Refer to the directions and guidance for assistance in developing your goals.
By June 2015, 70% of all ELL students in grades 3-5 will increase by one proficiency level on the Speaking portion of the NYSESLAT Exam
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Describe the identified need that generated this goal. The needs assessment should encompass the entire school and be based on the performance of students, in relation to State
academic content and student achievement standards.
According to NYSESLAT and previous ELL periodic assessment data, ELL students are performing at a lower level in reading and writing strands.
Instructional Strategies/Activities
Describe the research-based school wide reform instructional strategies and activities that will be used to achieve the goal in part A. Enumerate each strategy/activity and its corresponding
subsection in parts B, C, D, and E. For each strategy/activity identified in part A, a corresponding item must be provided in parts B, C, D, and E.
A. Strategies/activities that encompass the needs of identified subgroups
1. Establish professional development for ELL teachers addressing reading and writing strategies that improve student outcomes. Professional Development will include:
Text Complexity, Instructional shifts, Depth of Knowledge, Universal Design for Learning, Curriculum Planning, Differentiated Instruction, and assessments.
2. Develop schedules to support the schools instructional goals giving teachers the common planning time needed to meet with colleagues. Teachers on grade levels
and teacher team members will meet regularly to effectively adjust curriculum and instruction to help students move towards the expectations of Common Core
Learning Standards (CCLS).
3. Principal and faculty engage students and families in reciprocal and ongoing discussions regarding student progress towards meeting school and class expectation.
4. Teachers, teacher teams, administrators, ELL coordinators and the data specialist review students’ reading and writing data for ELL students using the NYSESLAT
test results.
5. Parents are given the opportunity to gain a better understanding of goals and objectives for student learning and to better understand student performance during
parent workshops, parent orientation meetings, conferences and PTA meetings.
6. The ELL department along with classroom teachers, look closely at current student work to understand the steps needed to reach the level of performance that the
Common Core demands using criterion based rubrics.
7. ELL teachers will continue to support literacy by focusing on building grade level vocabulary, CCLS listening comprehension, CCLS writing skills and higher order
thinking skills (i.e. Depth of Knowledge).
8. ELL teachers will participate in teacher team work that analyzes student work using a rubric based approach to share effective strategies with classroom teachers that
will assist with planning and next steps for classroom instruction.
9. Curriculum maps and pacing calendars will be revisited and revised to ensure continuity, rigor of instruction across grades and alignment to Common Core Learning
Standards.
10. Teachers in grades K-5 will be trained to facilitate guided reading groups for students at beginning and intermediate levels and students at advanced reading levels
will participate in book clubs.
11. ELL Coordinator is conducting a year- long series of Parent Workshops on using ELL strategies across content area subjects. Based on ELL data,
a program (Let’s Talk About It) was purchased to increase reading, writing, listening and speaking strategies.
B. Key personnel and other resources used to implement each strategy/activity
1. Administrators provide PD to all ELL teachers. PD is individualized when needed. The CFN and other educational consultants will also assist with PD needs.
2. Administrators create schedules for all teachers.
3. Administrators, teachers, parent coordinator, ELL department communicates with parents and the community
4. Teachers, teacher teams, ELL department, administrators, data specialist.
5. Teachers, administrators, parents and students.
6. ELL department and classroom teachers.
7. ELL teachers, ELL coordinators, and administration
8. ELL teachers and teacher teams
9. Administration and teaching staff
10. Classroom teachers and paraprofessionals.
11. ELL Coordinator, teachers, parents, paraprofessionals, and administration
C. Identify targets to evaluate the progress, effectiveness, and impact of each strategy/activity
1. PD evaluation forms at the conclusion of PD, execution of lesson plans to determine alignment with the Danielson Framework (Domain 3)
2. Unit and curriculum planning maps from team meetings
3. Learning environment survey and student progress reports
4. Student data and test scores.
5. Student progress reports and monthly parent letters
6. Current student work
7. Observations and Danielson’s Framework for teaching rubric.
8. Lesson plans and student work.
9. Curriculum maps and pacing calendars.
10. Student assessment results.
11. Assessment results.
D. Timeline for implementation and completion including start and end dates
1. Professional development will take place weekly on Mondays and Tuesday from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
2. Teachers will meet during weekly common planning time and during professional learning meetings from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
3. Progress reports will be distributed twice annually from September 2014-June 2015.
4. Assessment results are analyzed to create goals from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
5. Progress reports and goals are distributed twice annually from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
6. During teacher team meeting and professional learning meetings, teachers analyze student work ongoing from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
7. ELL teachers will focus on vocabulary ongoing from Sept. 2014- June 2015.
8. ELL teachers will analyze student work ongoing from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
9. Curriculum maps and pacing calendars will be created monthly from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
10. Data driven Guided Reading groups and Book Clubs will be ongoing from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
11. Professional development for parents and teachers will be ongoing from Sept. 2014-June 2015.
E. Describe programmatic details and resources that will be used to support each instructional strategy/activity
1. Programming professional learning workshops for all staff members on Mondays and Tuesdays.
2. Individualized professional development for teachers.
3. Parent involvement will take place during publishing parties, Open School Week, Assemblies, PTA meetings, and other special events.
4. ARIS, School Net, Think Central, and other assessment tools will be used to collect data.
5. Parents will receive progress reports and monthly newsletters.
6. Work will be analyzed during teacher team and RTI meetings.
7. Teachers will enhance vocabulary with the use of laptops, Promethean board, and other supplemental materials.
8. Resources for analyzing work include rubrics aligned with the CCLS, progress monitoring results, Fountas Pinell benchmarks, conference notes and other data from
teacher made assessments.
9. Flexible schedule of ELL Teachers provide push in /pull out opportunities and allotted time for ELL planning.
10. Curriculum maps will be created during Tuesday planning and common prep periods.
11. MONDO Let’s Talk About It program will be used to develop language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing)
Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
All schools should cite strategies to increase parent involvement that aligned to the goal when applicable. Title I schools should reference these activities in your school’s Title I Parent
Involvement Policy (PIP).
• Translate all critical school documents and provide interpretation during meetings and events as needed for all ELL parents, including the activities below.
• Actively involve and engage parents in the planning, review and evaluation of the effectiveness of the school’s Title I program, including the implementation of the
school’s Title I Parent Involvement Policy and School-Parent Compact;
• Engage parents in discussion and decisions regarding the required Title I set-aside funds;
• Ensure that the Title I funds allocated for Parent Involvement are utilized to implement activities and strategies as described in our Parent Involvement Policy and the
School-Parent Compact;
• Parent Workshops will be conducted based on a Parent Needs Assessment Survey with topics that may include: parenting skills, understanding educational
accountability, grade-level curriculum and assessment expectations; literacy, accessing community and support services; and technology training to build parents’ capacity
to help their children at home;
• A newly established Parent Resource room has been launched for the 2014-2015 school year that includes a technology station, a promethean board, information
station, PTA Bulletin board and the Parent Coordinator.
Budget and Resource Alignment
Indicate using an “X” the fund source(s) that your school is using to support the instructional goal.
X Tax Levy Title IA X Title IIA X Title III Set Aside Grants
List any additional fund sources your school is using to support the instructional goal below.
Title 1 SWP, ARRA, School support supplement, contract for excellence funding.
Goal and Action Plan #2
Use this template to identify an annual goal. Respond to each section to indicate strategies and activities in support of accomplishing this goal.
Annual Goal #2
Describe a goal you have identified for the year. Refer to the directions and guidance for assistance in developing your goals.
By June 2015, 57% of students in grades 3-5 will reflect an average score of 3.2 in meeting state standards on the English Language Arts Assessment.
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Describe the identified need that generated this goal. The needs assessment should encompass the entire school and be based on the performance of students, in relation to State
academic content and student achievement standards.
In the school year 2013-2014, there were 52% of grades 3-5 students who met state standards in ELA with and average score of 3.0.
Implications from Item Skills analysis common core state exam:
Students in all grades need to explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. Students in all grades will refer to details and
examples.
Instructional Strategies/Activities
Describe the research-based school wide reform instructional strategies and activities that will be used to achieve the goal in part A. Enumerate each strategy/activity and its corresponding
subsection in parts B, C, D, and E. For each strategy/activity identified in part A, a corresponding item must be provided in parts B, C, D, and E.
A. Strategies/activities that encompass the needs of identified subgroups
1. Teachers will participate on teacher teams examining student work making instructional decisions to improve student progress.
2. Teachers will design and deliver instruction using multiple entry points and a variety of strategies based on students’ needs.
3. Student performance and progress will be monitored through pre/post assessments aligned to the Ready Gen program.
4. NYC Performance Tasks (MOSL) will also be used to measure student progress.
5. Students at risk, in particular, those students not meeting grade level standards, Special Education Students, English Language Learners and those students who
represent the lowest third participate in additional targeted instruction.
6. Teachers developed a plan for their Professional Learning opportunities based on survey results provided by the Professional Learning Committee.
7. Teachers will facilitate Professional Learning sessions based on their professional needs and strengths. Individualized teacher PD plans will be developed on an as
needed basis.
8. Teachers utilize professional learning opportunities to develop curriculum writing plans.
9. Teachers will use “Mentoring Minds” to develop students’ language skills such as vocabulary that will support writing skills.
B. Key personnel and other resources used to implement each strategy/activity
1. Administration, CFN 202, ESL Department, teacher and Instructional Leaders, and paraprofessionals will develop curriculum and lesson plans.
2. Administration and teachers will conduct learning rounds to promote collaboration and discuss best practice strategies through noticing and wondering directly related
to Common Core Learning Standards.
3. The Data Specialist will collect data from existing management systems, conducting assessment item analysis and assisting administration
in how best to utilize that data to improve student learning outcomes.
4. Teachers provide intervention for students as needed in and out of the classroom.
5. School Administrators will monitor student learning by collecting teacher data binders, conferencing with teachers, reviewing MOSL assessments,
and through frequent classroom visits using The Framework for Teaching as an evaluation tool.
6. Parents will be invited to Parent Teacher Conferences, orientation meetings, PTA, SLT, and workshops to review and learn about best practices in ELA.
7. Meet at least bi monthly with PPT, Special Education Liaison and Reading teacher to ensure that students with IEP’s or special needs are provided with
the supports and resources needed to succeed. Conference with teachers to make sure that all students who need extra support are receiving ongoing AIS services
including extended day.
C. Identify targets to evaluate the progress, effectiveness, and impact of each strategy/activity
1. Pre/Post unit assessments, ongoing formative assessments and performance on CCLS aligned tasks.
2. Teacher team agendas and minutes
3. Teacher reflection surveys collected after each professional learning session.
4. Lesson plans and student work will be evaluated through observations.
5. Administration and faculty will engage students and families in reciprocal and ongoing discussions regarding student progress towards meeting
6. grade level expectations
7. K-5 MOSL assessments in Fall and Spring to assess student growth.
8. Running records for independent reading evaluation will be implemented 2-3 times a year to assess progress
D. Timeline for implementation and completion including start and end dates
1. ELA skills will be assessed using the NYC Performance Task from September 2014 to June 2015.
2. Professional Learning strategies will be ongoing from September 2014 to June 2015.
3. Curriculum maps will be developed, modified and utilized continuously ongoing from September 2014 to June 2015.
4. Formal/Informal observations and Learning Rounds from September 2014-June 2015
5. September 2014-June 2015
6. September 2014-June 2015
7. September 2014-June 2015
E. Describe programmatic details and resources that will be used to support each instructional strategy/activity
1. Teachers meet every Monday afternoon for professional learning and evaluation of assessments
2. Teacher teams meet every Tuesday afternoon for 75 minutes.
3. Teachers meet on Monday afternoons for school-wide professional learning.
4. Formal/Informal observations and Learning Rounds
5. Develop schedules to support instructional goals.
6. Common planning time will be scheduled so teachers can meet on a regular basis to develop rubrics that align to the DOE / CCLS standards for
7. Informational and opinion writing and response to literature.
8. Teachers will share best practices and plan units of study in ELA.
Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
All schools should cite strategies to increase parent involvement that aligned to the goal when applicable. Title I schools should reference these activities in your school’s Title I Parent
Involvement Policy (PIP).
• Conduct parent workshops with topics that may include: understanding educational accountability, grade-level curriculum and assessment expectations; CCLS and
related tasks; literacy; and technology training to build parents’ capacity to help their children at home
• Schedule additional parent meetings (e.g., quarterly meetings, with flexible times, such as meetings in the morning or evening, to share information about the school’s
educational program and other initiatives of the Chancellor and allow parents to provide suggestions;
• Translate all critical school documents and provide interpretation during meetings and events as needed;
• Meet with parents during Tuesday afternoon parental involvement time.
• PS 234Q school website with online resources for parents.
Budget and Resource Alignment
Indicate using an “X” the fund source(s) that your school is using to support the instructional goal.
X Tax Levy Title IA Title IIA X Title III Set Aside Grants
List any additional fund sources your school is using to support the instructional goal below.
Title I SWP, ARRA, School support supplement and contract for excellence funding.
Goal and Action Plan #3
Use this template to identify an annual goal. Respond to each section to indicate strategies and activities in support of accomplishing this goal.
Annual Goal #3
Describe a goal you have identified for the year. Refer to the directions and guidance for assistance in developing your goals.
By June 2015, 85% of students in Grades 3-5 will reflect an average score of 3.7 in meeting State Standards on the NYS Math Assessment.
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Describe the identified need that generated this goal. The needs assessment should encompass the entire school and be based on the performance of students, in relation to State
academic content and student achievement standards.
In the school year 2013-2014 there were 80% of grade 3-5 Students who met state standards in math with an average score of 3.5.
Implications from item skills analysis: Students in all grades need to apply properties of operations; read and write multi-digit whole numbers; solve multi-step word
problems.
Instructional Strategies/Activities
Describe the research-based school wide reform instructional strategies and activities that will be used to achieve the goal in part A. Enumerate each strategy/activity and its corresponding
subsection in parts B, C, D, and E. For each strategy/activity identified in part A, a corresponding item must be provided in parts B, C, D, and E.
A. Strategies/activities that encompass the needs of identified subgroups
1. Teachers incorporate the use of open ended responses and multi steps word problems to engage students in mathematical conversations to raise the level of student
thinking and understanding of mathematical concepts and problem solving strategies.
2. Teacher’s model accountable talk in daily math instruction. While utilizing content based vocabulary and encourage students to share their explanations and
alternative strategies in solving math problems.
3. Data from Go Math assessments and Mathletics will be used to plan instructional math strategies and to differentiate curriculum for small group instruction.
4. Teachers will facilitate professional development modeling mathematics depth of knowledge, instructional shifts, CCLS math standards and various approaches and
strategies to be used in order to enhance instruction and progress. Identify at risk students and plan academic intervention to support classroom instruction in Math
including UDL, RTI and multiple entry points for learning.
5. Teachers will utilize math manipulative in centers and flexible grouping to develop mathematical concepts and problem solving skills and to differentiate instruction.
6. Teachers will model “accountable talk” in daily math instruction and foster critical thinking skills through discussion and sharing of explanations and
alternative solutions to mathematical problems
B. Key personnel and other resources used to implement each strategy/activity
1. Administration, teacher and Instructional Leaders, paraprofessionals will develop multi step math problems and challenging tasks and higher order thinking questions.
2. Administrators and teachers will evaluate progress and next steps using data from Go Math assessment and content rubrics.
3. Staff will provide professional learning opportunities for all constituents.
4. The Data Specialist will collect data from existing management systems, conducting assessment item analysis and assisting administration and in how best to utilize
that data to improve student learning outcomes. Data specialist will continue to provide training to teachers on the use of ARIS, School Net, Think Central and STARS
along with other assessment tools to access and analyze data.
5. Teachers will incorporate the Mathematics Depth of Knowledge Questioning, Go Math re-teach and enrich resources into their planning and teaching to improve
critical thinking skills.
6. Teachers will continue to incorporate the use of technology, including online resources and tutorials and interactive white boards, as instructional aids in math
instruction.
C. Identify targets to evaluate the progress, effectiveness, and impact of each strategy/activity
1. Student progress and lesson effectiveness will be evaluated through observations, team meetings, learning rounds.
2. Curriculum will be differentiated based on Go Math Assessment data and content specific rubrics.
3. Professional Learning will be individualized based on survey strengths and needs.
4. School leaders will conduct frequent formative classroom observations and provide teachers with formative feedback as per The Framework for Teaching 2014.
5. School leaders will conduct frequent formative classroom observations and provide teachers with formative feedback as per The Framework forTeaching 2014.
D. Timeline for implementation and completion including start and end dates
1. Math techniques, strategies, questions and word problems will be evaluated and utilized continuously from September 2014 to June 2015. Teachers will use student
work samples, and standardized assessments to create interim and long term goals for each student. Target population: K-5. Responsible staff members: teachers,
principal, assistant principals. Timeline September 2014-June 2015.
2. Curriculum maps will be created from September 2014 to June 2015. A school-wide study of the Core Curriculum Learning Standards (CCLS) in mathematics will be
undertaken. On-grade, as well as across-grade opportunities will be used to plan and ensure rigor and scaffolding for student learning. Target population: K-5.
Responsible staff members: teachers, principal, assistant principals.
 Professional development in math will be ongoing from September 2014 to June 2015.
3. Network Specialists will provide teacher workshops to share curricula information, strategies used in the teaching and learning of math and its real world applications.
Our teachers conduct professional development opportunities to increase content knowledge and its application.
4. September 2014 – June 2015
5. September 2014 – June 2015
6. September 2014 – June 2015
E. Describe programmatic details and resources that will be used to support each instructional strategy/activity
1. Teachers meet every Tuesday afternoon for professional learning and evaluation of assessments
2. Teacher teams meet every Tuesday afternoon for 75 minutes.
3. Teachers meet on Monday afternoons for school-wide professional learning.
4. Formal/Informal observations and Learning Rounds.
5. Develop schedules to support instructional goals
6. Common planning time will be scheduled for teachers on the grade to meet weekly to plan instruction, to look at student work, to share ideas and resources and to
discuss the Common Core State Standards.
Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
All schools should cite strategies to increase parent involvement that aligned to the goal when applicable. Title I schools should reference these activities in your school’s Title I Parent
Involvement Policy (PIP).
• Conduct parent workshops with topics that may include: understanding math problems, grade-level curriculum and assessment expectations; Math CCLS and related
tasks; Go Math; and technology training to build parents’ capacity to help their children at home; ThinkCentral and Mathletics math website
• Schedule additional parent meetings (e.g., quarterly meetings, with flexible times, such as meetings in the morning or evening, to share information about the school’s
educational program and other initiatives of the Chancellor and allow parents to provide suggestions.
• Translate all critical school documents and provide interpretation during meetings and events as needed;
• PS 234Q school website with online resources for parents
• Monthly SLT meetings to discuss and ensure the implementation of our CEP goals.
Budget and Resource Alignment
Indicate using an “X” the fund source(s) that your school is using to support the instructional goal.
X Tax Levy Title IA Title IIA X Title III Set Aside Grants
List any additional fund sources your school is using to support the instructional goal below.
Title I SWP, ARRA, Contract for Excellence
Goal and Action Plan #4
Use this template to identify an annual goal. Respond to each section to indicate strategies and activities in support of accomplishing this goal.
Annual Goal #4
Describe a goal you have identified for the year. Refer to the directions and guidance for assistance in developing your goals.
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Describe the identified need that generated this goal. The needs assessment should encompass the entire school and be based on the performance of students, in relation to State
academic content and student achievement standards.
Instructional Strategies/Activities
Describe the research-based school wide reform instructional strategies and activities that will be used to achieve the goal in part A. Enumerate each strategy/activity and its corresponding
subsection in parts B, C, D, and E. For each strategy/activity identified in part A, a corresponding item must be provided in parts B, C, D, and E.
A. Strategies/activities that encompass the needs of identified subgroups
1.
B. Key personnel and other resources used to implement each strategy/activity
1.
C. Identify targets to evaluate the progress, effectiveness, and impact of each strategy/activity
1.
D. Timeline for implementation and completion including start and end dates
1.
E. Describe programmatic details and resources that will be used to support each instructional strategy/activity
1.
Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
All schools should cite strategies to increase parent involvement that aligned to the goal when applicable. Title I schools should reference these activities in your school’s Title I Parent
Involvement Policy (PIP).
Budget and Resource Alignment
Indicate using an “X” the fund source(s) that your school is using to support the instructional goal.
Tax Levy Title IA Title IIA Title III Set Aside Grants
List any additional fund sources your school is using to support the instructional goal below.
Goal and Action Plan #5
Use this template to identify an annual goal. Respond to each section to indicate strategies and activities in support of accomplishing this goal.
Annual Goal #5
Describe a goal you have identified for the year. Refer to the directions and guidance for assistance in developing your goals.
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Describe the identified need that generated this goal. The needs assessment should encompass the entire school and be based on the performance of students, in relation to State
academic content and student achievement standards.
Instructional Strategies/Activities
Describe the research-based school wide reform instructional strategies and activities that will be used to achieve the goal in part A. Enumerate each strategy/activity and its corresponding
subsection in parts B, C, D, and E. For each strategy/activity identified in part A, a corresponding item must be provided in parts B, C, D, and E.
A. Strategies/activities that encompass the needs of identified subgroups
1.
B. Key personnel and other resources used to implement each strategy/activity
1.
C. Identify targets to evaluate the progress, effectiveness, and impact of each strategy/activity
1.
D. Timeline for implementation and completion including start and end dates
1.
E. Describe programmatic details and resources that will be used to support each instructional strategy/activity
1.
Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
All schools should cite strategies to increase parent involvement that aligned to the goal when applicable. Title I schools should reference these activities in your school’s Title I Parent
Involvement Policy (PIP).
Budget and Resource Alignment
Indicate using an “X” the fund source(s) that your school is using to support the instructional goal.
Tax Levy Title IA Title IIA Title III Set Aside Grants
List any additional fund sources your school is using to support the instructional goal below.
Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
Schools need to maintain accurate records of students who are receiving Academic Intervention Services to ensure that students who are not at proficiency receive effective
and timely assistance. These records need to be made available upon request and indicate the total number of students receiving AIS in each subject area listed below and
for each applicable grade in your school.
Description
Type of Academic Intervention
Service (AIS)
Type of Program or strategy (e.g.
repeated readings, interactive
writings, etc.)
Method for delivery of service (e.g.
small group, one-to-one, tutoring,
etc.)
When the service is provided (e.g.
during the school day, before or after
school, etc.)
ELA
Info-PairedTexts; Mondo Guided
reading, interactive writing, Close reads,
text complexity, organizational writing,
word study, Fundations, Wilson, Critical
Thinking for Life, Mentoring Minds.
Small group instruction (push in and pull
out)
RTI in Tier 1, 2, and 3 groups (Tier 1:
whole class, Tier 2 : small group 8:1,
Tier 3: small group 3:1)
One to one instruction
Intervention takes place:
During the school day, extended day
and during afterschool programs
Mathematics
Mathletics, and other supplemental math
materials, hands on learning, problem
solving skills, as well as computational
fluency and accuracy.
Small group instruction (push in and pull
out)
RTI in Tier 1, 2, and 3 groups (Tier 1:
whole class, Tier 2 : small group 8:1,
Tier 3: small group 3:1)
Intervention takes place:
During the school day, extended day
and during afterschool programs
Science
Guided reading, interactive writing,
RTI, close read, text complexity,
organizational writing, word study,
test prep, writing and revisions,
reading comprehension with a focus
on science.
Small group instruction ;
One to one instruction; whole class
Intervention takes place:
During the school day and extended
day program
Social Studies
Guided reading, interactive writing,
RTI, close read, text complexity,
organizational writing, word study,
vocabulary, writing and revisions,
reading comprehension with a focus
on social studies.
Small group instruction ;
One to one instruction; whole class
Intervention takes place:
During the school day and extended
day program
At-risk services (e.g. provided by the
Guidance Counselor, School
Psychologist, Social Worker, etc.)
Read Alouds; Value lessons; Conflict
resolution; antibullying
Small group instruction (push in and pull
out)
One to one instruction; whole class
Intervention takes place:
During the school day, extended day
and during afterschool programs
Title I Information Page (TIP)
For Schools Receiving Title I Funding
 All elements of the All Title I Schools section must be completed*.
 School Wide Program (SWP) schools must also complete the SWP Schools Only section.
 Targeted Assistance (TA) Schools must also complete the TAS Schools Only section
*If a required component is addressed elsewhere in this plan, you may refer to the page number(s) where the response can be
found.
Title I Status
Indicate with an “X” your school’s Title I Status.
X School Wide Program (SWP) Targeted Assistance (TA) Schools Non-Title I
All Title I Schools
Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT)
Describe the strategies and activities including strategies for recruitment, retention, assignments, and support including high quality
professional development that ensures staff is highly qualified.
-Mentoring Programs; Individualized Professional Development Plan for teachers; Cycles of teacher observations (Feedback
Sessions); Instructional Leads/Liaisons attend Professional Development; Classroom Inter-Visitation; Common Planning
period with Staff Developers; In-house professional development during grade and faculty conferences; Collaboration with
H.R. liaison of CFN 202; Interviewing and observing ATR’S and substitute teachers for future vacancies or postings.
High Quality and Ongoing Professional Development
Describe the strategies and activities for high quality professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals, and staff that
enable all students to meet Common Core State Standards (CCSS).
All staff participates in ongoing PD’s throughout the school year. During 2014-15 school year full day PD will take place in
Sept, Nov, and June. All sessions will focus on the alignment of the curriculum to the CCLS and Danielson Framework for
teaching. All staff members will engage in data discussions throughout the school year to identify trends and develop plans to
address the individual and school wide needs of our students.
Coordination and Integration of Federal, State, and Local Services and Programs
Describe how the coordination and integration of Federal, State, and/or local funds are used to meet the intent and purpose programs
whose funds are consolidated ( i.e., services for Students in Temporary Housing (STH), violence prevention programs, housing programs,
Head Start, etc.).
Funds are used to purchase supplies and supplemental materials to support at risk students and students in temporary
housing. Staff salaries – all staff members will be involved in activities to support all learners especially English Language
Learners and Students with Disabilities
SWP Schools Only
Transition Plans to Assist Preschool Children (Elementary Schools Only)
Describe the transition plans used to assist preschool children from early childhood programs to the elementary school program (e.g. aligned
curriculum, joint PD & parent involvement activities, sharing of records/info, early intervention services, etc.).
• Kindergarten Orientation for Pre-Kindergarten parents
• Pre-Kindergarten parents receive information packets on how to assist their child in the transition to Kindergarten
• Pre-K teachers plan lessons in accordance with the Pre-K Common Core Learning Standards
• Parent Coordinator conducts parent involvement workshops
• Pre-K teachers attend city-wide professional development
Measures to Include Teachers in Decisions Regarding Assessments
Describe the decision making process that teachers participate in regarding the use and selection of appropriate multiple assessment
measures and the professional development provided regarding the use of assessment results to improve instruction.
Teachers meet with each other and administrators during professional development sessions to develop assessments,
curriculum adjustment, unit plans and lesson plans.
MOSL committee and UFT representative meet with teaching staff to make decisions on measures of student learning,
assessments, curriculum adjustments, rubrics and other evaluations.
TA Schools Only
Use of Program Resources
Describe how the TA program resources will assist participating children to meet proficiency.
TA Coordination with the Regular Program
Describe the planning, coordination and support of the TA program with the regular educational program (i.e., providing ELT, accelerated,
high–quality curriculum, including applied learning; and minimize removing children from the regular classroom during regular school day).
Directions and Guidance for Developing and Updating the
Parent Involvement Policy (PIP) (Required for Title I Schools ONLY)
The template below meets the parental involvement requirements of Title I. Your school is encouraged to use the template below to
update your school’s current policy or replace it entirely with a Parent Involvement Policy created by your school that meets federal
requirements. The activities and/or strategies included in your school’s policy should align with current CEP goals for improving
student achievement.
The PIP should describe how your school will plan and implement effective parent involvement activities and/or strategies to
improve student academic achievement and school performance. The School-Parent Compact is a component of the PIP that
outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share this responsibility. Schools are encouraged to include
feedback from the Parent Coordinator when updating the policy. In addition, if your school community will be engaged this year in
central parent involvement initiatives, such as Parent Academy, which will provide training for school communities to help
strengthen family-school partnerships, please be sure to include these activities in your policy.
Parent Involvement Policy (PIP)
Educational research shows a positive correlation between effective parental involvement and student achievement. The overall
aim of this policy is to develop a parent involvement program that will ensure effective involvement of parents and community in our
school. Therefore, our school, in compliance with the Section 1118 of Title I, Part A of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, is
responsible for creating and implementing a parent involvement policy to strengthen the connection and support of student
achievement between our school and the families. Our school’s policy is designed to keep parents informed by actively involving
them in planning and decision-making in support of the education of their children. Parents are encouraged to actively participate
on the School Leadership Team, Parent Association, and Title I Parent Committee as trained volunteers and welcomed members of
our school community. Our school will support parents and families of Title I students by:
 providing materials and training to help parents work with their children to improve their achievement level, e.g., literacy, math
and use of technology;
 providing parents with the information and training needed to effectively become involved in planning and decision making in
support of the education of their children;
 fostering a caring and effective home-school partnership to ensure that parents can effectively support and monitor their child’s
progress;
 providing assistance to parents in understanding City, State and Federal standards and assessments;
 sharing information about school and parent related programs, meetings and other activities in a format, and in languages that
parents can understand;
 providing professional development opportunities for school staff with the assistance of parents to improve outreach,
communication skills and cultural competency in order to build stronger ties between parents and other members of our school
community;
Our school’s Parent Involvement Policy was designed based upon a careful assessment of the needs of all parents/guardians,
including parents/guardians of English Language Learners and students with disabilities. Our school community will conduct an
annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this parent involvement policy with Title I parents to improve the academic
quality of our school. The findings of the evaluation through school surveys and feedback forms will be used to design strategies to 
more effectively meet the needs of parents, and enhance the school’s Title I program. This information will be maintained by the
school.
In developing the Title I Parent Involvement Policy, parents of Title I participating students, parent members of the school’s Parent
Association (or Parent-Teacher Association), as well as parent members of the School Leadership Team, were consulted on the
proposed Title I Parent Involvement Policy and asked to survey their members for additional input. To increase and improve parent
involvement and school quality, our school will:
 actively involve and engage parents in the planning, review and evaluation of the effectiveness of the school’s Title I program
as outlined in the Comprehensive Educational Plan, including the implementation of the school’s Title I Parent Involvement
Policy and School-Parent Compact;
 engage parents in discussion and decisions regarding the required Title I set-aside funds, which are allocated directly to
schools to promote parent involvement, including family literacy and parenting skills;
 ensure that the Title I funds allocated for parent involvement are utilized to implement activities and strategies as described in
our Parent Involvement Policy and the School-Parent Compact;
 support school-level committees that include parents who are members of the School Leadership Team, the Parent Association
(or Parent-Teacher Association) and Title I Parent Committee. This includes providing technical support and ongoing
professional development, especially in developing leadership skills;
 maintain a Parent Coordinator (or a dedicated staff person) to serve as a liaison between the school and families. The Parent
Coordinator or a dedicated staff person will provide parent workshops based on the assessed needs of the parents of children
who attend our school and will work to ensure that our school environment is welcoming and inviting to all parents. The Parent
Coordinator will also maintain a log of events and activities planned for parents each month and file a report with the central
office.;
 conduct parent workshops with topics that may include: parenting skills, understanding educational accountability grade-level
curriculum and assessment expectations; literacy, accessing community and support services; and technology training to build
parents’ capacity to help their children at home;
 provide opportunities for parents to help them understand the accountability system, e.g., NCLB/State accountability system,
student proficiency levels, Annual School Report Card, Progress Report, Quality Review Report, Learning Environment Survey
Report;
 host the required Annual Title I Parent Meeting on or before December 1st of each school year to advise parents of children
participating in the Title I program about the school’s Title I funded program(s), their right to be involved in the program and the
parent involvement requirements under Title I, Part A, Section 1118 and other applicable sections under the No Child Left
Behind Act;
 schedule additional parent meetings, e.g., quarterly meetings, with flexible times, such as meetings in the morning or evening,
to share information about the school’s educational program and other initiatives of the Chancellor and allow parents to provide
suggestions;
 translate all critical school documents and provide interpretation during meetings and events as needed;
 conduct an Annual Title I Parent Fair/Event where all parents are invited to attend formal presentations and workshops that
address their student academic skill needs and what parents can do to help;
Our school will further encourage school-level parental involvement by:
 holding an annual Title I Parent Curriculum Conference;
 hosting educational family events/activities during Parent-Teacher Conferences and throughout the school year;
 encouraging meaningful parent participation on School Leadership Teams, Parent Association (or Parent-Teacher Association)
and Title I Parent Committee;
 supporting or hosting Family Day events;
 establishing a Parent Resource Center/Area or lending library; instructional materials for parents;
 hosting events to support, men asserting leadership in education for their children. parents/guardians, grandparents and foster
parents;
 encouraging more parents to become trained school volunteers;
 providing written and verbal progress reports that are periodically given to keep parents informed of their children’s progress;
 developing and distributing a school newsletter or web publication designed to keep parents informed about school activities
and student progress;
 providing school planners/folders for regular written communication between /teacher and the home in a format, and to the
extent practicable in the languages that parents can understand;
SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT
REQUIRED OF ALL SCHOOLS
MAY BE LAST YEARS BUT MUST BE UPDATED
Our school, in compliance with the Section 1118 of Title I, Part A of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, is implementing a SchoolParent
Compact to strengthen the connection and support of student achievement between the school and the families. Staff and
parents of students participating in activities and programs funded by Title I, agree that this Compact outlines how parents, the
entire school staff and students will share responsibility for improved academic achievement and the means by which a schoolparent
partnership will be developed to ensure that all children achieve State Standards and Assessments.
I. School Responsibilities
Provide high quality curriculum and instruction consistent with State Standards to enable participating children to meet the State’s
Standards and Assessments by:
 using academic learning time efficiently;
 respecting cultural, racial and ethnic differences;
 implementing a curriculum aligned to the Common Core State Learning Standards;
 offering high quality instruction in all content areas;
 providing instruction by highly qualified teachers and when this does not occur, notifying parents as required by the No Child
Left Behind (NCLB) Act;
Support home-school relationships and improve communication by:
 conducting parent-teacher conferences each semester during which the individual child’s achievement will be discussed as well
as how this Compact is related;
 convening an Annual Title I Parent Meeting prior to December 1st of each school year for parents of students participating in the
Title I program to inform them of the school’s Title I status and funded programs and their right to be involved;
 arranging additional meetings at other flexible times, e.g., morning, evening and providing (if necessary and funds are available)
transportation or child care for those parents who cannot attend a regular meeting;
 respecting the rights of limited English proficient families to receive translated documents and interpretation services in order to
ensure participation in the child’s education;
 providing information related to school and parent programs, meetings and other activities is sent to parents of participating
children in a format and to the extent practicable in a language that parents can understand;
 involving parents in the planning process to review, evaluate and improve the existing Title I programs, Parent Involvement
Policy and this Compact;
 providing parents with timely information regarding performance profiles and individual student assessment results for each
child and other pertinent individual school information;
 ensuring that the Parent Involvement Policy and School-Parent Compact are distributed and discussed with parents each year;
Provide parents reasonable access to staff by:
 ensuring that staff will have access to interpretation services in order to effectively communicate with limited English speaking
parents;
 notifying parents of the procedures to arrange an appointment with their child’s teacher or other school staff member;
 arranging opportunities for parents to receive training to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and to observe
classroom activities;
 planning activities for parents during the school year, e.g., Parent-Teacher Conferences;
Provide general support to parents by:
 creating a safe, supportive and effective learning community for students and a welcoming respectful environment for parents
and guardians;
 assisting parents in understanding academic achievement standards and assessments and how to monitor their child’s
progress by providing professional development opportunities (times will be scheduled so that the majority of parents can
attend);
 sharing and communicating best practices for effective communication, collaboration and partnering will all members of the
school community;
 supporting parental involvement activities as requested by parents;
 ensuring that the Title I funds allocated for parent involvement are utilized to implement activities as described in this Compact
and the Parent Involvement Policy;
 advising parents of their right to file a complaint under the Department’s General Complaint Procedures and consistent with the
No Child Left Behind Title I requirement for Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and Title I programs;
II. Parent/Guardian Responsibilities:
 monitor my child’s attendance and ensure that my child arrives to school on time as well as follow the appropriate procedures to
inform the school when my child is absent;
 ensure that my child comes to school rested by setting a schedule for bedtime based on the needs of my child and his/her age;
 check and assist my child in completing homework tasks, when necessary;
 read to my child and/or discuss what my child is reading each day (for a minimum of 15 minutes);
 set limits to the amount of time my child watches television or plays video games;
 promote positive use of extracurricular time such as, extended day learning opportunities, clubs, team sports and/or quality
family time;
 encourage my child to follow school rules and regulations and discuss this Compact with my child;
 volunteer in my child’s school or assist from my home as time permits;
 participate, as appropriate, in the decisions relating to my child’s education;
 communicate with my child’s teacher about educational needs and stay informed about their education by prompting reading
and responding to all notices received from the school or district;
 respond to surveys, feedback forms and notices when requested;
 become involved in the development, implementation, evaluation and revision to the Parent Involvement Policy and this
Compact;
 participate in or request training offered by the school, district, central and/or State Education Department learn more about
teaching and learning strategies whenever possible;
 take part in the school’s Parent Association or Parent-Teacher Association or serve to the extent possible on advisory groups,
e.g., Title I Parent Committees, School or District Leadership Teams;
 share responsibility for the improved academic achievement of my child;
III. Student Responsibilities:
 attend school regularly and arrive on time;
 complete my homework and submit all assignments on time;
 follow the school rules and be responsible for my actions;
 show respect for myself, other people and property;
 try to resolve disagreements or conflicts peacefully;
 always try my best to learn.
DBN: 30Q234
4c. “Conceptual” Consolidation of Funds in SWP Schools
Directions: All Schoolwide Program (SWP) schools in NYC are conceptually consolidating their Federal, State, and
Local funds, even though the Galaxy system reports the allocations in separate accounting codes1
. To be eligible for
the flexibility consolidation of Federal funds enables, a Schoolwide Program school must identify in its Schoolwide 
plan (SCEP) which programs are included in its consolidation and the amount each program contributes to the
consolidated Schoolwide pool. Additionally, the school plan must document that it has met the intent and purposes
of each program whose funds are consolidated2
. On the chart below, indicate which Federal, State, and/or local Tax
Levy program funds that are consolidated in your school’s Schoolwide Program, the amount each program
contributes to the consolidated Schoolwide pool, and verification that the school has met the intent and purposes
of each program whose funds are consolidated.
Program Name Fund Source
(i.e. Federal,
State or Local)
Funding Amount:
Indicate the amount
contributed to
Schoolwide pool.
(Refer to Galaxy for
FY ’15 school
allocation amounts.)
Place an (X) in Column A below to verify that
the school has met the intent and purposes
of each program whose funds are
consolidated. Indicate in Column B, page #
references where a related program activity
has been described in this plan.
Column A
Verify with an (X)
Column B
Page # Reference(s)
Title I Part A (Basic) Federal $299,279.97 X See action plan
Title I School Improvement
1003(a)
Federal $16,961 X See action plan
Title I Priority and Focus
School Improvement Funds
Federal
Title II, Part A Federal $180,520.00 X See action plan
Title III, Part A Federal $17,812.00 X See action plan
Title III, Immigrant Federal X See action plan
Tax Levy (FSF) Local $2,810,275.00 X See action plan
1
Explanation/Background:
Title I Schoolwide Program schools are expected to use the flexibility available to them to integrate services and programs
with the aim of enhancing the entire educational program and helping all students reach proficient and advanced levels of
achievement. In addition to coordinating and integrating services, Schoolwide Program schools may combine most Federal,
State and local funds to provide those services. By consolidating funds from Federal, State, and local sources, a Schoolwide
Program school can address its needs using all its available resources. This gives a school more flexibility in how it uses
available resources to meet the identified needs of all its students.
Consolidating funds in a Schoolwide Program means that a school treats the funds it is consolidating like they are a single
“pool” of funds. In other words, the funds from the contributing programs in the school lose their individual identity and the
school has one flexible pool of funds. The school uses funds from this consolidated Schoolwide pool to support any activity of
the Schoolwide Program without regard to which program contributed the specific funds used for a particular activity. To
consolidate funding in a Schoolwide Program, the school does not literally need to combine funds in a single account or pool
with its own accounting code. Rather, the word “pool” is used conceptually to convey that a Schoolwide Program school has
the use of all consolidated funds available to it for the dedicated function of operating a Schoolwide Program without regard
to the identity of those funds.
Consolidating Federal funds in a Schoolwide Program has the following additional advantages:
 Consolidating Federal funds eases the requirements for accounting for funds from each specific program separately,
because a Schoolwide school is not required to distinguish among funds received from different sources when
accounting for their use.
 A school that consolidates Federal funds in its Schoolwide Program is not required to meet most of the statutory and
regulatory requirements of the specific Federal programs included in the consolidation (e.g., semi-annual time and
effort reporting for Title I). However, the school must ensure that it meets the intent and purposes of the Federal
programs included in the consolidation so that the needs of the intended beneficiaries are met.
2
The intent and purposes of the Federal programs indicated on the chart above (Part 4C of this section) are as follows:
 Title I, Part A – Schoolwide Programs: To upgrade the entire educational program in the school in order to improve
the academic achievement of all students, particularly the lowest-achieving students. This includes provision of
services for Students in Temporary Housing (STH).
 Title I School Improvement 1003(a) - support implementation of school improvement activities identified through
the Diagnostic Tool for School and District Effectiveness (DTSDE) reviews or a school review with district oversight and
included in the DCIP/SCEP.
 Title I Priority and Focus School Improvement Funding: support implementation of school improvement plans that
aims to improve instruction and address the identified needs
 Title II, Part A: Supplementary funding to improve student academic achievement by reducing class size in grades K,
1, 2, and 3, with an emphasis on grades with average register greater than 20. If space is not available to form
additional classes, funds may support push-in teacher(s) to supplement the instructional program.
 Title III, Part A: To help ensure that children with limited English proficiency become proficient in English, develop
high academic attainment in English, and meet the same challenging State academic content and achievement
standards in the core academic subjects that all other children are expected to meet. Another purpose of this
program is to increase the capacity of schools to establish, implement and sustain high-quality language instruction
programs and English language development programs that assist schools in effectively teaching students with
limited English proficiency. Title III, Part A is also designed to promote the participation of parents and communities
of limited English proficient children in English language instruction programs.
 Title III Immigrant: Supplementary and enhanced services to LEP/ELL immigrant students, in the areas of English
language acquisition and content area achievement.
Important Note: The following funds may not be consolidated:
 Title I Parent Involvement Set-aside: Title I, Part A funds must support parent involvement activities and programs.
Chancellor’s Regulation A-655 requires School Leadership Teams to consult with Title I parent representatives
regarding the Title I program and the use of these funds. Parent involvement activities funded through Title I must be
included in the parent involvement policy and aligned with student achievement goals in the school comprehensive
educational plan.
 Title I Priority and Focus School Parent Engagement Set-aside: Additional set-aside is to enable greater and more
meaningful parent participation in the education of their children.
 IDEA: To ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education designed
to meet their individual needs.
 Grant funds awarded via a competitive process, including Title I 1003(g) SIG or SIF funds: These funds must be used
for the purposes specified by the Grantor, as described in the school’s approved grant application.
LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION 2014-2015
Requirement under Chancellor’s Regulations – for all schools
DBN: 30Q234 School Name:
Cluster: 2 Network: 202
Goal: To communicate whenever feasible with non-English speaking parents in their home language in order to support shared parent-school
accountability, parent access to information about their children’s educational options, and parents’ capacity to improve their children’s
achievement.
Part A: Needs Assessment Findings
1. Describe the data and methodologies used to assess your school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs to ensure that all
parents are provided with appropriate and timely information in a language they can understand.
Home Language Surveys, Ethnic surveys, Emergency Blue Cards, and school made surveys are used to assess and determine P.S. 234's
wriiten translation and oral interpretation needs. Home Language surveys and Ethnic Surveys are completed and reviewed upon registration of
students. Emergency blue cards are completed immediately at the start of every school year. Home Language surveys and Ethnic surveys
are available in all necessary languages. All data is entered into ATS. Schools made surveys are also translated into all needed languages.
Addionally, PS 234Q monitors language need throught out the school years as more students are registered and as requests by parents for
translation are obtained.
2. Summarize the major findings of your school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs. Describe how the findings were reported to
the school community.
According to our most current findings, translation services are needed for the majority of P.S. 234's parent community. Translation and
interpretation services are needed in Spanish, Bengali and Arabic. An analysis of the Home Language Survey data, indicates that translation
and interpretation needs are most necessary in Spanish followed by Bengali and Arabic. Our findings were reported to the school community
through P.T.A. Meetings, Parent Involvement Plan, Language Allocation Policy, School Parent Compact and professional development
workshops. Furthermore PS234q has established a new website in which parents are informed of all the available resources in our school and
this includes language translation and interpretation. Parents are then able to communicate to the school their needs and concerns in a
language they can understand. Our school website translates to any language families need interpretation with.
Part B: Strategies and Activities
1. Describe the written translation services the school will provide, and how they will meet identified needs indicated in Part A. Include
procedures to ensure timely provision of translated documents to parents determined to be in need of language assistance services.
Indicate whether written translation services will be provided by an outside vendor, or in-house by school staff or parent volunteers.
Written translation needs for Spanish, Bengali, and Arabic are sent to the Translation Unit of the NYC Department of Education. They translate
all home correspondence. These letters inform parents of important testing dates, parent workshops, and school events and closures. To
ensure the timely receipt of documents, letters will be sent home with an attached statement in the appropriate languages stating the
importance of the document and its need to be translated. This information will also be posted in our website to assure instant communication
with families having access to the internet. Emails are also utilized by our school to communicate to the parents the availability of these
services. Moreover, staff members who speak another language are readily available to provide written translation and interpretation when
requested, in timely manner.
2. Describe the oral interpretation services the school will provide, and how they will meet identified needs indicated in Part A. Indicate
whether oral interpretation services will be provided by an outside contractor, or in-house by school staff or parent volunteers.
Oral translation needs will be met in a timely fashion by in house staff fluent in the major languages as determined by the home language
survey statistics. Oral translation will be provided through the utilization of the "talk technologies" translation devices during parent workshops
and PTA meetings. In addition, the ESL staff will provide person to person translation services during registration procedures, phone calls
home, IEP meetings, Parent Teacher Conferences, and when immediate parental needs arise. When necessary our school will provide outside
verdors to provide the translation in languages not readily available.
3. Describe how the school will fulfill Section VII of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 regarding parental notification requirements for translation
and interpretation services. Note: The full text of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 (Translations) is available via the following link:
http://docs.nycenet.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-151/A-663%20Translation%203-27-06%20.pdf.
P.S. 234 Q plans to inform parents of the availability of translation and interpretation services by posting a notification on the school's main
entrance, in the main office, in the parent coordinator's office and other conspicuous places. Parents will also receive letters notifying them of
their rights to receive translation and interpretation services (provided that their primary levy constitutes 10-20 or more of the languages spoken
at family homes). P.S 234's school safety plan will include a provision ensuring the parents in need of language assistance will not be
prevented from reaching the schools administrative offices due to language barriers. This notification will also be available in our school's
website as well as emailed to parents who providing us with their electronic emails.
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Title III Supplemental Program for ELLs for the 2014-15 and 2015-16 SY
Directions: Title III supplemental services for ELLs must include all of the following three components:
 Direct instruction: activities must be used to support language development, English and native language
instruction, high academic achievement in math, and/or other core academic areas.
o The Title III supplemental instructional services must be based on student need
o These supplemental services should complement core bilingual and ESL services required under
CR Part 154.
o Direct supplemental services should be provided for before school, after school, and Saturday
programs.
o Teachers providing the services must be certified bilingual education and/or ESL teachers.
 High quality professional development that is “of sufficient intensity and duration to have a positive and
lasting impact on the teachers’ performance in classrooms.”
o Professional development activities should be well-planned, ongoing events rather than one-day
or short-term workshops and conferences.
 Parent engagement and supports must ensure that there are appropriate translation and interpretation
services to meet community needs.
o These are in addition to mandated activities, such as parent orientation during ELL identification
process.
NOTE: The Title III program planning ratio is as follows: 60% direct to instruction, 10% to parental involvement,
10% to professional development, and 20% to OTPS.
For more information on Title III requirements, please see the School Allocation Memo or contact your Senior ELL
Compliance and Performance Specialist. Submit this form to your Senior ELL Compliance and Performance
Specialist by October 31, 2014.
Part A: School Information
Name of School: P.S. 234Q DBN: 30Q234
This school is (check one): conceptually consolidated (skip part E below)
NOT conceptually consolidated (must complete part E below)
Part B: Direct Instruction Supplemental Program Information
The direct instruction component of the program will consist of (check all that apply):
Before school After school Saturday academy
Total # of ELLs to be served:
Grades to be served by this program (check all that apply):
K 1 2 3 4 5
Department of English Language Learners and Student Support
Milady Baez, Senior Executive Director
52 Chambers Street, Room 209
New York, New York 10007
Phone: 212-374-6072
http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/ELL/default.htm
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Part B: Direct Instruction Supplemental Program Information
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Total # of teachers in this program: 3
# of certified ESL/Bilingual teachers: 3
# of content area teachers:
Describe the direct instruction supplemental program here and include the
 rationale
 subgroups and grade levels of students to be served
 schedule and duration
 language of instruction
 # and types of certified teachers
 types of materials
Begin description here:
P.S.234Q provides English Language Learners with supplemental services in the after School Program.
The additional after school programs will provide services for grades 2nd, 3rd,4th and 5th.
P.S. 234Q has three ESL classes that will meet a total of 24 sessions,on Wednesdays, beginning in mid
October, 2014 and ending in the middle of April 2015 from 2:25 P.M. to 4:25P.M. Group size will be
maintained at 25 students per teacher.This will result in approxamely 50-75 ELL students receiving
additional support in their educational endeavor. A total of 3 certified teachers will provide instruction
using the NYC and NYS content and performance standards. The focus of instruction will be Literacy and
Mathematics using ESL strategies and techniques to guide and assist students in the acquisition of skills
to achieve higher scores on the NYSESLAT as well as city and state tests. The strategies will include the
CALLA method for teaching ELLs the content areas. Additionally, the teachers will be utilizing TPR,
scaffolding and other ESL strategies to give students meaningful and understandable input to bring
successful language learning experiences for all students.
These grades were selected in accordance with the NYSESLAT and ELA data indicating these grades have
the greatest need for support in order to achieve an increase in both NYSESLAT and ELA scores. The
focus will also be placed on math, after a careful analysis of the data from the New York State Math
Assessment which indicated the need to support our 3rd and 4th and 5th grade students in math.
Second grade has been included to enrich and assure their success in these areas. This support will help
them to achieve a better performance in the New York State Math Assessment.
Supplemental materials and general instructional supplies will be purchased to support this program
and assure high quality instruction provided by certified personnel.
Part C: Professional Development 
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Part C: Professional Development
Describe the school’s professional development program for Title III Program teachers as well as other
staff responsible for delivery of instruction and services to ELLs.
 rationale
 teachers to receive training
 schedule and duration
 topics to be covered
 name of provider
Begin description here: P.S.234Q
Title III Professional Development Program will focus on providing teachers with scaffolding and
differentiated instruction strategies for teaching English Language Learners. A tremendous focus will be
placed on techniques best used to prepare ELLs to meet and exceed the NYC and NYS performance and
learning standards as well as increasing achievement scores on city and statewide tests. The ESL
teachers in the After School Program, as well as monolingual teachers servicing the ELL population will
receive the training necessary to ensure the use of ESL strategies within the programs. Participating
teachers will receive credit towards completion of the seven hours of ESL training required of all
teachers by New York State Department of Education.
Topics that will be addressed during these professional development sessions are as follow:
1. One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to Scaffolding across the Disciplines:
Types of Scaffolding will include but not limited to differensiation of lessons according to students level
of language acquisition. Differentiation of lessons following the multiple intelligences and learning styles
of the students. Additionally teachers will be trained the development of effective ESL lessons that
address the individual needs of students. Furthermore, teachers will be utilizing the data obtained
through testing as well as teacher's collected data through observation and interaction with the
students in development of ESL lessons..
2. One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to Differentiated Instructional
Strategies. Teachers will be trained in utilizing data to drive their instruction for groups and or individual
students. Teachers will be trained in the development of focussed lessons that will support and develop
the students' learning, in their areas of need.
3) One 2-hour professional development session will be devoted to the strategies needed to prepare
ELLs to meet the city and state standards. As well as to gain a clear understanding of the NYSESLAT. In
addition a focus will be placed on the instructional strategies needed to increase Language literacy skills
in preparation for the ELA and Math exams. The CALLA method of instruction will be reviewed and
analyzed to aid teachers in the development of understable lessons, for ELL students. This to bring
fourth their knowledge and give them the opportunitty for successful outcomes in their learning
experiences.
Part D: Parental Engagement Activities 
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Part D: Parental Engagement Activities
Describe the parent engagement activities targeted toward parents of ELLs that will impact higher
achievement for ELLs. NOTE: These are in addition to mandated activities, such as parent orientation
during ELL identification process.
 rationale
 schedule and duration
 topics to be covered
 name of provider
 how parents will be notified of these activities
Begin description here:
P.S. 234 Title III Program will provide ELL parents/guardians with the opportunity to attend a variety of
family literacy and math workshops, so that they can better assist in the education and learning of their
children at home.
Also, parent workshops will be conducted after school hours by ESL personnel, coaches, and the Parent
Coordinator to guide parents with the following:
• One 2 hours workshop on using math strategies in problem solving at home to help in the
development and practice of skills taught in class. We will also focus on how native laguage skills can be
transferred into english skills.
• One 2 hours workshop on familiarizing parents with ESL standards and testing. Parents will learn to
utilize life activities as learning experiences to help their children in the language acquisition process.
•One 2 hours workshop to have the parents understand the Balanced Literacy Approach and how they
can help in maintaining this balance at home through homework. Furthermore, parents will learn the
benefits of visiting libraries and exposing their children to real world experiences.
Part E: Budget
FOR SCHOOLS NOT CONCEPTUALLY CONSOLIDATED ONLY. Ensure that your Title III budget matches
your Title III Plan.
Allocation Amount: $0
Budget Category Budgeted Amount Explanation of expenditures in this
category as it relates to the program
narrative for this title.
Professional salaries
(schools must account for
fringe benefits)
 Per session
 Per diem
Purchased services
 High quality staff
and curriculum
development
contracts.
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Part E: Budget
FOR SCHOOLS NOT CONCEPTUALLY CONSOLIDATED ONLY. Ensure that your Title III budget matches
your Title III Plan.
Allocation Amount: $0
Budget Category Budgeted Amount Explanation of expenditures in this
category as it relates to the program
narrative for this title.
Supplies and materials
 Must be
supplemental.
 Additional
curricula,
instructional
materials.
 Must be clearly
listed.
Educational Software
(Object Code 199)
Travel
Other
TOTAL
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