WHICH
HOME
WOULD
YOU
RATHER
LIVE IN?
RELIABILITY
THAT WEATHERS
THE STORM
MAY 2014
Co-op Di erence: The Power to Choose or
the Power to Lose…Page 20
CoServ_05-2014 TCP DC.indd 1 4/10/14 10:22 AM
3 QUESTIONS: RELIABILITY, CHOICE AND VALUE
Q: Has CoServ provided a reliable supply of energy during the last decade of rapid growth?
A: Yes. Our company diligently monitors and carefully plans for the new infrastructure needed to
distribute energy to growing communities. 12 years ago, our utility served 65,000 meters using
16 substations. Today, our territory covers the same area, and the company serves 172,000
meters using 27 substations. Over the next ten years as the population boom continues, so will
the demand for power. CoServ stands ready to meet that need.
Q: Why can’t I choose my electric provider?
A: In 2002, the Texas Legislature restructured the retail electricity market. Often referred to as
deregulation, this action applied only to investor-owned, for-profi t utilities within the region
managed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and a ects about
75 percent of Texas residents. City-owned utilities and not-for-profi t electric cooperatives can
opt in to the deregulated market but are not required to do so.
Q: Does choice equal lower electricity rates?
A: No. In fact, throughout the past decade, independent reports and studies have found that
the exact opposite happened: Pricing in this market has been dysfunctional, and rates for
Texans have actually increased. CoServ Electric is one of 75 electric cooperatives in Texas that
serve more than 3 million residents. Only one of these co-ops has opted in to deregulation.
The rest, including CoServ, adopted a cautious approach because they were not convinced
that deregulation was in the best interests of their Members. Also, the decision would be
permanent because once opted into the deregulated market, it is impossible to opt out.
CoServ_05-2014 TCP DC.indd 2 4/10/14 10:22 AM
CRAZY AUNT SHERRY´S PASTA SALAD
1 16-oz box bow tie pasta
1 red onion
1 green bell pepper
2 Roma tomatoes
1 cucumber
1 ½ cup sugar
1 cup white vinegar
½ cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon pepper
2 teaspoons mustard
1 tablespoon parsley fl akes
Cook pasta according to box directions, drain and set
aside. Chop or dice each vegetable and set aside.
Dressing: Mix the liquid and powder ingredients together
well. Add vegetables (you can put as much of each
vegetable that you chopped as you’d like) to pasta and pour
dressing over. Mix so that vegetables and pasta are coated.
Can be served right away or best when refrigerated for a
few hours. Will yield a large 9” × 13” serving dish.
Recipe borrowed from Sherry Carnes courtesy of
Janie Mann
Doesn’t this dish look perfect for a picnic at the park? If you think so, too—and
want more recipes—you should start following us at Pinterest.com/CoServ.
You’ll fi nd other Employee recipes that will tantalize your taste buds and make
you savor the fl avor. Prefer the hard copy? For a 2014 CoServ Calendar with
perforated pull-out recipe cards, email your address to communications@
coserv.com and we’ll drop one in the mail to you while supplies last.
CoServ_05-2014 TCP DC.indd 3 4/10/14 10:22 AM
Facebook.com/CoServEnergy
 = 1 FUNTASTIC NIGHT
3 reasons to
follow us on
Facebook
1. Real-time updates on service
disruptions and restorations
2. Weather, Safety and Energy tips
and news
3. Play #CoServTrivia for a chance
to win a $
200 bill credit
CoServ | 7701 S Stemmons, Corinth, TX 76210-1842 | (940) 321-7800 | contact@coserv.com
CoServ_05-2014 TCP DC.indd 4 4/10/14 10:22 AM
TEXAS
Pour
Add wine to our
embarrassment
of riches
Pour
TEXAS
Add wine to our
embarrassment
of riches
COSERV ELECTRIC EDITION MAY 2014
Xeriscaping Cooking with Peanuts Barbed-Wire Phone Lines
 may 14 local covers - black 4/15/14 8:39 AM Page 1
© Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2014
Introducing Kubota’s RTV X-Series – the next generation of North America’s top-selling diesel utility vehicle for 10 years running.
Rugged, truck-inspired styling. Powerful Kubota diesel engines. New best-in-class “extra duty” independent rear suspension.
Plus more hardworking options and attachments than ever before. See your authorized Kubota dealer to learn more.
www.kubota.com
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 3
TEXAS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Darryl Schriver, Chair, Merkel; Jerry B. Boze, Vice Chair, Kaufman; David Marricle, Secretary-Treasurer, Muleshoe; Debra A. Cole,
Itasca; Kyle J. Kuntz, Livingston; Robert A. Loth III, Fredericksburg; Mark Rollans, Hondo • PRESIDENT/CEO: Mike Williams, Austin • COMMUNICATIONS & MEMBER SERVICES
COMMITTEE: Kelly Lankford, San Angelo; Bryan Lightfoot, Bartlett; Billy Marricle, Bellville; Stan McClendon, Wellington; Blaine Warzecha, Victoria; Jerry Williams, Paris; Kathy Wood, Marshall
MAGAZINE STAFF: Martin Bevins, Vice President, Communications & Member Services; Jeff Joiner, Editor; Tom Widlowski, Associate Editor; Karen Nejtek, Production Manager; Andy Doughty,
Creative Manager; Grace Arsiaga, Print Production Specialist; Ashley Clary-Carpenter, Field Editor; Suzanne Haberman, Staff Writer; Kevin Hargis, Copy Editor; Elizabeth John, Communications Assistant;
Ellen Stader, Proofreader; Andrew Boze, Editorial Intern FIRE HELMET © QUEEN21 | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB
COVER PHOTO A 2012 cabernet claret flows into a glass at Spicewood Vineyards. By Laura Jenkins
FEATURES
May 2014 Since 1944
We Know Vino The rest of the world is discovering, as
are Texans, that our bragging rights include a burgeoning
wine industry Story and Photos by Laura Jenkins 8
Lawn Be Gone! Xeriscaping offers a water-wise strategy
to cultivate attractive yards that minimize—or eliminate—
thirsty grasses By Kaye Northcott 14
35
36
39 42
FAVO R I T E S
20 Local Co-op News
Get the latest information plus
energy and safety tips from your
cooperative.
35 Texas History
Wired for Sound
By Camille Wheeler
36 Recipes
For Love of Peanuts
39 Focus on Texas
Inspirational
40 Around Texas
List of Local Events
42 Hit the Road
Fossati’s Delicatessen in Victoria
By Sheryl Smith-Rodgers

ONLINE
TexasCoopPower.com
Texas USA
Women’s Work
By E.R. Bills
Observations
Secretary Appreciation
By Martha Deeringer
Around Texas: Enjoy big helpings in a small town and help out the
Bleiblerville Volunteer Fire Department at a fish fry and fundraiser May 18. 40
4 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
The National Grass of Texas
w w w . T U R F F A L O . c o m w w w . T U R F F A L O . c o m
or 800-872-0522
Bred in Texas to help save one of our most precious resources - water! Order from your
nursery or direct from Turffalo online. Your lawn will be shipped to you in plugs that are
easy to install at one per square foot. Then get ready for a green lawn - in sun or in shade!
Let’s Get
Crackin’!
Let’s Get
Crackin’!
• Fry bacon slices until crisp. Break into ½-inch pieces and set aside.
• Melt 4 tablespoons of butter in a sauté pan. Add pecans, brown sugar,
Worcestershire and mustard and stir well. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, stirring well
to mix. Remove from heat and set aside.
• Core pears and slice into 24 ⅛-inch rounds. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter
in the pan. Add pear slices and cook for
1 minute per side. Remove from pan and set aside.
• Place 4 slices of Brie, 4 pear slices, 4 to 5 bacon pieces and about 2 tablespoons
of pecan mixture on half of each tortilla.
• Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a small (9- to 10-inch) skillet. Add one quesadilla
to pan and sauté for 1 minute. Fold empty half of the tortilla over the Brie
mixture and continue to sauté until lightly browned and slightly crisp on both
sides. Repeat process with remaining quesadillas, keeping each quesadilla
warm until ready to serve.
3 slices bacon
¾ cup butter, divided
1 cup Texas pecans,
chopped medium fine
¼ cup packed dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
½ teaspoon prepared yellow mustard
2 crisp pears
1 round (8 ounces) Brie
6 flour tortillas (fajita size)
NUTSFORTEXASPECANS!
Make Texas Pecans part
of your meals year round.
Spice up any party with Texas pecans.
Pecans contain an abundance of
unsaturated fats, and studies show
they can help lower cholesterol levels,
making pecans good and good for you!
Do you have a great recipe to share?
Enter the 2014 Texas Co-op Power
Holiday Recipe Contest today at
TexasCoopPower.com.
TEXAS PECAN BOARD
Visit TexasPecans.orgfor more recipes
and a list of Texas pecan retailers.
SURPRISE PECAN BRIE QUESADILLAS
2012 Texas Co-op Power Holiday Recipe Contest $500 Winner
proud of all recipients of the Congressional
Medal of Honor.
LORETTA BEDFORD | SAN AUGUSTINE
DEEP EAST TEXAS EC
A Great Native Son
Thanks so much for the short article
about T.R. Fehrenbach [“He Wrote
Texas’ History Book,” March 2014]. I
had not heard
about his death in
December, so that
was a surprise.
My favorite
work of his is “This
Kind of War.” It
includes several
pages of information
about my
father, Col. Arthur
B. Busbey Jr. (then a captain) and
his experiences as an infantry company
commander in the Korean
War. I quoted from that book at my
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 5
father’s funeral at Fort Sam Houston
National Cemetery four years ago.
Sadly, Texas lost another great
native son in Mr. Fehrenbach.
CHARLES P. B. BUSBEY | DRIPPING SPRINGS
PEDERNALES EC
Pearl Portrayed Perfectly
Your article describes Pearl perfectly
[“Pearl Bluegrass Jam,”
March 2014]. My parents, Tom and
Jeanette Ludwick, were avid bluegrass
fans and called Pearl their
second home, even to the extent
of leaving their travel trailer permanently
parked at the community
center until their deaths.
Any bluegrass fan or musician
worth his or her salt knows all
about Pearl. Thank you for a heartwarming
article that I can share
with my family.
JEFF LUDWICK | TEMPLE
HEART OF TEXAS EC
TEXAS CO-OP POWER VOLUME 70, NUMBER 11 (USPS 540-560). Texas Co-op Power is published monthly by Texas Electric Cooperatives (TEC). Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX and at additional offices. TEC is the
statewide association representing 76 electric cooperatives. Texas Co-op Power’s website is TexasCoopPower.com. Call (512) 454-0311 or email editor@TexasCoopPower.com. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE is $4.08 per year for
individual members of subscribing cooperatives. If you are not a member of a subscribing cooperative, you can purchase an annual subscription at the nonmember rate of $7.50. Individual copies and back issues are
available for $3 each. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas Co-op Power (USPS 540-560), 1122 Colorado St., 24th Floor, Austin, TX 78701. Please enclose label from this copy of Texas Co-op Power showing old
address and key numbers. ADVERTISING: Advertisers interested in buying display ad space in Texas Co-op Power and/or in our 30 sister publications in other states, contact Martin Bevins at (512) 486-6249. Advertisements
in Texas Co-op Power are paid solicitations. The publisher neither endorses nor guarantees in any manner any product or company included in this publication. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with
the advertiser.
© Copyright 2014 Texas Electric Cooperatives, Inc. Reproduction of this issue or any portion of it is expressly prohibited without written permission.
Willie Wiredhand © Copyright 2014 National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.
GET MORE TCP AT
TexasCoopPower.com
Find more letters online in the
Table of Contents. Sign up for
our E-Newsletter for
monthly updates,
prize drawings
and more!
WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!
ONLINE: TexasCoopPower.com/share
EMAIL: letters@TexasCoopPower.com
MAIL: Editor, Texas Co-op Power,
1122 Colorado St., 24th Floor,
Austin, TX 78701
Please include your town and electric co-op.
Letters may be edited for clarity and length.
CURRENTS
Include These Books, Too
Good list. I would add “The Jefferson
Bible.” With Greek, Latin,
French and English on facing pages,
I could perhaps teach myself an
extra language or two.
VEDA SMITH | PIPE CREEK
BANDERA EC
I would recommend very highly
William J. Bennett’s “The Book of
Virtues.” It is more than 800 pages
of poems, stories, famous speeches
and excerpts from the Bible and
plays. Good reading for all ages.
JUANA BISHOP | AUSTIN
PEDERNALES EC
What books would you want on a
deserted island? Share your list on
our Facebook page or send it to
editor@texas-ec.org. And see more
lists from readers in our online Letters
to the Editor.
Making Us Proud
“Valor Always Welcome” [March
2014] on Gainesville’s recognition as
the Most Patriotic Small Town in
America was the best article you’ve
ever printed. I knew of Gainesville’s
title, but I hadn’t realized the reason
or the extent of the town’s project.
The article by E.R. Bills demonstrates
all that is possible when a
town is united in beliefs and works
together to make reality happen.
All Texans should be proud of the
residents of Gainesville as well as @TexasCoopPower
Letters, emails and posts from our readers
Must Reads for a Deserted Island
I enjoyed “Bound and Determined” [March 2014], but I was especially challenged
by the question, “What books would you want on a deserted island?”
Initially, I started to list all of my favorite books and writers, which in itself
is not an easy task. But as I explored this task in more depth, my list began
to change.
The books would have to sustain me. They would have to keep me sane
and grounded. They would have to bring me hope and keep me connected to
my past and to the rest of humanity. Some would have to soothe; some would
have to challenge; some would have to make me laugh.
The Bible
“Charming Billy” by Alice McDermott
“Leaving Cheyenne” by Larry McMurtry
“The Power of One” by Bryce Courtenay
“Paula” by Isabel Allende
“PrairyErth” by William Least Heat-Moon
“Hard Times” by Studs Terkel
“The Decameron” by Giovanni Boccaccio
“The Best Short Stories of Ring Lardner”
“Selected Poems” (Spanish and English) by Pablo Neruda
JIM HILL | LUBBOCK | SOUTH PLAINS EC
GOOD
BOOK
LOCAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE EDITION MARCH 2014
Gainesville’s Heroes Artisanal Cheese Pearl Bluegrass Jam
Curl Up With a
Hairstylist Reigns
Over Reading Empire
GOOD
BOOK
Medal of Honor recipient
Duane E. Dewey
DAVE SHAFER
6 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
LOST PINES: SARAH BEAL, BLUEBONNET ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
CO-OPS IN THE COMMUNITY
Lost Pines Find Friends
More than two years after a wildfire burned 34,000
acres of the famed Lost Pines forest in Central Texas,
Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative employees lent a
hand and some shovels to the recovery. About 80 co-op
employees and their families planted more than 5,000
loblolly pine seedlings on 15 acres at the co-op’s Bastrop
headquarters in January, replacing trees lost in the
Bastrop County Complex fire, which started over Labor
Day weekend in 2011. The seedlings were provided by
TreeFolks, an Austin-based urban forestry charity.
CURRENTS
Tuxes and Deep Pockets
High school students—or, more likely, their parents—dig deep these days for
their social event of the school year: prom. The nationwide average cost of
going to prom was $1,139 last year, according to a survey by Visa Inc. Parents
foot 59 percent of that bill, the survey showed.
Where does all the money go? A Seventeen magazine survey in 2012
found that girls spent an average of $231 on a dress, $50 to get their hair
done and $68 on their makeup. In addition, they shell out $45 for shoes and
$32 on jewelry. Then there are the costs of tuxedo rentals, dining out, perhaps
a limo.
Texas teens go to prom at a cost higher than the national average,
spending $1,203. Kids in the Northeast rack up the heaviest bills, averaging
$1,528.
Energy, innovation, people, places and events in Texas
Mother’s Day Milestone
Mother’s Day officially turns 100 this month. By 1911, Mother’s
Day was celebrated in most states, and on May 8, 1914, President
Woodrow Wilson signed a joint resolution designating
the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.
Anna Jarvis is considered the founder of Mother’s Day in
the U.S. Though she never married or had children, she lobbied
passionately to set aside a day to honor mothers. She was
inspired by her own mother, Anna Marie Reeves Jarvis, an
activist and social worker in West Virginia who used to express
her desire that someday someone should honor all mothers,
living and dead.
When Mother’s Day quickly became a gold mine for the
flower, candy and greeting card businesses, the younger Jarvis
fervently objected and spent decades trying to turn the focus
of the day to intimate family celebrations.
Was she successful? You decide. American consumers spent
about $170 on Mom last year, according to theweek.com. (That
compares to about $120 spent on Dad for Father’s Day, according
to outsidethebeltway.com.)
Bluebonnet EC employees and friends plant 5,000 loblolly pine
seedlings to replace trees lost in the 2011 Bastrop County wildfire.
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 7
Texas farms produced 433 million pounds of peanuts in 2013, according to the Texas Department
of Agriculture. That’s enough to make more than 4 billion peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Of
course, peanuts have a place in many recipes, as you’ll see starting on Page 36.
Find more
happenings all
across the state at
TexasCoopPower
.com
CFL: © SOMCHAISOM | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB. CRAWFISH: © SERGEJ RAZVODOVSKIJ | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB. PEANUT: © YVDAVID | DOLLAR PHOTO CLU B
ENERGY NEWS
CFLs’ Grace Period
For decades, most of the lightbulbs
in our homes were
incandescents. They were
cheap to buy and costly
to run. Ninety percent of
the energy they use is
given off as heat, and
only 10 percent as light.
Maybe that’s why many
of us had “Turn out the
light!” drilled into us
every time we left a room
as kids.
Incandescents are being
phased out, replaced in large
part by CFLs—compact
fluorescent lamps. They
are cheap to run and more
expensive to buy than
incandescents. They can
last 10 times longer than
incandescents, although
the more you flip them on
and off, the more you shorten
their lifespans. So does “Turn out
the light!” apply to CFLs?
The Department of Energy
proposes a simple rule: Leave your
CFL on if you will be out of the
room for 15 minutes or less. Otherwise,
turn off the light.
433,000,000
HAPPENINGS
Mudbug Mania
Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start of summer, and there’s
no secret about what’s on the menu May 23–25 at the Crawfish Festival in
Fredericksburg. Of course, there is more to do than eat your fill of the tasty
little mudbugs. (Still, bring your appetite: Last year, close to 6,000 pounds of
boiled crawfish were served.)
Delicacies featuring the popular critter include bread, sausage and po-boys.
If crawdaddies aren’t your thang, there’s boiled shrimp. Have a more refined
palate? Opt for the Sunday creole brunch from chef John Russ.
Swing your hips to country and zydeco music and shop from some of Texas’
finest artisans. For the kiddies, a carnival, climbing wall and zip line beckon,
but perhaps best of all is a petting zoo featuring baby alligators.
INFO: $7 for adults, $5 for ages 6-12; (830) 433-5225; fbgcrawfish.com
A
8 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
s a general rule, Texans aren’t great at
keeping secrets. We’re the swaggering sort, ever poised to tell
the world about our Blue Bell, our barbecue, our bluebonnets
and our beer. We’ve got the goods, and we’re highly inclined to
tout them to anyone who’ll listen.
But even the most loyal and loudmouthed among us might
not be aware that our beloved state has been quietly cultivating
another extraordinary asset. Texas is settling into its terroir—a
French term to describe the specific environmental conditions,
especially soil and climate, that influence a wine’s flavor. And
that, in turn, has spawned an emergent wine culture that’s unlike
any other in the nation. For a variety of reasons, the Texas wine
industry has seen astonishing growth over the past 10 years, and
by all indications, the rest of the world is catching on.
Wine Enthusiast Magazine named the Texas Hill Country
one of the top 10 wine travel destinations in the world for 2014.
Numerous Texas wines have recently received high honors at
prominent competitions around the globe, outscoring wines
that hail from many of the most celebrated viticultural regions.
The figures alone reflect an astounding expansion: The number
of wineries in Texas has increased more than 500 percent,
from 46 in 2001 to 293 as of December 2013. The Texas wine
and grape industry contributed $1.8 billion to the Texas economy
in 2011 and is currently ranked fifth in the nation in both
wine production and consumption. Clearly, we’re in the midst
of an epic growth spurt.
We Know Vino
The rest of the world is discovering,
as are Texans, that our bragging
rights include winemaking
Alamosa Wine Cellars owner Jim Johnson
pioneered growing grapes in Texas that thrive
in a hot climate. At top, a cluster of grapes at
Spicewood Vineyards nears harvesting.
STORY AND PHOTOS BY LAURA JENKINS
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 9
Spicewood Vineyards owner Ron Yates is as likely to be tending his grapevines—his 32 acres of grapes include European varieties such as viognier, graciano and tempranillo—
as he is pouring wine for visitors eager for a taste. Yates and his staff are eager to engage guests in conversations about wine.
Wine in Texas is nothing new. In his book, “The Wineslinger
Chronicles: Texas on the Vine” (Texas Tech University Press,
2012), Russell Kane recounts the origins of winemaking in
Texas. The abbreviated explanation is that Spanish missionaries
brought vines to Texas in the mid-1600s. Though the grapes
survived the next 175 years, wine wasn’t terribly common or
popular by the time Texas won independence from Mexico. Add
in the Civil War and a host of other conflicts, and it’s plain to see,
Kane writes, how such forces “delayed the civility and economic
development necessary for expanding wine culture in Texas.”
Texas grape growing and winemaking accelerated in the 19th
and 20th centuries, but the 18th Amendment, which outlawed
producing, selling or transporting alcoholic beverages from
January 1920 until its repeal in December 1933, interrupted
viticultural expansion for decades. According to Kane, there
were more than 50 wineries in Texas before Prohibition, and it
took until the late 1990s to surpass that number. Prohibition
“left a complicated and arcane set of laws” in its wake, says
Kane, some of which have been lifted only recently.
Today, many refer to state legislation passed in 2003 and
2005 as the tipping point for the recent industry surge. Among
other things, those changes in the law expanded wineries’ ability
to ship directly to consumers and extended permission to
sell and serve wine on their premises—regardless of whether
they are located in a dry county.
Late wine pioneers Doc McPherson and Bob Reed are largely
regarded as the fathers of the modern Texas wine industry. The
two Texas Tech researchers experimented with grape growing
in the Panhandle near Lubbock in the 1960s and ’70s. The area
later became the Texas High Plains American Viticultural Area,
which generates more than half of the state’s wine grapes every
year. The pair eventually established Llano Estacado in 1976, an
iconic Texas winery near Lubbock that’s still one of the top wine
producers in the state.
McPherson is thought to have been the first to plant Italian
sangiovese grapes in Texas. Though he reportedly never made a
commercial wine entirely from sangiovese, McPherson’s experiment
reinforced the notion that grapes from regions that share
climate similarities with Texas—Italy, Spain and Portugal, for
example—might thrive here. Still, most vintners in the Lone
Star State continued to focus on California-centric grapes,
including varieties such as chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon,
which don’t typically flourish in extreme heat.
In the late 1980s, Jim Johnson had a hunch that adopting
California’s model might not be the most effective approach to
Texas winemaking. At the time, Johnson lived in Houston and
worked for NASA, but he also moonlighted at a wine store to
satisfy his growing fascination with winemaking.
“I thought that there might be some grapes we could grow that
could do better than what the California paradigm demanded at
the time,” says Johnson, now the owner of Alamosa Wine Cellars in
the Hill Country near San Saba. “It was a gut feeling. I knew there
were hot places in Europe that made wines and that the wines they
were making weren’t cabernet, merlot or chardonnay.”
After hearing a California vintner underscore the importance
of winemaking talent in the industry, Johnson left NASA,
moved to California and enrolled in the viticulture and enology
program at the University of California, Davis. 
pure and simple
1 oz 99.99% Fine Silver Texas Round
No hassles, no sales calls.
If we don’t have it, we don’t sell it.
Orders ship overnight within 3 days of payment.
texmetals.com
Save $20 on your next order with coupon PUREANDSIMPLE
Texas Precious Metals is an authorized dealer for the US Mint, Australian
Perth Mint, and the Royal Canadian Mint, among others. We’ve
been “Doing Business the Texas Way” since 1898, and we are rated
A+ with the Better Business Bureau.
361.594.3624 Shiner, TX 77984 Mon-Fri 8am - 4pm CST
“ ”
ResellerRatings.com
“ ”
GoldDealerReviews.com
Why us?
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 11
After graduating in 1991, Johnson worked for wineries in California
and Texas before planting his own vineyard near San Saba
in 1996. He started by growing sangiovese and viognier (grapes
indigenous to Italy and France, respectively) and later added
tempranillo, a Spanish grape that has done so well here some have
started calling it the “National Red Grape of Texas.” Alamosa
released the first commercial tempranillo in Texas in 2000.
Johnson was near the forefront of the growing trend to cultivate
nontraditional grapes, which include varieties most
Americans haven’t heard of—tannat, souzão, mourvèdre and
albariño, to name a few. Many of these grapes have been around
for centuries in Europe, and they thrive in weather conditions
that somewhat mirror Texas’. So far, the European grapes seem
to be making themselves right at home here.
If you’ve ever been to Napa, chances are you’ve tasted plenty
of California cabernet sauvignon. It accounts for 40 percent of
the region’s production. Most people know that California is the
undisputed wine king of America. And for that reason, many
have tried to duplicate its success.
“When Oregon first started as a wine-producing state, they
were trying to emulate California and grow the same stuff,”
Johnson says. “It wasn’t until they figured out that pinot noir
and pinot gris were the varieties that worked best for their climate,
their soil and their topography that they finally got their
own chapter in ‘The World Atlas of Wine.’ ” Johnson says that
he and other Texas growers and winemakers are arguably making
the same types of discoveries.
The hope, of course, is that wine lovers will embrace the
unconventional. But 90 percent of the domestic wine produced
in the United States comes out of California, and many consumers
tend to equate familiar names with quality—a bias that
often keeps them from trying anything else. Dacota Haselwood,
former chief governmental affairs officer at the Texas Wine and
Grape Growers Association, says that tasting rooms have the
right idea on how to get past such preconceptions.
“One of the things I think the Texas wine industry learned
early is the best way to convince somebody that you have a good
product is to get it in their mouths,” Haselwood says. “If a person
walks into a tasting room and they’ve never had wine in
their lives, you have much more of an opportunity to educate
Tours of wineries allow oenophiles—wine connoisseurs—to observe the production process. Clockwise from top left: Visitors get a sip of red straight from a barrel at
William Chris Vineyards in Hye. Elsewhere at William Chris, a vat of white wine awaits the next step of production. An aroma wheel, inset, helps wine tasters identify the
many fragrances and flavors in wine. Grapes get stirred early in the production process at Dry Comal Creek Vineyards in New Braunfels.
12 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
them about nontraditional varietals. They’re open to trying
anything. But you and I both know people who only drink white
wine, and they only drink pinot grigio.”
Many in the industry say that the biggest hurdle in introducing
new wines is persuading folks to try something besides what
they’re attached to. But once the “new” wine hits their taste
buds, they’re often sold.
Not Everything Is Bigger
Spending an afternoon at Spicewood Vineyards, about 30
miles northwest of Austin, is like being cradled in the palm of
the Texas Hill Country. A cluster of towering live oaks hangs like
a canopy over the spacious, breezy porch. Visitors recline in
comfy chairs and savor wine while chatting, picnicking or simply
enjoying the serenity.
If you’re looking for owner Ron Yates, he’s probably the
bearded guy in shorts and flip-flops pouring your wine. Yates
and his staff exemplify the ethos that has given Texans a reputation
for being approachable, friendly and easygoing—where
winemakers issue an invitation not only to taste great wine but
also to be a part of the conversation that surrounds it, regardless
of how much you know.
Wineries in Texas come in all shapes and sizes. Among the
largest are Mesa Vineyards in Fort Stockton, which produces the
Ste Genevieve wine brand; Becker Vineyards in Stonewall; and
Llano Estacado. Those three combined accounted for more than
half of the 3.2 million gallons of wine produced in Texas in 2013.
But much of the growth in the industry over the past 10 years
can be attributed to a host of smaller wineries that are slowly
helping define Texas wine culture. Most will never become a Mesa
Vineyards or a Llano Estacado, and that’s exactly what their owners
want. A growing number of vintners prefer a low-key operation,
where the demands of production are high enough to sustain a
business and low enough to keep them near the shop floor.
“It’s a challenge for us as we grow to keep our balance,” says
John Rivenburgh, a co-founder of Bending Branch, a boutique
winery in Comfort. “As you get bigger, obviously there are more
things you’ve got to do. When there’s more work, it’s a little
harder to taste wines with people. We’re definitely striving to
keep that small, intimate feeling about our place.”
Clockwise from top right: Tempranillo grape vines, gaining a reputation as the ‘National Red Grape of Texas,’ bask in the Hill Country sun at Spicewood Vineyards. Grape
stomp events are festive rituals at wineries across the state. At Dry Comal Creek, willing guests can partake in the Annual Order of the Purple Foot, where feet get undressed
and wine glasses get wrapped. For those who prefer to limit the purple to their taste buds, Andrew Stephens offers a variety of choices in the tasting room.
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 13
There are differing opinions about
what constitutes a “boutique” winery.
Usually the term refers to small, sometimes
family-owned and operated cellars
that produce wine in limited quantities.
The emphasis is less on volume and the
size of the facility and more on the art of
winemaking and creating a communal
experience around it. Bending Branch
typifies that approach. It’s not that large
wineries don’t make spectacular wines or
provide stellar tasting experiences. Many
do. But you’re not as likely to run into the
winemakers or the owners when you’re in
their tasting rooms.
Johnson is a good example of an “artisan”
winemaker, meaning he’s at the helm
of every step of the process at Alamosa
Wine Cellars—from growing the grapes to
bottling the wine. In all likelihood, you’ll
find him in the tasting room because he’s
there about 80 percent of the time it’s
open. Rivenburgh and his co-founder
(and father-in-law), Bob Young, stay busy
tending to the 16 grape varieties they’ve
planted in their vineyard. But they also
intentionally spend time in the tasting
room whenever they can.
Bobby Cox, a legendary viticultural
consultant who has been a key player in
the evolution of the Texas wine industry,
says that what Texas has to offer is not
only great wines but also a highly accessible
experience. That sociable vibe is in
direct contrast to the elitism that many
attribute to Napa.
“Part of the problem of establishing a
consumer base in Texas is that all too
often people assume that they don’t know
enough to drink wine,” Cox says. “They
think it’s too formal; it’s kind of a crooked
pinkie thing. But that’s not the way it is in
Texas; we want wine to be fun.”
If the online calendars of many Texas
wineries are any indication, Cox is spot
on. Plans for 2014 include stargazing parties,
grape stomps, cook-offs, barrel tastings,
gourmet pairings and live music
galore. And that’s the short list.
“Texas wines are more like the ones
you would find on your vacation in Italy
than your vacation in California,” Cox
says. “One of the subliminal reasons that
we love our Italian wines is that Lucille
Ball stomped grapes in Italy, not France.
It’s the fun aspect, the casual aspect. You
don’t have to know about the wines to
enjoy them.”
Laura Jenkins is an Austin
writer and photographer.
14 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
TOP: GREG HARRISON. BOTTOM: SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN
A walk down WaterSaver Lane at
the San Antonio Botanical Garden takes
only a few minutes, but that’s long
enough to get a bonanza of ideas for
reducing water use without sacrificing a
beautiful and inviting landscape.
With the assistance of the San Antonio
Water System, the garden has created
six model landscapes that offer a
variety of approaches to using droughtresistant
vegetation. WaterSaver Lane is
one of many educational efforts in
parched San Antonio, where the population
has grown by 52 percent since 1984,
but water use has increased only 21 percent,
according to the city’s water utility.
Sasha Kodet, the botanical garden’s
education director, takes me on a tour of
several sample gardens and explains
that water-thrifty yards don’t have to be
rocky and forbidding.
One of the first lawns Kodet shows me
is the Traditional American Lawn, one of
the most common Texas yards. It relies on
St. Augustine, the greediest of all turfs that
uses more water, fertilizer and pesticides
than other lawn grass, according to Kodet.
It’s close-cropped and needs watering
once a week during the growing season.
Farther down WaterSaver Lane, we’ll
see yards with less turf and more patios,
perennial flowerbeds, herb gardens and
groundcover.
Before we get there, it’s time to consider
why we should care. Of course, there
is saving money. Many cities are using
graduated rates for water use, making it
expensive to water lawns and plants.
But what if you don’t mind paying
more to keep your St. Augustine lush
and green? Well, there’s another compelling
reason to save water: Texas is
running out of it.
Much of the state is in the midst of an
extended drought. Fall rains provided significant
relief to some areas, giving the
impression that things aren’t so bad.
LAWN BE
GONE!
LAWN BE
GONE!
BY KAYE NORTHCOTT
Xeriscaping
offers water-wise
strategy to cultivate
attractive
yards
The watersaver garden at the San Antonio
Botanical Garden showcases water-friendly
lantana, mugwort, agave, yucca and esperanza.
The cottage gardens along WaterSaver
Lane feature bat-faced cuphea, Belinda’s
Dream rose and Confederate jasmine.
TexasCoopPower.com
SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN
May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 15
However, a little perspective shows otherwise.
Texas State Climatologist John
Nielsen-Gammon of Texas A&M University
explains that drought conditions
affected half of the state in November
2013. “That’s a smaller percentage than at
any time since the current drought began
in late 2010,” Nielsen-Gammon says.
But you need to consider, he adds,
that “in the western half of the state, several
consecutive years of drought have
continued to deplete water stored in
reservoirs and aquifers. Despite all the
rain in the eastern half, statewide reservoir
storage is only about 63 percent of
capacity, while in a normal year it would
be about 80 percent. The long-range
forecasts aren’t especially favorable, and
normal rain isn’t sufficient in West
Texas to replenish water supplies.”
Across the state, the No. 1 use of
water is irrigation. “That water is ultimately
being used to feed people,” says
Nielsen-Gammon. “Urban irrigation, or
watering, is the largest use of water
within cities, but unlike irrigation for
food, urban irrigation is more like simply
pouring water on the ground.”
He explains that in a large urban area,
a 20 percent reduction in irrigation could
eliminate the need for an entire new
reservoir. Water-saving practices in the
yard are among the least punishing and
most rewarding ways to address shortages
that will only become more acute.
The now-common term for such conservation
efforts is xeriscaping, a concept
developed in 1981 and copyrighted by the
Denver Water Department. Xeriscaping
sets you free from the traditional lawn.
Imagine less mowing, or no mowing at all,
and winding paths through glades of
perennial flowers with transitions to dramatic
grasses or shrubs.
Depending on the size of your property,
you might want to think of the outdoor
area as different rooms. You can
have an area for succulents leaning
against rocks, especially if you have a
slope for good drainage. You can have
crushed granite or pebbles for walkways
or even geometric sections divided by
brushed steel for a clean, modern look.
You can have an outdoor living room and
a kitchen annex.
Back on WaterSaver Lane, Kodet
shows me the Manicured Xeriscape
Landscape, which is similar to traditional
American lawns. It provides the same
neat, clean appearance but substitutes
less thirsty grasses and ground cover for
St. Augustine. I get one idea for my yard,
which is to plant privet, a perennial
shrub, in an area where I once had St.
Augustine and keep it cut low.
The Texas Hill Country Landscape is
great for areas with thin, alkaline soils.
This yard uses natural rock outcroppings
and leaves some areas as natural habitat.
(This could take on a desert look.) For
the most part, it is water-wise to use
perennial plants (ones that come back
year after year) rather than annuals that
Asiatic jasmine, zoysia grass, salvia
farinacea, artemisia and Mexican
ruellia create a manicured xeriscape.
Visitors on WaterSaver Lane walk
past vitex, duranta, Belinda’s
Dream rose and a turkey fig tree.
16 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN
have to be replanted or reseeded yearly.
Wildflowers are the exception. They
must be reseeded every year, but they
adapt so well to the natural landscape and
need so little attention that xeriscapers
endorse them. The more native plants
used, the less watering is required.
On to the Wildscape Landscape,
designed to attract wildlife and insects
that need a variety of food—nectar, seeds
and berries. As in the Hill Country landscape,
native plants are used because
they handle periods of drought better
than most imports.
The Cottage Garden, or kitchen garden,
is a part of every culture. Designs
may change around the world, but there
is a practical use for every planting,
whether for cut flowers, herbs, vegetables
or fruit. It’s rather a hodgepodge, but
your eye can be directed to a trellis or a
birdbath or a garden bench.
Last, we see one of my favorites, the
Spanish Courtyard. I’ve already adopted
this look in my backyard. Designed as an
extension of living space, a patio made of
brick, stone or crushed rock is set in decorative
patterns. I have a recirculating
fountain. It loses some water to evaporation
but nowhere near as much as a
lawn sprinkler. Birdbaths provide an
interesting sculptural look. Vegetation
is usually limited to the periphery or
large pots.
Xeriscaping has an option for just
about everyone. For myself, I’d rather be
filling a birdbath, watering a few plants
in big pots and topping off the fountain
than mowing and weeding and putting in
a lawn irrigation system. Besides, I enjoy
my yard a lot more knowing I did my part
to conserve Texas’ water.
Visit sabot.org to learn more about
the San Antonio Botanical Garden’s
WaterSaver Lane.
Kaye Northcott is a former editor of Texas
Co-op Power.
Web Extras on TexasCoopPower.com
• Learn tips for designing your garden escape.
• Read about seven principles for designing
a successful xeriscape garden.
Agave calliandra, cenizo and
yucca rostrata thrive at the
Botanical Garden entrance.
Mexican oregano and aloe
Goldenrod with porterweed
in foreground
Mexican bush sage
Scientifically
ENGINEERED
toDEFY
 GRAVITY
®
The Ultimate Shock Absorbing
Footwear
As featured in hundreds
of magazines, on radio
and TV nationwide,
Gravity Defyer® shoes
are changing lives every
day. They have become a
comfort phenomenon,
and are being used
and recommended by
professionals in hospitals, the food
service industry, board rooms across
the country and more.
A Decade of Science in Every Pair
The patented VersoShock® system
was developed by Impact Research
Technology and is found exclusively
in Gravity Defyer® footwear. It absorbs
harmful impact relieving discomfort from
every step before returning energy that
propels you forward. Stay more active
on your feet and experience unparalleled
comfort and performance.
Feel Weightless
Standing, walking, and
running are easier as the
VersoShock® system’s
energy return makes you
feel lighter, like you’re
walking on clouds.

Absorbs Shock
on Impact
Energy Return
Propels You
SHOES THAT WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE... GUARANTEED!
VS2W VersoShock®
Trampoline Sole
Smart Memory springs
combined with elastic
polymers AVS3 Ventilation System
Cools the foot and circulates air
Accommodates
Orthotic Inserts
*'HI\%HQHÀWV
s!BSORBHARMFULIMPACT
s3TAYCOMFORTABLEACTIVE
s3UPPORTPROTECTYOURBODY
s3TANDWALKWITHGREATEREASE
G-DEFY SUPER WALK
MEDIUM & WIDE WIDTHS
WHITE TB9004MWS
BLACK TB9004MBS
MEDIUM WIDTHS
BLUE TB9004MUS
GREY TB9004MGS
BLK/RED TB9004MBR
MEDIUM & WIDE WIDTHS
BLK/PURP TB9004FBP
WHT/BLU TB9004FWSU
WHT/PNK TB9004FWSP
MEDIUM WIDTHS
GRY/BLU TB9004FGA
GRY/PNK TB9004FGP
WHT/GRN TB9004FWL
¸0KLJPKLK[VM\SÄSSH
life’s dream and go to
China…without my
Gravity Defyer® [shoes]
this would have been
impossible.” – Eleanor W
“After ordering and wearing your
Gravity Defyer® [shoes], I have
renewed faith that I will be able
to continue my passion for senior
softball. Thank you.” – Ron B
“I work in a restaurant. Finally
found the shoes that don’t kill my
legs and feet…Gravity Defyer®
shoes are awesome!” – Diana B
Super Walk $129.95
Men · Sizes 7.5-15 Women · Sizes 5-11
Once you put on your first pair, you
won’t ever want to take them off!
We guarantee that they will change
your life, or simply return them and
pay nothing.
&REE2ETURNSs&REE%XCHANGES
TRY A PAIR FREE
FOR 30 DAYS!
PLUS
FREE SHIPPING
COUPON CODE: MQ8EFT9
OR
3 PAYMENTS OF
$43.32
Call 1 (800) 429-0039
GravityDefyer.com/MQ8EFT9
*Offer valid for new customers only. Deferred billing for 30 days from the date shipped and is an option selection during checkout.
Credit card authorization required. S&H nonrefundable. See website for details.
Your watch shouldn’t cost more than
your car. It should look and feel like a
power tool and not a piece of bling.
Wearing it shouldn’t make you think twice
about swinging a hammer or changing a tire.
A real man’s timepiece needs to be ready for
anything. But that’s just my opinion. If you
agree, maybe you’re ready for the Stauer
Centurion Hybrid. Use your Exclusive
Insider Promotional Code below and I’ll
send it to you today for ONLY $59.
This watch doesn’t do dainty. And neither
do I. Call me old-fashioned, but I want
my boots to be leather, my tires to be deeptread
monsters, and my steak thick and rare.
Inspiration for a man’s watch should come
from things like fast cars, firefighters and
power tools. And if you want to talk beauty,
then let’s discuss a 428 cubic inch V8.
Did I mention the $59 price tag? This
is a LOT of machine for not a lot of money.
The Stauer Centurion Hybrid sports a
heavy-duty alloy body, chromed and
detailed with a rotating bezel that allows
you to track direction. The luminous hour
and minute hands mean you can keep
working into the night. And the dual digital
displays give this watch a hybrid ability. The
LCD windows displays the time, day and
date, includes a stopwatch function, and
features a bright green electro-luminescent
backlight. We previously offered the
Centurion for $199, but with the exclusive
promotional code it’s yours for ONLY $59!
No matter what, this watch can keep
up. Thanks to the Stauer 30-day Money
Back Guarantee, you’ve got time to prove it.
If you’re not totally satisfied, return it for a
full refund of the purchase price. You also
get a 2-year replacement guarantee on both
movements. But I have a feeling the only
problem you’ll have is deciding whether to
keep the Stauer Centurion on your dresser
or tucked inside your toolbox.
14101 Southcross Drive W., Dept. CNW257-03
Burnsville, Minnesota 55337 www.stauer.com
Digital-Analog Hybrid • Dual digital displays • Heavy-duty chromed body • 3 ATM Water Resistant
LCD windows for time, date and day • Luminous hands • Contrast Stitch Band fits a 7 1/4"–9 1/4" wrist

“I work in the surveying and
construction industry...
This is my work horse watch
and I am proud to wear it.”
— C.S. from Fort Worth, TX
How to Tell Time Like a Man
Our digital-analog hybrid has two sides... tough and tougher.
Get it now for an unbelievable $59!
Stauer®
TAKE 70% OFF
INSTANTLY!
When you use your
Promotional Code
Smart Luxuries—Surprising Prices ™
Stauer Centurion Hybrid Watch— $199
Promotional Code Price Only $59
or two payments of $2950
+ S&P
Rating of A+
Order now to take advantage of this fantastic low price.
1-800-333-2057
Your Insider Promotional Code: CNW257-03
Please use this code when you order to receive your discount.
We owe you an apology. This exclusive deal is
guaranteed to ruin every jewelry purchase
you make from now on. Once you realize
that it’s possible to own a genuine cultured pearl necklace
for FREE, other luxury brands are bound to disappoint.
They can’t handle FREE jewelry. They can’t even afford
to try. But you can. And that’s all that matters to us.
We're offering our Mitsuko Organic Cultured Pearl Necklace
online for $299. But if you'd like it for near NOTHING
(you pay only the $19.95 shipping & processing–see details
below) all you need to do is call 1-800-859-1542.
It's okay to be skeptical. You have every right to be.
Why would any company give away a pearl necklace?
Good question. We believe that once you try us, you’ll
be back for more. But maybe a better question is why
other luxury jewelers don't think twice about offering cultured
pearls for hundreds—even thousands—more. I'm sure they have
their reasons. But you don't have to fall for them. Not anymore.
Call today for your FREE Mitsuko Organic Cultured Pearl Necklace
and you'll realize that luxury doesn't have to cost a fortune.
Mitsuko Organic Cultured Pearls—Exclusively from
Stauer. Every necklace is the product of generations of
expertise. From natural genesis to final selection,
imported Mitsuko organic cultured pearls are held to
the highest standard. This continous, 26" strand showcases
a collection of 6½-7mm white cultured pearls.
Each necklace is hand-strung and double-knotted to
keep every precious pearl secure.
This exclusive FREE offer can’t last forever.
Unfortunately, we are only able to make a limited
number of these necklaces available to the public for
free. Don’t let this incredible opportunity pass you by!
To ensure that you receive your FREE Mitsuko
Organic Cultured Pearl Necklace, please call today.
Your idea of luxury will never be the same!
YOUR FREE PEARLS ARE HERE
experience the luxury of mitsuko organic cultured
pearls regularly $299, get them today for FREE*
Call now while our supplies last...
1-800-859-1542
Promotional Code MFP230-01
Please mention this code when you call.
14101 Southcross Drive W.,
Dept. MFP230-01
Burnsville, Minnesota 55337 www.stauer.com
Stauer®
Mitsuko Cultured Pearl Necklace
Regularly $299†
Yours FREE*
*Pay only $19.95 shipping & processing
* This offer is valid in the United States (and Puerto
Rico) except in TX, FL, CO, OK, RI, NH, WV and
ID. These state residents will be charged one cent
($.01) + shipping & processing for the item. Void
where prohibited or restricted by law. Offer subject
to state and local regulations. Not valid with any
other offers and only while supplies last. This offer
is limited to one item per shipping address.
By implanting a nucleus
inside the oyster, farmers
stimulate the natural
creation of a pearl. Each
Mitsuko cultured pearl is
harvested, polished and
strung by hand.
Rating of A+
Smart Luxuries—Surprising Prices ™
† Free is for Call-In Customers only versus the
original Stauer.com price.
$
400
Lost Savings
$
300
$
200
$
100
$
600
$
700
$
800
$
500
0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
$
4,500 in Lost Savings per household
Source: United States Energy Information Administration
http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/sales_revenue.xls
Exhibit 3: This exhibit
compares electricity costs for
a typical customer paying
average rates charged by
deregulated retail electric
providers in Texas, to costs for
a customer with the same
usage but paying average
rates charged by Texas
providers exempt from
deregulation.
*For purposes of comparison,
this exhibit assumes monthly
electricity usage of 1,300 kWh.
THE DEREGULATED ELECTRICITY MARKET:
POWER TO CHOOSE OR POWER TO LOSE?
In the late 1990s, supporters of a deregulated Texas
electricity market claimed the move would save Texans money
and lower rates through a competitive market. A decade’s worth
of data indicates this did not happen. In fact, earlier this year,
the Houston Chronicle cited analysis by the Texas Coalition
for A ordable Power that found Texans in deregulated areas
have paid $
22 billion more than those in regulated service
areas over the past decade. That equates to about $
4,500 per
household in lost savings. The editorial concluded:
In hindsight, it is clear that deregulation was never
about getting the best deals for Texas consumers. It
was about bigger salaries for CEOs and bigger returns
for shareholders. It was about creating a middleman
in a system that never needed one, by gaining access to
expensive electric power infrastructure to sell electricity
without having to pay for building it.
It also created a system where generation, transmission and
distribution, and the retail sale of power were unbundled.
As a result, deregulated consumers have experienced a
decline in reliability since deregulated entities are for-profi t
organizations focused on the lowest costs possible and meeting
minimum standards.
The deregulated areas of Texas cover about 85 percent of the
state. So where does this leave the 15 percent of the state that is
exempt from this system for buying and selling electricity?
In the case of CoServ Electric, a not-for-profi t provider, the
answer is: In good hands with stable rates and reliable service.
CoServ Electric is a Member-owned, not-for-profi t, electric
cooperative. CoServ’s Board of Directors are Members who
are elected at-large by CoServ Electric Members. The Board
and the CoServ Electric executive leadership team proactively
monitor the deregulated market because they have a fi duciary
responsibility to make decisions that are in the best fi nancial
interests of CoServ Members.
Our Members deserve reasonable and stable electric rates.
Conversely, the mission of Retail Electric Providers (REPs) is
to generate investor profi t. CoServ has no shareholders, and
our responsibility is to our Members. Our current residential
rate is around 10 cents per kWh, which is less than the current
average (11 cents) that Texas REPs were o• ering in April and
competitive with the lowest 12-month fi xed price REP o• er
per the Association of Electric Companies of Texas. It’s
also important to understand that rates listed on Power to
Choose are “limited o• ers.” These rates are not representative
of what these REPs are actually charging their consumers.
Conversely, CoServ’s residential rate is charged to all
Members and is representative of what our Members actually
pay for power.
We’ve been a local not-for-profi t company, with a local Call
Center for more than 75 years. This means no gimmicks or
short-term promotional rates that are unsustainable. No o• -
shoring of Customer Service jobs or long hold times.
 It also means the reliable delivery of power when you need
it most, like during the December 2013 ice storm that left
deregulated parts of the DFW area without power for days.
We hope these details help clarify a topic that isn’t as clearcut
as it seems—specifi cally: “The power to choose” does not
automatically result in lower cost or more reliable service.
For more information, please visit CoServ.com. We welcome
your feedback at contact@coserv.com.
All told, Texans living
in deregulated areas
would have saved more
than $
22 billion dollars
in lower residential
electricity bills since
2002 had they paid the
same average prices as
Texans living outside
deregulation. The lost
savings amounts to
more than $
4,500 for
a typical household
since 2002.
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
20 Texas Co-op Power COSERV ELECTRIC May 2014
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 20 4/14/14 11:04 AM
$
400
Lost Savings
$
300
$
200
$
100
$
600
$
700
$
800
$
500
0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
$
4,500 in Lost Savings per household
Source: United States Energy Information Administration
http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/sales_revenue.xls
Exhibit 3: This exhibit
compares electricity costs for
a typical customer paying
average rates charged by
deregulated retail electric
providers in Texas, to costs for
a customer with the same
usage but paying average
rates charged by Texas
providers exempt from
deregulation.
*For purposes of comparison,
this exhibit assumes monthly
electricity usage of 1,300 kWh.
4 REASONS WHY ‘CHOICE’ ISN'T
WHAT YOU THINK IT IS
1. The "great deals" on PowerToChoose.com are
on a per-contract basis are not sustainable.
Last year, a Retail Electric Provider (REP) o
 ered
new customers a 4.4-cent per kWh deal. A great
deal, sure … for three months. A deeper dive
showed the rate rose to 12.2 cents after the threemonth
contract expired and contained several
hidden charges (i.e., a $
5 charge for every call to
customer service). It's this type of bait and switch
price volatility that CoServ wants to avoid for its
Members. Our rates aren't just for three months;
they're stable and long-term.
2. A recent study by Texas ROSE1
 indicates the
deregulated utility industry is mimicking the
airline industry—fees, fees and more fees—to
increase revenue. The study states that many
REP fees are buried in the fi ne print of the terms
of service. Fees now exist for customer service,
minimal usage, contract cancellation, payment
reminders, etc. Also, a growing REP trend is
charging a higher per-kWh cost for not enrolling
in E-Bill or participating in automatic bank draft,
and subsidizing lower rates for new customers by
charging existing customers more.
3. The electric provider "choice" in Texas is more
perception than reality. Because CoServ Electric
owns, operates and maintains the infrastructure
serving your homes and businesses, it's important
to understand that CoServ is your wires company,
as well as your power provider. If CoServ opted
in to the deregulated market, you would indeed
be able to decide who sells your electricity, but
CoServ’s infrastructure would continue to deliver
your power. As a result, a portion of your monthly
bill would still be paid to CoServ for delivery costs.
Thus, it's unlikely that o
 ering "choice" would
actually lower your rates in the long term.
4. The decision to opt in to the deregulated
market is irrevocable. Given this uncertainty and
dysfunction in the deregulated market, CoServ is
hesitant to change the structure of our business in
favor of a model that doesn't appear to e
 ectively
control costs and rates for the long run. Again,
as a not-for-profi t electric cooperative, CoServ is
committed to delivering power at a competitive
cost for all Members—not just the newest or most
established. If we were positive that deregulation
would allow us to maintain this mission for
Members, we would've opted in to deregulation
already. By taking a more cautious approach to
monitor the market’s progress, we've been able to
see the bigger picture surrounding deregulation
and protect Members from price volatility.
1
Ratepayers’ Organization to Save Energy
SAVE THE DATE: ANNUAL MEETING
Mark your calendar for our Annual Meeting and dinner,
where you’ll learn about CoServ’s 21st Century Vision as
a leader in implementing innovative energy ideas. CoServ
was created to serve, and we’re committed to our Mission of
providing safe, reliable, energy solutions.
When: Thursday, June 19
What: Dinner at 5:30 p.m.
 Business meeting at 7 p.m.
 Door prizes drawn after the meeting
Where: University of North Texas Coliseum
 Denton, Texas
FACEBOOK PROMOTION: Like last year, we’ll
be interacting with you on Facebook before and
during dinner! Members who respond to our Annual
Meeting Facebook post between 5 and 7 p.m. will be entered
in a special drawing for a $
300 electric-bill credit. Stay tuned
for details! (NOTE: You must be present to win.)
Prepare in advance by “liking” our page at Facebook.com/
CoServEnergy. And watch for more details in the June issue
of Texas Co-op Power magazine! JUNE 19VOTE EARLY
EAT WELL
WIN BIG!!!
May 2014 COSERV ELECTRIC Texas Co-op Power 21
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 21 4/14/14 11:04 AM
SUMMER SPIKES PEAK DEMAND
Power must be continuously delivered to CoServ Electric’s
distribution system to meet your electricity needs. CoServ’s
power provider is Brazos Electric Cooperative, and we’re
one of 16 Member/Owners of Brazos in the same way that
more than 152,000 North Texans are CoServ Member/Owners.
Brazos provides competitively priced power by optimizing
the operation of its electric generation plants with wholesale
power market purchases. Brazos forecasts the electricity
needed daily by CoServ (and its other members), monitors
power consumption and schedules required power supply
for delivery to the ERCOT (Electric Reliability Council of
Texas) transmission grid.
Just like at your homes or businesses, an electric meter
measures the amount of wholesale power delivered to CoServ.
We pay for this supply at Brazos’ wholesale power rate, which
contains a peak kilowatt (kW) demand charge. That charge
represents roughly 42 percent of CoServ’s annual power
cost. This translates to about 2.5 cents per kWh in your retail
electric bill.
How can Members reduce this
demand charge and save money?
Kilowatt demand is the amount of power consumption
during a 15-minute period. CoServ’s wholesale demand charge
is based on peak demand—the maximum kW demand during
June, July, August and September. CoServ’s peak demand is
Curtis Trivitt (CTSS),
SVP—Energy Services
CURTIS TRIVITT C
S S
T
Says So
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
22 Texas Co-op Power COSERV ELECTRIC May 2014
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 22 4/14/14 11:04 AM
about 1.2 million kW. Each kW of peak demand costs about $
103,
adding roughly $
1.23 million to our annual wholesale power bill.
Without question, peak demand is a component of the bill that
can be controlled/reduced. And because wholesale power cost
is a direct pass-through in CoServ’s retail rates, any savings in
wholesale power cost results in a reduction on your electric bill.
CoServ’s peak kW demand typically occurs on the hottest days
between 4 and 8 p.m. Air conditioners and pool pumps are two
large contributors to peak demand, but delaying the use of any
electric appliance during these times reduces the peak-demand
charge.
According to a recent peak-demand Brazos study, deferring
the use of one residential AC unit can result in a 1.2 kW
reduction in peak demand; turning o† a pool pump can produce
a 1.7 kW reduction in peak demand; and delaying the use of an
electric water heater can produce a 0.4 kW reduction. Assuming
it is possible to achieve 2 kW of demand reduction per home,
and assuming 50 percent of Members participated in demandreduction
actions, at $
103 in wholesale savings per kW reduced,
CoServ would pass through over $
15.6 million in savings to our
Members on their electric bills—every year.
CoServ Members can signifi cantly impact our wholesale
power cost with simple actions:
„ On the hottest days, increase the thermostat setting
by 3 to 5 degrees between 5 and 6:30 p.m. Using
a Wi-Fi enabled programmable thermostat adds
convenience to managing temperature settings.
(Even more savings—CoServ now offers a $
50 rebate
for these types of thermostats.)
„ If you have a pool, set the pump to run before 4 and
after 8 p.m.
„ If you have an electric water heater, install a timer to
turn the unit off between 5 and 6:30 p.m.
„ Delay washing clothes/dishes and cooking until after
6:30 p.m.
„ Turn as many lights off as possible.
„ Close window blinds and shades.
 For a chance to win a $
200 electric bill credit, visit
Facebook.com/CoServEnergy and look for May’s
Curtis Trivitt Says So column. The full article includes
information about new technology that CoServ is
using to reduce peak kW demand though a technique
called CVR (Conservation Voltage Reduction). To be
entered in the drawing, comment on Curtis’ suggestions, o† er
a suggestion of your own for energy savings or simply "like"
the status update. Together, we can reduce peak demand and
reduce electric cost.
FRISCO TEENS WIN DC TRIP
Congratulations to Aarushi Aggarwal and Sahara
Khan, winners of CoServ’s 2014 Electric Cooperative
Youth Tour!
Aarushi and Sahara, both of Frisco, will travel to
Washington, DC, this summer for an all-expenses-paid
trip to learn about our nation’s government. Joining
them will be 1,500 youths from electric cooperatives
across the nation.
“I never thought I would be blessed with such an
invitation. When I got the email, I literally jumped on my
feet and screamed,” said Aarushi, a 17-year-old junior at
Liberty High School.
As a fi rst-generation American whose parents are from
India, Aarushi said she’s particularly excited to share her
experiences with her family. “Whatever knowledge I get
from this trip,” she said, “they’ll learn, too.”
Sahara, a 16-year-old junior at Wakeland High
School, said she aspires to join the legal profession and
that the trip is a great opportunity “to get exposed to
American history and current national undertakings.”
Her parents, she said, are very supportive. “When they
explained to me the highlights of the trip, I instantly
knew I had to apply!”
Both are part of the graduating class of 2015 and
were selected for their extracurricular activities,
involvement in their communities and written responses
demonstrating knowledge about government, leadership
and electric cooperatives.
The National Rural Electric Cooperative
Association (NRECA), which has coordinated the
Youth Tour since 1964, uses the all-expenses-paid trip
to give students a fi rsthand look at the political process
and the role it plays for co-ops. Students will experience
several landmarks, including the Smithsonian Institution
and Mount Vernon, and also visit their congressional
representative’s o¨ ce on Capitol Hill.
To fi nd out more about the program and how to
apply for the 2015 Youth Tour, visit CoServ.com>
Community>Academic Initiatives>Electric
Cooperative Youth Tour.
Aarushi Aggarwal Sahara Khan
CURTIS TRIVITT C
S S
T
Says So
May 2014 COSERV ELECTRIC Texas Co-op Power 23
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 23 4/14/14 11:04 AM
Pipelines in your community
CoServ Gas transports natural gas every day through a
network of pipelines. According to statistics from the National
Transportation Safety Board, pipelines are the safest and most
reliable method of transporting natural gas. We are committed to
safe and reliable operation of our pipelines in your community.
Once designed, tested and installed, pipelines are operated and
maintained according to all federal and state requirements. We also
conduct frequent inspections and maintenance to ensure we are
providing the safest delivery of natural gas to your home or business.
Where the pipelines are:
Since pipelines are located underground and are not visible to
the eye, CoServ Gas uses line markers to identify the proximity of
the pipeline. The markers are placed to help you, our Customer, as
well as any individual or company planning to excavate. The marker
will typically provide the name of the gas company, the contents
of the pipeline and an emergency phone number. While markers
play an important role in identifying pipelines, they are not used to
give depth or exact locations. The only way to ensure the location
of a pipeline is to practice the “call before you dig” rule. Pipeline
markers are important for the safety of the general public. It is a
federal crime for any person to willfully deface, remove or destroy
any pipeline sign or marker.
Call before you dig:
Before you dig or excavate 16 inches or deeper, state law requires
you to contact the National One-Call Center, 811. Please call 48
hours (two business days) before you start your project, whether it’s
landscaping, building fences or major construction. CoServ Gas will
mark the lines at no cost to you. If the pipeline is damaged in any
way—even if it appears to be minor—call 911 and immediately notify
CoServ Gas at (940) 321-7800 or (800) 274-4014 so that we can
conduct a thorough inspection and make necessary repairs.
Customer Yardlines
CoServ Gas maintains the gas line in your yard up to the point
it reaches your meter. If your meter is mounted away from your
house, the pipe between the meter and house is Customer-owned
and is your responsibility to maintain. If this pipe is not maintained,
it may become subject to the potential hazards of corrosion and
leakage. Customers are responsible for periodically inspecting pipes
for corrosion and leakages and making repairs if unsafe conditions
exist. Pipes can also be cut or damaged by excavation. When a
Customer calls 811, a locator service will come out and mark utilityowned
lines, but they do not mark Customer-owned lines beyond
the meter. If you plan to dig around your gas line or ours, you should
always dig by hand. It may be necessary to contact a plumber to
locate or inspect your yardline and make repairs if needed.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO MAKE ANY
REPAIRS YOURSELF.
Potential Hazards of Pipeline Products
Besides liquid petroleum and natural gas, pipelines transport
a variety of products for our everyday lives such as oxygen for
hospitals. They may contain other types of gases, chemicals,
hazardous liquids, refi ned products or crude oil, as well as
nonfl ammable products. If a leak were to occur on the pipeline,
some of these materials could cause environmental damage.
Other products may be highly fl ammable, or harmful if inhaled,
cause eye or skin irritation and possible di culty breathing.
Because of these potential hazards, it is important to be able to
recognize a pipeline leak.
How to recognize gas leaks:
Pipeline emergencies include damaged pipelines, a fi re or
explosion near or directly involving a pipeline, a natural disaster
a ecting the pipeline, a leaking pipeline or leaking pipes in your
house or building.
Here are some tips to help you recognize a gas leak:
„ Look—Persistent bubbling in standing water or discolored
vegetation are signs of a possible leak around the pipeline.
„ Listen—Note any unusual noise like a hissing or roaring sound.
„ Smell—Odor is an easy way to identify the release of natural
gas. Natural gas in its original state is odorless.
An additive is injected into the gas supply to help our
Customers smell and identify the release of natural gas. That
additive smells like rotten eggs.
What to do when a leak occurs:
1. Immediately leave the area.
2. Abandon any equipment being used in or near the suspected leak.
3. From a safe location, call 911 and immediately notify CoServ
Gas at (940) 321-7800 or (800) 274-4014. Give your name,
phone number, description of the leak and its location.
4. Warn others to stay away when possible.
What NOT to do:
1. Do NOT touch, breathe, or make contact with the leaking gas.
Stay upwind.
2. Do NOT light a match, start an engine, use a telephone, operate
light switches or do anything that may create a spark.
3. Do NOT attempt to extinguish any pipeline fi re that may start.
4. Do NOT drive into a leak or vapor cloud area. Automobile
engines may ignite the vapors.
What CoServ Gas will do during an emergency:
CoServ Gas will immediately dispatch trained personnel
upon notifi cation of an emergency. We will provide information
to public safety o cials to aid in their response. We will also
take the necessary operational steps to minimize the impact of
the emergency.
Contact information:
To report an emergency, call 911 and immediately notify
CoServ Gas at (940) 321-7800 or (800) 274-4014.
For more safety tips, visit our website at CoServ.com>Gas>
Resources>Safety. Please do NOT report gas emergencies
(including leaks) via the Web.
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
24 Texas Co-op Power COSERV ELECTRIC May 2014
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 24 4/14/14 11:04 AM
INDIAN CREEK STUDENTS GET
A CHARGE OUT OF POWERRACE! BOARD GAME
“Can a person really become a supervillain after being
electrocuted, like in the new Spiderman movie?”
“What about the time SpongeBob touched an electric eel
and Patrick tried to rescue him and became electrocuted …
and then Squidward tried to rescue Patrick, and he became
electrocuted, too?”
These are just some of the questions that Indian Creek
fi fth-graders posed to CoServ Area Manager Dan Mugg
when he brought CoServ’s giant board game POWERrace!
to the Carrollton elementary school in February to teach
students about how electricity gets distributed.
Players divided into four groups and surrounded the
approximate 5-by-8-foot board game, each with the mission
to bring electricity to a designated building across town and
to wire as many buildings as possible in the process.
The game comes with a set of playing cards that informs
students how much money they have and what choices they
can make. To win, a team must abide by the rules on the
cards drawn and bring electricity—one pole or underground
connection at a time—to the team’s designated building.
“Don’t waste money!” one frugal fi fth-grader called out
to his teammates. With the assistance of Area Manager
Tracee Elrod, who acted as the banker and scorekeeper,
each class of students played for 30 minutes before a
winning team was declared.
“I like how engaged they are,” said science teacher Amy
Vitosh. “They’re arguing over what they should do and
coming up with their own strategies.”
Students learn how to power a town with electricity
and how to work together as a team while keeping track of
a budget. For instance, one team had to choose between
burying its power line for $
3,000 or putting it above ground
on a pole for $
1,000.
“The developer gets to choose,” Dan told them. The
students chose the above-ground option and positioned the
pole one move closer to the target building.
“It was a great morning, a great group of kids,” Dan said.
CoServ Area Manager Dan Mugg
conceived the idea for the board
game POWERrace! as a tool
to educate children about the
distribution of electricity.
Want to play POWERrace! at your school? Please
send a note to CoServ Area Manager Dan Mugg care of
communications@coserv.com, subject line “POWERrace!”
May 2014 COSERV ELECTRIC Texas Co-op Power 25
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 25 4/14/14 11:04 AM
The Board of Directors approved the Mission, Vision and
Core Values at the last board meeting of 2013 as guiding
elements for an inspiring future. The elements set the tone
for the daily work of CoServ Employees. They help our
organization prioritize our responsibilities to our Members
and Customers, and set guidelines for planning strategic
objectives. It is every Employee’s duty to uphold the CoServ
Mission and to aspire to achieve the Vision. Guided by our
Core Values, our Employees serve each other as we serve our
Members and Customers.
One of the extraordinary di† erences o† ered by an electric
co-op is the benefi t of being local. Our Employees are your
friends and your neighbors. Some are even your family
members. If you need something, just let us know.
Mission (our purpose—why we exist):
To deliver excellent service to our Members and Customers by
providing safe and reliable energy solutions.
Vision (our goal for the future):
To be a respected leader dedicated to implementing innovative ideas
that fulfi ll the needs of those we serve.
CORE VALUES
Ž Respect Ž Accountability Ž Integrity Ž Safety Ž Excellence Ž Service
OUR PEOPLE,
PURPOSE
AND FUTURE
Created under the National Rural Electrifi cation Act,
the Denton County Electric Cooperative was founded
in 1937 to bring electricity to rural areas and the people
who lived there—people ignored by for-profi t providers.
As a CoServ Member, you are a part of this historic
mission—whether your family has lived in North Texas
for generations or whether you’re new to the area.
CoServ’s history keeps us rooted in the communities
we serve. But the mission is evolving and branching out,
as is our vision for the future while our organization
continues to experience substantial growth. Led by
CoServ’s Executive Leadership Team, strategic planning
began last year to acknowledge the changes in our
growing communities and to lead our organization to
update our Mission and revise our Vision Statement and
Core Values.
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
26 Texas Co-op Power COSERV ELECTRIC May 2014
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 26 4/14/14 11:04 AM
I think you are doing an outstanding job promoting conservation
and I want to say, "Thank you."
–CoServ Member Leslie Vinson of Frisco
via email
Love the new rebate program! You guys are great!
–CoServ Member Brian A. Ricci of McKinney
via email
VOICE OF MEMBERSHIP
CoServ Vision Statement
To deliver excellent service to
our Members and Customers
by providing safe and reliable
energy solutions.
Contact Information
CoServ.com
contact@coserv.com
(940) 321-7800
Open Monday—Friday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Telephones answered
24 hours a day
Board of Directors
Clyde Geer
Chairman
McKinney, District 3
Anne Vaden
Vice Chairman
Argyle, District 5
Richard Muir
Secretary/Treasurer
Sanger, District 1
Leon Pelzel
Pilot Point, District 2
Jerry Cobb
Frisco, District 4
Bill Ragsdale
Flower Mound, District 6
Curtis Tally
Justin, District 7
I would like to convey my gratitude for the generous donation that the
CoServ Charitable Foundation made to Civil Air Patrol Nighthawk
Squadron. The computer equipment that will be purchased with your
donation will enable us to fulfi ll the missions of CAP more e  ectively.
Emergency Services, through e‚ cient mission management, Cadet
Programs, especially Cyber Patriot, and Aerospace education will all
benefi t from the new more capable hardware.
Thank you again,
 —Mark Hammack, 1st Lt., CAP
Operations O‚ cer
X-413 Nighthawk Composite Squadron
CORRECTION
The 95 kilowatt (kWp) solar photovoltaic system on the roof of CoServ's truck shed cost $
4,900 per kWp, not $
4.90 per kWp, as stated in the CoServ pages of March's Texas Co-op Power.
Thank you
May 2014 COSERV ELECTRIC Texas Co-op Power 27
CoServ Electric Reliable • Safe • Local • Trusted
CoServ_05-2014 TCP.indd 27 4/14/14 11:04 AM
28 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
Display This Maintenance-Free Pool And $AVE $$!
Call TODAY to Qualify for this Limited-Time Opportunity!
VISIT US ON THE WEB!
WWW.SWIMTEXSUN.COM
STAYcation at Home in 2014!
1-800-SWIMTEX(1-800-794-6839)
A family owned and operated Texas Company since 1986.
PRE-APPROVED
FINANCING
AVAILABLE!
WE CONSIDER
ANYTHING
ON TRADE!
WANTED: DEMO HOMESITES FOR 2014 SEASON











Seminole, TX
432.758.1110
Denver City, TX
806.592.3501

































Tornillo, TX
915.764.2263
San Angelo, TX
325.653.4541
Ballinger, TX
325.365.5773
Big Spring, TX
432 263.8344

































432.263.8344
Mesquite, NM
575.233.0123
Deming, NM
575.546.2773
O t ff ener sd 2 82/ .3102/ S emo r oitcirtse ns appl ;y
iF ncna lai Ins emllat nt P al n. Opt oi ns in pi tc ure ma
www. c.tnemelpmisnialphtuos











3230
htiw
F02 t
F5 t R
F5 t F
 t smre subj tce to c ngha .e Fi ncna ing subj tce to appro
ya not be include n prd i .eci
moc











ax
32 w/ 5 30 r E edaol
ramp ans rbd ak se
ta medn ax el tra eli r
oR ryta uC tter
Frontier Box Bl eda
evo d c er dit on John D eree
If Panhandle/West Texas Is Your
Market, We’veGot YouCovered.
Call: Martin Bevins at (512) 486-6249
Email: advertising@TexasCoopPower.com
If Panhandle/West Texas Is Your
Market, We’veGot YouCovered.
Target customers close to home with
the new Panhandle/West Texas advertising
section of Texas Co-op Power. Be
part of a statewide magazine—without
the statewide cost. Call or email today.
PANHANDLE/WEST TEXAS AUDIENCE
Circulation 86,600 • Readership 216,500
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 29
MARKETPLACE MARKETPLACE
BUY • SELL • TRADE • ACROSS TOWN • ACROSS TEXAS
3 designs & 11 colors to choose from!
Replace your vinyl skirting with STONECOTE.
1-830-833-2547
www.stonecote.com
MANUFACTURED HOME OR PIER & BEAM HOME
INSULATED CEMENT SKIRTING
(512) 263-6830 • www.brushshark.com
SKID STEER MOUNTED SHEAR
• 1
/2" to 6" diameter trees and brush.
• Perfect for cedar, shin oak, persimmon, mesquite.
On your pond or lake, with or without roof.
All sizes—installation available.
45 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE
Call for Free Information • 1-800-310-1425
www.ellisonmarine.com • Ellison Marine, Franklin, TX.
FLOATING FISHING PIER
405-257-1236
www.countryhatchery.net
Country Hatchery • Box 747 • Wewoka, OK 74884
Call for a free color brochure
Muscovy Ducklings
Turkey Poults
Chicks: in Reds, SilverLaced
Wyandottes,
Light Brahmas, Cinnamon
Queens, Orpingtons,
Barred Rocks, Ameraucanas,
Black Australorps, White
and Brown Leghorns,
Red Ranger Broilers, Guineas
40 x 50 x 10 = $8,637.00
40 x 60 x 12 = $10,362.00
50 x 75 x 12 = $14,376.00
60 x 80 x 14 = $18,153.00
100 x 150 x 14 (M-1) = $46,824.00
PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
1-800-509-4949 www.accessiblebuildings.com
30 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
 DUCTLESS A/C HP SYSTEMS
• Eliminate those noisy inefficient window units!
• Replace that old dirty central A/C system!
• Energy efficient up to 20+ SEER
• Save up to 30% or more on your electric bill
• Improved Air Quality/Extremely Quiet
• Cools and Heats – No Furnace Required
• Affordable / Financing Available (w.a.c.)
 Call Toll Free 800-228-1265
 www.atlanticservice.com
 6525 Baker Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76118
Discover what the rest of the world has known
for years; all the advantages of ductless split
systems. Call us today for a free estimate.
OCEAN FREIGHT CONTAINER SALES
SECURE STORAGE
Water-Tight/Rodent Proof
LARRY SINGLEY
1-866-992-9122 CALL (817) 992-9122
Toll Free 1-888-875-8233
Fax : 9 4 0 - 4 8 4 - 6 7 4 6 emai l: info@rhinobldg.com
We b site : www. R H I N OBL D G .COM
Prices F.O.B. Mfg. Plants;
Seal Stamped Blue Prints;
Easy Bolt Together Design.
Farm•Industrial•Commercial
VISIT
OUR
WEBSITE
PRICES INCLUDE COLOR SIDES & GALVALUME ROOF
ASK ABOUT
OUR
ARENAS
(Local codes may affect prices)
25 YEAR COLOR WARRANTY
Based In
Texas
30’ x 50’ x 12’........$8,985
40’ x 60’ x 12’........$12,490
50’ x 75’ x 14.........$17,999
60’ x 100’ x 12’......$24,400
100’ x 150’ x 14’....$57,800
“NEW” SLIDE-IN TUB
Locally Owned & Operated
817-326-3003
Call for a FREE DVD and Catalog!
877-201-5850
Includes models, product specifi cations, and special factory-direct offers.
TOLL
FREE
World’s FIRST Trimmer
for Riding Mowers!
NEW FOR 2014!
The DR® TOW-BEHIND TRIMMER/ MOWER is the
perfect time- and back-saving solution for anyone
who mows with
a riding mower,
then spends just
as long (or longer!) going around their property a
second time on foot to do the trimming.
TRIM FASTER,
MOW WIDER!
Tightly trims around fence posts,
trees, and other obstacles with
spring-loaded action!
TRIMS PRECISELY
by automatically
defl ecting
around
obstacles!
MOWS WIDER by extending
the reach of your riding mower,
saving you time.
5X FASTER and more powerful
than any handheld trimmer!
83319X © 2014
HEAVY-DUTY DR®
TRIMMER CORD
out-trims and
out-lasts ordinary
trimmer line.
Try a DR®
at Home for
6 Months!
Call for details.
DRtrimmer.com/tow
FREE SHIPPING! FOR A LIMITED TIME.
GET RESULTS! ADVERTISE IN THE
CALL MARTIN FOR MORE INFORMATION
(512) 486-6249
MARKETPLACE
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 31
National Collector’s Mint
announces a special limited
release of 2,541 Morgan Silver
Dollars 93-136 years old at
$29 each. Several prominent
national dealers charge $46
MORE for a comparable
Morgan Silver Dollar. These
Morgans are among the last
surviving originals still in
existence, and each coin is
guaranteed to be in mostly
Brilliant Uncirculated to Fine
condition. Due to volatile
fluctuations in the precious
metals market, price can be
guaranteed @ $29 each for one
week only!
MARKET CONDITIONS
The last time silver hit $50 an
ounce, China was a poor,
underdeveloped nation. Now,
the Chinese are rich and using
over three times as much silver!
Will this drive the price of silver
back to $50 or even higher?
One thing is certain – dramatic
increases in silver investment
have seen silver prices rise over
368% in the last ten years, and
as much as 40% in one month
alone!
INVESTMENT
Increasing prices of precious
metals make every Morgan
Silver Dollar more
valuable. But acquiring
your own private
cache of Morgan
Silver Dollars is a
long term investment
in so much
more... in history...
in American heritage...
in the splendid
rendering of
Miss Liberty’s profile
by designer
George T. Morgan,
whose “M” mark on
every Morgan Silver Dollar
identifies his masterwork.
And, of course, Morgan Silver
Dollars have not been minted
for 93 years and are no longer
in circulation.
Phone orders will be filled on
a first-come, first-served basis
and a limit of 100 coins per
customer will be strictly adhered
to. Timely mail orders
will be accepted if directed to:
National Collector’s Mint,
Dept. 7569, 8 Slater St.,
Port Chester, NY 10573. THIS
OFFER MAY BE WITHDRAWN
AT ANY TIME WITHOUT
NOTICE AT THE SOLE
DISCRETION OF NCM.
You may order 1 Morgan Silver
Dollar for $29, plus $4 shipping,
handling and insurance, 3
for $94 ppd., 5 for $154.50 ppd.,
10 for $303 ppd., 20 for $599
ppd., 50 for $1480 ppd., 100 for
$2935 ppd. If you’re not 100%
delighted with your purchase
simply send us your postage
paid return within 60 days for a
refund of your purchase price.
60-Day Money Back Guarantee!
Direct from Locked Vaults to U.S. Citizens!
Hello, I’m Angela Marie
Buchanan. You might know
me as Bay Buchanan. I was
appointed by Ronald Reagan to
be the 37th Treasurer of the
United States… maybe you’ve
seen my signature on some of the bills in
your wallet. So, you can understand why
our nation’s coins are vitally important to
me. That’s why I’m so pleased to be able
to announce this release of Morgan Silver
Dollars by National Collector’s Mint.
Of all the coins ever struck by the U.S.
Gov’t, none have so captured our imaginations
the way Morgans have. I invite
you to sample some of these magnificent
Morgan Silver Dollars. Enjoy them.
Protect them. Celebrate them. What
better way to hold your history, our history,
America’s history in the palm of
your hand!
Sincerely,
Angela Marie (Bay) Buchanan
37th Treasurer of the United States of America
Co-Director, NCM Board of Advisors
Original U.S. Gov’t Morgan Silver Dollars
1-800-799-MINT(1-800-799-6468)
National Collector’s Mint, Inc. is an independent, private corporation not affiliated with, endorsed, or licensed by
the U.S. Government or the U.S. Mint. Offer not valid in CT or MN. © 2014 NCM, Inc. E1-E83
CALL TOLL-FREE,
ASK FOR EXT. 7569
Only
$
2900
each
A message from the
37TH TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES
32 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
(;;,5;065
46)03,/64,
6>5,9:
: ; 6 7
3,(2:
9,+<*,+
,3,*;90*
)033
30-,;04,>(99(5;@
05*9,(:,+
/64,=(3<,
05:<9(5*,
*9,+0;
56469,966-9<4)3,
,?7,9;
05:;(33(;065
:PUJL  YVVMV]LYJVT
  ®
LOW COST
Mobile Home Insurance





Start Saving
www.stdins.com
Call For A Custom Quote
8005220146
LOW
e HliboM





W CO
usne Imoe H





TS
ecnaru










Co elpm
repuS io
(I nidulcn g the o
saE y p ya
edwoL du
quot se
e&eerF
din





cete overa eg
io vresr ice
e o oitp f Cn o ider t C )sdra
nemy t p snal
du tc ib sel
e nilnoysae










9 16
wners
M ibo le
g
in
225008
om Qstuor A Cl FlaC
.www std





m
0 146
euotom Q
in oc.s
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
SUPER
COUPON!
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last.
Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last.
Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last.
Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last.
Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last.
Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot
be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original
purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original
coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
NOBODY BEATS OUR QUALITY, SERVICE AND PRICE!
FACTORY DIRECT SAVINGS
How does Harbor Freight sell great quality
tools at the lowest prices? We buy direct
from the same factories who supply the
expensive brands and pass the savings
on to you. It’s just that simple! Come in
and see for yourself why over 25 million
satisfi ed customers and leading automotive
and consumer magazines keep talking
about our great quality and unbeatable
prices. Visit one of our 500 Stores
Nationwide and use this 20% Off Coupon
on one of over 7,000 products*, plus pick
up a Free 1" x 25 Ft. Tape Measure, a
$6.99 value.
• We Will Beat Any Competitor’s Price
 Within 1 Year Of Purchase
• No Hassle Return Policy
• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed
Customers Say and Experts Agree Harbor Freight WINS in QUALITY and PRICE
If You Buy Tools Anywhere Else,
You're Throwing Your Money Away
QUALITY TOOLS AT RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICES Nationwide
500 Stores HARBOR FREIGHT LIFETIME
WARRANTY ON ALL HAND TOOLS!
LIMIT 1 - Save 20% on any one item purchased at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by
calling 800-423-2567. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon, gift cards, Inside
Track Club membership, extended service plans or on any of the following: compressors,
generators, tool storage or carts, welders, fl oor jacks, Towable Ride-On Trencher (Item
65162), open box items, in-store event or parking lot sale items. Not valid on prior purchases
after 30 days from original purchase date with original receipt. Non-transferable. Original
coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
SUPER COUPON!
ANY SINGLE ITEM!
20%
OFF LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at
our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last.
Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original
coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
SUPER COUPON!
FREE
WITH ANY
PURCHASE
Item
95275 SAVE shown
50%
 3 GALLON, 100 PSI
OILLESS PANCAKE
AIR COMPRESSOR
LOT NO. 95275
60637/69486/61615
REG.
PRICE
$79.99
$3999
SUPER
COUPON!
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
REG. PRICE $179.99
$12999 $8999
SAVE
$90
900 PEAK/ 800 RUNNING WATTS 2 HP (63 CC) GAS GENERATOR LOT NO. 66619
69381/60338 Item
69381
shown
NEW!
 9000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH
WITH REMOTE CONTROL
AND AUTOMATIC BRAKE
REG.
PRICE
$399 .99
$27999
LOT NO. 68143 /61346/61325
Item
61325
shown
SAVE
$120
"An Excellent Means of Adding a Winch to your
4x4 Without Breaking the Bank"
– 4 Wheel Drive SUV Magazine
LOT NO.
68784
69387
62270
REG.
PRICE
$649 .99
$36999
 44", 13 DRAWER INDUSTRIAL QUALITY
ROLLER CABINET
Item
68784
shown
"We Are Impressed With the Quality...
The Price is Incredible"
– Car Craft Magazine
• Super High
Gloss Finish!
• 2633 lb. Capacity
• Weighs 245 lbs.
SAVE
$280
NEW!
$6999 REG.
PRICE
$99 .99
 1.5 HP ELECTRIC POLE SAW
LOT NO. 68862
SAVE
$30 Item 47902
shown
40 PIECE 1/4" AND 3/8" DRIVE
SOCKET SET
$349 REG.
PRICE
$9.99
 LOT NO.
 47902 SAVE 61328 65%
Item 2707
shown
SAVE
41%
$699
REG. PRICE $11 .99
8 FT. 6" x 11 FT. 4"
FARM QUALITY TARP
LOT NO. 2707
60457/69197
Item
68887
shown
LOT NO.
68887
 61849
 90 AMP FLUX
WIRE WELDER
REG. PRICE $149.99
$9999
• No Gas Required!
SAVE
$50
WE CARRY
A FULL LINE OF
WELDING WIRE
$7999 REG.
PRICE
$129 .99
 1500 PSI
PRESSURE
WASHER
LOT NO. 68333 /69488
Item
68333
shown
SAVE
$50
$1799
REG. PRICE $29 .99
21 PIECE SAE/METRIC
GO-THRU SOCKET SET
LOT NO. 67974
SAVE
40%
SUPER
COUPON!
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount
or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
$5999 $8999
REG. PRICE $119. 99
 RAPID PUMP®
1.5 TON ALUMINUM
RACING JACK
 LOT NO.
68053
69252
60569/62160
• 3-1/2 Pumps
Lifts Most
Vehicles!
• Weighs 27 lbs.
"The Undisputed King of the Garage"
– Four Wheeler Magazine
SAVE
$60
Item 68053
shown
SUPER
COUPON!
LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last.
Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/14. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
SAVE $150
1195 LB. CAPACITY 4 FT. x 8 FT. HEAVY DUTY FOLDABLE UTILITY TRAILER
• DOT certified
Item 90154 shown
REG. PRICE
$399.99
$24999
$29999
LOT NO. 90154 /62170
1" x 25 FT.
TAPE
MEASURE
ITEM 69080
69030/69031
VALUE
$699
Item 69080 shown
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 33



Cannot be combined with promotional pricing. Everyday prices start at $54.99/mo. Requires 24-month commitment,
credit qualification and qualifying programming.
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
ANYWHERE.
Get an iPad®
 mini Free when you sign up for DISH and the Hopper.®
Only from DISH
BUNDLE AND SAVE WITH DISH

FREE
FREE


FREE

FREE HOPPER UPGRADE
•
•
•
•


CHOOSE YOUR PACKAGE AND SAVE!
240+ Channels 240+ Channels
America’s Top 200
$
69
ACT NOW
$
39FOR 12 190+ Channels 190+ Channels MONTHS
America’s Top 120
$
54
ACT NOW
$
29FOR 12
MONTHS
55+ Channels
Smart Pack
$
32
ACT NOW
$
19
FOR 12
MONTHS
290+ Channels 290+ Channels
America’s Top 250
$
79
ACT NOW
$
44FOR 12
MONTHS













MOH













ME T E TN ER













TAI MN ENT
L













LIMITED-T F
D- E
F -T OF
D TE
O







































Cannot be combined with pr
MOH
ANY
eG n it a













Cannot be combined with promotional pricing. Everyday prices st
credit qualification and qualifying pr
ME T E TN ER
Y E HW E . R
n i daP ®
 m ni i erF e ehw n you s
lnO y f or m D













ces start at $54.99/mo. Requires 24-month commitment,
ation and qualifying programming.
TAI T MN EN
u s gi p fn u or D SI H and the Ho
m D HSI













es 24-month commitment,
.reppo
®
-TIME FE F
R! FE


























C OH
55 Cha l
S ck ram t Pa
$
32













ESO YOU
+091 Cha
A s ’acirem
$
54
ACT ON W
$
19
F RO 12













R PACKAG
+042 C nnha
A s m T ’acire
$
69 nnha sle
s T 0 po 12
4
A
$
CT ON W
29F RO 12
M HS TNO













$
7
GE NA D S
nn sle
T 0 po 20
9 A
$
CT ON W
39F RO 12
M HS TNO +092 C nnha
A s m To ’acire
79 $













S ! AVE
nn sle
po 2 05 A
$
CT ON W
44F RO 12
M HS TNO


























F EER
toN eligible f ro Ho erpp or
iPad m ini o .reff
+55 C nnha sle













HO PP RE UGP R
M HS TNO













ACT ON
F E RE P
rof m 3 on sht
R DE A
Mon ht ly D













OW NA D AL OS
P N ER MI MU CH NA
s
lA l o reff s r riuqe e 2 tnom-4 h c emtimmo
 DVR a dn r viece er f see appl .y Prom ito on la pr seci n













O GET:
NELS
ne t and c ider t q .noitacfiilau
 n to eligible f ro i daP m ini o ff er.


























U BN EAT
• W cta h all y
• I tnatsn ly s
• S rot p te u
• roceR d u
as me time













TA LB E WH LO - E OH E M DH
l y uo r live and r edroce V ad T n
 s pik c mmo erci *sla
o 2p t 00, 0 h ruo f ys o uo r f tirova
o 6 dip t nereff t s woh t ts a eh
me*













F E RE H
of 4 mr 2 htno s
F E RE IN
i o 6 rn up t oo
A m ll o reff s r riuqe e 2 -4
aPi d m ni s 1i i B W6 G F-i
o a r use of t eh Ho erpp tr
ffO er subj tce to change
D DVR
*erehwyn
te s swoh













DH
s vA ailab el with qua fil yi gn pack .sega
NSTA LL ATI NO
sm
tnom h c nemtimmo t and c ider t q .noitacfiilau
Fi o yln . R tome e v niwei g r eriuqe s W F-i i c noitcenno
fsna er f .erutae
ge b desa pr on muime cha nn el a iav la .ytilib







































as me time
erutaeF* must be
vA ailab el with qua













adol tlaC
88-1
me
 e an bled by customer.
ua p gniyfil pack .sega lhtnoM y DVR and r eviece r f ee s a













Ie Bvad sny aa
3758-614-88
.ylpp













!GI
B NU L D N E A D SAV
A n s ow yk h ou ca s
W H- ITH D SI HNET I SP HG













V TI E WI H D SH
va e $ 01 /m .o
P N DEE I R T NT E E


























r r
Impor Ttnat er Cdnasm on itid on :s Pr
ve er yady mo ylhtn price app seil a dn is s
remaining a .seilpp vitcA ioat n f ee may
diAd oit nal R qe ui :stnemer For iPad
pr immargo ng. A elbaliav w elih supp seil
om nt lh y cirp e eilppa s na d is cejbus t to
not a lbaliav e w ti h s cele t p ca ka seg . oH
Req :stnemeriu erF e St radna d Prof sse
empiuqE nt c osirapmo n b esa n ed o piuq
sremotsuc , and s cejbu o tt t mre s of a pp
© 102 4 SID H rowteN k C.L.L . lA l gir hts ra e p epor rt f Sy o rat z E etn rt emnia nt, LL













r
omoPr ffOlanoit er :s eriuqeR ac vit at fonoi ne iyfilauqw ng sHSID erv
 s tcejbu to c ngeha . ETF: If you c ecna l s civre e d niru g f ri st 24 mont sh
y appl .y
 mi in O :reff C emotsu r m su t s cele t H eppo r system and m umini m o
s last. Model s tcejbu to c ngeha w tuohti notic .e HD F er e fo 4 Mr 2 no
egnahc . imerP um ahC elsnn : -3 mo htn pr muime offer lav isue 61$
eppo r Feat :seru A oHotu p feat ru e is o ln y a lbaliav e w ti h p cabyal k t
anoi l nI st lla at oi n ylno . C iatre n e nempiuq t is esael d na d sum t be ruter
nemp t a lbaliav e f or m m oja r TV p redivor s as of 1 41/71/ . Wat nihc g l vi
lbacilp e P mor ot anoi l and R aitnedise l C emotsu r a stnemeerg . State re
devreser . ®OBH , xameniC ® na d ler ated lennahc s na d civres e ram CL . B CAL K S LIA S © 2 10 4 S rat z E etn rt emnia nt, L CL . All R thgi s R ese













vic llA.e icpr c,seef,se harge p,s ackage ,s pr immargo ng, ef at f,seru
s, e lra y t oitanimre n fee of $20 for e ca h month r niniame g a seilpp . F
of A ’acirem s Top 120 p ca ka eg ; a oll w 4-6 w ee ks for d yrevile ; of ef r n
:shtn A anoitidd l $ m/01 D fo H ee w evia d for f ri st 24 mont sh . R eriuqe
;5 aft prer omot oi na pl er oi d, then rruc- ent ve er yady mont ylh icpr ase
he n xe t day of s cele t p mitemir e s woh s on A CB , C SB , FOX and NB
enr d to SID H u op n oitallecnac n or enruternu d empiuqe nt eef s ylppa . U
ve and r edroce V ad T rehwyn e r eriuqe s an I detcennoc-tenretn , S gnil
emesrubmie nt c egrah s may a ylpp . Ad anoitid l rest noitcir s and t exa s m
r e ks ra e ht e treporp y of moH e oB x eciffO , .cnI MITWOHS E i a s tsiger devre . i aP s a td i ramedar k of A lpp e I .cn , r eretsige n td i he U S. . and o













u
r
oitcnuf na dnaytil offer cottcejbuss ngeha ohtiw ut ton ic .e After -21
or i aP d m ni i of ref f y, i ou c ecna l s civre e d niru g f sri 4 mt 2 shtno , e lra
r not a lbaliav e in P eu rto R ci o or U IVS . ETF b esa n pd i ra t on e dyrev
es c uounitno s e nemllorn n At i aPotu y w ti h P selrepa s B gnilli . Af et r pr
app cottcejbuseradnayl ngeha kcolB. bu ts er H@ om Iseriuqere nter
C as p ra f Pt o miTemir e A mityn e f erutae . Both f erutae s are s cejbu t t
. U orfp nt and anoitidda l lhtnom y eef s am y ylppa . R nidroce g h ruo s yrav
elbane- d DVR and c lbitapmo e m libo e d ecive . iM sce all usneo : O eff
s may a ylpp . reffO s end 6 41/21/ .
er d ramedart k of mitwohS e krowteN s .cnI a , BC S ynapmoC . STARZ ot eh r c seirtnuo . A lpp s ne i ot a p napicitra r sn ot i osnop r of t ih s p omor













mo htn promot oi na pl er oi d, then rruc- ent
y t nimre at oi n fee of $30 for e ca h m htno
ad y p cir e ( e.i . n anoitomorp-no l p ecir ) f ro
mo ot anoi l p doire , t nerruc-neh t e yadyrev
ne ocmaertsott nten cylno-DH.t han lsne
o at t ytilibaliav . tsnI al tnempiuqE/noital
y; 002 0 h ruo s esab d on SD p .gnimmargor
rs a lbaliav e for new and q eifilau d f remro
na d etaler d lennahc s na d civres e skram
.noito DR_8838_10062












 
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 35
Texas History
Wired for Sound Between you, me and the fence post,
barbed-wire telephone systems kept rural folks hanging on every word
BY CAMILLE WHEELER
On March 10, 1876, Alexander Graham
Bell debuted the talking telegraph: the telephone.
Bell earned two patents for his
invention, and in 1877, he and two financial
backers formed the Bell Telephone Company.
But when Bell’s second patent expired
in 1894, the technological landscape underwent
a seismic shift. Suddenly, Bell wasn’t
the only company that could legally operate
telephone systems in the U.S.
Over the next decade, more than 6,000
independent telephone companies went
into business, and the number of telephones
in the country swelled from less than half a
million to 3.3 million. Telephone systems,
though, mostly served urban populations.
Entrepreneurs steered clear of rural
regions, where the installation of poles and
phone wires carried exorbitant costs.
But near the turn of the 20th century,
Great Plains settlers, including pioneers
across Texas, weren’t wireless. They had a
ready-made telephone transmission system in place: miles and
miles of barbed-wire fences that kept ranchers’ cattle herds
separate; prevented northern cattle herds from drifting on to
grass-rich Panhandle spreads; and delineated ranch pasture
from farm field, cow horse from plow horse.
Fences symbolized division—and connection. The process
started on the pages of Montgomery Ward and Sears Roebuck &
Co. catalogs, from which people could order telephones by mail.
From there, the spark of ingenuity provided the missing link.
As described by Seguin-based historian and author Charley
Eckhardt, electronic communication was now easily within
grasp. Using a jawed, metal alligator clip, you could clamp the
telephone wire from your house to the top wire on your barbedwire
pasture fence, making sure it connected to a property-line
fence. Or, if the yard fence was connected to the pasture fence,
you could clamp on there.
And so it went, house after house, fence after fence as rural
families struck up the kind of conversation, sort of, that Bell
imagined hearing when he began experimenting with telegraphwire
voice transmission in the early 1870s. “A rural telephone
system that had no operators, no bills—and no long-distance
charges—was born,” Eckhardt wrote in a 2008 online Texas
Escapes story, a version of which originally appeared in The
Tombstone Epitaph, a historical monthly Arizona newspaper.
Not surprisingly, the system had its flaws. Roaming cows and
lovesick bulls broke many a telephone wire. And rain-soaked
fence posts shorted out phones and lines. But discarded saloon
bottles, as Eckhardt explains, were good glass insulators.
Wooden pegs with drilled holes were whittled to fit inside broken
bottlenecks, and the bottles were nailed to fence posts, with
wire strung between the insulators.
There were other challenges. Without a central operator,
each household had its own crank-phone ring, such as two longs
and three shorts, to indicate incoming calls. A single long ring
denoted an emergency, and everybody along the line would pick
up the phone to hear the news. All telephones rang when calls
were made. Eavesdropping prevailed, and the discussion of anything
intimate was ill-advised, Eckhardt says.
But glitches and all, the system worked, surviving into the
1930s in some areas. After enabling farming and ranching to
coexist, “barbed wire unwittingly became part of the nation’s
budding telephone network,” Maryland-based author and historian
David B. Sicilia wrote in a 1997 Inc. magazine article. “What
kept crops and animals apart helped bring people together.”
In her 1958 book, “Light ’n Hitch: A Collection of Historical
Writing Depicting Life on the High Plains,” author Laura V. Hamner
praised barbed wire as both a “thorny barrier” and a link
among Texas ranch women. “Equally important as the urgent
message,” she wrote, “was the woman-talk which kept the barb
wire humming—and which meant so much to the lonely ladies
of the plains.”
JOHN KACHIK
Camille Wheeler is an Austin writer.
36 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
Recipes
RICK PATRICK
For Love of Peanuts It’s hard to find a food more versatile than the peanut, and Texas has long
been one of the country’s leading producers. The mighty legume, a good source of monounsaturated fat, fiber and
protein, remains a stalwart of Texas agriculture. Our state holds the distinction of growing all four types of peanuts
including runners, Spanish, Virginia and Valencia. Each is usually identified with certain foods. For instance, runners
are commonly used in peanut butter, while the high-oil, papery-skinned Spanish peanuts are often used in candy.
Through history, peanuts have been grown in various Texas towns, including Aubrey, Whitesboro and Floresville.
These towns no longer consider peanuts a cash crop but still each honor their peanut-growing heritage at festivals
held every October. These days, the “peanut capital” of Texas is Gaines County, the largest peanut-producing
county in the state—and the entire country, according to the Texas Peanut Producers Board. Nearby Terry County
also grows peanuts and is home to shelling facilities including Birdsong and Golden Peanut, which supply nuts to
some of the country’s most recognizable brands.
Here’s one of my favorite peanut recipes, Monster Bark, a free-form cookie cut into pieces and served like
candy bark or brittle. ANNA GINSBERG, FOOD EDITOR
Monster Bark
 1 large egg
 ⅓ cup granulated sugar
 ⅓ cup packed light brown sugar
 ¾ teaspoon baking soda
 ⅜ scant teaspoon kosher salt
 ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
 ½ cup peanut butter (4.8 ounces on a scale)
 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
 2½ tablespoons all-purpose flour
 1½ cups quick-cooking or old-fashioned (not instant) oats
 ¼ cup semisweet chocolate or peanut butter chips
 ¼ cup mini candy-coated chocolates (M&M’s)
 ⅓ cup chopped, lightly salted peanuts
› Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Line a large (about 18-by-
13-inch), rimmed, heavy-duty baking sheet with parchment
paper.
› In a mixing bowl, stir together the egg, both types of
sugar, baking soda, salt and vanilla. Stir in the peanut
butter and butter. When mixed, add flour and stir until
blended. Lastly, stir in the oats, chips, candies and
peanuts.
› Empty onto the baking sheet and divide dough into two
sections.
› Dampen fingers and press each section down to make it
as thin as possible. You could make one big slab, but
making two gives you more edge pieces and more crunch.
› Bake for 45 minutes. Remove from the oven and slide
parchment onto a cutting board. With a pizza cutter, cut
the slabs into multiple uneven pieces—but do not separate
cut pieces, as the cookies will still be rather crumbly
at this point. Return parchment paper with cookies to
baking sheet.
› Return to the oven and bake for another 15 to 20 minutes.
Let cool for about 10 minutes on baking sheet and
carefully transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
Cookies should crisp as they cool.
Servings: 12. Serving size: 2 cookies. Per serving: 229 calories, 6.1 g protein,
12.9 g fat, 25.6 g carbohydrates, 2.2 g dietary fiber, 240 mg sodium,
15.4 g sugars, 23 mg cholesterol
Cook’s Tip: If you have some thicker pieces that aren’t crunchy once cooled,
throw them back in the 250-degree oven for another 10 to 15 minutes, then
let cool. The thinner you press the slabs, the better chance you have of getting
crunchy bark.
Monster Bark
Peanut and Pea Salad
 1 package (10 ounces) frozen peas, thawed
 1 cup dry-roasted peanuts
 1 cup chopped celery
 6 strips bacon, cooked and crumbled
 ¼ cup chopped red onion
 ½ cup mayonnaise
 ¼ cup prepared zesty Italian salad dressing
› In a large bowl, combine the peas, peanuts, celery, bacon
and onion.
› Mix the mayonnaise and Italian dressing in a small bowl.
Pour over salad and toss to coat.
› Chill until served.
Servings: 5. Serving size: ¾ cup. Per serving: 494 calories, 15.8 g protein,
39.2 g fat, 17.8 g carbohydrates, 5.8 g dietary fiber, 592 mg sodium, 6.6 g
sugars, 15 mg cholesterol
DEBRA TACKER | FARMERS EC
Pea-Nutty Meat Loaf
 ½ cup chopped onions
 ½ cup chopped bell peppers
 1 teaspoon olive oil
 ½ cup finely chopped dry-roasted peanuts
 2 pounds ground chuck
 2 slices white sandwich bread, torn into pieces
 2 teaspoons seasoned salt
 1 teaspoon sugar
 ¾ teaspoon black pepper
 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
 2 beaten eggs
 2 tablespoons milk
 ½ cup tomato sauce
 Ketchup or barbecue sauce for topping, optional
› Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
› Saute onions and bell peppers in olive oil. Put in a large
bowl and add peanuts, chuck, bread, salt, sugar, pepper,
Worcestershire, eggs, milk and tomato sauce. Mix well.
› Divide mixture equally between two loaf pans and bake
for about 40 to 45 minutes. During last 10 minutes of
baking, top with ketchup or barbecue sauce, if desired.
Servings: 8. Serving size: 1 slice. Per serving: 397 calories, 24.4 g protein,
29.5 g fat, 8.6 g carbohydrates, 1.6 g dietary fiber, 766 mg sodium, 2.9 g
sugars, 127 mg cholesterol
TOMMY OSTEEN | CENTRAL TEXAS EC
MARIAN EVONIUK| PEDERNALES EC
Peanuts Contest Winner: Texans love their
peanuts, and this month’s recipe submissions
were evidence of that! Although many readers’
recipes scored high in testing, here’s our favorite.
Peanut Butter Dream Pie
 1 cup Spanish peanuts (no skins), finely chopped
 6 cinnamon graham cracker squares, finely crushed
 ¼ cup butter, melted
 ¼ cup brown sugar
 ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons chocolate syrup, divided
 3½ cups heavy cream
 4 tablespoons granulated sugar
 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract
 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, divided
 ½ cup peanut butter
 1 cup powdered sugar, divided
› Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
› In a small bowl, combine peanuts, graham cracker
crumbs, butter and brown sugar. Reserve ¼ cup for
topping. Press remainder into bottom and up sides
of a 10-inch pie pan. Bake for 8 minutes. Let cool
slightly then drizzle bottom of crust with ¼ cup of
chocolate syrup.
› In a medium bowl, beat heavy cream until frothy.
Add granulated sugar and vanilla and beat until
peaks are stiff but not dry.
› In a large bowl, beat half of the cream cheese with
the peanut butter and ½ cup powdered sugar until
fluffy. Add half of the whipped cream and beat until
smooth. Pour into crust and drizzle with another
¼ cup chocolate syrup.
› In a large bowl, beat remaining cream cheese and
½ cup powdered sugar until smooth. Add remaining
whipped cream and beat until fluffy. Spread over first
layer and drizzle with remaining chocolate syrup.
Swirl syrup into second layer and top with reserved
graham cracker mixture.
› Refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight before
serving. Pie can be frozen. Remove from freezer
1 hour before serving.
Servings: 12. Serving size: 1 slice. Per serving: 612 calories, 9.3 g
protein, 48.4 g fat, 39.5 g carbohydrates, 2.3 g dietary fiber, 274
mg sodium, 28.6 g sugars, 126 mg cholesterol
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 37
Web Extra on TexasCoopPower.com
Find more peanut recipes online along with recipes from years past.
$100 Recipe Contest
• Instead of a recipe contest in September, we will showcase staff picks.
Watch for favorite dishes from our kitchens.
• October’s recipe contest topic is Cakes. If you think you bake one so
yummy it, well, takes the cake, share the recipe with our readers. The
deadline is May 10.
There are three ways to enter: ONLINE at TexasCoopPower.com/contests; MAIL to 1122 Colorado St., 24th
Floor, Austin, TX 78701; FAX to (512) 763-3401. Include your name, address and phone number, plus your
co-op and the name of the contest you are entering. 
“While shopping, my wife saw an
expensive metal table she liked. I offered to make her
one, but with my own design & style. Even with little
metalworking experience, I imported my sketch and cut
out the metal table - all in one piece and with no other
materials. The table came out just how I imagined! Plus,
several people want to buy my table design. Now I can
PDNHP\LGHDVLQWRXQLTXH	SUR¿WDEOHSURMHFWVXVLQJWKH
PlasmaCAM®!”
‡ID[‡ZZZSODVPDFDPFRP
32%R[‡&RORUDGR&LW\&2
-Dennis Cordova, Amateur Metalworker
The PlasmaCAM® machine makes
it easy for you to cut
intricate metal projects.
Call today for your
FREE demo video to see
what you can do with this
amazing machine!
®
TexasCoopPower.com
Upcoming Contests
July Issue: Friendship Deadline: May 10
August: Refreshing September: Energy
All entries must include name, address, daytime phone and co-op affiliation, plus the contest topic and a brief
description of your photo. ONLINE: Submit highest-resolution digital images at TexasCoopPower.com/contests.
MAIL: Focus on Texas, 1122 Colorado St., 24th Floor, Austin, TX 78701. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be
included if you want your entry returned (approximately six weeks). Please do not submit irreplaceable photographs—send
a copy or duplicate. We do not accept entries via email. We regret that Texas Co-op Power cannot
be responsible for photos that are lost in the mail or not received by the deadline.
Focus on Texas
Inspirational Sources of inspiration are the
driving force behind some of life’s most rewarding
achievements. When facing adversity, one drop of
encouragement can become a reservoir of confidence
and creativity. These are a few reader-submitted
photos that were inspirational to us. ANDREW BOZE
Web Extras on TexasCoopPower.com
‘You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.’ Hockey legend
Wayne Gretzky said that. You also miss 100 percent of our online Inspirational
photos unless you check out our website.
o Ralph Arvesen of Pedernales EC captured this photo of daughter
Makayla against the sunset in northwestern Blanco County.
This photo, submitted by Judy Faught of Lyntegar EC and taken by her
daughter Breck, captures the connection between generations. a
Carrie O’Brien-Sibley of Farmers
EC spotted a great blue heron
coming home to its family on
Lake Fork in Rains County. d
g This photo, taken by Susan
Green of Heart of Texas EC,
shows a vast field of resilient
sunflowers, shining even under
a cloudy sky.
o Elizabeth Coffman of Heart of Texas EC submitted this well-arranged
shot, taken by her daughter, Emma.
15
Luling 87th Annual Field Day,
(830) 875-2438, lulingfoundation.org
Bulverde [15-18, 22-25] S.T.A.G.E. performances
of ‘Tom Walker,’ (830) 438-2339
16
Gainesville M-o-o-ving Thru the Mud with
Landon, (940) 372-0343, mudwithlandon.com
Huntsville 11th Annual Shot in the Dark
Golf Tournament, (936) 295-8113,
chamber.huntsville.tx.us
Lufkin Sawmill Sampler, (936) 632-9535,
treetexas.com
Kerens [16-17] 2nd Annual Dancin’ on the
Bricks and BBQ Cook-off, (903) 396-2971,
ci.kerens.tx.us
Madisonville [16-17] MSCA BBQ Cook-off,
(936) 348-8460, sidewalkcattlemens.com
17
Gainesville A Day and Night for VISTO,
(940) 902-3402, concertforvisto.com
Valley Spring Valley Spring VFD Annual
Fish Fry, (325) 247-5354
May
10
Corsicana 16th Annual Coyote Squadron
Airsho, (903) 257-8282, coyotesquadron.org
Johnson City JCVFD Annual Fish Fry
and Raffle Fundraiser, (830) 868-7684,
johnsoncity-texas.com
Mico Mico VFD Annual BBQ,
(830) 751-2848, micovfd.org
Waco Funky Junk Roundup,
(405) 596-1687, montagefestivals.com
Wimberley Garden Club Tour,
(512) 847-3595, wimberleygardenclub.org
CHALK: © VESNA CVOROVIC | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB. FLOWERS: © ALEKSS | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB
Pick of the Month
Chalk This Way!
Lewisville [May 17]
(972) 625-1726, lakesidearts.org
This daylong event features professional chalk
artists, an amateur chalk art contest, a scholarship
contest and a children’s gallery, plus art
vendors, food, drinks and music.
40 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
Around Texas Get Going > This is just a sampling of the events
May 10
Wimberley
Garden Club Tour
34thAnnual
Step Back in Time for the ime for the Time of Your Life
Just 30 minutes south of Dallas/Fort Worth in Waxahachie
Get Your Tickets On-Line TODAY
www.SRFestival.com
Find Events Online
Gas Up and Go!
Fairs, festivals, food and family fun!
It’s all listed under the Events tab
on our website.
Pick your region. Pick your month.
Pick your event. With hundreds of
events throughout Texas listed
every month, TexasCoopPower.com
has something for everyone.
17
Victoria Art Car Victoria Parade,
(361) 575-8227, navemuseum.com
Dripping Springs [17-18] Tour the Talent
Art Studio Tour, (512) 296-7751,
tourthetalent.com
18
Bleiblerville Bleiblerville VFD Fish Fry
& Fundraiser, (979) 249-6382
23
Ennis [23-25] 48th Annual National
Polka Festival, (972) 878-4748,
nationalpolkafestival.com
23
Fredericksburg [23-25] Fredericksburg
Crawfish Festival, (830) 433-5225,
fbgcrawfish.com
24
Port O’Connor Memorial Weekend Kids’
Fishing Tournament, (361) 983-2244,
portoconnorchamber.org
Fort Worth [24-25] Fort Worth Gem and
Mineral Club Annual Show, (817) 925-5760,
fortworthgemandmineralclub.org
Gainesville [24-26] Lavender Festival,
(940) 665-6938, lavenderridgefarms.com
30
Athens [30-31] Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion
and Contest, (888) 294-2847, athens.tx.org
31
The Colony Mother & Son Luau,
(972) 625-1106, visitthecolonytx.com
Tyler Vince Vance and the Valiants Concert,
(903) 881-9733, josefelicianofoundation.org
POLKA COUPLE: © KITTY | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB. TACKLE BOX: © GARRY_IMAGES | DOLLAR PHOTO CLUB
Submit Your Event!
We pick events for the magazine directly from
TexasCoopPower.com. Submit your event for
July by May 10, and it just might be featured
in this calendar!
June
1
Sherman [1-7] 8th Annual Melody Ranch
Bluegrass Festival, (903) 546-5893,
melodyranchbluegrassfestival.com
5
Levelland [5, 12, 19, 26] Sounds of Texas
Concert Series, (803) 894-3157,
levellandtexas.org
TexasCoopPower.com May 2014 Texas Co-op Power 41
May 23
Ennis
48th Annual
National Polka
Festival
May 24
Port O’Connor
Memorial Weekend
Kids’ Fishing Tournament
Austin
Beaumont
Cleveland
Corpus
Christi
Dallas
Fort Worth
Houston
Rosenberg
San Antonio
Sherman
Terrell
Texarkana
Tyler
800.756.2506 unitedbilt.net
* With approved credit for qualified land owners. Lic Res Mort Lender AR,LA,MS,MO,OK,TX NMLS#39943
In-house financing with ZERO down & no payments for 6 mos!
Surprisingly affordable.
This is a great time to build your new home!
Building materials are affordably priced
and mortgage rates are at an all-time low.
Get started today with United-Bilt Homes.
Sign Up for Our Monthly
E-Newsletter
Get links to our best content
delivered to your inbox each
month! Feature stories, recipe
and photo contest winners,
monthly giveaways—get it all
in the TCP e-newsletter!
Sign up today at
and festivals around Texas. For a complete listing, please visit TexasCoopPower.com/events.
42 Texas Co-op Power May 2014 TexasCoopPower.com
Hit the Road Victoria
If only walls could talk. Then, oh,
the tales that Fossati’s Delicatessen in
Victoria could tell. The wooden slats
might whisper about a bloody incident
after the turn of the 20th century when
an enraged resident shot down his wife’s
lover, who staggered across the deli’s
front threshold and died. Or they might
recall a hot day in August 1932 when
gangsters Bonnie and Clyde flung open
the swinging doors, gulped down a beer at
the bar, then fled. “At least, that’s what
Uncle Kite used to tell,” says Therese Fossati
Bomersbach, 71, who runs the family
deli, billed as the state’s oldest.
True or not, the colorful stories add to
the Wild West ambiance that permeates
Fossati’s, established in 1882 by Frank
Napoleon Fossati (feh-SEH’-tee). “My
grandfather was a stonecutter from Italy
who hoped to find a job at the state Capitol,
but he arrived too soon,” says Bomersbach,
a member of Nueces Electric Cooperative.
“For a time, he worked for the
railroad. Then he came to Victoria and
opened a chili and sandwich stand” at the
intersection of South Main and Juan Linn
streets, she says. Later, he opened a bar
across the street. In 1895, he and a partner
opened a saloon on a third corner. Then
in 1902, he opened Fossati’s Grocery and
Feed Store in the present 1895 clapboard
building, which still retains the original
wooden bar and large mirror.
Frank retired in 1910 and handed the
business to son Caeton (Kite). In those
early years, only men frequented Fossati’s.
At the bar, a trough-style spittoon at their
feet provided a convenient place to spit
tobacco and take care of other matters. At
day’s end, someone would rinse the
trough into an outside drain. To this day,
the spittoon remains—but for looks only!
Another remnant from Frank’s era
hangs high on one wall. The framed
prose, hand-penned in black ink on
stained butcher paper, advises patrons
how to act like gentlemen. “In 1908, my
grandfather paid a traveling sign painter
two schooners [mugs] of beer and a
sandwich for that,” Bomersbach says.
“The sign disappeared in the 1960s, but
we got it back in July 2013.”
Caeton retired in 1967. Managers outside
the family ran Fossati’s until 1981,
when it shut down. But not for long.
Seven descendants, including Bomersbach,
bought back the business in 1984.
After renovations, Fossati’s reopened for
lunch only (it is closed weekends) in 1987.
On the menu, several items harken
back to Frank and Caeton’s time, like the
Reuben sandwich and Kite’s Kalteraufschnitt
(Dutch lunch), a plate of sliced
meats and cheeses served with coleslaw,
potato salad and sliced bread. Along with
sandwiches, the deli also serves soups,
salads and a daily special, such as King
Ranch chicken or lasagna. Tempting
desserts include peach cobbler, apple
crisp and Fossati’s brownie sundae.
Daring customers request the deli’s
signature hot beer mustard, made fresh
using Frank’s original recipe. “Our mustard
doesn’t get you going down, but it’ll
sure clear out your sinuses!” Bomersbach
grins. “We use beer, ground mustard
and one other ingredient. And it’s
not horseradish!”
No hot mustard, please, for Phil
Castille, president of the University of
Houston-Victoria, who drops by regularly
for a double-meat corned beef on rye with
a side of coleslaw. “Fossati’s is a local
institution with a long history,” he says
between bites. “We love to bring our job
candidates here. But the thing is, the food
is always good. Just having a heritage
wouldn’t keep this place open!”
Sheryl Smith-Rodgers, a frequent contributor,
is a member of Pedernales Electric Cooperative.
Fossati’s Deli, 302 S. Main St., (361) 576-3354,
open from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on weekdays only.
Fossati’s Delicatessen, billed as the oldest in the state, boasts menu items
and captivating tales from another century BY SHERYL SMITH-RODGERS
Good food and a colorful history draw crowds to FOSSATI’S DELICATESSEN in Victoria. H
BRYAN TUMLINSON
Web Extras on TexasCoopPower.com
• Watch a video from Fossati’s.
• View a slideshow with more photos.
• Can’t get to Victoria anytime soon? Sample
Fossati’s menu with recipes for German
potato salad and broccoli cheese soup.
 877-2-Mueller
 www.muellerinc.com
 32 Convenient Locations
GORGEOUS. STRONG. EFFICIENT.
Simply Stunning
RESIDENTIAL METAL ROOFING
GORGEOUS. STRONG. EFFICIENT
S
RESIDENTIAL MET
S py S
RESIDENTIAL METAL ROOFING
GORGEOUS. STRONG. EFFICIENT
tu
AL ROOFING
tu
CIENT.
g
Call 877-2-Mueller
Click www.muellerinc.com
Come By 32 Convenient L
 877-2-Mueller (877-268-3553)
.muellerinc.com
ocations






TEXASʼ LARGEST RURAL LENDER

Rural Land Loans
Residential Home Loans
Farm & Ranch Loans
Livestock & Equipment Loans
Operating Capital
Real Estate Appraisal Services
Agribusiness Financing
Leasing
Expand your horizons













r h




















































Expa













and your ho













rizons
















































































































































































































mpiuqE&kcotseviL
naoLhcnaR&mraF
LemoHlaitnediseR
snaoLdnaLlaruR













snaoLtnem
sn
snaoL













anruterew
ootstfiorp
repoocruo
adnaetatse
C a aFlatip
We’re













nruofotnecrep001tsomla
ruohguorhT.sremotsucru
mocruodnaerutcurtsevita
snaolssenisubirga fo ylraenr
tlucirgaedamsahtiderCmr
e the answer












ruootkcabsgninraeten
,margorpeganortap
nruterottnemtimm
rutnecay y. We ecarbme
laer,noitcudorplarut
er.












gnisaeL
naniFssenisubirgA
siarppAetatsElaeR
latipaCgnitarepO
pq













 gnicn
secivreSla













sremotsuc
latipaC
XET













gniodfotfienebtcnitsida̶
moc.tiderCmraF
GRALʼSAX













.suhtiwssenisubg
0
R
78 7. 055.449
URTSEG













n
EDNELLA
osuwolloF













R
 davido.extraxim@gmail.com