Dear Members,
Welcome to the April edition of
Members’ News. After the glorious
weather over the weekend, I hope
you are brimming with the joys of
Spring! We are focussed on keeping
you updated with services and
benefits on offer through your
membership.
This month, in Newsflash, we are
pleased to announce that Mayor of
London, Ken Livingstone will be
responding to your questions for the
6th year running at Business
Question Time. In Spotlight, save
your business time and money by
using the new online export
document processing service,
ChamberCert.
If you have any queries regarding your
membership, feel free to contact the
Member Relationship team anytime
on 020 7203 1713 or email
membersnews@londonchamber.co.uk
Clare Denham
Service Development Executive
FORTHCOMING EVENTS
*FREE*
Wednesday 17th April
Business Question Time with the
Mayor of London
5.30pm - 8.30pm
Premier Plus member: Complimentary
Thursday 18th April
Property and Construction Breakfast
Club
8.30am - 9.30am
Premier Plus member: £23.50
Tuesday 24th April
Networking Training: SMEs
Networking with Larger Companies
5.30pm - 8.30pm
Premier Plus member: £41.13
Wednesday 25th April
Meet the Experts: Defence
Exporting
8.00am - 10.00am
Premier Plus member: £41.13
Members' News
helping you get the most out of membership
In this issue: Business Question Time | ChamberCert |
London Games: What's new |
Forthcoming events | and more..
NEWSFLASH...Business Question Time with the
Mayor of London
Don’t miss your opportunity to highlight
issues and concerns that affect your
business in the capital.
Business Question Time is an annual event which
provides members with the unique chance to question
the Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone. In this rare
forum, we enable London businesses to address the
Mayor on important topics such as transport, business
growth or funding and opportunities surrounding the
London Games.
This year's Business Question Time will be held at the
remarkable City Hall with the Mayor of London, Ken
Livingstone on 17th April between 5.30pm – 8.30pm.
Business Question Time is focussed on business issues
that concern you so it is important you submit a question
in advance of the event. Download the booking form to
secure your place and submit your question. The Mayor
will not have advance warning of the questions; this
process merely allows us to identify the key issues for
members and to group all questions by topic.
SPOTLIGHT ON...ChamberCert
Obtaining an EC Certificate
of Origin, invoice or other
documents is faster than
ever using ChamberCert.
ChamberCert allows you to easily complete web-based
forms, store consignee names and frequently used text
to issue your documents within minutes. Our secure
system will apply the Certification and Authentication
stamp and signature digitally, allowing you to print
ready-to-use documents and arrange any required
legalisation directly with the relevant embassy.
ChamberCert meets the security needs of the largest
exporters, with 128 bit data encryption, secure storage
and regular backups. You can also save records of all
your Certificates online with quick and easy retrieval
tools. Register with ChamberCert today and start
processing your documents through this fast and
effortless online service. For more information, please
see www.londonchamber.co.uk
Wednesday 9th May
Meet the MOD
12.30pm - 4.00pm (allocated time
slots)
Premier Plus member: £99.88
SEE FULL
EVENTS DIARY
TOP TIP...
Directory of Members 2007-8
You should receive the printed
Directory of Members 2007-8 in the
post by 20th April. If you haven't
received it by then, please contact the
Member Relationship team.
Remember that all members' up-todate
details can also be found in the
Online Directory within the Members'
Zone of our website
www.londonchamber.co.uk

We are looking to recruit a number
of professionals to enhance the
range and quality of services we
offer and improve communication
with our members.
For full job descriptions of the exciting
opportunties on offer please click here.
JOBS...JOBS...JOBS
WEBWATCH...London Games: What's new
Five years and four months to go!
In an effort to keep members fully
informed of news and developments
surrounding the London Games, we have
added a What’s new section within the
London Games area in the Members’
Zone.
What’s new provides you with regular updates and
opportunities to help you get the most out of the London
Games.

The London Games section within the Members’ Zone
also includes information on how to get involved in the
Games, tips on writing a successful bid, London
Chamber of Commerce published reports and useful
weblinks for further information. Please contact the
Member Relationship team if you need to be reminded
of your username and password for the Members’ Zone.
Membership Benefits
 Business Builder
 Legal Advice line
 Disaster Recovery Service
 Chamber Connect
 and much more....
FURTHER INFORMATION
Please contact the Member Relationship team for more information on the services highlighted in
Members' News and general assistance, including lost usernames and passwords;
T: 020 7203 1713 E: membersnews@londonchamber.co.uk
If you would prefer to view Members' News in PDF format, simply click
www.londonchamber.co.uk/membersnews for a full archive of editions.
If you would like a colleague to receive Members' News or you do not wish to receive this monthly
newsletter, please email membersnews@londonchamber.co.uk
MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS | EVENTS | INFORMATION | NEWS AND POLICY
| INTERNATIONAL | EXPORT DOCS | VENUE HIRE | ABOUT US
Privacy: Respecting the privacy of our members and ensuring the confidentiality of membership information is critical to the London
Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the Privacy Statement is to ensure that we interact with all our members in line with the
current legislation such as the UK's DATA Protection Act 1998 and in accordance with their wishes. We do not share contact
information with third parties.
© 2006 London Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved.
For further details on counts, profiles and insert programmes
please call one of the sales team on 01225 480480
or email sales@responseone.co.uk
Please find below an outline of all the insert programmes
managed by Response One Media Sales
INSERT PROGRAMME PROFILE
Upmarket online buyers from the UK’s no.1 online
fashion and beauty retailer.
80% female, aged 18-35, £25K+ ABC1
www.responseone.co.uk
TYPES OF
DESPACTH
Magazines - approx 450K/
month
RATE CARD / CPT
£45.00
The ultimate online destination for lingerie, swimwear,
nightwear, loungewear and menswear.
75% Females, aged 25-60, £35K+ ABC1
Catalogue mailing - approx
100K/quarter product
despatches - approx 40K/
month
£45.00
Internet and mail order plant company selling a year
round range of Jersey grown plants and gardening
accessories with the added benefit of free delivery. Equal
Male / Female split, 66% aged 65+ (20% 55-64) ABC1
Catalogue mailings - approx
300K/month product
despatches - approx
150,000K Spring and 100K
£45.00
Receptive online fashion buyers and bloggers from
one of the most on-trend fashion and beauty retailers
available. 100% females, aged 16-35, £15K+
Product despatches- 200K/
month
£45.00
Magazines are sent monthly to loyal, highly affluent,
educated subscribers.
59% male, age 25-60, AB
Magazine mailings - 150K/
month
£45.00
Affluent UK nurses who are members of the Royal
College of Nursing, and receive 2 publications in their
homes. 92% female, aged 45+ 80% aged 50+, £25K+
RCN Bulletin - 390K
magazine mailings/fortnight
nursing standard -
25K magazine mailings/week
£45.00
Very loyal mail order multi buyers from this niche
programme which offers specialist videos and DVD
titles. 50/50 gender split, aged 50+ highly affluent
Customer mailings - approx
140K/month
£45.00
A contemporary fashion brand with over 100 years of heritage.
Well crafted knitwear and sharp polo shirts, the brand produces
a generous offering of smart and sport staples. 100% male
product (75% male traffic), aged 25-54, Income £35K+.
Inserts and product sampling
opportunities <20,000 per
month
Inserts £45/000
Sampling £POA
Discerning mail order and online book buyers from this
award winning company. 82% female, aged 35-65,
£20K+
Catalogues mailings -
up to 1 million/month Product despatches -
up to 200K/month VIP mailings -
up to 100K/month
£45.00
Rebranded as The Football Pools, the customers play a
variety of football pools and lottery style games.
75% males, Lottery – 50/50 gender split, aged 50+,
£15K+ BC1
£45.00 Customer Mailings -
Approx 50K/month
For further details on counts, profiles and insert programmes
please call one of the sales team on 01225 480480
or email sales@responseone.co.uk
www.responseone.co.uk
Please find below an outline of all the insert programmes
managed by Response One Media Sales
INSERT PROGRAMME PROFILE TYPES OF
DESPACTH RATE CARD / CPT
The Hut Group ‘Consumer Brands’, is made up of the
clothing, white-goods, games, DVDs and entertainment
buyers, including brands such as Zavvi, Iwantoneofthose
and thehut.com department store. Males and females
aged 20-50, ABC1 £25K+
Product despatches -
Approx 200K/month
£45.00
With despatches to sports, fitness, leisure and health
stores buyers, including brands such as Exante Diet,
Myvitamins, Probikekits and Myprotein, ‘Lifestyle Brands’
is the UK’s leading online sports nutrition manufacturer
and supplier. 80% Males, aged 20-45, £30K+ ABC1
Product despatches -
Approx 250K/month
£45.00
The Hut Group ‘Prestige Brands’ is made up of Despatches
to the high end health, beauty and fashion stores buyers,
including brands such as Mybag, Allsole, Coggles, Lookfantastic,
Mankind and Beautyexpert.
80% Female aged 20-45, Affluent ABC1 £35K+
104 Directories delivered across the UK, throughout
the year.
Demographic profiling available for improved targeting
2 million per month Test Rate
only £16
BOUND INSERTS Increasing marketing opportunities with flexible formats
in chosen directories.
Demographic profiling available for improved targeting
427 Bound Inserts available
UK wide
Rates available
on request
Product despatches -
Approx 250K/month
£45.00
CONSUMER BRANDS
LIFESTYLE BRANDS
PRESTIGE BRANDS
Community Services Directory
Eastbourne & South Wealden
Hastings & Rother
Lewes & North Wealden
Countywide
August 2014/v2.0 
Page 2 of 45
Introduction
The services listed in this directory have been collated from information available on various different directories, e.g. East Sussex 1Space and
ESCIS, and from organisations’ websites.
As such the information is accurate to the best of our knowledge but we would strongly recommend that you contact the organisation listed to
ensure that the information is still correct, or use the relevant staff practice guidance where appropriate.
The services included in this directory are, to the best of our current knowledge, either free to the client or low-cost. Work to map and catalogue
community-based services is on-going and as such we will be issuing updates to this Directory in the near future.
If you have any feedback or updates on the services listed, or if you are aware of any additional free or low-cost community-based services that
are not currently listed here, please let us know using the contact details listed below:
Kevin Moore – Service Development Manager
Phone: 01273 335236
Email: kevin.moore@eastsussex.gov.uk
Zareen Graves – Project Support Officer
Phone: 01273 335653
Email: zareen.graves@eastsussex.gov.uk 
Page 3 of 45
EASTBOURNE AND SOUTH WEALDEN
Organisation Contact Details Details Cost
Age Concern: Eastbourne
Befriending scheme
Zara O'Brien/Mari Easton
The William and Patricia Venton Centre
Junction Road
Eastbourne, BN21 3QY
Phone: 01323 749034
Other: 01323 638474
E: info@ageconcerneastbourne.co.uk
W: www.ageconcerneastbourne.org.uk
Offers a regular visitor to give friendship and
support to isolated older people who are unable to
leave their home.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Free
Age Concern: Eastbourne
Forget-me-not
Zara O'Brien/Mari Easton
The William and Patricia Venton Centre
Junction Road
Eastbourne, BN21 3QY
Phone: 01323 749034
Other: 01323 638474
E: info@ageconcerneastbourne.co.uk
W: www.ageconcerneastbourne.org.uk
Is a telephone befriending service that provides a
regular contact call to brighten the day of an
isolated older person.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Free 
Page 4 of 45
Age Concern: Eastbourne
Home from Hospital
Zara O'Brien
The William and Patricia Venton Centre
Junction Road
Eastbourne, BN21 3QY
Phone: 01323 749854
E: info@ageconcerneastbourne.co.uk
W: www.ageconcerneastbourne.org.uk
Visit you in Hospital then at home, collect
prescriptions and shopping.
Coverage: Eastbourne & Pevensey Bay
Free
Age Concern: Eastbourne
Social Activities
NEW
ENTRY
The William and Patricia Venton Centre
Junction Road
Eastbourne, BN21 3QY
Phone: 01323 638474
E: info@ageconcerneastbourne.co.uk
W: www.ageconcerneastbourne.org.uk
There are a variety of activities that take place
Monday to Friday, early morning to mid afternoon.
Each day will offer different activities including:
Creative Writing, Tai Chi, Making Memories, Drop
in Café, Poetry Circle, Extend Classes, art
Groups, Hourly Computer Open Sessions and
Community Choir (all ages).
Coverage: Eastbourne
Some activities are
free of charge,
others range
between £1.50 to
£4.00 - please
contact the provider
to confirm
availability and book
a place.
Age Concern: Eastbourne
Transport service to local
supermarkets
Roger
The William and Patricia Venton Centre
Junction Road
Eastbourne, BN21 3QY
Phone: 01323 638474
E: info@ageconcerneastbourne.co.uk
W: www.ageconcerneastbourne.org.uk
Transport to local supermarkets - 1.5hr shopping
trip assisted by a volunteer – who will also help
taking in the shopping away.
Coverage: Eastbourne
£7 includes travel
fee & assistance of
a volunteer during
shopping trip. 
Page 5 of 45
Age Concern: Hailsham,
Hellingly & Herstmonceux
Social events for over 55's
Dave Snoxell
Charles Hunt Centre
Vicarage Field
Hailsham
BN27 1BG
Phone: 01323 844398
E: info@ageconcernhailsham.org.uk
W: www.ageconcernhailsham.org.uk
Caring for the over 55's. We are a Social club
offering cooked lunches, chiropody, nail care,
hairdresser, charity shop and a lot lot more. We
are open weekdays 9.30am-4pm and Saturdays
10-12noon. We offer warmth, comfort, good
homemade food and a fun and friendly
environment for all our members. Hot meals are
served week days, afternoon activities every
week day include bingo, Kurling, line dancing,
movement to music, shortmat bowling and
entertainment shows. We also offer personal
services e.g. hairdressing, nail cutting, chiropody,
hearing aid advice and maintenance, home
friendship visits, holidays and outings. We have
approximately 600 members and 65 volunteers.
Coverage: Hellingly, Hailsham & Herstmonceux
Lunches: members
£4.25/non
members: £5.25 –
Friday PM dementia
sessions £2.50
contribution
Age UK East Sussex
Healthy Living Club
Su Reece
Bowes Court
Battle Road
East Hailsham
BN27 1DX
Phone: 01273 476 704 (ext 117)
The clubs will be for two hours, normally from
10am - 12pm and are volunteer-led. Participants
will be encouraged to give suggestions for
activities and the types of support they would like
to receive to help them improve their health.This
service is funded by East Sussex County Council
to support people aged 50 or over who are at risk
of health inequalities to lead healthier lifestyles.
Free (funded by
ESCC) - There will
be a 50p charge for
refreshements 
Page 6 of 45
Mob: 07850 987148
E: susan.reece@ageukeastsussex.org.uk
W: www.ageuk.org.uk/eastsussex/ourwork/healthy-living-clubs
Coverage: Hailsham
Age UK East Sussex
Healthy Living Club
Su Reece
Shinewater Sports and Community Centre
Milfoil Drive
Langley
BN23 8ED
Phone: 01273 476 704 (ext 117)
Mob: 07850 987148
E: susan.reece@ageukeastsussex.org.uk
W: www.ageuk.org.uk/eastsussex/ourwork/healthy-living-clubs
The clubs will be for two hours, normally from
10am - 12pm and are volunteer-led. Participants
will be encouraged to give suggestions for
activities and the types of support they would like
to receive to help them improve their health.This
service is funded by East Sussex County Council
to support people aged 50 or over who are at risk
of health inequalities to lead healthier lifestyles.
Coverage: Hampden Park
Free (funded by
ESCC) - There will
be a 50p charge for
refreshements
Alice Croft House
Over 50's Club
NEW
ENTRY
Lesley Penfold/Kim Colman
Cornfield Lane
Eastbourne
BN21 4NE
Phone: 01323 728 157
E: alicecrofthouse@yahoo.co.uk
Open to members and non members. Open
Monday to Friday between 9am -4pm. Offering
activities, social events, bowls, exercise classes,
creative writing, Tai Chi. Coffee mornings take
place on Tuesday mornings.
Coverage: Eastbourne and 7 mile radius from the
Town Hall
Cost for non
members £3.50/
members £2.50 
Page 7 of 45
Autism Sussex
Autism Sussex Family
Support Services
Parent/Carer Support
Groups
NEW
ENTRY
Diane Reeves - Parent Liaison Officer
Deerfold Centre
233 Seaside Road
Eastbourne
BN22 7NR
Mob: 07889 829125
W: www.asfamilysupport.org.uk
We currently run support groups which are
facilitated by Parent Liaison officers and specialist
staff from both within and outside the
organisation. Morning Drop in groups are from
10.00am - 12noon - refreshments are included.
Guest speakers will be arranged as the groups
become established.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Please contact the
provider for details.
British Red Cross
Volunteer Home Visitor
Service takes place in Client Homes
Phone: 0800 0280831
W: http://www.redcross.org.uk/
Offer practical and emotional support to carers in
the community for a period of 4-6 weeks after the
person they care for has left Hospital or a Care
Home. Includes providing
encouragement/confidence
building/companionship to either/both the carer
and the cared for and shopping.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Free 
Page 8 of 45
Downland Village Lunch
Group
NEW
ENTRY
Mrs Linda Hallums
Village Hall
The Street
Selmeston
BN26 6UG
Phone: 01323 896 008
A delicious meal of fresh local produce in a
friendly atmosphere for all village members. Free
transport provided to and from venue. Call first for
availability.
Coverage: Berwick & downland villages
Cost £5.00 per head
Goodnews Evangelical
Mission Trust (G.E.M)
GEM Befriending and
Support Ministry
NEW
ENTRY
Ralph Harris
Service takes place in Client's Home
Phone: 01323 641 531
E: ralph.harris10@yahoo.co.uk
This service aims at visiting residents in
Care/Nursing Homes to bring companionship,
friendship and where required practical help and
support. The Trust will also provide trips out and
(Subject to Trustee Approval) fund the cost of
mobility equipment (specialised wheelchairs, etc)
provided that certain pre-conditions are met
(contact provider for further details). The service
is also available to adults who, for reasons of age
or disability, are effectively "shut-in" their own
homes and/or suffer from isolation, loneliness and
a lack of human companionship.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Services are funded
by the Trust -
please note: some
maybe subject to
Trustees approval
e.g.) Trips out and
mobility equipment.
Hailsham Probus Club
The Hailsham Club
Richard Jeffries
43 Vicarage Field
Hailsham
BN27 1BG
Association for retired & semi-retired professional
and business men. The Hailsham Probus Club
meets on the 2nd Monday of every month for
guest speakers and club business. Other
£25 membership
plus £12.50 one off
joining fee 
Page 9 of 45
NEW
ENTRY
Phone: 01323 845 418 activities include members and ladies lunches,
day outings and short holidays.
Coverage: Eastbourne
PARCHE
Pastoral Action in
Residential Care Homes for
the Elderly
NEW
ENTRY
Jackie Delaney
Service takes place in Care
Homes/Client's Homes
Phone: 01323 438 527 (Mon & Tues only)
E: PARCHEenquiries@hotmail.co.uk
W: www.parche.org.uk
PARCHE is a Church-based Ministry of Christian
Teams bringing fellowship, comfort, Bible
teaching, Communion and friendship to the
Elderly living in Care Homes. They will also, on
occassions, provide visits to clients home - please
contact provider for availablity.
Coverage: Eastbourne only
Visits are free of
charge
Pevensey Senior Support
Group
Pop in & social events
Mrs Simpkin
Ethel Wood Community Centre
129 Coast Road
Pevensey Bay
BN24 6SG
Phone: 01323 762929
The group meets every Tuesday morning, from
11.30am to 1pm for a light lunch, social events
such as Bingo, Sales table & assistance with form
filling in a relaxed atmosphere.
Coverage: Pevensey
Cost of light lunch
£3.00
Royal Voluntary Service
Get Well Stay Well & Good
Neighbour Scheme (Get
Well)
Russell Centre
24 Hyde Road
Eastbourne
BN21 4SX
Phone: 01273 611 441
E:
getwellstaywell@royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk
We deliver a home support and befriending
service which enables those who need a helping
hand and those who are socially isolated to
remain independent, improve their quality of life
and know that there is 'someone who cares'.
Coverage: East Saltdean to Newhaven
Good Neighbour
Scheme is free,
other than mileage
costs if being taken
out by a volunteer. 
Page 10 of 45
Royal Voluntary Service
Lunch Club and Pop in
Centre
Peter Stenning, Centre Manager
Russell Centre
24 Hyde Road
Eastbourne
East Sussex
BN21 4SX
Phone: 01323 412 279
W: www.royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk
Lunch and activities for the over 55's (men and
women). The Royal Voluntary Service provides a
range of services to help people in need who
might otherwise feel lonely and isolated. The
Eastbourne Russell Centre is aimed at the
Elderly. The centre is open Monday - Friday 9.00
- 5.00, you can book a fresh 2 course lunch by
telephoning 01323 412279. The centre offers a
friendly welcome and has various daily activities
including I.T. coaching, alongside a drop in cafe
and rooms for hire. Reasonable disabled access.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Lunch for non
regulars £5.50 and
regulars £5.00
includes dessert
Shinewater Shaftesbury
Centre Trust (SSC)
Light Bite
NEW
ENTRY
St. Barnabas Church
Kingfisher Drive
Eastbourne
BN23 7RL
Phone: 01323 760 654
Held on the first Monday of each month, offering a
light meal with pudding and a drink.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Cost £2.50
Shinewater Shaftesbury
Centre Trust (SSC)
Lunch Club
Di Game
St. Barnabas Church
Kingfisher Drive
Eastbourne
Held every Wednesday at St Barnabas Church
offering a cooked meal with dessert and drink.
Around 40 people attend each week ages range
between 39yrs to 97yrs. Following on from the
Cost £3.50 
Page 11 of 45
NEW
ENTRY
BN23 7RL
Phone: 01323 760 654
meal there will be a social event such as bingo or
entertainment. Please contact Di for availablility.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Sussex Oakleaf
Social Activities
Peter Noble/Ann Boniface
Old Town Community Centre
1A Central Avenue
Eastbourne
BN20 8PL
Phone: 01323 430203
E: brightview@sussexoakleaf.org.uk
W: www.sussexoakleaf.org.uk
Sussex Oakleaf are commissioned to provide Day
Services in East Sussex based on the ethos of
recovery and social inclusion for adults with
mental health issues, offering social and
structured support to members. Social meetings
take place on Thursdays between 10am -12pm at
the Community Centre. Other meetings take
place in the Town Centre, currently at Dickens
Tea Shop on Mondays, 10am-12pm and
Eucalyptus, Grove Road on Thursdays also
between 10am - 12pm.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Pay for own
refreshments.
The Blind Centre Hall
NHS Retirement Fellowship
Hazel Wilks - Branch Secretary
Eastbourne Blind Society Centre
Longstone Road
Eastbourne, BN22 8DA
Phone: 01323 483454
E: barriehazel@hotmail.co.uk
W: www.nhsrf.org.uk/branchesdata.php?brnm=62
To promote fellowship and alleviate loneliness
and worry amongst retirees from the National
Health Service. We enjoy speakers, outings and
sociable occasions. Our age group is wide
ranging so we also enjoy walking, swimming and
ten pin bowling.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Annual subscription
of £8.00 applies 
Page 12 of 45
The Villagers Lunch Club
NEW
ENTRY
Mrs Penny Petrides
Village Hall
Bodle Street Green
Hertsmonceux
BN27 4RE
Phone: 01323 833 146
Local lunch club. Takes place every 3rd Monday
monthly from 11.30am to 2.30pm. Offers
tea/coffee and a two course lunch followed by
talks, socialising, quizes, raffle and more recently
has aquired an indoor curling set. Transport
maybe available for local residents. Please call
first to check for availability.
Coverage: Bodle Street Green
Tea/Coffee & two
course meal costs
£6.00
U3A: Eastbourne Central
Member meetings
Church Hall
St Saviour’s Church
South Street
Eastbourne
BN21 4UT
Phone: 01323 647329
W: www.u3asitec.org.uk
Meeting place is the Church Hall, Eastbourne.
Study Groups which meet regularly in members'
homes offer shared learning experinces in a wide
range of interest groups and activities.
Coverage: Eastbourne
Membership fee of
£12.50 applies plus
contributions
HASTINGS & ROTHER
Organisation Contact Details Details Cost
Age UK East Sussex
Healthy Living Club
Su Reece
Bevin Court
St Leonards on Sea
Hollington
TN38 9DE
The clubs will be for two hours, normally from
10am - 12pm and are volunteer-led. Participants
will be encouraged to give suggestions for
activities and the types of support they would like
to receive to help them improve their health.This
Free (funded by
ESCC) - There will
be a 50p charge for
refreshements 
Page 13 of 45
Phone: 01273 476 704 (ext 117)
Mob: 07850 987148
E: susan.reece@ageukeastsussex.org.uk
W: www.ageuk.org.uk/eastsussex/ourwork/healthy-living-clubs
service is funded by East Sussex County Council
to support people aged 50 or over who are at risk
of health inequalities to lead healthier lifestyles. Coverage: Hollington
Age UK East Sussex
Information & Advice
Enquiries
50 Robertson Street
Hastings
TN34 1HL
Phone: 01424 426 162
Information is provided for older people, their
families and friends and professionals who may
be helping to care for older people.
We can provide help and advice on:
• Information about Age UK East Sussex’s
services
• Pensions
• Attendance allowance
• Housing issues
• Finding support at home
• Choosing and funding a place in a residential
care home
• Health and social care
• Leisure and social activities
• Family and personal matters
• Filling in forms
• Rights to local services
• Utility bill queries
• Any other issues that affect older people
Free 
Page 14 of 45
This service is free and confidential. Face-to-face
appointments are available, Monday to Friday
10.00am – 1.00pm – please call first to check that
someone is able to see you.
Coverage: Hastings
Age UK East Sussex
Take Home and Settle
Enquiries
50 Robertson Street
Hastings
TN34 1HL
Phone: 01424 426 162
This service enables older people who have
attended A&E at the Conquest Hospital to go
home rather then be admitted.
Coverage: St Leonard's, Hastings & Rother
Free
Activities, Respite,
Rehabilitation, Care Centre
(ARRCC)
Drop in for Lunch
NEW
ENTRY
Magdala House
Ferry Road
Rye
TN31 7DN
Phone: 01797 226 535 for week day lunch
reservations.
Please ring 01797 229 363 for further
details and to reserve a place for the
Sunday Roast Lunch
A nutricious and freshley cooked 2 course meal
including a juice drink, served on Mondays,
Thursdays & Fridays. Orders must be placed
before 10am and a place will be reserved for you.
There will also be a two course Sunday Roast
coming soon. Orders must be placed by 10am on
the Saturday to reserve a place. This service is
open to people aged 65+ and places are limited.
Coverage: Rye
Cost of meal £5.00 
Page 15 of 45
Association of Carers
Support Services for Young
Carers
Sue Palmer, Services Manager
Association of Carers
Jackson Hall
Portland Place
Hastings,
TN34 1QN
Phone: 01424 722 309
E: sue@associationofcarers.org.uk
W: http://www.associationofcarers.org.uk/
We support unpaid Carers in East Sussex by
providing free, high quality, volunteer-led services
that encourage independence and reduce
isolation. Young Carers Association provides a
befriending service for young carers between
7yrs-13yrs. Peer to peer support is provided as
well as social activities such as outings.
Coverage: Hastings & Rother
Free
Association of Carers
Young Carers Association
Sue Palmer, Services Manager
Association of Carers
Jackson Hall
Portland Place
Hastings
TN34 1QN
Phone: 0300 330 9498
Other: 01424 722 309
E: sue@associationofcarers.org.uk
W: http://www.associationofcarers.org.uk/
A befriending Scheme that offers peer support,
friendship, guidance and outings to young carers
between the ages of 7yrs - 13yrs.
Coverage: Hastings & Rother
Free 
Page 16 of 45
Autism Sussex
Autism Sussex Family
Support Services - Parent
Support Groups
NEW
ENTRY
Alison Salmon - Parent Liaison Officer
Roebuck 3 Resource Centre
Roebuck Street
Hastings
TN34 3BB
Phone: 0845 450 0060
E: alison.salmon@autismsussex.org.uk
W: www.asfamilysupport.org.uk
We currently run support groups which are
facilitated by Parent Liaison officers and specialist
staff from both within and outside the
organisation. Morning Drop in groups are from
10.00am - 12noon - refreshments are included.
Guest speakers will be arranged as the groups
become established.
Coverage: Hastings
Please contact
provider for charges
Autism Sussex
Teenz Group
NEW
ENTRY
For more details or to book a place
contact: Nina Wolecki or Samantha Fievez
Wave Leisure
Shakespear Hall
Fort Road
Newhaven
BN9 9DL
Phone: 0845 450 0060
E: childrenesx@autismsussex.org.uk
W: www.asfamilysupport.org.uk
This is a social group for young people aged 10+
with Autism Spectrum Conditions. The group
focuses on improving social and communication
skills, making new friends and having fun in a
relaxed and informal setting. The group runs
alternate Mondays term time only 5pm- 7pm (10-
13yrs) and 7pm - 9pm (14-19yrs). The sessions
are participant led, so the Teenz choose the
activities on offer which can include: Film nights,
sports, Quiz nights, Social Skills workshops,
Cookery and Art. There are also monthly trips to
the cinema, bowling, swimming, Cafe and
Restaurants.
Coverage: Newhaven
The cost is £6 per
session 
Page 17 of 45
Catsfield Village Hall
Catsfield Social Club
NEW
ENTRY
Jim and Sarah Campbell
Church Road
Catsfield
Battle
TN39 9DP
Contact Jim & Sarah Campbell and they
will pass on your details to the relevant
person who will then contact you. Phone:
01424 893498.
Meetings occur every Tuesday between 7pm and
10pm. There are numerous board games, Wii
and a Table Tennis table. Members come to
enjoy a game of Scrabble or simply to chat and
enjoy free refreshments. Come for the evening or
simply pop in for a while.
Coverage: Catsfield
Cost is £2.00
Catsfield Village Hall
The Catsfield Book Group
NEW
ENTRY
Jim and Sarah Campbell
Church Road
Catsfield
Battle
TN39 9DP
Contact Jim & Sarah Campbell on 01424
893 498 and they will pass on your details
to the relevant person who will then
contact you.
We meet the third Tuesday of the month at 4pm
to discuss book of the month. These are provided
by Battle Library who allow members to keep their
books longer to return it to any ESCC library.
Discussion is always lively and adds to the
enjoyment of reading. The more difficult the book,
often the more interesting the discussion. Current
members come from Catsfield, Battle, Bexhill and
Ashburnham. New readers are welcome.
Coverage: Catsfield
Cost is £1 per
meeting to cover the
cost of the hall.
Marsham Older People's
Project (MOPP)
Jim Saphin (Vice Chairman)
Fairlight Village Hall
Broadway
Include lunch, transport is available, information
and advice on health with Podiatry and other
health services, meet new friends and social
Cost including lunch
and refreshments
£5.00. Cost for 
Page 18 of 45
Meeting at Fairlight Village
Hall
Fairlight
TN35 4DA
Mob: 07905 981036
activities
Coverage: Fairlight, Pett Level & Three Oaks
transportation
£2.00.
Royal Voluntary Service
Isabel Blackman Club
Mrs. Sue Adey, Centre Development
Manager
Winding Street
Hastings
TN34 3AT
Phone: 01424 717674
E: sue.adey@tesco.net
We provide a welcoming and pleasant
environment for socialising and activities e.g. art,
IT, Salsa-size, Extend, Thai Chi, Heritage
Reminiscence sessions, Community Cafe,
Community Cars and lots more together with a
hot meal. Open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday,
Friday 10.00am - 3.30pm. Also we have Church
meetings here on a Sunday.
Coverage: Hastings
Contact provider for
cost.
Rye & District Day Centre
Day Centre
Mr Dave Pellen, Co-ordinator
Magdala House Day Centre
Ferry Road
TN31 7DN
Phone: 01797 223 467
Meets at Magdala House Day Centre, Ferry
Road, Rye on Tuesdays & Wednesdays 10.00 -
2.30pm - To provide a convivial atmosphere in
which socially and rurally isolated elderly people
can meet and where they can enjoy a two course,
home-cooked meal, social activities, art and
exercise classes, access to large print library
books, help and advice. Toe nail clipping and
hearing aid service can be provided.
Coverage: Rye & surrounding villages
Some availability on
Wednesdays, more
on Tuesdays £5.50
for the day
excluding transport.
Rye Community
Transport
depending on
location: £3 base
charge and 50p per 
Page 19 of 45
mile.
Salvation Army
Salvation Army Silver
Threads Club
Major Hatcher
The Salvation Army Citadel
St Andrews Square
Hastings
TN34 1SR
Phone: 01424 426894
We meet every Wednesday, hall open from 12
noon. Meeting time is 1.45pm to 2.45pm. A club
for over sixties with singing/ quizzes/ outings/
guest speakers. Serious and fun.
Coverage: Hastings
Membership £4-00
per year and small
contributions may
apply.
Salvation Army
Triple 20's Club
Mrs B Bassett
Salvation Army Hall
418 Old London Road
Ore
Hastings
TN35 5LL
Phone: 01424 422422
Monday 2.30-4.00pm. People over 50 welcome.
Fun and friendly atmosphere. Activities include
entertainment, good company, outings,
educational programming, exercises and quizes.
The club is preceded by a Tai Chi class - 1.15-
2.00 for more info phone Mrs Bassett.
Coverage: Hastings
£1 contribution.
Senior Citizens Club Bexhill
Senior Citizens Club
Mrs. Shirley Rolt, Chairman
45 Eversley Road
Bexhill On Sea
TN40 1HA
Phone: 01424 846105
E: bexhillseniors@yahoo.com
A club for the over 55's with varied daily activities.
The club is open from 9.00am each morning, daily
activities take place every morning and some
afternoons, coffees/teas available from 10.00am
until 11.15am and light lunches from noon.
Coverage: Bexhill
membership runs
from April - £18 first
year and £15
annually thereafter.
Computer courses:
6 weeks - £12. All
other activities
contribution of 50p. 
Page 20 of 45
W: www.bexhill-seniors-club.co.uk
U3A: Battle and District
Monthly meetings
NEW
ENTRY
Mrs Kathryn Rumsby - Membership
Secretary
Battle Memorial Hall
81 High Street,
Battle
TN33 0AQ
E: kratglenleigh@tiscali.co.uk
W:http://u3asites.org.uk/code/u3asite.php?
site=405&page=2
Meetings are normally held on the first Monday of
the month at 10.30am. There are a variety of
activities and groups on offer including singing,
bird watching, current affairs, Scrabble, Theatre
and French conversation. Membership is open to
all those who are no longer in full-time
employment. No qualifications are required or
awarded. Please see website for further details of
courses and groups.
Coverage: Battle & District
Membership fees:
£13 - full year (from
September) £6.50
(Joining Apr-Aug)
U3A: Hastings & Rother
Member meetings
Mrs Julie Windus, Membership Enquiries
Members Homes
Hastings
Phone: 01424 752681
W:
http://u3asites.org.uk/code/u3asite.php?sit
e=383
Unique and exciting self help educational
movement for people no longer in full time work.
Study groups are held in members homes. Offers
new friendship opportunities.
Coverage: Hastings & Rother
Membership fee of
£17 applies -
membership starts
from Sept. 
Page 21 of 45
U3A: Rye & District
Member meetings
Noel & Kathy Varley
Rye Community Centre
Conduit Hill
Town Centre
Rye
TN31 7LE
Phone: 01797 223760
W: www.u3asites.org.uk/rye
We meet at Rye Community Centre in Conduit
Hill on the third Monday of the month at 2pm.
There are also activity and study groups for art,
craft, history, French, German, Spanish, literature,
current affairs, bird watching, militaria, walking
history, rambling, gardening, luncheons and
swimming.
Coverage: Rye & District
Annual membership
£12 (starts from
September)
LEWES & NORTH WEALDEN
Organisation Contact Details Details Cost
British Red Cross
Volunteer Home Visitor
Enquiries
The service takes place in client’s Homes
Heathfield
Phone: 0800 0280831
Offer practical and emotional support to carers in
the community for a period of 4-6 weeks after the
person they care for has left Hospital or a Care
Home. Includes providing
encouragement/confidence
building/companionship to either/both the carer
and the cared for and shopping.
Coverage: Heathfield, Lewes, Newick,
Peacehaven & Seaford
Please contact the
provider. 
Page 22 of 45
Carillion Cottage
Help & information centre
NEW
ENTRY
Barbara Liddle
Carillon Cottage
High Street
Wadhurst, TN5 6AA
Phone: 01892 785658
Carillon Cottage is located in the centre of
Wadhurst High Street next to the Post Office and
is owned by the Parish Church of St Peter and St
Paul. It offers information and support for the
whole village. It houses the parish church
administrative office, the office for the Social
Action Project (SAP) and an information centre
open six mornings and four afternoons a week.
Information is available on a wide range of
subjects and volunteers are always willing to help
those people who come to us with a problem or
query.
Opening Times: Mon – Sat: 9:30am – 12:30pm
and 2:00pm – 4:00pm
Closed Weds and Sat afternoons.
Coverage: Wadhurst
Free
Carillion Cottage
Voluntary driver's scheme
NEW
ENTRY
Barbara Liddle
Local Wadhurst
Wadhurst
Phone: 01892 785658
Voluntary drivers scheme and information service
available to local Wadhurst residents only.
Clients call the cottage who will contact the driver
on call. Local residents wil be picked from their
home and taken on short trips to local hospitals,
GP, Opticians, dentists, etc.
Coverage: Wadhurst only
Contribution
towards cost of
petrol 
Page 23 of 45
Community Transport for
the Lewes Area
Community Transport
NEW
ENTRY
The Hillcrest Centre,
Hillcrest Road,
Newhaven
BN9 9EA
Phone: 01273 517 332
E: info@ctla.org.uk
W: www.ctla.org.uk
Provides transport for those who have difficulty
with access to public transport. The office is
available for bookings from 8.00am to 4.00pm
Monday to Friday.
Coverage: Lewes
Fares differ
according to
distance travelled
and can range
between £2.00 -
£5.00. Contact
provider for exact
charges.
Crowborough Lunch Club
Lunch Club
Cindy Hamilton
United Church Hall
Croft Road
Crowborough
TN6 1HA
Mob: 07968 756 748
E: cindy.hamilton@btinternet.com
This lunch club offers the town's citizens a place
to meet and enjoy a freshley cooked meal in a
happy and friendly atmosphere. It is held every
Wednesday with morning tea/coffee with biscuits
served between 10.30am to mid-day. A two
course lunch is served at 12.30pm. After lunch
there is a club raffle, followed by bingo. Public
transport to and from the lunch club is available
via the community bus, Wealdlink, which operates
a door to door service from member's homes.
Coverage: Crowborough
Yearly Lunch Club
membership £2 +
Weekly Lunch
£4.00. Wealdlink
community bus
travel costs £1 for a
lifetime membership
fee & a return fare
of £3.00.
Downs 60 Plus Club
Social meetings
Kathy
Sutton Corner
Seaford
BN25 4QW
The Downs 60 Plus Club was inaugurated in
1966. It’s premises are within the grounds of the
Downs Leisure Centre facility at Sutton Corner,
Seaford. It is run by members for members
Annual subscription
is £50 per adult
which entitles
Members to take 
Page 24 of 45
Phone: 01323 896422
through its active Committee and it has strong
links with Age Concern (Seaford) who assist in
many ways.The purpose of the Club is to provide
facilities for those over 60 years to come together
and enjoy the range of interests. If interested,
come along any day between 10am -Noon and 2-
4pm and see for yourself. On Tuesday morning
the club Secretary Kath is usually here to help,
but other members can always assist you.
Coverage: Seaford
part in one or more
of the Activities.
Five Ash Down Village Hall
Five Ash Down Social
Group & Pop-in
NEW
ENTRY
Jane Sturt
Village Hall
Five Ash Down
Uckfield
TN22 3AH
Phone: 01825 732 129
Social Group. Every Tuesday 10-11am. We pass
on information e.g. neighbourhood watch, bus
times, hospital and NHS also what is being
organised locally etc.
Coverage: Uckfield
Entrance fee 40p -
entitles you to
Tea/Coffee + Biscuit
Forest Row Parish Council
and Community Centre
(FRPC)
Thursday Club over 60's
Carolyn Coomber
The Community Centre
Hartfield Row
Forest Row, RH18 5DZ
Phone: 01342 822661
E: info@forestrow.gov.uk
Thursday Club held twice a month for over 60's
Coverage: Forest Row and surrounding areas
£1 for a cup of tea
and piece of cake 
Page 25 of 45
Forest Row: Village
Support Network
Befrienders Scheme
The Community Centre
Hartfield Row
Forest Row, RH18 5DZ
Phone: 07581 131822
E: frvsn@yahoo.com
Visit by an approved volunteer for a friendly chat
Coverage: Forest Row
£5 membership fee
per year
Forest Row: Village
Support Network
Coffee
mornings/Outings/Therapie
s & Exercise classes
The Community Centre
Hartfield Row
Forest Row, RH18 5DZ
Phone: 07581 131822
E: frvsn@yahoo.com
Regular coffee mornings held in the village whilst
Venue on the green is being built.
Coverage: Forest Row
£5 membership fee
per year
Forest Row: Village
Support Network
Community information
The Community Centre
Hartfield Row
Forest Row, RH18 5DZ
Phone: 07581 131822
E: frvsn@yahoo.com
Website and advisory service line to inform senior
citizens of available facilities.
Coverage: Forest Row
£5 membership fee
per year
Forest Row: Village
Support Network
Forest Row Community
Transport
Carolyn Coomber
The Community Centre
Hartfield Row
Forest Row, RH18 5DZ
Phone: 01342 822661/07581 131822
E: frvsn@yahoo.com
Community transport scheme
Coverage: Forest Row
45p per mile and £1
admin fee 
Page 26 of 45
Hartfield Social Group &
Lunch Club
NEW
ENTRY
Linda Graham
High Street
Hartfield
TN7 4AA
Phone: 01892 770487
E: linda.graham@hartfieldonline.org
This social lunch group is held once a month on
the third Wednesday in the Village Hall and is
open to the wider community. The session starts
from 12.30pm to 2.00pm and includes lunch,
quizzes, bingo, dominoes and an occassional
speaker.
Coverage: Hartfield & Coleman's Hatch
Lunch costs £3.00
per head
Lewes House of Friendship
(Friend of Age UK)
Meeting at the House of
Friendship
Mrs Heather Hicks, Chairman
208 High Street
Lewes
BN7 2NS
Phone: 01273 476469
E: hoflewes@aol.com
W: http://www.houseoffriendship.org.uk/
Meeting place for over 55's, social events,
activities, lip reading classes, Computer tuition &
professional footcare.
Coverage: Lewes
Membership fee
starts from January
- single person £10
& couples £15 -
small contributions
to activities maybe
required.
Linked Hands
Short term transport
NEW
ENTRY
Christine Bell
Village Hall
Lewes Road
Cross in Hand
TN21 0UY
Phone: 01435 863293
Short term help with car lifts for essential
appointments such as visits to the GP or Dentist.
Coverage: Waldron & Cross in Hand
Contributions are
requested for petrol 
Page 27 of 45
Linked Hands
Social meetings
NEW
ENTRY
Mrs Marion Perry
Village Hall
Lewes Road
Cross in Hand
TN21 0UY
Phone: 01435 867 271
Monthly Monday meetings for social contact,
activities and Outings. Between 10am -12pm.
Coverage: Waldron & Cross in Hand
Contribution of £1
for Tea/Coffee &
refreshments - cost
of outings will vary
please contact
provider
Linked Hands
Information advice
NEW
ENTRY
Mrs Marion Perry
Village Hall
Lewes Road
Cross in Hand
TN21 0UY
Phone: 01435 867 271
Contacts available for advice and help in an
Emergency
Coverage: Waldron & Cross in Hand
Contribution of £1
for Tea/Coffee &
refreshments - cost
of outings will vary
please contact
provider
Linked Hands
Home visits
NEW
ENTRY
Mrs Marion Perry
Service is provided at Client’s Home
Waldron
Phone: 01435 867 271
Home visits to those who are Housebound or
Bereaved
Coverage: Waldron & Cross in Hand
Please contact
provider 
Page 28 of 45
Newhaven & District
Mencap
Social club & Open Door
drop in
NEW
ENTRY
Riverside Hall West Quay
Newhaven
BN9 9BP
Phone: 01273 517 345
Open Door enquiries: 01273 584 762
E:
newhaven.lewesmencap@btconnect.com
W: www.mencap.org.uk
Social club held on Friday evenings from 7pm -
9pm. Monday's there is an Open Door drop in
session between 10.00am - 2.30pm ideal for
socialising, chatting and playing games.
Coverage: Newhaven
Drop in £1 entry fee
includes Tea/Coffee
and use of facilities.
Newhaven Age Concern
Club
Social Club
West Quay
Newhaven
BN9 9BP
Phone: 07850 987 131
W: www.ageuk.org.uk/eastsussex/ourwork/day-centres-and-clubs
Opportunity to meet other people and form
friendships, transport provided, freshly cooked
midday meal, quizzes, Reminiscence, therapeutic
activities, etc
Coverage: Newhaven
Cost of meal -
contact provider for
costs. 
Page 29 of 45
Newhaven Day Club
NEW
ENTRY
Tony Roaf
West Quay
Newhaven
BN9 9HD
Phone: 01273 512 708
Open 50yrs+ who live in the Newhaven and
surrounding area. The club opens
Monday/Tuesday/Thursday between 10am-4pm
with a range of activities such as Bingo, Darts, Art
classes and Snooker. Refreshments and lite bite
snacks are available. On Fridays the club runs
from 10am to 2pm and lunch is available on this
day.
Coverage: Newhaven
Tea/Coffee 45p -
Friday lunch £4 -
membership fee
£10 per year.
Newick Area Community
Care Association (NACCA)
Community Club
NEW
ENTRY
Peggy Oswald-Fotheringham
Community Centre
The Green
Newick
BN8 4LR
Phone: 07561 372 403
This Community Club is aimed at the elderly
inhabitants of Newick and surrounding areas.
Meetings take place on Tuesdays and Fridays
from 10.30am to 3.30pm. Tea & Coffee is
available as well as lunch and various activities
and entertainments. Easy access for disabled
people, no steps. Transport can be provided.
Coverage: Newick
Contact provider for
details.
Rotherfield St Martin
Church-in-Community
project
Jo Evans
The RSM Centre
Rotherfield Memorial Institute
North Street
Rotherfield
TN6 3LX
RSM Volunteer Driver Scheme, Often it's as
simple as dropping in to say "Hello" in a
neighbourly way, befriending, reaching things
down from a high shelf or helping to collect some
shopping. Therapies, massage, foot therapy,
toenail cutting. We provide a centre where people
£10 membership
per year, and then
contributions
depending on
activity. Please call
for further 
Page 30 of 45
Phone: 01892 853021
W: www.rotherfieldstmartin.org.uk
can meet and participate a range of social and
creative activities and enjoy refreshments in a
relaxed and caring environment. We provide
transport to medical appointments, an information
service, library, health programme and supportive
therapies. We visit people in their homes and
involve the wider community wherever possible.
Coverage: 15-mile radius of the RSM Centre
information.
Royal Voluntary Service
Get Well Stay Well & Good
Neighbour Scheme (Get
Well)
Service takes place in Client’s homes
Newhaven
Phone: 01273 611441
E:
getwellstaywell@royalvoluntaryservice.org
.uk
W: www.royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk
Collecting a prescription
Coverage: Newhaven & Lewes Coastal Strip
The Friends of Beechgrove
Unit
Friends of Beechgrove
activities
Noeleen Carpenter
Crowborough Community Hospital
Southview Road
Crowborough
TN6 1HB
Phone: 01892 662089
Friends of Beechgrove provides a range of
activities such as Ballroom Dancing, Singing,
Yoga, Movement to Music and Craft. These take
place in community venues and are aimed at
preventing social isolation, and promoting reintegration
into the community for elderly people
who have or have had mental health issues. The
activities are for older isolated and vulnerable
people, some with dementia. Transport can be
arranged.
Coverage: Crowborough & Uckfield
Modest contribution 
Page 31 of 45
U3A: Crowborough
Member meetings
Meetings take place in Members Homes in
the area of Crowborough
W:
http://u3asites.org.uk/code/u3asite.php?sit
e=371
Self-help, self-managed lifelong learning co
operatives for older people, sharing learning
experiences in a wide range of interst groups for
fun.
Coverage: Crowborough
Membership fee
may apply
U3A: Mayfield & District
Member meetings
Brian Grimwood , Membership Secretary
Mayfield Memorial Hall
Mayfield
TN20 6EH
Phone: 01892 852128
Unique and exciting self help educational
movement for people no longer in full time work.
Study groups are held in members homes. Offers
new friendship opportunities.
Coverage: Mayfield & District
Membership is £14
for a single person
and £25 for two
people at the same
address.
U3A: Newhaven &
Peacehaven
Member meetings
Mrs Roma Humphrey, Membership
Secretary
Meetings take place in Members Homes
Newhaven & Peacehaven (meetings
alternate between the two locations)
Phone: 012732 515958
W: www.u3asites.org.uk/newhavenpeacehaven
Meetings with speakers, alternate between both
areas, trips to theatre and places of interest.
Offers new friendship opportunities.
Coverage: Newhaven & Peacehaven
Membership fee
£12 (runs from Sept
to Sept) 
Page 32 of 45
U3A: Ringmer
Member meetings
Meetings take place in Members Homes
Ringmer
E: i.loughborough@btinternet.com
Ringmer U3A belongs to a national network of
local U3As. Each U3A operates autonomously.
Activity groups in Ringmer are Art Appreciation,
Astronomy, Listening to Music, Play Reading,
Poetry, Readers Circle, Scrabble, Spanish,
Cookery, Genealogy (family history), Gardening
and French. Meetings are held on a weekday at
2, 3 or 4 week intervals, depending on the group
Coverage: Ringmer
Membership fee
and small
contributions may
apply
U3A: Seaford
Member meetings
NEW
ENTRY
Mary Young
The Downs Leisure Centre,
Jumble Cottage,
Alfriston Road,
Seaford
BN25 3JN
Phone: 01323 351 882
E: gmaryyoung@gmail.com
W: www.seafordu3a.co.uk
Aims to enable older people to extend and share
their knowledge, experience and skills. Held at
members homes, and larger groups are held at
the Leisure Centre. Call provider to check courses
and availability as these tend to book up very
quickly.
Coverage: Seaford
Annual subscription
of £10 - plus
additional fees for
any courses
booked. 
Page 33 of 45
U3A: Uckfield
Member meetings
Chris Churchman, Membership Secretary
Uckfield Civic Centre,
Uckfield
TN22 1AE
E: membership@uckfieldu3a.co.uk
W: http://www.uckfieldu3a.co.uk/
Aims to enable older people to extend and share
their knowledge, experience and skills. Groups
include: Literature, walking, painting, languages,
Scrabble, Bridge, etc
Coverage: Uckfield
Membership of £10
per annum applies.
COUNTYWIDE
Age UK East Sussex
Home from Hospital
Enquiries
Head Office
54 Cliffe High Street
Lewes
BN7 2AN
Phone: 01424 426 162
Volunteer hospital visitors for patients aged 55+,
also providing short-term support and
encouragment at home.
Coverage: Countywide (except from Eastbourne)
Free
Association of Carers
Computer Support
Sue Palmer, Services Manager
Association of Carers
Jackson Hall
Portland Place
Hastings
Helps Carers learn how to use their computer in
ways that will support them in their caring role,
helping them to have more time to themselves
and reducing their isolation.
Free 
Page 34 of 45
TN34 1QN
Phone: 0300 330 9498
Other: 01424 722 309
E: sue@associationofcarers.org.uk
W: http://www.associationofcarers.org.uk/
Coverage: Countywide
Association of Carers
Respite and befriending
Sue Palmer, Services Manager
Association of Carers
Jackson Hall
Portland Place
Hastings
TN34 1QN
Phone: 0300 330 9498
Other: 01424 722 309
E: sue@associationofcarers.org.uk
W: http://www.associationofcarers.org.uk/
We support unpaid Carers in East Sussex by
providing free, high quality, volunteer-led services
that encourage independence and reduce
isolation, including a respite service to family
Carers, matching a volunteer who sits with the
cared for person for around three hours a week
so that the Carer can get a break from their caring
role.
Coverage: Countywide
Free 
Page 35 of 45
Association of Carers
Telephone Support Service
for Carers
Sue Palmer, Services Manager
Association of Carers
Jackson Hall
Portland Place
Hastings
TN34 1QN
Phone: 0300 330 9498
Other: 01424 722 309
E: sue@associationofcarers.org.uk
W: http://www.associationofcarers.org.uk/
Provides Carers with a listening ear and the
opportunity to discuss their caring role in
confidence.
Coverage: Countywide
Free
Care for the Carers
Befriending Service
Service takes place at client’s homes.
Hightlight House
8 St Leonards Road
Eastbourne
BN21 3UH
Phone: 01323 738390
 E: info@cftc.org.uk
Trained volunteers with warmth and good
listening skills provide social interaction and
emotional support to isolated rural carers by way
of a regular home visit (times to be agreed with
the Befriending Scheme Co-ordinator)
Coverage: Countywide
Free 
Page 36 of 45
Carers Breaks Dementia
Engagement Service
Dementia Supper Clubs
The Dementia Supper Clubs are mainly
held in eateries Countywide – current
areas include: Eastbourne/ Hailsham,
Seaford, Lewes, Heathfield, Uckfield,
Robertsbridge, Hastings & Bexhill.
Phone: Contact 01323 449294 for
information about your local supper club.
They offer informal social groups for Carers and
the cared for person as part of the Carers Breaks
Dementia Engagement Service meeting monthly
at various locations around the county.
Coverage: Countywide
Cost of a meal
The East Sussex
Association of Blind and
Partially Sighted People
Social meetings
NEW
ENTRY
Fiona Blyth
Ringmer Village Hall
Lewes Road
Lewes
BN8 5QH
Phone: 01323 832252
E: info@eastsussexblind.org
W: www.eastsussexblind.org
East Sussex Association of Blind and Partially
Sighted People is an independent Charity and is a
member of the East Sussex Vision Care
partnership delivering a comprehensive cross
county service. ESAB supports 14 local social
groups around the county. The groups usually
meet once a month and transport can be
arranged to the meetings. The groups are
organised by teams of local volunteers. See our
website for a list of our social groups. To find out
where your nearest social group meets, please
contact the provider. A home visit will be arranged
to assess suitability of membership.
Coverage: Herstmonceux, Polegate & Lewes
Membership fee
£10 - there maybe
additional
contributions for
events. 
Page 37 of 45
East Sussex Hearing
Resource Centre
Support Resources
David Rowan
8 St Leonard's Road
Eastbourne
BN21 3UH
Phone: 01323 722 505
E: mail@eshrc.org.uk
W: http://www.eshrc.org.uk/
Resources/support for deaf & blind. Elderly
mental health support group.
Our work involves almost all issues to do with
Deaf, deafened and deafblind people. The
services include:
•Communication Support
•Technology for deaf people
•Lip-reading
•Sign Language
•Hard of Hearing groups
•Hearing aid maintenance
•Hearing aid batteries
•Home Visits
•Outreach
•Deaf Outreach Service (bus)
•Provision & installation of assistive devices
•Hearing screening tests
Drop-in sessions operate on Tuesdays and
Wednesdays between 10am - 4pm.
Appointments are not necessary.
Coverage: Countywide
East Sussex Library and
Information Service
Books on Prescription
Business Information Centre
Phone: 01424 724 620
To find your nearest library call 0345
Items can be borrowed from any library in East
Sussex. These are self-help mental health books
for adults, families and young people which have
been read and recommended by local experts.
The books cover common mental health issues
Free 
Page 38 of 45
NEW
ENTRY
6080196
E: library.enquiries@eastsussex.gov.uk
W: www.eastsussex.gov.uk//libraries
including anxiety and depression and can be
borrowed from any library either with or without a
prescription from a health practitioner. Libraries
also have books about lots of other health
conditions including pain management, dementia,
cancer and long term conditions.
Coverage: Countywide
East Sussex Library and
Information Service
Home Library Service
NEW
ENTRY
Business Information Centre
Phone: 01424 724 620
To find your nearest library call 0345
6080196
E: library.enquiries@eastsussex.gov.uk
W: www.eastsussex.gov.uk//libraries
This is a free volunteer delivery of books and
audiobooks to people who are housebound or
carers. Your volunteer will visit at a time and
frequency convenient to you and bring your
choice of books which can include Large Print
books or books on cassette or CD.
Coverage: Countywide
Free
East Sussex Library and
Information Service
Reminiscence resources:
books, games and objects
Business Information Centre
Countywide
Phone: 01424 724 620
These resources are books, music, films,
photocards, or objects which help to re-awaken,
people’s memories of their experiencesand lives.
They can be used for working with older people
and adults or children with disabilities, either in a
Free 
Page 39 of 45
for people with memory
loss
NEW
ENTRY
To find your nearest library call 0345
6080196
E: library.enquiries@eastsussex.gov.uk
W: www.eastsussex.gov.uk//libraries
group setting or one-to-one. They are ideal for
care homes, carers and family members. The
materials are available to borrow free of charge to
any library member and it is free to join the library.
Coverage: Countywide
Home Works
Housing Related Support
Service
NEW
ENTRY
Southdown Housing Association
2 Bell Lane
Lewes
BN7 1JU
Hastings & Rother:
Phone: 01424 858 341
Mobile: 07540 721 244
Fax: 01424 858 342
E: referrals@homeworkseast.org.uk
Eastbourne, Lewes & Wealden:
Phone: 01273 898 700
Mobile: 07773 377754
Home Works is a housing related support service
for clients aged 16-64 whether single, a couple or
a family to overcome housing difficulties
(Council/Housing Association or privately rented)
such as:
• Struggling to manage their home/tenancy.
• Living in unsuitable accomodation
(including overcrowding).
• Preparing to/or in the process of moving
into a more suitable home.
• Homelessness - including "sofa
surfing"/staying with friends and families
temporarily.
• Managing health and safety in the home
and keeping safe at home. If a client is
eligible for Home Works or STEPS
Free to client 
Page 40 of 45
Fax: 01273 898 701
E: referrals@homeworkswest.org.uk
W:
http://www.southdownhousing.org/services
/housing-support/homeworks/
because of a housing issue they will
receive a service that will holistically
support them to increase their choice,
control and confidence. For example
-learn how to deal with budgeting/debt
issues,
 - keep themselves safe e.g. erport anti
social behaviour, avoid scams,
 - develop local and informal networks of
support,
- learn how to access a wide range of
community based services,
- link in with statutory services e.g. register
with a GP,
 - find out how to get online and use a
computer,
 - find out how to look for work, training or
volunteering.
Coverage: Countywide
Living Well Service Living Well
First Floor Offices
Warrior Square Station
St Johns Road
St Leonard’s on Sea
East Sussex
TN37 6HP
The Living Well Service aims to support clients to
maintain their independence by preventing
isolation and showing them alternative ways to
live in greater comfort and improve wellbeing.
The service is primarily for people who are either
frail or elderly, or have a long-term physical
condition, sonsory imparment or physical
Free to client 
Page 41 of 45
Phone: 0800 917 4569
E: livingwell@familymosaic.co.uk
W: www.safeandwellathome.co.uk
disability.
The Service visits clients in their own home (up to
two visits), offering a range of personalised
support, advice and practical solutions to
maximise the client's quality of life and improve
their health and wellbeing.
Coverage: Countywide
Living Well Enhanced
Service
Living Well
First Floor Offices
Warrior Square Station
St Johns Road
St Leonard’s on Sea
East Sussex
TN37 6HP
Phone: 0800 917 4569
E: livingwell@familymosaic.co.uk
W: www.safeandwellathome.co.uk
The Living Well Enhanced Service is aimed at
supporting people with substantial and critical
needs, and supports health and social care
practitioners in Neighbourhood Support Teams to
develop creative support plans by working with
clients to access universal, low cost and free local
services.
In addition to the support provided by the main
service, the Enhanced service will:
• Work with volunteer agencies or identify
alternative ways to help support needs
such as shopping, cleaning, community
transport and social activities;
• Support behavioural change to improve
lifestyles through motivational interviewing
and setting smart goals;
• Recommend and support clients to access
Free to client 
Page 42 of 45
relevant Telecare and Telehealth
solutions.
These clients are supported for up to six visits to
achieve their goals.
A pilot Enhanced Volunteer Service is
operational until end of October 2014 to increase
volunteering support available to ASC clients. The
pilot will offer clients up to a further six visits from
volunteers to help with needs such as daily living
chores, social support, signposting and one-off
practical help with odd jobs around the home.
Referrals to the Enhanced Volunteer Service can
be made via the normal referral route to the Living
Well service.
Coverage: Countywide 
Page 43 of 45
STEPS
Housing Support
If you live in Eastbourne, Lewes or
Wealden, contact Eastbourne Homes:
Telephone: 01323 436 414
Text: 07970 668 106
Email: referrals@stepswest.co.uk
If you live in Hastings or Rother, contact
In Touch:
Telephone: 0300 123 2422 (local rate)
Text: 07944 140 016
Email: referrals@stepseast.co.uk
STEPS to stay independent is a free and
confidential housing support service.
They can visit you at home, and help you work
out what support you personally need to keep
living independently, regardless of what kind of
accommodation you live in.
They can support you to:
• liaise with your landlord or mortgage company
• understand your tenancy or mortgage
arrangement
• find more suitable accommodation
• claim any welfare benefits you are entitled to
• get specialist debt advice
• set up or change utility suppliers
• resolve disputes or other issues with your
neighbours
• find out about local groups or activities in your
area
• take part in healthy living activities
• make sure your home is safe.
Coverage: Countywide
Free to client 
Page 44 of 45
The Fire Fighters Charity
Beneficiary Support
Services
NEW
ENTRY
Countywide
Countywide
Phone: 0800 389 8820
W: www.firefighterscharity.org.uk
We provide recuperation, rehabilitation &
psychological therapy at 3 Centres, in Cumbria,
Devon and Littlehampton. Our beneficiaries are
serving personnel (uniformed & support staff, full
time & retained) + retired and their dependants.
We can advise on/ sign-post or assist with;
financial hardship, debt, welfare benefits,
disability issues, equipment and adaptations.
These are just a small sample of some of the
issues the Charity can help with.
Coverage: Countywide
Cost is dependant
on service. Please
contact provider for
further details.
Wel Being
Telecare
NEW
ENTRY
Wealden and Eastbourne Lifeline
68 Grove Road
Eastbourne
BN21 4UH
Phone: 01323 644 422
E: info@welbeing.org.uk
W: http://www.welbeing.org.uk/
Telecare offers a comprehensive way of
managing the risks to a person’s independence,
health and home environment, 24 hours a day, 7
days a week. The Telecare solutions that are
available can be tailored according to an
individual’s needs; by placing a variety of discreet
wireless sensors around the home, which will
automatically raise an alert if they detect a
possible problem.
Coverage: Countywide
Client’s personal
budget will be
charged for cost of
equipment, sensors
and monitoring. The
maximum
contribution from
the client is £2.85
per week, subject to
a financial
assessment. 
Page 45 of 45
Wel Being
Telecheck
Wealden and Eastbourne Lifeline
68 Grove Road
Eastbourne
BN21 4UH
Phone: 01323 644 422
E: Welbeing case worker:
azar.kamyar@eastbourne.gcsx.gov.uk
W: http://www.welbeing.org.uk/
TeleCheck provides a monitoring service to
ensure that people are supported to live safely
and securely in their own community and maintain
their wellbeing. The calls will be structured to
provide brief time limited support and information
to the client so that they can make informed
choices about their wellbeing, security and
independence.
Coverage: Countywide
This free service is
initially available for
up to 3 months. 
The Wimbledon Club, Church Road, Wimbledon SW19 5AG T: 020 8971 8090
www.thewimbledonclub.co.uk
TITLE……….
FIRST NAME………………………………….
FAMILY NAME......................................................................
ADDRESS………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
POST CODE………………………………….
DATE OF BIRTH………………………………….
MOBILE PHONE………………………………….
HOME PHONE………………………………….
EMAIL………………………………………………………………………………
During the year members require a parking permit to allow vehicular access to
The Wimbledon Club grounds. Please supply your vehicle registration number
in order to obtain one.
VEHICLE REGISTRATION NUMBER…………………………………….
ARE YOU CURRENTLY A MEMBER OF THE WIMBLEDON CLUB? YES/NO
IF YES, WHICH SECTION(S) DO YOU BELONG TO:
CRICKET / FITNESS / HOCKEY / SQUASH / TENNIS
PTO
THE WIMBLEDON CLUB
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM
The Wimbledon Club, Church Road, Wimbledon SW19 5AG T: 020 8971 8090
www.thewimbledonclub.co.uk
Please indicate which tennis membership you are applying for below.
STUDENT UNDER 30 FULL OFF-PEAK
Please indicate whether you would like to pay your subscription fee now or after your club induction.
PAY NOW PAY AFTER INDUCTION
Please indicate your preferred method of payment. We encourage all members to pay subscription fees by
direct debit by completing the direct debit form attached to the adult information pack. This is also available
from reception and at: www.thewimbledonclub.co.uk
CASH CHEQUE DEBIT/CREDIT CARD BACS TRANSFER DIRECT DEBIT
Please indicate your subscription fee below. Pro rata rates can be obtained from the adult information pack;
reception; or are available at: www.thewimbledonclub.co.uk
JOINING FEE: £100 / £0 (existing members of The Wimbledon Club are exempt)
PRO RATA MEMBERSHIP FEE: £
TOTAL SUBSCRIPTION FEE: £
Members often need to contact each other to arrange box league games, tournament matches, club matches
etc. Please indicate below if you are happy for your contact details to be made available. Selecting YES indicates
you are happy for the details to be included in a tennis member directory sent to all tennis members.
I am happy for the following to be included:
Home Phone YES / NO Mobile Phone YES / NO Email YES / NO
All tennis members automatically become British Tennis Members (BTMs) for free (RRP £25/year). BTMs
receive access to tennis promotions; an LTA rating for competitions; and the opportunity to enter the club
ballot for Wimbledon Tickets. Please indicate whether you are a BTM and your BTM number below.
I am a BTM YES / NO BTM No: …………………………
If you are not a BTM and DO NOT want to become a British Tennis Member tick this box
Post or email this form, with or without your payment, to the address/email below:
Rackets Administrator
The Wimbledon Club
Church Road
Wimbledon
SW19 5AG
Email: racketsadmin@TWCsport.co.uk
The Head Adult Coach will then contact you to arrange your club induction.
When your form and payment have been received and you have had your induction you will receive a
members’ handbook, gold shoe tag and court booking details. Your membership card will be ready to collect
from behind the bar within 7 days. We hope you enjoy your tennis at The Wimbledon Club 
THE WIMBLEDON CLUB
TENNIS SECTION APPLICATION FORM
Tennis Court Calendar FAQS May 2015
TENNIS COURT CALENDAR – FAQs
1. How do I access the Tennis Court Calendar?
The club will set up an online Tennis Court Calendar account for you and provide you with a
user name and password. In order to set up an account for you we will be sharing your
name and email address with MYCOURTSTM so that they can set up a Tennis Court Calendar
account for you and issue you with a user name and password. You can choose to opt out if
you wish, see ‘Do I need to do anything’ below.
2. Do I need to do anything?
Adult members only need to take action if they wish to opt out. To opt out please write to
Christine Hensby at info@sltcc.co.uk no later than 9th June 2015. Junior members must be
opted-in by a parent or guardian who should complete and return a Parental Consent Form.
3. How will you use my personal information?
Please see our privacy policy for details of how we and MYCOURTSTM (HBI Consulting Ltd)
will use your personal information.
4. What if I change my mind later?
No problem. Our Administrator will deal with your request as a bespoke amendment.
5. Who are MYCOURTSTM?
MYCOURTSTM (HBI Consulting Ltd) already provide court reservation accounts to several
clubs, including our own squash and racketball section.
6. Who is administering the new Tennis Court Calendar for Sydenham Tennis Club?
Because updating the Tennis Court Calendar is a significant workload, we have contracted
Andrew Lewis, former Club Chairman, through his company yourMANFRIDAY (see
www.yourmanfriday.net), to be the Tennis Court Calendar Administrator under the direction
of the Tennis Committee. Andrew can be contacted at andrew.lewis@sltcc.co.uk
7. How do I use the calendar?
Further information will be provided when members receive their user name and password.
Squash and racketball members seem to find the system very straightforward.
8. Will I always have to book if I want to play tennis at the club?
No. Booking will remain optional even for those courts which are available for booking.
However, those who do book will have priority for those courts. We shall endeavour to 
Tennis Court Calendar FAQS May 2015
ensure that there is always at least one and normally two non-bookable courts available for
members who turn up on the day, looking for a free court.
9. How much will it cost? How do I pay?
Initially, the booking fee will be 50p per half hour and the Board will keep the rate under
review thereafter. Members can buy credit, minimum of £10, using Paypal. Further
information about how to book will be provided online.
10. How will the club ensure a level playing field for all members?
The online bookings etiquette will aim to give all members, including juniors, fair access to
courts. The administrator will aim to ensure a proper balance between bookable courts and
those that will remain ‘free’. The Tennis Committee will keep all aspects under review in the
light of members’ feedback.
11. Do I have to add my personal details (email, home phone, or mobile) to the Members’
Directory?
Your email address will be included in the Members’ Directory when your account is set up.
You have the option to add your telephone numbers when you log in.
12. I don’t want other members to see my contact details. Can I remove them?
You can remain incognito if you wish. Simply visit ‘Edit My Profile’ to change you profile
settings. However, that could make it difficult for other members using the Directory to
arrange leagues, tournament matches and games with you. (In 5 years, squash and
racketball members have reported no concerns.)
13. Can I use the same user name and password for both tennis and squash websites?
All members will receive a new user name and password for the Tennis Court Calendar. You
will need to retain the user name as given but it will be possible to change your password by
following instructions in “My Settings”.
14. If I opt out, can I still join the adult singles leagues?
No. For ease of administration, the adult leagues already require members to participate
online.
15. So what happens next?
In June the club will forward the names and email addresses of all tennis members
(excluding any who have opted out and juniors who have not opted in) to MYCOURTSTM.
MYCOURTSTM will then issue each member with a user name and password plus step-by-step
instructions how to get started. Members can then sit back and enjoy all the benefits!
Handbook
Season
2013/2014
CONTENTS
 The Football League Trust Futsal League
Club Directory
04 A — C
06 C — L
08 L — P
10 P — S
12 W
13 Game Weeks
 League Season 2013/14
14 League 1
NORTH WEST (LEEDS ARENA)
NORTH EAST (LEEDS ARENA)
NORTH CENTRAL (LEEDS ARENA)
SOUTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
NORTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
CENTRAL MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
SOUTH WEST (SWINDON ARENA)
SOUTH EAST (SCORE CENTRE)
16 League 2
NORTH WEST (LEEDS ARENA)
NORTH EAST (LEEDS ARENA)
NORTH CENTRAL (LEEDS ARENA)
SOUTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
NORTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
SOUTH WEST (SWINDON ARENA)
SOUTH EAST (SCORE CENTRE)
18 League 3
NORTH WEST (LEEDS ARENA)
NORTH CENTRAL (LEEDS ARENA)
SOUTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
SOUTH WEST (SWINDON ARENA)
SOUTH EAST (COULSDON)
19 League 4
NORTH CENTRAL (LEEDS ARENA)
SOUTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
SOUTH WEST (SWINDON ARENA)
20 Match Day Information
22 Coaches Code of Conduct
Club Directory (A — C)
The Football League Trust Futsal League
Contact: Allan Phillipson
Tel: 07534 475 885
Email: allan.phillipson@stanleytrust.co.uk
Contact: Chris McGrail
Tel: 01254 296 256
Email: chris.mcgrail@brfctrust.co.uk
Contact: Owen Fisher
Tel: 01273 878 260
Email: owen.fisher@albioninthecommunity.org.uk
Contact: Jamie Fogg
Tel: 07792 110 268
Email: Jamiect@blackpoolfc.co.uk
Contact: Craig Farrand
Tel: 07779 139 770
Email: farrando84@aol.com
Contact: Ian Parkes
Tel: 07835 001 294
Email: ian.parkes@bcfc.co.uk
Contact: John Moody
Tel: 0117 952 2581
Email: john@bristolroverscommunity.org.uk
Contact: Jame Tose
Tel: 07813 879 248
Email: fitc1@carlisleunited.co.uk
Contact: Tim Moffatt
Tel: timmoffatt21@live.co.uk
Email: 07900 194 082
Contact: Dean Wright
Tel: 07557 232 422
Email: deanwright@buryfccommunitytrust.co.uk
Contact: Simon Stephens
Tel: 02920 643 655
Email: ss.cardiffcityfc@gmail.com
4 5
Contact: Olly Roberts
Tel: 07751 987 448
Email: Olly.Roberts@ctfc.com
Contact: Kay Adkins
Tel: 07803 604 089
Email: kayadkins@chesterfield-fc.co.uk
Contact: Michael Harrington
Tel: 07979 636 088
Email: michaelharrington@cpfcfoundation.org
Contact: Adam Thorley
Tel: 07790 845 363
Email: adam.thorley@dcfc.co.uk
Contact: Ray Walker
Tel: 07777 677 606
Email: ray.walker28@btinternet.com
CHESTERFIELD FC
Contact: Ian Dabell
Tel: 07960 559 178
Email: ian.dabell@doncasterroversfc.co.uk
Contact: Danny Harris
Tel: 07827 871 721
Email: Danny.harris@exetercityfc.co.uk
Contact: Rachael Lakey
Tel: 07771 776 460
Email: rachael.lakey@thezone.uk.com
Contact: Daniel Nicholson
Tel: 07932 625 315
Email: daniel.nicholson@tigerstrust.co.uk
Contact: Mark Westerby
Tel: 07595 279 365
Email: markwesterby@grimsbytownfitc.co.uk
Contact: Steve Brotherwood
Tel: 07917 412 823
Email: communitytrust2@herefordunited.co.uk
Club Directory (C — L)
The Football League Trust Futsal League
6 7
Contact: Chris Eley
Tel: 07732 202 223
Email: chris.eley@itfc.co.uk
Contact: Michael Kinsey
Tel: 07957 590 621
Email: michael.kinsey@leedsunited.com
Contact: Mark Lynk
Tel: 07528 142 614
Email: lynky_1@hotmail.com
Contact: Charlotte Dinsdale
Tel: 07793 844 958
Email: Charlotte.Dinsdale@mfcp.co.uk
Contact: Adam Martin
Tel: 07813 162 324
Email: adam.martin@lcfc.co.uk
Contact: Alan Blackman
Tel: 0208 556 5973
Email: Alan.Blackman@locsp.org
Contact: Micahel Stringfellow
Tel: 07834 034 033
Email: michaelstringfellow@morecambefc.com
Contact: Dan Walder
Tel: 07894 588 105
Email: dan.walder@mkdonsset.com
Contact: Martin Carruthers
Tel: 07794 325 982
Email: mc@nottscountyfitc.org.uk
Contact: Dave Farrell
Tel: 07795 186 040
Email: dave.farrell@theposh.com
Contact: Russell Lewis
Tel: 07887 878182
Email: russell.lewis@ntfc.tv
Contact: Jason Lee
Tel: 07920 885 599
Email: jason.lee@nottinghamforest.co.uk
Club Directory (L — P)
The Football League Trust Futsal League
8 9
Contact: Mike Foley
Tel: 07917 137 440
Email: mike.foley@pafc.co.uk
Contact: Jim Cooper
Tel: 07831 364 677
Email: jim.cooper@community.port-vale.co.uk
Contact: Kevin Coles
Tel: 07789 202 402
Email: kevin.coles@futsaluk.net
Contact: Martin Payne
Tel: 07848 113 884
Email: svengoren@hotmail.com
Contact: Keith Ellis
Tel: 07738 622521
Email: keith.ellis@pompeyitc.org.uk
Contact: Kyle Armstrong
Tel: 07446 192213
Email: kyle@pne.com
Club Directory (P — S)
The Football League Trust Futsal League
10
Contact: Chris Kirby
Tel: 07983 401 011
Email: chris.kirby@rotherhamunited.net
Contact: Gav Cooper
Tel: 07875 088 825
Email: gavcooperover50coordinator@hotmail.co.uk
Contact: Brian Williams
Tel: 01743 289 177
Email: communitysportstrust@shrewsburytown.co.uk
Contact: Mark Gamble
Tel: 07821 579 374
Email: mgamble@saintsfc.co.uk
Contact: Chris Bailey
Tel: 07856 220 353
Email: chris.bailey@sufc.co.uk
Contact: Ricky Hunt
Tel: 0114 221 2378
Email: ricky.hunt@swfc.co.uk
11
Contact: Billy Shulver
Tel: 01702 341 351
Email: B.Shulver@southendunited-cet.co.uk
Contact: Luke Sharps
Tel: 07881 923 872
Email: luke@stfc-fitc.co.uk
Contact: Dave Lawrence
Tel: 07904 588 095
Email: dave.lawrence@albionfoundation.co.uk
Contact: Jack Blackburn
Tel: 07525 901164
Email: j.blackburn@wiganathletic.com
*A player can only play for one of their club’s teams over the course of a game week
GAME WEEK DATE
game week 1 Starts: 25th September 2013
 Ends: 2nd October 2013

game week 2 Starts: 9th October 2013
 Ends: 16th October 2013

game week 3 Starts: 23rd October 2013
 Ends: 6th November 2013

game week 4 Starts: 13th November 2013
 Ends: 20th November 2013

game week 5 Starts: 27th November 2013
 Ends: 4th December 2013

game week 6 Starts: 11th December 2013
 Ends: 18th December 2013

game week 7 Starts: 8th January 2014
 Ends: 15th January 2014

game week 8 Starts: 22nd January 2014
 Ends: 29th January 2014

game week 9 Starts: 5th February 2014
 Ends: 12th February 2014

game week 10 Starts: 5th March 2014
 Ends: 12th March 2014

game week 11 Starts: 19th March 2014
 Ends: 26th March 2014

game week 12 Starts: 2nd April 2014
 Ends: 30th April 2014

game week 13 Starts: 7th May 2014
 Ends: 14th May 2014

game week 14 Starts: 21st May 2014
 Ends: 4th June 2014

game week 15 Starts: 11th June 2014
 Ends: 18th June 2014

National League 2 Finals Birmingham Arena Sunday 15th June 2014
National League 1 Finals Birmingham Arena Sunday 22nd June 2014
National League 3&4 Finals Birmingham Arena Wednesday 25th June 2014
Club Directory (W)
The Football League Trust Futsal League
12 13
Contact: Andy Harston
Tel: 07964 840 611
Email: AndrewHarston@wolves.co.uk
Game Weeks
NORTH WEST (LEEDS ARENA)
Accrington Stanley (A)
Carlisle United (A)
Blackburn Rovers (A)
Blackpool (A)
Preston North End (A)
Wigan Athletic (A)
Morecambe (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 1 Finals
League 1
NORTH EaST (LEEDS ARENA)
Bradford City (A)
Doncaster Rovers (A)
Leeds United (A)
Grimsby Town (A)
Hull City (A)
Scunthorpe United (A)
Middlesbrough (A)
Bury (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 1 Finals
NORTH CENTRAL (LEEDS ARENA)
Huddersfield Town (A)
Rochdale (A)
Rotherham United (A)
Sheffield United (A)
Sheffield Wednesday (A)
Chesterfield (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 1 Finals
SOUTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
Cardiff City (A)
Bristol City (A)
Bristol Rovers (A)
Cheltenham Town (A)
Northampton Town (A)
West Brom (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 1 Finals
NORTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM AreNa)
Derby County (A)
Notts County (A)
Nottingham Forest (A)
Leicester City (A)
Wolves (A)
Mansfield Town (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 1 Finals
CENTRAL MIDLANDS (Birmingham Arena)
Crewe Alexandra (A)
Hereford United (A)
MK Dons (A)
Shrewsbury Town (A)
Peterborough United (A)
Port Vale (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 1 Finals
SOUTH WEST (SWINDON ARENA)
Exeter City (A)
Plymouth Argyle (A)
Reading (A)
Southampton (A)
Swindon Town (A)
Portsmouth (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
SOUTH EAST (SCORE CENTRE)
Crystal Palace (A)
Ipswich Town (A)
Leyton Orient (A)
Southend United (A)
Brighton and Hove Albion (A)
Chelsea (A)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
League Season
2013/2014
14 15
NORTH WEST (LEEDS ARENA)
Accrington Stanley (B)
Carlisle United (B)
Blackburn Rovers (B)
Blackpool (B)
Preston North End (B)
*Top 2 qualify for National League 2 Finals
League 2
NORTH EaST (LEEDS ARENA)
Bradford City (B)
Doncaster Rovers (B)
Leeds United (B)
Grimsby Town (B)
Hull City (B)
Scunthorpe United (B)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
NORTH CENTRAL (LEEDS ARENA)
Huddersfield Town (B)
Rotherham United (B)
Chesterfield (B)
Sheffield United (B)
Sheffield Wednesday (B)
Middlesbrough (b)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
SOUTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
Cardiff City (B)
Bristol City (B)
Bristol Rovers (B)
Cheltenham Town (B)
Northampton Town (B)
West Brom (B)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
NORTH MIDLANDS (BIRMINGHAM ARENA)
Derby County (B)
Notts County (B)
Nottingham Forest (B)
Wolves (B)
MK DONS (B)
Crewe Alexandra (B)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
SOUTH WEST (Swindon Arena)
Exeter City (B)
Plymouth Argyle (B)
Reading (B)
Southampton (B)
Swindon Town (B)
Portsmouth (B)
*Top 3 qualify for National League 2 Finals
League Season
2013/2014
16
SOUTH EAST (Score Centre)
Crystal Palace (B)
Ipswich Town (B)
Leyton Orient (B)
Southend United (B)
Brighton and Hove Albion (B)
*Top 2 qualify for National League 2 Finals
17
* The best 3rd placed team from either
North West League 2 or South East
League 2 will also qualify
NORTH EAST (Leeds Arena)
Bradford City (C)
Leeds United (C)
Grimsby Town (C)
Hull City (C)
Scunthorpe United (C)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 3 Finals
League 3
NORTH CENTRAL (Leeds Arena)
Huddersfield Town (C)
Accrington Stanley (C)
Rotherham United (C)
Sheffield United (C)
Sheffield Wednesday (C)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 3 Finals
SOUTH MIDLANDS (Birmingham Arena)
Cardiff City (C)
Bristol City (C)
Derby County (C)
West Brom (C)
Notts County (C)
Wolves (C)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 3 Finals
SOUTH WEST (Swindon Arena)
Exeter City (C)
Plymouth Argyle (C)
Southampton (C)
Swindon Town (C)
Bristol Rovers (C)
Cheltenham Town (C)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 3 Finals
League Season
2013/2014
18
NORTH CENTRAL (Leeds Arena)
Huddersfield Town (D)
Accrington Stanley (D)
Scunthorpe United (D)
Sheffield United (D)
Bradford City (D)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 4 Finals
SOUTH MIDLANDS (Birmingham Arena)
Cardiff City (D)
Bristol City (D)
Derby County (D)
Notts County (D)
Cardiff City (E))
*Top 4 qualify for National League 4 Finals
19
SOUTH WEST (Swindon Arena)
Exeter City (D)
Southampton (D)
Swindon Town (D)
Exeter City (E)
Swindon Town (E)
Cheltenham Town (D)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 4 Finals
SOUTH EAST (COULSDON)
Crystal Palace (C)
Leyton Orient (C)
Brighton and Hove Albion (C)
Portsmouth (C)
Leyton Orient (D)
*Top 4 qualify for National League 3 Finals
League 4
Match Day Information
3.5 Finals teams must ensure they are available
for all scheduled games.
3.6 In the event of a qualified team being
unable to play in the finals tournament, the
next highest ranked team in that league
will qualify.
4. LATE KICK OFFS AND
POSTPONEMENTS
4.1 Teams must be on the pitch and ready to
play at the scheduled kick off times.
4.2 Any teams that are late will lose the game
5-0 unless it is decided by the league that it
would be detrimental to another side in the
league.
4.3 In the event that a club is unable to fulfil
their fixture, the coach must contact
TVS on 07773 023338 at the earliest
opportunity. If a team is unable to fulfil a
their fixture, the match will be forfeited 5-0
(unless it is decided by the league that it
would be detrimental to another side in
the league). Postponement of fixtures will
only be authorised in the event of extreme
adverse weather conditions. It is at the
discretion of the FLTFL committee whether
the circumstances warrant the fixture
being re-arranged.
4.4 If a team do not have enough players
available to fulfil a fixture, the result will be
forfeited and a 5-0 victory will be awarded
to the opposition (unless it is decided by
the league that it would be detrimental to
another side in the league). If a team has
more than one fixture, the players available
must play for the most senior side (i.e. the A
team) with the remaining fixture(s) forfeited.
4.5 Failure to comply with the aforementioned
postponement procedure will result in a 5-0
defeat for the club concerned.
4.6 In the event that a postponement is
authorised, it shall be re-arranged to be
played at the earliest possible opportunity
that suits all parties, before the end of
the season.
5. DISCIPLINE
5.1 All clubs must demonstrate respect for the
referees, venue staff, coaches and players of
other clubs.
5.2 All matches will start and finish with the
respect handshake between both teams and
the match day officials
5.3 It is the responsibility of the club coach to
ensure that these standards are adhered
to. Please refer to the ‘Coaches Code of
Conduct’ (page 22) for further information.
5.4 Yellow cards will be awarded at the
discretion of the referee but will typically be
given for:
 — Unsporting behaviour
 — Dissent
 — Persistent infringement of the rules
5.5 Red cards will be awarded at the discretion
of the referee but will typically be given for:
 — Serious Foul Play
 — Violent Conduct
 — Deliberately preventing a goal scoring
opportunity by unfair means
 — Using offensive or abusive language
 — Receiving 2 yellow cards
5.6 Any player that receives 3 yellow cards over
the course of the season will be suspended
for one game. Any player that receives 9
yellow cards over the course of the season
will be suspended for two games.
The suspension will begin immediately and
will apply to the A, B, C and D teams.
5.7 Any player that receives a red card will be
suspended for one game. The suspension
will begin immediately and will apply to the A,
B, C and D teams.
5.8 All yellow and red cards are to be reported
by the club coach in the Match Day Form.
5.9 For any incident which does not fall under
standard dismissal offences or is deemed
by the referee as a serious offence, a
misconduct charge will be issued (See
Appendix 2). All misconduct charges will
be referred to a disciplinary panel who will
decide on further action within 5 days of
the charge being issued.
1. RULES
1.1 All Football League Trust Futsal League
(FLTFL) matches will be played in
accordance with the FIFA Futsal Laws. The
FIFA Futsal Laws can be viewed at:
 http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/
affederation/generic/51/44/50/
futsallawsofthegameen.pdf
1.2 It is the responsibility of the club coach to
ensure that all players are familiar with these
match day rules.
1.3 All games will consist of two 20 minutes
halves of continuous running time, with a
two minute interval at half time.
1.4 A team may name up to 9 substitutes
for any match but there is no limit to the
number of substitutions that can be made
during a game.
1.5 Players may substitute at any time during the
match without notifying the referee but must
wait for the departing player to leave the
pitch before entering.
1.6 A player can play for any of their clubs A,
B, C or D teams throughout the season but
cannot play for more than one team in the
same game week. A game week will cover
a fortnightly period in which a club’s A, B,
C and D team will all play their fixtures. The
start and finish dates for each game week
are detailed on page 13.
1.7 If a player has already played for one of his
club’s teams and plays again within the
same game week, the result will be forfeited
and a 5-0 victory will be awarded to the
opposition (unless it is decided by the league
that it would be detrimental to another side
in the league).
1.8 All players will be issued with an ID card
which must be presented to the referee
before kick-off. If a player is unable to
present his ID card it will be at the discretion
of the referee whether that player will be
allowed to participate in the match.
1.9 It is compulsory for all players, including
goalkeepers to wear shinguards. Any players
who are not wearing shinguards will not be
permitted to play.
2. MATCH DAY FORM
2.1 For all FLTFL matches an official Match Day
Form (see Appendix 1) is to be completed
and submitted by the club coach detailing:
 — Team Sheet
 — Half Time and Full Time Scores
 — Goalscorers
 — Yellow and Red Cards
 — Match Report
2.2 The Match Day Form is to be submitted via
email to info@tvseducation.com no later than
12:00pm the following day of the match.
2.3 The Match report will provide a brief
summary of the match and as a rough guide
should be no shorter than 100 words and no
longer than 200 words.
2.4 All information submitted in the Match Day
Form will be used to document the matches
on the FLTFL website.
3. SCORING SYSTEM
3.1 Three points will be awarded for a win and
one for a draw.
3.2 Teams equal on points will be separated by
goal difference, followed by goals scored,
followed by the aggregate results between
the two teams that are level.
3.3 The top teams from each league will qualify
for the National Finals tournaments to be
played at the end of season. Please refer
to pages 14-19 for the breakdown of how
many teams qualify from each division.
The National Final tournaments will
determine the National League 1, League 2,
League 3 and League 4 champions for the
2013-2014 season
3.4 The structure of the National Finals
tournaments and all fixtures will be advised
to participating teams upon completion
of the league schedule and posted on the
FLTFL website. 20 21
Football League Trust Futsal League:
Coaches Code of Conduct
All players, coaches and officials involved in the
Football
League
Trust
Futsal
League
have a responsibility to promote high standards of behaviour within the game.
In order
to achieve the high standards expected, the league relies on the full co-operation of
everyone involved.
As club coach,
I take ultimate responsibility for the conduct of my team and agree to
abide by the responsibilities stated below; I agree:
— To ensure my players are made fully
aware of futsal’s unique rules as many
of them will be new to Futsal. My aim
is to enable them to play to their best
ability within the laws of the game
— To embrace the spirit of Futsal and
create a positive playing environment
as generating a negative playing
experience may be detrimental to the
students’ classroom studies
— To remember that this is first and
foremost and educational programme,
and therefore players must be up to
date with their studies. I accept that it
is irresponsible to reward students with
game time who are significantly behind
in their studies without good reason.
Game time should be a reward for
dedicated efforts in class, not a given
— That I will not field an ineligible player at
any time and accept that there will be
consequences should I do so
— To ensure that all necessary items are
brought to fixtures, in particular a first
aid kit and player ID
— To ensure players will have their ID
cards at all fixtures, if not I will notify
TVS Education prior to leaving or
accept that they may not be able to
play in the given fixture
— To treat attending coaching CPD days
as a priority in my schedule
— To uphold the reputation of FLT Futsal,
my community trust and professional
parent club…
— To display and promote high standards
of behaviour at all times
— To refrain from using offensive or
abusive language/behaviour at all times
— To show respect to all others involved
on match days including referees,
match day officials, opposition players
and opposition coaches
— To accept and respect all decisions
made by match day officials
— To never publically engage in criticism of
match day officials
— To never enter the pitch without the
permission of the match day officials
— To adhere to the laws of the game
It is my responsibility to ensure that my
players:
— Understand the high standards
of behaviour and respect that are
expected from them
— Accept and respect all decisions made
by match day officials
— Refrain from using offensive or abusive
language/behaviour at all times
— Learn to accept responsibility for their
own behaviour
— Understand that fair play, player safety
and enjoyment of the game are more
important than winning at all costs
I understand any breaches of the code of
conduct may result in action being taken by
FTLFL disciplinary panel.
22 23
Signed Print Name Club
25
Appendix 2:
Referee Disciplinary Report
Incident Report
Level 1
Denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity, either by obstruction or deliberate handball
Attempting to kick or strike another player
Use of offensive, insulting or abusive language or gestures towards another player or coach
Serious foul play
A second bookable offence
Date
Venue
Referee
Player
Team
Opponent
Level 2
Violent conduct
Kicking or striking another player
Use of offensive, insulting or abusive language or gestures towards a match official
Spitting
Head butting
Assault
Refusing to leave the field of play when ordered
Causing a match to be abandoned
Any offences in which the offender has also acted in a discriminatory manner for reasons of
ethnic origin, colour, race, religion, sex, sexual, orientation, disability
Signed
Appendix 1:
Match Day Form 2013-2014
Match Report: (200 words or less)
Player Goals Yellow Red
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Half Time Full Time
Team Name A
Opponent A
Contact:
info@tvseducation.com
tel: 07773 023338
fltfutsal.co.uk
 @FLTFutsal
Tel: 01983 293261 www.cowesprimary.co.uk 26th June 2014
Cowes
131
Compton
106
Ryde
123
Blackgang
122
House Points
TOTALS:
 To report pupil absence by 9.30am each day: Tel: 293261 or Email: admin@cowespri.iow.sch.uk
 This Week’s Successes & News
 Hampshire Games Triumph!
Congratulations to all the children who on Friday
20th June travelled to Aldershot to take part in the
Hampshire Games. Our Netball team qualified for
this competition by coming 1st in Cowes Cluster
High 5 Netball Tournament and runners up in the
Island Finals. In very hot conditions the team had to play 9 games and
due to some excellent play they only lost 2 of these! This put them into
the play-offs for 6th place which resulted in a draw. This meant out of 20 schools from Hampshire
and Isle of Wight, Cowes finished in equal 5th place - an excellent achievement! The team were
Oliver Evans, Rohan Didier, Noah Cumpsty, Chloe Duggan, Gabrielle Sellier, Charlotte Despard
and Lialani Durno.
Our Athletics team were invited to the Hampshire Games and were selected to represent the
Island due to the standard of all their previous performances. Again in very warm conditions the
team all had to complete four events. With some very tough opposition to contend with Cowes
finished in 6th place out of 10. Well done to them all! The team were Ben Snow, Harry Thearle,
Calum George, Jacob Jarvis, Holly Bartlett, Jessica Clarke, Charlee Roberts and Charlotte Sollars.
 Girls Cricket Success!
Our Girls Cricket team was again in action on Tuesday when they went to
Shalfleet to play 2 cricket matches. The first of these was against Shalfleet and
after some excellent bowling skills we won the match. This meant we stayed in
the competition and played against St Francis. This was a much tougher game
and despite some excellent catching skills we were just beaten and therefore
went out of the competition. Very well done to all the girls, you did yourselves proud. The team
were Lialani Durno, Charlee Roberts, Omethra Abeykoon, Summer Price, Georgia Furse Chloe
Duggan, Charlotte Despard and Gabrielle Sellier.
Dates for Sports Days
Please remember that our school sports days will be held on Tuesday 8th July
1:00pm - 2:50pm (EYFS, Year 1 & 2) and Wednesday 9th July 1:00pm - 2:50pm
(Years 3 - 6). Your child will need to wear a T Shirt which represents their House
Team colour. Thank you.
Walk The Wight Total
We have currently raised a grand total of £1074.00 for the Earl Mountbatten
Hospice. A fantastic well done. Please ensure anymore sponsorship money is
handed into the office by Friday 4th July. Thank you.
Donations for Raffle Prizes
We are currently seeking donations to our ever popular raffle, maybe you run your
own business and would like to donate a voucher, or, work for a tourist attraction
and could donate some tickets? If you are able to help in anyway, please see a
member of the office staff, we would be very grateful for your support.
Highest performing school in Cowes area for SATs. Top Island school for L5 Reading, 2nd for
Writing, 3rd for L4+ Reading, Writing & Maths. In all cases exceeding National expectations.
Attendance: Whole School Target: 95.6% 
Fri 27th June - Tern Class Assembly at 9:00am
Mon 30th June - Weds 2nd July - Parent Lunches Year 5 & 6 (details to follow)
Weds 2nd July - Heron Assembly
Thurs 3rd July - Fri 4th July - Transition Days
Tues 8th July - Sports Day (EYFS, Year 1 & 2) 1pm - 3pm (parents welcome)
Weds 9th July - Sports Day (Years 3 - 6) 1pm - 3pm (parents welcome)
Fri 11th July - Year 2 Celebration Assembly (parents welcome)
Mon 14th July - Mufti Day - KS1 Chocolate, KS2 Bottles
Fri 18th July - Summer Fayre & Horticultural Show - 3:00pm - 5:30pm
Weds 23rd July - Year 6 Leavers Assembly
Thurs 24th July - School Closed
For bookings
and full
details,
please call
Julie Durno,
Club Manager on: 07511 709 744.
 Drop-In Sessions

If you would like to add your name to the newsletter emailing list,
please email the office: admin@cowespri.iow.sch.uk
Headteacher’s Drop-In Times
Wednesday 2.30-3.00pm
in the Reception Area/Meeting Room.
Please use the front entrance and
sign in at the office.
Class Drop-In Times after School
Monday: Year 4 and Year 6
Tuesday: Early Years
Wednesday: Year 3 and Year 5
Thursday: Year 1 and Year 2
Mufti Day
We will be having a Mufti Day on
Monday 14th July
In order to support our Summer Fayre
& Horticultural Show Tombola, we will
be having a mufti day and will need
items for our ever popular tombola:-
EYFS & KS1 - Chocolate
KS2 - Bottles
Thank you
Cowes Primary
Community & Business
Directory
If you’re planning a party, need
childcare, business services or some
work doing around the house. Check
out our very own online Community &
Business Directory! It’s packed with
information about local services
provided by staff and parents/carers of
children at Cowes Primary School.
If you would like to be included in the
directory, please email
mandy@islandcom.co.uk. Entries are
free.
www.cowesprimaryCBD.co.uk
 Letters home w/c 23rd June 2014
G&T Letter—Selected pupils only
Ryde Mardis Gras Letter - Selected pupils
only
Handball Letter - Selected pupils only
Sports at CEC Letter - Selected pupils only
If you have not received any of these letters,
please collect from the office.
Trinity Theatre, Cowes
All my Sons (Arthur Miller)
16, 17, 18, 19 July at 7.30pm
Tickets: £8.00
Box Office: 01983 295229
Book Online: www.caods.org.uk
Horticultural Show
Please remember that
your entry form can
be handed in NOW
along with the entry
money! But all forms
must be received no
later than Wednesday
16th July. Thank you
Garden Canes Needed
Do you have any spare 6ft and/or 8ft
canes that you could donate to the
school for our gardening club.
Reminder - Recorder Payments
Final recorder payments are due before
the end of term. Fees for the term are
£30.00. Please contact Sarah Glaccum
on ph: 209167 if you have any concerns
or questions.
Information on Home to School Transport
Consultation
http://www.iwight.com/Residents/Schools-andLearning/School-Admissions/Home-to-SchoolTransport-consultation

Publishing, Printing & Website Services for the Mining Industry2013 Media Pack
Tradelink Publications Ltd
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
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Tradelink Publications Ltd was established in 1984 in the UK, and rapidly expanded, publishing magazines and directories for
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Tradelink Publications Ltd was established in 1984 in the UK, and rapidly expanded, publishing
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British National Coal Board, giving him an in depth knowledge of the coal mining industry.
The following international titles are published by Tradelink
ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH
MINING EQUIPMENT COMPANIES
3
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Contents |03
About Tradelink Publications 02
Overview of the company
Product portfolio
 Services offered
 Added value
Contents 03
Mining World 04-05
Circulation profile
 Overview
 Geographical breakdown
 Commodity breakdown
Editorial programme
 Copy and publication dates
 Feature articles
 Event distribution
Coal International 06-07
Circulation profile
 Overview
 Geographical breakdown
 Business sector breakdown
Editorial programme
 Copy and publication dates
 Feature articles
 Event distribution
Foreign issues
International Guide to the Coalfields 08
History
Directory contents
Distribution profile
Copy and publication dates
Website Services 09
News
Events
Mines and quarries
Industry suppliers
Commodity prices
Banner advertisements
Graphic Design Services 10
Design and print
Mailing and leaflet distribution
Rates & Data 11
Print publications
 Positions and sizes
 Formats
Digital media
 Positions and sizes
Subscriptions
 Titles ISBN/ISSN
Contact details 12
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
04|Mining World Circulation Profile
Circulation by geographical area
Circulation by commodity
Coal
16%
Other/
combination
9%
Copper
11%
Gold
15%
Nickel
6%
Uranium
3%
Silver
8%
Molybdenum
5%
Diamond
3%
Iron ore
14%
Potash
10%
Circulation by business sector
Exploration & drilling
companies
17%
Mining operations
32%
OEMs & service
providers
7%
Other
8%
Processing &
materials handling
18%
16%
15%
8%
3%
9%
5%
3%
6%
14%
10%
11%
Coal
Gold
Silver
Uranium
Other/combination
Molybdenum
Diamond
Nickel
Iron ore
Potash
Copper
Exploration & drilling companies
Mining operations
OEMs & service providers
Operating companies
Other
Processing & materials handling
17%
32%
7%
18%
8%
18%
Operating
companies
18%
Overview
•	 Minimum 5,000 copies, plus bonus print for exhibitions
and conferences..
• In excess of 12,000 qualified email addresses are given
electronic access to a PDF version of Mining World.
•	 Mining World has a worldwide circulation, concentrating
on English speaking countries and Europe.
•	 It is published 6 times a year, making the news
up to date, the features more flexible and giving
our readers more information.
•	 Posted free of charge to mine operators, managers,
drilling and processing companies; addressed to the
people who influence the purchasing decisions within
their companies.
•	 Other recipients include trade associations, libraries,
OEMs and service providers.
•	 Extra copies are distributed at exhibitions and
conferences, where we engage in media partnerships.
•	 For details of our “Added Value,” see page 02.
Others include - smelters, steel processes and PR companies
Africa
7%
USA & Canada
35%
UK
10%
China & Asia
13%
Australia & NZ
10%
CIS
9%
Europe
5% South America
11%
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Mining World Editorial Programme |05
All issues
News Worldwide exploration reports, production results, processing developments, financial
reports and new appointments, health and safety issues and developments.
Plant & New innovations, launches and adaptations of machinery, electronics and services
Equipment for surface and underground mines.
Feature As listed above plus current topics. Subject to change and improvement throughout
Articles the year.
All articles are subject to change throughout the year.
Exhibition representation Country Start date
39th Annual Conference on
Explosives & Blasting Technique
USA 10 Feb
SME USA 24 Feb
PDAC Canada 03 Mar
Fluid & Process Brazil 19 Mar
Exhibition representation Country Start date
bauma Germany 15 Apr
23rd International Mining
Congress & Expo
Turkey 16 Apr
Mining World Russia Russia 14 May
Minex Turkey 23 May
Exhibition representation Country Start date
International Heavy Minerals
Conference
India 27 Nov
Exhibition representation Country Start date
Euro Mine Sweden 10 Jun
Exponor Chile 17 Jun
April 2013
Drilling and blasting.
Simulation of the behaviour of rock support mesh restrained
by reinforcement systems.
Yielding bolt support for rock burst prone workings.
Copy date: 22 Mar 2013
February 2013
Mine automation.
Ground control at the Spremberg copper mine.
The use and application of thin spray liners (TSLs) in mining.
Copy date: 18 Jan 2013
Exhibition representation Country Start date
23rd World Mining Congress &
Expo
Canada 11 Aug
CIM Canada 11 Aug
AIMEX Australia 20 Aug
bauma Africa South Africa 01 Sep
Mining Indonesia Indonesia 04 Sep
EuroMining Finland 11 Sep
June 2013
Longwall mining.
Validation of two new technologies for monitoring the in situ
performance of rock bolts.
How we can utilise the Atlas Copco intelligent computerised
system to improve the quality of rock bolting in mines and
tunnels.
Copy date: 24 May 2013
Exhibition representation Country Start date
17th ICPC Turkey 01 Oct
International Mines Rescue
Body Conference
Canada 05 Oct
9th FEM Conference Canada 29 Oct
October 2013
Block cave mining.
Monitoring of opencast mine rim slopes using vertical
inclinometers.
Caterpillar room and pillar solutions.
Copy date: 20 Sep 2013
August 2013
Room and pillar mining.
Influencing parameters on the behavior of gas storage
caverns in salt.
The influences of excavation surface curvature and
roughness on reinforcement and support practice.
Copy date: 19 Jul 2013
December 2013
Underground signals and communications.
Innovative geoservices for exploration and monitoring of
mining areas.
Static and dynamic performance of an energy-absorbing
rock bolt.
Copy date: 22 Nov 2013
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Overview
•	 Coal International is the international coal orientated
magazine reaching a worldwide audience in all areas
of the coal mining industry.
•	 Free distribution to coal mine managers and operators.
•	 Minimum 5,000 copies plus bonus print for exhibitions and
conferences.
•	 Issues available by post, e-mail and download from
www.mqworld.com.
•	 Published 6 times a year in English.
•	 One Chinese issue a year.
•	 Two Russian issues a year.
•	 One Polish issue a year.
Circulation by geographical area
06|Coal International Circulation Profile
Circulation by business sector
Operating companies
14%
Mining operations
38%
Exploration & drilling
companies
12%
Processing & materials
handling
14%
OEMs & service providers
4%
Power plants
7%
Associations & libraries
3%
Other
8% Processing & materials handling
Mining operations
Exploration & drilling companies
Operating companies
Power plants
Associations & libraries
OEMs & service providers
Other
14%
38%
12%
14%
7%
3%
4%
8%
Others include - smelters, steel processes and PR companies
0 500 100 1500 2000 2500
Africa
4%
USA
& Canada
38%
UK 3%
China
& Asia
25%
Australia
& NZ
8%
CIS
Europe 17%
4%
South America
1%
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Language Publication date Copy date Editorial Exhibition representation
Russian June 2013 05 April 2013 News, Plant & Machinery Ugol Rossii & Mining, Novokuznetsk
Russian TBC TBC News, Plant & Machinery TBC
Chinese October 2013 13 September 2013 News, Plant & Machinery China Coal & Mining Expo, Beijing
Polish September 2013 02 August 2013 News, Plant & Machinery International Fair of Mining, Katowice
Foreign Language Editions
Coal International Editorial Programme |07
Exhibition representation Country Start date
39th Annual Conference on
Explosives & Blasting Technique
USA 10 Feb
SME USA 24 Feb
Exhibition representation Country Start date
AIMEX Australia 20 Aug
bauma Africa South Africa 01 Sep
Mining Indonesia
Katowice Mining Fair
Indonesia
Poland
04 Sep
10 Sep
Exhibition representation Country Start date
bauma Germany 15 Apr
Mining World Russia Russia 14 May
Exhibition representation Country Start date
17th ICPC Turkey 01 Oct
China Coal & Mining Expo China 22 Oct
Exhibition representation Country Start date
International Heavy Minerals
Conference
India 27 Nov
Exhibition representation Country Start date
AIMS 2013 Germany 22 May
Ugol Rossii & Mining Russia 04 Jun
Longwall USA USA 11 Jun
All issues
News Worldwide exploration reports, production results, processing developments, financial reports and new
appointments, health and safety issues and developments. Underground and surface mining covered.
Plant & New innovations, launches and adaptations of machinery, electronics and services for surface and
Equipment underground mines.
Feature Articles As listed above plus current topics. Subject to change and improvement throughout the year.
All articles are subject to change throughout the year.
January - February 2013
Sustainability in mining.
Comparison of the state of the art of the gateroads in Polish
and German coal mining.
Training of roofbolting engineers for Suek mines in Russia.
Copy date: 14 Dec 2012
March - April 2013
Room and pillar mining in South Africa.
Planning an inclined shaft at the Sadovaya mine for the
purposes of opening up a new mining field.
The introduction of UK rock bolting technology into coal
mines around the world.
Copy date: 22 Feb 2013
July - August 2013
Focus on Australian longwall mining.
The development and application of a logical framework
for specifying roof and rib support/reinforcement in
Australian underground coal mines.
Surface subsidence induced by underground coal mining
in Indonesia.
Copy date: 14 Jun 2013
November - December 2013
Latest innovations in material handling.
Applicability of rock bolting system and ground control
management under weak strata in Indonesia.
Identification of grouting discontinuity of rock bolts as an
efficient way to control safety conditions in mine roadways.
Copy date: 25 Oct 2013
May - June 2013
Underground signals and communications.
Performance analysis of resin and mechanical anchorage
bolting systems.
Rockbolting trials in underground coal mines in Japan.
Substantiation of rope anchors length in the conditions of
mines in the Western Donbas coal region.
Copy date: 12 Apr 2013
September - October 2013
Water and dust management.
Caterpillar room and pillar solutions.
An innovative technology of simultaneous extraction of two
seams.
Numerical simulation of dynamic impact of loads,
transported by suspended monorails, on yielding arch
supports.
Copy date: 16 Aug 2013
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
History
The International Guide to the Coalfields was first
published in 1948. It is a directory of the world’s coal
mines and their operating companies.
It has long been regarded as the “Bible of the Industry” for
management and engineers in the coal mining industry.
08|International Guide to the Coalfields
Contents
Operating companies
Name, address and contact details of operating
companies, together with details of their subsidiary
companies.
Mining operations
Name, address and contact details of operating
mines throughout the world, with information on mine
type, method of mining and production figures where
available.
Industry suppliers
List of OEMs, parts and service providers to the coal
mining industry. Branch details with contact person and
short company profile. All companies cross-referenced to
products and services section.
Products and services section
Alphabetical listing of goods and services provided by
the industry suppliers.
Who needs a Guide?
Possibly the most useful marketing tool in the coal mining
and production industry. Up to date contact details with
relevant mine addresses listed.
An essential source of reference for anyone working in the
coal mining industry.
Copy deadline 28 Jun 2013
Publication July 2013
Key dates
Distribution
Posted to the most productive operating companies
around the world. In return for their complimentary copy,
we request verification of accuracy of their data entries.
Contact info@tradelinkpub.co.uk to see if you qualify for
a free copy.
Circulation by geographical area
Africa
6% USA
& Canada
31%
UK 5%
China
& Asia
18%
Australia
& NZ
18%
CIS
14%
Europe
6%
South America
2%
9
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08|International Guide to the Coalfields
Website www.mqworld.com
News Daily news gathering service for the global mining and mineral extraction industry.
Operation updates including exploration, drilling, production figures and financial reports.
Product launches, innovations and developments.
Powerful search engine for archived press releases and news items.
Publications Full downloads of PDF versions of printed publications: Mining World and Coal International
plus foreign language editions of Coal International.
Events Calendar of major mining exhibitions and conferences worldwide, with media partnerships
and links to exhibition organiser’s websites for more information.
Mines and quarries On-line database listing mines and quarries names, addresses, contact and production
details.
Contact us for subscription option to select addresses by commodity, geographical area or
extraction method employed.
Industry suppliers Comprehensive list of equipment and service providers to the mining industry.
Search engine available for key words, categories and products.
Commodity prices Instant link to up-to-the-minute mineral and metal commodity prices.
Banner advertisements Company banner advertisements are displayed on the news page with a weblink to your
own website.
Banners work on a rotational basis, and are positioned as a shared title or border banner.
Social media Please join us on Facebook or Twitter @tradelinkpub.
By working together, we make our great industry even greater.
Contacts We offer an email alert service when news appears on our website, or reminder when our
publications are uploaded.
To be included on our distribution list, please email info@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Media partners In order to serve our advertisers better, we sponsor international mining exhibitions and
conferences, and our journals are distributed to the attendees.
Website services |09
Increase in email subscriptions to regular newsletters
13000
12000
10000
8000
6000
4000
2000
0
Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July
 2012
Number of email subscribers to
regular newsletter
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10|Graphic Design & Services
Design Services
Brochures, posters, flyers, leaflets, point of sale, corporate
ID, banner ads, magazines, exhibition services and
advertisements.
Printing Services
Any media, from single sheets to hundreds of thousands.
Mailing Services
Insert leaflets with our journals.
Separate mailings from our extensive database of global
mines and quarries.
Mailing can be categorised by:
Geographical region
Commodity mined
Operating companies PRINT Mining operations
Association of British Mining
Equipment Companies
A division of Hubbell Limited
GAI-TRONICS
Osborn Metals
Tradelink Publications Ltd
Advanced Chain Technologies
The Association of British Mining Equipment Companies
Abmec Russian posters_2012_Pink.indd 1 08/05/2012 15:27:32
Publications
Mining Industry
 for the
For editorial and advertising
Tel +44 (0)1777 871007 | Fax +44 (0)1777 872271
Email info@tradelinkpub.co.uk | www.mqworld.com
Tradelink Publications Ltd
Publisher of Journals and Directories for the Mining Industry
News
中文版
WĘGIEL
MIĘDZYNARODOWY
中文版
КОУЛ ИНТЕРНЭШНЛ
For editorial and advertising
Tel +44 (0)1777 871007 | Fax +44 (0)1777 872271
Email info@tradelinkpub.co.uk | www.mqworld.com
+44 (0)1777 871007
+44 (0) 7712 562511
sales@mqworld.com
www.mqworld.com
Ollerton Road, Tuxford
Newark, Nottinghamshire
NG22 0PQ. UK
Kevin Barratt
Advertisement Sales
11
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11
Position & Size Mechanical Data Mining
World
Coal
International
International
Guide to the
Coalfields
Front cover 210mm x 210mm 3mm bleed on all sides £3,500.00 N/A N/A
Front cover 210mm x 240mm 3mm bleed on all sides N/A £3,500.00 N/A
Front cover 210mm x 225mm 3mm bleed on all sides N/A N/A £3,500.00
Front covers are compiled of an operational image and company name or logo with contact details inside the publication
Back cover 210mm x 297mm 3mm bleed on all sides £2,800.00 £2,800.00 £2,800.00
Inside covers 210mm x 297mm 3mm bleed on all sides £2,500.00 £2,500.00 £2,500.00
Double page spread 420mm x 297mm 3mm bleed on all sides £4,500.00 £4,500.00 £4,500.00
Full page 210mm x 297mm 3mm bleed on all sides £2,400.00 £2,400.00 £2.400.00
Half page landscape 185mm x 131mm no bleed £1,250.00 £1,250.00 £1,250.00
Half page portrait 90mm x 263mm no bleed N/A £1,250.00 N/A
Quarter page landscape 185mm x 65mm no bleed £660.00 £660.00 0 £660.00
Quarter page portrait 90mm x 131mm no bleed N/A £660.00 N/A
Entry only Name, address and contacts N/A N/A 0 £350.00
Classified Various sizes From £125.00 From £125.00 From £125.00
Inserts Up to A4 size contact us for competitive rates
Please supply advertisements as a PDF high resolution (300 dpi or more) in CMYK format
Advertisements received as RGB will be converted to CMYK and colour variation may occur
Note: Mining World is a bound publication, please do not place text within 10 mm of the edge of the page as it could
disappear into the bind
Agency discount 10%
Multiple booking discount Please contact our Sales Department for available offers
Foreign language journals Same rates and data as English issues
Restrictions Advertisements published with the approval of the publisher
Digital Media Description Per Annum
Company link Company logo linked to your own website and entry in the Industry Suppliers
section of www.mqworld.com
220(w) x 150(h) pixels
0 £350.00
Title banner 468(w) x 68(h) pixels £1,000.00
Border banner 160(w) x 120(h) pixels £1,200.00
Please supply banners as an animated GIF or JPEG file to studio@mqworld.com
Advertising Rates & Data |11
Title Language ISSN/ISBN Issues and Cost Per Annum
Mining World English 2045-2578
2045-2586 (online)
6 £70.00
 £60.00 (UK)
Coal International English 1357-6941
2045-2985 (online)
6 £160.00
 £140.00 (UK)
Coal International Chinese 1357-6941 1 £30.00
Coal International Polish 1357-6941 1 £30.00
Coal International Russian 1357-6941 2 £60.00
International Guide to the Coalfields English 1364-7512
978-0-9554436-5-7
1 £150.00
Mining and Commodity Reports English On-line shop POA
Agency discount 10%
Subscriptions to Publications
Print Publications
Internet Services
Tradelink Publications Ltd
Ollerton Road
Tuxford
Newark
Nottinghamshire
NG22 0PQ
United Kingdom
Tel +44 (0)1777 871007
Fax +44 (0)1777 872271
Email info@tradelinkpub.co.uk
www.mqworld.com
2014 Editorial programme
Tradelink Publications Ltd
Publishing, Printing & Website Services for the Mining Industry
Opportunities
Besides publishing Coal International, Mining
World and the International Guide to the Coal
Fields, Tradelink also produces a daily and weekly
e-newsletter.
Our website is updated daily with breaking company
and equipment news, a calendar of conferences,
events and shows, an on-line data base of mines &
quarries, a comprehensive list of equipment & service
providers, an instant link to up-to-the-minute mineral
and metal prices, and more…
Besides which you’ll also find us on:
History
Tradelink Publications was established in 1984 with the
acquisition of the Colliery Guardian, which subsequently
became Coal International magazine. Expanded rapidly,
Tradelink Publications now publishes the bi-monthly
Mining World and Coal International alongside the annual
International Guide to the Coalfields. Coal International
is also printed in Russian, Polish and Chinese languages
throughout the year corresponding with the major
exhibitions taking place.
Facebook “f” Logo CMYK / .eps Facebook “f” Logo CMYK / .eps
sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Other services
Tradelink can also provide design services for
brochures, posters, flyers, and leaflets, point of sale,
corporate ID, banner ads, magazines, exhibition
services and advertisements.
Our printing service covers any media from single
sheets to thousands, banners, posters, leaflets, and
more…
Our mailing service means we can insert leaflets with
our journals & magazines. Separate mailings from our
extensive database of global mines and quarries, with
mailings classified by region, commodity, operating
companies and mining operations.
We are members of:
02 | About Tradelink Publications
3
History
First published in 1948, the International Guide
to the Coalfields is an annual directory listing
global mining operations and operators, alongside
production statistics, country profiles and more.
Long regarded as the “coal industry Bible” by mine
managers and engineers it acts as a comprehensive
marketing tool within the industry.
Up to date contact details together with relevant
mine addresses, senior personnel and engineers
The International Guide to the Coalfields is quite
possibly the most useful reference tool available and
is also available on-line.
Contents
Operating companies
Name, address and contact details of operating
companies, with details of their subsidiary
companies.
Mining operations
Name, address and contact details of operating
mines throughout the World, with information on
mine type, method of mining and production figures
where available.
Industry suppliers
List of OEMs, parts and service providers to the coal
mining industry. Branch details with contact person
and short company profile. All companies crossreferenced
to products and services.
Products and services section
Alphabetical listing of goods and services provided
by the industry suppliers.
Distribution
Complimentary copies are posted to the most
productive operating companies around the World
in return for their verification of our data. Contact
info@tradelinkpub.co.uk to see if you qualify for a
free copy.
Copy deadline 3rd October 2014
Publication 17th October 2014
Key dates
Circulation by geographical area
Africa
6%
USA
& Canada
31%
UK 5%
China
& Asia
18%
Australia
& NZ
18%
CIS
14%
Europe
6%
South America
2%
International Guide to the Coalfields | 03
To advertise in the International Guide to the Coalfields, contact sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Overview
Tradelink Publishing’s flagship publication, Coal
International is probably the oldest English language
coal magazine in the world. Established in 1858 as the
Colliery Guardian, it is distributed to an international
database of mining professionals, including coal mine
managers, engineers and operators.
Coal International expanded to become an international
publication when the UK’s coal industry was privatised
in the mid-1980s, and is now regarded Worldwide as
the No 1 magazine within the coal industry.
• Published six times a year
• Over 5000 printed copies, plus BONUS circulation to
exhibitions and conferences
• Free distribution to mine managers and operators
• Available as hardcopy or downloadable PDF
• Chinese, Russian and Polish language issues.
• Besides a wealth of technical articles, site visits and
industry news, Coal International also covers health
& safety, financial news, alongside new products &
equipment in every issue.
Language Publication date Copy date Editorial
Russian April 2014 4th April News, Plant & Machinery
Russian August 2014 18th July News, Plant & Machinery
Chinese October 2014 5th September News, Plant & Machinery
Polish August 2014 1st August News, Plant & Machinery
Foreign Language Editions
Processing &
materials handling
Mining operations
Exploration &
drilling companies
Operating
companies
Power plants
Associations &
libraries
OEMs & service
providers
Other
14%
38%
12%
14%
7%
3%
4%
8%
Others include - smelters, steel processes and PR companies
Circulation by business sector
04 | Coal International
Operating companies
14% Mining operations
38%
Exploration & drilling
companies
12%
Processing &
materials handling
14%
OEMs & service providers
4%
Power plants
7%
Associations & libraries
3%
Other
8%
To advertise in Coal International, contact sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
There will be bonus
circulation of
Coal International and
Mining World to our
premium list prior to all
major exhibitions.
January - February 2014
Equipment selection: the effect on mining operations
efficiency
Modern plough systems
Roof bolting & ground control
Upper Big Branch: What can we learn?
Focus on: South Africa
Equipment focus: Over ground haulers
Site visit
Copy date: 24th January
March - April 2014
Global continuous miner census: results &
comparisons
Impact of corrosion on mining equipment
Material Handling
Working at deep levels
Bolter miners
Focus on: Russia & Ukraine
Equipment focus: Safety equipment
Site visit
Copy date: 21st March
July - August 2014
Safety: tagging and tracking
Thin seam mining
Longwall powered supports
Water management
Focus on: China
Equipment focus: Shaft-sinking & winding gear
Site visit
Copy date: 25th July
November - December 2014
Stowing on longwall faces
Gas drainage
Mine software-Benefits and risks
Shaft sinking
State of the art planning technology
Focus on: Australia
Equipment focus: Crushing and screening
Site visit
Copy date: 21st November
May - June 2014
High performance drilling and blasting
Management of multi seam interactions
Sustainable development strategy for Serbian open
cast mines and thermo power plants
Coal Preparation
Focus on: Poland
Equipment focus: Draglines, shovels & excavators
Site visit
Copy date: 23rd May
September - October 2014
Signals and communications
Globalisation: technological challenges
Room and pillar
Focus on: India
Equipment focus: Automation
Site visit
Copy date:  26th September
Africa
4%
USA
& Canada
38%
UK 3%
China
& Asia
25% Australia
& NZ
8%
CIS
17%
Europe
4%
South America
1%
Circulation by geographical area
Coal International | 05
To advertise in Coal International, contact sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Circulation by geographical area
16%
15%
8%
3%
9%
5%
Coal
Gold
Silver
Uranium
Other/combination
Molybdenum
Diamond
Nickel
Iron ore
Potash
Copper
Exploration & drilling companies
Mining operations
OEMs & service providers
Operating companies
Other
Processing & materials handling
17%
32%
7%
18%
8%
18%
Others include - smelters, steel processes and PR companies
06 | Mining World
Overview
Mining World covers the surface and underground
mining sectors. Besides a wealth of technical articles,
site visits and industry news, Mining World also
covers health & safety, financial news, alongside new
products & equipment in every issue.
Further articles of interest will be added throughout
the year. Should your company wish to contribute any
articles or white papers of interest please note the
copy deadlines.
• Minimum 7000 printed copies, plus bonus circulation
for exhibitions and conferences
• Over 12000 qualified email addresses
• A Worldwide circulation concentrating on the English
speaking countries and Europe
• Published six times per year
• Posted free of charge to mine operators,
managers, drilling and processing companies.
• Addressed directly to the people who influence
the purchasing decisions within their companies
• Other recipients include trade associations,
educational establishments, libraries, OEMs and
service providers
• Extra copies distributed at exhibitions and
conferences
Circulation by business sector
To advertise in Mining World, contact sales@tradelinkpub.co.uk
Circulation by commodity
3%
6%
14%
10%
11%
Africa
7%
USA & Canada
35%
UK 10%
China &
Asia
13% Australia & NZ
10%
CIS
9%
Europe
5%
South America
11%
7
All articles are subject to change throughout the year.
Mining World | 07
News Worldwide exploration reports, production results, processing developments, financial
reports and new appointments, health and safety issues and developments.
Product &
Equipment
New innovations, launches and adaptations of machinery, electronics and services for surface
and underground mines.
Feature
Articles
As listed above plus current topics. Subject to change and improvement throughout the
year. Should your company wish to contribute any articles or white papers of interest
please note the copy deadlines.
All issues
February 2014
Globalisation and technological challenges
Working at deep levels
Sensors
Country focus: Australia
Equipment focus: Crushing & screening
Site visit
Copy date: 10th Jan
April 2014
Equipment selection: the effect on mining operations
efficiency
Rapid blind shaft sinking
Take it to the next level: new technology for creating
slot holes
Mine software: benefits and risks
Country focus: India
Equipment focus: Automation
Site visit
Copy date: 7th March
August 2014
Mine planning
Wear parts/Corrosion
Material handling
From plain technology to high tech: Customer specific
solutions for LHDs
Country focus: South America
Equipment focus: Pumps
Site visit: The Sangan Iron Ore mines: An example of
modern mining in Iran
Copy date: 11th July
December 2014
Shaft sinking & winding
Sustainability
Stability analysis of pastefill used for backfill material
at Kencarna underground gold mine North Halmahera,
Indonesia
Country focus: Indonesia
Equipment focus: Conveyer material handling
Site visit
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June 2014
Safety: tagging and tracking
Sensors-Evaluation
Monorails
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Equipment focus: Drilling
Site visit
Copy date: 9th May
October 2014
Signals & communications
Rock anchoring
Underground transportation
Country focus: Africa
Equipment focus: Excavators & haulers
Site visit
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Groundsure
Ground Stability
Report
Address: Specimen Address
Date: Mar 27, 2015
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
Your Reference:Ground Stability Specimen
Client: Searches UK Ltd
Brought to you by Searches UK Ltd
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
If you would like any further assistance regarding this report then please contact
SEUK on (T) 0845 2411815, email: info@searchesuk.co.uk
Brought to you by Searches UK Ltd
Overview of Findings
For detailed guidance on each dataset, please refer to the Summary of Findings sections listed
below.
Factor Assessment Section
Ground Workings and Infilled land
Historical Surface Ground Workings In Need of Further Assessment 1.1
Historical Underground Workings In Need of Further Assessment 1.2
Current Ground Workings Passed 1.3
Mining and Extraction
Historical Mining In need of Further Assessment 2.1
Coal Mining Passed 2.2
Shallow Mining In Need of Further Assessment 2.3
Mining Cavities In Need of Further Assessment 2.4
Natural Cavities Passed 2.5
Brine Extraction Passed 2.6
Gypsum Extraction Passed 2.7
Tin Mining In Need of Further Assessment 2.8
Clay Mining Passed 2.9
Natural Hazards & Additional Factors
Natural Ground Subsidence Negligible - Very Low 3.1
Landfills
Operational or non-operational landfills Passed 4
Geology
Artificial None 5.1
Drift None 5.2
Bedrock Yes 5.3
Boreholes No 5.4
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Expert Assessment
Consultant's Overview and Guidance
From the information within this report we consider it possible that Ground Stability Issues
may affect the property.
The BGS have identified a low-moderate potential for shallow mining. This means that the
rocks underlying the area are of a type known to have been mined at shallow depth in some
parts of the UK, and that such working may be possible in your area. In these cases it is
recommended that you seek further advice from a Royal Institute Chartered Surveyor (RICS),
the local Building Control Officer, or by ordering a Geological Report from the BGS. It is also
recommended that you obtain a Coal Authority mining search, which will provide a
comprehensive search of former mining activity, including coal mining at deeper levels. For
further information regarding Tin Mining Groundsure recommends obtaining a Tin Mining
report. This can be ordered by writing to Mining Searches UK, Highburrow Lane, Wilson Way,
Pool Industrial Estate, Redruth, Cornwall. TR15 3RN Tel: 01209 218861
You may wish to check that any structural surveys performed on the property have taken the
potential for ground instability into consideration. If such factors have not been considered,
you may wish to contact the local Building Regulations Officer, Planning Department and if
recently constructed, the site developers. Newer developments may benefit from an NHBC
guarantee or other environmental warranty which often covers structural issues.
Unless suitable information is available confirming that suitable ground engineering techniques
have been used at the site, you may wish to seek further more detailed assessment of stability
and / or structural issues through a Chartered Surveyor or Chartered Engineer.
If you need any further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact our helpline on
0845 2411815 quoting the above report reference number.
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Aerial Photograph
NW
▲
N NE
◄W E►
SW S
▼
Aerial photography supplied by Getmapping PLC.
© Copyright Getmapping PLC 2003. All Rights Reserved.
SE
Site Name: Specimen Address
Grid Reference: 123456,123456
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
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Detailed Findings
1. Ground Workings
NW
▲
N NE
◄W E►
SW S
▼
SE
© Crown copyright and database
rights 2015. Ordnance Survey
license 100035207.
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
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1. Ground Workings
1.1 Historical Surface Ground Working Features derived from the Historical
Mapping
This data set is derived from Groundsure's unique Historical Map Land Use Database
Are there any Historical Surface Ground Working Features within 250m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
Guidance: The study site has been identified as lying in proximity to areas potentially affected by surface ground workings.
Areas that have undergone ground workings may cause ground instability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses,
mass movement and landslides etc, depending on the nature of the workings and / or backfilling.
The following Historical Surface Ground Working Features derived from the Historical Mapping information is provided
by Groundsure:
ID Distance (m) Direction Use Date
2A 2.0 S Refuse Heap 1958
3A 4.0 S Unspecified Heap 1879
4A 4.0 S Refuse Heap 1906
5 45.0 N Cuttings 1879
6B 73.0 E Refuse Heap 1906
7B 73.0 E Unspecified Heap 1879
8B 75.0 E Unspecified Heap 1990
9B 75.0 E Unspecified Heap 1976
10B 78.0 E Refuse Heap 1958
11C 113.0 N Cuttings 1906
12C 115.0 N Cuttings 1958
13J 117.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1906
14 127.0 E Unspecified Ground Workings 1879
15D 130.0 SW Refuse Heap 1958
16D 133.0 SW Refuse Heap 1906
17D 133.0 SW Unspecified Heap 1879
18E 156.0 W Cemetery 1976
19E 156.0 W Cemetery 1990
20F 160.0 NE Unspecified Heap 1879
21F 161.0 NE Refuse Heap 1906
22 163.0 NW Unspecified Heap 1879
23 165.0 NE Refuse Heap 1958
24G 172.0 NW Refuse Heap 1906
25G 172.0 NW Unspecified Heap 1879
26H 172.0 NW Refuse Heap 1906
27H 172.0 NW Refuse Heap 1958
1.2 Historical Underground Workings Features from Detailed Mapping
This data set is derived from Groundsure's unique Historical Map Land Use Database
Are there any Historical Underground Working Features within 250m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
Guidance: The study site has been identified as lying in proximity to areas affected by underground workings. Areas that
have undergone underground workings may cause ground instability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses, mass
movement and landslides etc, depending on the nature of the workings and / or backfilling.
The following Historical Underground Working Features from Detailed Mapping information is provided by Groundsure:
Distance (m) Direction Use Date
18.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
18.0 S Unspecified Shafts 1879
18.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
82.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1879
117.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1906
141.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
144.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
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194.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
1.3 Current Ground Workings
This data set is derived from the BGS BRITPITS database covering active, inactive mines, quarries, oil wells, gas
wells, mineral wharves, and rail deposits throughout the British Isles.
Are there any Current Ground Workings within 250m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
The following Current Ground Workings information is provided by British Geological Society:
Distance (m) Direction Use Pit Name
1 200.0 E Tin East Carnbrea Mine
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2. Mining and Extraction
2.1 Historical Mining
Are there any Historical Mining features within 500m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment In need of Further Assessment
Guidance: The study site has been identified as lying in proximity to areas affected by historical mining. Areas that have
undergone mining may cause ground instability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses, mass movement and
landslides etc, depending on the nature of the workings and or backfilling. Unless suitable information is available confirming
that suitable ground engineering techniques have been used at the site, it would be prudent to contact the Local Authority
Planning department to confirm that suitable design measures were implemented at the site during construction, or you may
wish to have a detailed structural survey undertaken at the site by a RICS accredited surveyor.
The following Historical Mining information provided by Groundsure :
Distance (m) Direction Details Date
18.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
18.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
18.0 S Unspecified Shafts 1879
82.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1879
117.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1906
141.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
144.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
194.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
250.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1879
274.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
318.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1906
318.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1879
321.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
326.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
377.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
383.0 NW Unspecified Shaft 1879
390.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
390.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
392.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
392.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
394.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
394.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
395.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
395.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
396.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
397.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1906
405.0 SE Unspecified Shaft 1879
421.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
425.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
427.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
427.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
427.0 SE Unspecified Old Shafts 1906
427.0 SE Unspecified Shaft 1879
429.0 SE Unspecified Old Shafts 1958
429.0 SE Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
429.0 SE Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
430.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1958
430.0 S Disused Tin 1906
431.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1958
432.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1906
434.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1906
434.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
451.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
461.0 S Engine Shaft 1906
470.0 S Engine Shaft 1879
472.0 W Unspecified Disused Shaft 1990
472.0 W Unspecified Disused Shaft 1976
478.0 S Unspecified Disused Shaft 1976
478.0 S Unspecified Disused Shaft 1990
479.0 W Unspecified Shaft 1879
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2.2 Coal Mining
Are there any coal mining areas within 75m of the study site? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance:The study site is not located on or in proximity to an area which is affected by surface or sub-surface coal mining.
No further action is recommended.
2.3 Shallow Mining
What is the maximum hazard of subsidence relating to shallow mining within 175m* of the study site?
Low - Moderate
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
The following shallow mining information provided by the British Geological Survey is not represented on Mapping:
Distance[m] Direction Details
0.0 On Site Low-Moderate
Guidance: Many types of mining such as ironstone or limestone extraction take place close to the surface. These types of
mining can pose a subsidence risk as they sometimes cause surface collapses. Where low-moderate is indicated, this means
that the rocks underlying the area are of a type known to have been mined at shallow depth in some parts of the UK, and
that such working may be possible in your area. In these cases it is recommended that you seek further advice from a Royal
Institute Chartered Surveyor (RICS), the local Building Control Officer, or by ordering a Geological Report from the BGS. It is
also recommended that you obtain a Coal Authority mining search, which will provide a comprehensive search of former
mining activity, including coal mining at deeper levels.
2.4 Mining Cavities
Is the site located in an area of mining cavities? Yes
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
The following Non-Coal Mining Cavities information provided by Peter Brett Associates
Distance (m) Direction Address Superficial Deposits Bedrock Deposits Type of Mining
248.0 E CARN BREA EAST,
Redruth, Cornwall
- Mylor Slate
Formation, Felsite,
Granite
Bornite,
Chalcocite,
Copper, Malachite,
Native Copper,
Tetrahedrite
Guidance: This risk rating is obtained from the mining cavities dataset, which is supplied and digitally combined by Peter
Brett Associates. There are records within 250m of the site. Areas that are associated with mining cavities may cause ground
stability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses, mass movement and landslides etc, depending on the style of
mining used. Unless suitable information is available confirming that suitable ground engineering techniques have been used
at the site, it would be prudent to contact the Local Authority Planning department to confirm that suitable design measures
were implemented at the site during construction.
2.5 Natural Cavities
Is the site located in an area of natural cavities? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: This risk rating is obtained from the mining cavities dataset, which is supplied and digitally combined by Peter
Brett Associates. There are no records within 250m of the site.
*
This Includes an automated buffer of 150m.
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2.6 Brine Extraction
Is the site located in an area of brine extraction? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
2.7 Gypsum Extraction
Is the site located in an area of gypsum extraction? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
2.8 Tin Mining
Is the site located in an area of tin mining? Yes
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
Guidance: This site is within a postcode where tin mining is reported to have occurred. This may or may not mean that this
site has been affected by tin mining. For further information you may wish to consider obtaining a Tin Mining report. This can
be ordered by writing to Mining Searches UK, Highburrow Lane, Wilson Way, Pool Industrial Estate, Redruth, Cornwall. TR15
3RN Tel: 01209 218861
2.9 Clay Mining
Is the site located in an area of clay mining? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
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3. Natural Ground Subsidence
3.1 Natural Ground Subsidence
What is the potential for natural ground subsidence* within the search area? Negligible - Very Low
Guidance
This hazard rating is obtained from the amalgamation of six datasets which are supplied and digitally
combined by the British Geological Survey (BGS). These datasets indicate the hazard posed by the
occurrence of: Swell-Shrink Clay, Landslide, Compressible Ground, Collapsible Ground, Dissolution of
Soluble Rocks and Running Sands. Many Factors may contribute to ground subsidence problems. For
instance significant problems can arise in conurbations underlain by clay rich bedrock, such as over clay
strata in the South East of England, or South Wales. Whilst surveyors are normally aware of local
problem areas, data provided by the BGS can highlight areas where a significant potential for natural
ground subsidence exists and which may need particular consideration.
Where negligible - very low potential is indicated, this means that you need take no further action in
relation to natural ground subsidence in this area.
*The term “Subsidence” refers to ground movement that could cause damage to foundations in domestic
or other properties.
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4. Landfill and Waste Sites
NW
▲
N NE
◄W
E►
SW S
▼
SE
Landfill & Waste Sites Legend © Crown copyright and database
rights 2015. Ordnance Survey
license 100035207.
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4.1 Landfill Sites
Are there any operational or non-operational landfill sites within 500m of the search centre? Yes
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No action required.
4.2 British Geological Survey / DoE Landfill Site Survey
Database searched and no data found.
4.3 Environment Agency Active Landfill Sites
Database searched and no data found.
4.4 Environment Agency Historic Landfill Sites
The following records are represented as points and polygons on the Landfill and Waste Sites
map. Only points or polygons within 500m of the property are detailed.
ID Distance [m] Direction Site Name Site Reference Data Type
1 338.0 NW Former Railway Cutting, Redruth Hospital,
Redruth, Cornwall
- Polygon
4.5 Groundsure Local Authority Landfill Sites Data
Database searched and no data found.
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5. Geology
5.1 Artificial Deposits/Made Ground
Database searched and no data found.
5.2 Superficial Deposits/Drift Geology
Database searched and no data found.
5.3 Bedrock Deposits/Solid Geology
Records of Bedrock Deposits/Solid Geology within 25m of the study site:
ID Distance (m) Direction LEX Code Description Rock Description
1 0.0 On Site MRSL-MBAR MYLOR SLATE FORMATION METABASALTIC-ROCK
2 2.0 N MRSL-HSSL MYLOR SLATE FORMATION HORNFELSED SLATE AND
HORNFELSED SILTSTONE
(Derived from 1:50,000 scale BGS Geological Survey Mapping)
5.4 Borehole Records
The systematic analysis of data extracted from the BGS Borehole Records database provides
the following information.
Records of boreholes within 250m of the search centre: 0
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Contacts
Searches UK Ltd Helpline
Telephone: 0845 2411815
info@searchesuk.co.uk
Environment Agency
Tel: 08708 506 506
Devon and Cornwall
Sir John Moore House - Victoria Square, Bodmin, PL31 1EB
Tel: 03708 506 506
South West Tel: 03708 506 506
Web: www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Email: enquiries@environment-agency.gov.uk
Local Authority
Cornwall Council (Unitary). Address: County Hall, Treyew
Road, Truro, Cornwall, TR1 3AY. Web:
http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/. Tel: 0300 1234 100
British Geological Survey Enquiries
Kingsley Dunham Centre
Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG
Tel: 0115 936 3143. Fax: 0115 936 3276.
Email: enquiries@bgs.ac.uk
Web: www.bgs.ac.uk
BGS Geological Hazards Reports and general geological
enquiries
The Coal Authority Property Search Services
200 Lichfield Lane, Berry Hill,
Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, NG18 4RG
Phone: 0345 7626 848 - DX 716176 MANSFIELD 5
Email:groundstability@coal.gov.uk
Web: www.groundstability.com
Ordnance Survey
Adanac Drive, Southampton
SO16 0AS
Tel: 08456 050505
Getmapping PLC
Virginia Villas, High Street, Hartley Witney,
Hampshire RG27 8NW
Tel: 01252 845444
CoPSO
The Old Rectory, Church Lane, Thornby, Northants NN6 8SN
Tel: 0871 4237191
(www.copso.org.uk)
Peter Brett Associates
Caversham Bridge House, Waterman Place, Reading
Berkshire RG1 8DN
Tel: +44 (0)118 950 0761 E-mail: reading@pba.co.uk
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This report is produced by Groundsure Ltd, whose correspondence address is Groundsure Ltd, Sovereign House, Church Street,
Brighton, BN1 1UJ (Tel: 08444 159 000, Fax: 01273 763569, Email: info@4c.Groundsure.com). Groundsure's registered address is
Groundsure Ltd, c/o Top Right Group Limited, The Prow, 1 Wilder Walk, London W1B 5AP. United Kingdom.Registration Number:
3421028. VAT Number 486 4004 42.
Acknowledgements
PointX © Database Right/Copyright, Thomson Directories Limited © Copyright Link Interchange Network Limited © Database
Right/Copyright and Ordnance Survey © Crown Copyright and/or Database Right. All Rights Reserved. Licence Number [03421028].
This report has been prepared in accordance with the Groundsure Ltd standard Terms and Conditions of business for work of this nature.
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Search Code
IMPORTANT CONSUMER PROTECTION INFORMATION
This search has been produced by Groundsure Ltd, Sovereign House, Church Street, Brighton, BN1 1UJ. Tel: 08444
159 000. Email: info@4C.Groundsure.com which is registered with the Property Codes Compliance Board (PCCB) as a
subscriber to the Search Code. The PCCB independently monitors how registered search firms maintain compliance
with the Code.
The Search Code:
·provides protection for homebuyers, sellers, estate agents, conveyancers and mortgage lenders who rely on the
information included in property search reports undertaken by subscribers on residential and commercial property
within the United Kingdom
·sets out minimum standards which firms compiling and selling search reports have to meet
·promotes the best practice and quality standards within the industry for the benefit of consumers and property
professionals
·enables consumers and property professionals to have confidence in firms which subscribe to the code, their
products and services.
By giving you this information, the search firm is confirming that they keep to the principles of the Code. This
provides important protection for you.
The Code’s core principles
Firms which subscribe to the Search Code will:
·display the Search Code logo prominently on their search reports
·act with integrity and carry out work with due skill, care and diligence
·at all times maintain adequate and appropriate insurance to protect consumers
·conduct business in an honest, fair and professional manner
·handle complaints speedily and fairly
·ensure that products and services comply with industry registration rules and standards and relevant laws
·monitor their compliance with the Code
COMPLAINTS
If you have a query or complaint about your search, you should raise it directly with the search firm, and if
appropriate ask for any complaint to be considered under their formal internal complaints procedure. If you remain
dissatisfied with the firm’s final response, after your complaint has been formally considered, or if the firm has
exceeded the response timescales, you may refer your complaint for consideration under The Property Ombudsman
scheme (TPOs). The Ombudsman can award compensation of up to £5,000 to you if he finds that you have suffered
actual loss as a result of your search provider failing to keep to the Code.
Please note that all queries or complaints regarding your search should be directed to your search
provider in the first instance, not to TPOs or to the PCCB.
TPOs Contact Details:
The Property Ombudsman scheme
Milford House
43-55 Milford Street
Salisbury
Wiltshire SP1 2BP
Tel: 01722 333306
Fax: 01722 332296
Email: admin@tpos.co.uk
You can get more information about the PCCB from www.propertycodes.org.uk.
PLEASE ASK YOUR SEARCH PROVIDER IF YOU WOULD LIKE A COPY OF THE SEARCH CODE
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
If you would like any further assistance regarding this report then please contact
SEUK on (T) 0845 2411815, email: info@searchesuk.co.uk Page 16
Brought to you by Searches UK Ltd
COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE
If you want to make a complaint, we will:
·Acknowledge it within 5 working days of receipt.
·Normally deal with it fully and provide a final response, in writing, within 20 working days of receipt.
·Keep you informed by letter, telephone or e-mail, as you prefer, if we need more time.
·Provide a final response, in writing, at the latest within 40 working days of receipt.
·Liaise, at your request, with anyone acting formally on your behalf.
Complaints should be sent to: Operations Director, Groundsure Ltd, Sovereign House, Church Street, Brighton, BN1
1UJ. Tel: 08444 159 000. Email: info@4C.Groundsure.com
If you are not satisfied with our final response, or if we exceed the response timescales, you may refer the complaint
to The Property Ombudsman scheme (TPOs): Tel: 01722 333306, E-mail: admin@tpos.co.uk.
We will co-operate fully with the Ombudsman during an investigation and comply with his final decision.
Report Reference: Ground Stability Specimen
If you would like any further assistance regarding this report then please contact
SEUK on (T) 0845 2411815, email: info@searchesuk.co.uk Page 17
Brought to you by Searches UK Ltd
Standard Terms and Conditions
1 Definitions
In these terms and conditions unless the context otherwise
requires:
“Beneficiary” means the person or entity for whose benefit the
Client has obtained the Services.
“Client” means the party or parties entering into a Contract
with Groundsure.
“Commercial” means any building or property which is not
Residential.
“Confidential Information” means the contents of this
Contract and all information received from the Client as a result
of, or in connection with, this Contract other than
(i) information which the Client can prove was rightfully in its
possession prior to disclosure by Groundsure and
(ii) any information which is in the public domain (other than
by virtue of a breach of this Contract).
“Support Services” means Support Services provided by
Groundsure including, without limitation, interpreting third party
and in-house environmental data, providing environmental
support advice, undertaking environmental audits and
assessments, Site investigation, Site monitoring and related
items.
“Contract” means the contract between Groundsure and the
Client for the provision of the Services, and which shall
incorporate these terms and conditions, the Order, and the
relevant User Guide.
“Third Party Data Provider” means any third party providing
Third Party Content to Groundsure.
“Data Reports” means reports comprising factual data with no
accompanying interpretation.
“Fees” has the meaning set out in clause 5.1.
“Groundsure” means Groundsure Limited, a company
registered in England and Wales under number 03421028.
“Groundsure Materials” means all materials prepared by
Groundsure and provided as part of the Services, including but
not limited to Third Party Content, Data Reports, Mapping, and
Risk Screening Reports.
“Intellectual Property” means any patent, copyright, design
rights, trade or service mark, moral rights, data protection
rights, know-how or trade mark in each case whether registered
or not and including applications for the same or any other rights
of a similar nature anywhere in the world.
“Mapping” means a map, map data or a combination of
historical maps of various ages, time periods and scales.
“Order” means an electronic, written or other order form
submitted by the Client requesting Services from Groundsure in
respect of a specified Site.
“Ordnance Survey” means the Secretary of State for Business,
Innovation and Skills, acting through Ordnance Survey, Adanac
Drive, Southampton, SO16 0AS, UK.
“Order Website” means the online platform through which
Orders may be placed by the Client and accepted by
Groundsure.
“Report” means a Risk Screening Report or Data Report for
Commercial or Residential property.
“Residential” means any building or property used as or
intended to be used as a single dwelling.
“Risk Screening Report” means a risk screening report
comprising factual data with an accompanying interpretation by
Groundsure.
“Services” means any Report, Mapping and/or Support
Services which Groundsure has agreed to provide by accepting
an Order pursuant to clause 2.6.
"Site" means the area of land in respect of which the Client has
requested Groundsure to provide the Services.
“Third Party Content” means data, database information or
other information which is provided to Groundsure by a Third
Party Data Provider.
"User Guide" means the user guide, as amended from time to
time, available upon request from Groundsure and on the
website (www.Groundsure.com) and forming part of this
Contract.
2 Scope of Services, terms and conditions, requests
for insurance and quotations
2.1 Groundsure agrees to provide the Services in accordance
with the Contract.
2.2 Groundsure shall exercise reasonable skill and care in the
provision of the Services.
2.3 Subject to clause 7.3 the Client acknowledges that it has not
relied on any statement or representation made by or on behalf
of Groundsure which is not set out and expressly agreed in
writing in the Contract and all such statements and
representations are hereby excluded to the fullest extent
permitted by law.
2.4 The Client acknowledges that terms and conditions
appearing on a Client’s order form, printed stationery or other
communication, or any terms or conditions implied by custom,
practice or course of dealing shall be of no effect, and that this
Contract shall prevail over all others in relation to the Order.
2.5 If the Client or Beneficiary requests insurance in conjunction
with or as a result of the Services, Groundsure shall use
reasonable endeavours to recommend such insurance, but
makes no warranty that such insurance shall be available from
insurers or that it will be offered on reasonable terms. Any
insurance purchased by the Client or Beneficiary shall be subject
solely to the terms of the policy issued by insurers and
Groundsure will have no liability therefor. In addition you
acknowledge and agree that Groundsure does not act as an
agent or broker for any insurance providers. The Client should
take (and ensure that the Beneficiary takes) independent advice
to ensure that the insurance policy requested or offered is
suitable for its requirements.
2.6 Groundsure's quotations or proposals are valid for a period
of 30 days only unless an alternative period of time is explicitly
stipulated by Groundsure. Groundsure reserves the right to
withdraw any quotation or proposal at any time before an Order
is accepted by Groundsure. Groundsure's acceptance of an Order
shall be binding only when made in writing and signed by
Groundsure's authorised representative or when accepted
through the Order Website.
3 The Client’s obligations
3.1The Client shall comply with the terms of this Contract and
(i) procure that the Beneficiary or any third party relying on
the Services complies with and acts as if it is bound by the
Contract and
(ii) be liable to Groundsure for the acts and omissions of the
Beneficiary or any third party relying on the Services as if such
acts and omissions were those of the Client.
3.2 The Client shall be solely responsible for ensuring that the
Services are appropriate and suitable for its and/or the
Beneficiary’s needs.
3.3 The Client shall supply to Groundsure as soon as practicable
and without charge all requisite information (and the Client
warrants that such information is accurate, complete and
appropriate), including without limitation any environmental
information relating to the Site and shall give such assistance as
Groundsure shall reasonably require in the provision of the
Services including, without limitation, access to the Site, facilities
and equipment.
3.4 Where the Client’s approval or decision is required to enable
Groundsure to carry out work in order to provide the Services,
such approval or decision shall be given or procured in
reasonable time and so as not to delay or disrupt the
performance of the Services.
3.5 Save as expressly permitted by this Contract the Client shall
not, and shall procure that the Beneficiary shall not, re-sell,
alter, add to, or amend the Groundsure Materials, or use the
Groundsure Materials in a manner for which they were not
intended. The Client may make the Groundsure Materials
available to a third party who is considering acquiring some or
all of, or providing funding in relation to, the Site, but such third
party cannot rely on the same unless expressly permitted under
clause 4.
3.6 The Client is responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of
its user name and password if using the Order Website and the
Client acknowledges that Groundsure accepts no liability of any
kind for any loss or damage suffered by the Client as a
consequence of using the Order Website.
4 Reliance
4.1The Client acknowledges that the Services provided by
Groundsure consist of the presentation and analysis of Third
Party Content and other content and that information obtained
from a Third Party Data Provider cannot be guaranteed or
warranted by Groundsure to be reliable.
4.2 In respect of Data Reports, Mapping and Risk Screening
Reports, the following classes of person and no other are
entitled to rely on their contents;
(i) the Beneficiary,
(ii) the Beneficiary's professional advisers, (iii) any person
providing funding to the Beneficiary in relation to the Site
(whether directly or as part of a lending syndicate),
(iv) the first purchaser or first tenant of the Site, and
(v) the professional advisers and lenders of the first purchaser
or tenant of the Site.
4.3 In respect of Support Services, only the Client, Beneficiary
and parties expressly named in a Report and no other parties
are entitled to rely on its contents.
4.4 Save as set out in clauses 4.2 and 4.3 and unless otherwise
expressly agreed in writing, no other person or entity of any
kind is entitled to rely on any Services or Report issued or
provided by Groundsure. Any party considering such Reports
and Services does so at their own risk.
5 Fees and Disbursements
5.1Groundsure shall charge and the Client shall pay fees at the
rate and frequency specified in the written proposal, Order
Website or Order acknowledgement form, plus (in the case of
Support Services) all proper disbursements incurred by
Groundsure. The Client shall in addition pay all value added tax
or other tax payable on such fees and disbursements in relation
to the provision of the Services (together “Fees”).
5.2 The Client shall pay all outstanding Fees to Groundsure in
full without deduction, counterclaim or set off within 30 days of
the date of Groundsure’s invoice or such other period as may be
agreed in writing between Groundsure and the Client ("Payment
Date"). Interest on late payments will accrue on a daily basis
from the Payment Date until the date of payment (whether
before or after judgment) at the rate of 8% per annum.
5.3 The Client shall be deemed to have agreed the amount of
any invoice unless an objection is made in writing within 28 days
of the date of the invoice. As soon as reasonably practicable
after being notified of an objection, without prejudice to clause
5.2 a member of Groundsure’s management team will contact
the Client and the parties shall then use all reasonable
endeavours to resolve the dispute within 15 days.
6 Intellectual Property and Confidentiality
6.1 Subject to
(i) full payment of all relevant Fees and
(ii) compliance with this Contract, the Client is granted (and is
permitted to sub-licence to the Beneficiary) a royalty-free,
worldwide, non-assignable and (save to the extent set out in this
Contract) non-transferable licence to make use of the
Groundsure Materials.
6.2 All Intellectual Property in the Groundsure Materials are and
shall remain owned by Groundsure or Groundsure's licensors
(including without limitation the Third Party Data Providers) the
Client acknowledges, and shall procure acknowledgement by the
Beneficiary of, such ownership. Nothing in this Contract purports
to transfer or assign any rights to the Client or the Beneficiary in
respect of such Intellectual Property.
6.3 Third Party Data Providers may enforce any breach of
clauses 6.1 and 6.2 against the Client or Beneficiary.
6.4 The Client shall, and shall procure that any recipients of the
Groundsure Materials shall:
(i) not remove, suppress or modify any trade mark, copyright
or other proprietary marking belonging to Groundsure or any
third party from the Services;
(ii) use the information obtained as part of the Services in
respect of the subject Site only, and shall not store or reuse any
information obtained as part of the Services provided in respect
of adjacent or nearby sites;
(iii) not create any product or report which is derived directly
or indirectly from the Services (save that those acting in a
professional capacity to the Beneficiary may provide advice
based upon the Services);
(iv) not combine the Services with or incorporate such Services
into any other information data or service;
(v) not reformat or otherwise change (whether by
modification, addition or enhancement), the Services (save that
those acting for the Beneficiary in a professional capacity shall
not be in breach of this clause 6.4(v) where such reformatting is
in the normal course of providing advice based upon the
Services);
(vi) where a Report and/or Mapping contains material
belonging to Ordnance Survey, acknowledge and agree that such
content is protected by Crown Copyright and shall not use such
content for any purpose outside of receiving the Services; and
(vii)not copy in whole or in part by any means any map prints
or run-on copies containing content belonging to Ordnance
Survey (other than that contained within Ordnance Survey’s OS
Street Map) without first being in possession of a valid Paper
Map Copying Licence from Ordnance Survey,
6.5 Notwithstanding clause 6.4, the Client may make reasonable
use of the Groundsure Materials in order to advise the
Beneficiary in a professional capacity. However, Groundsure
shall have no liability in respect of any advice, opinion or report
given or provided to Beneficiaries by the Client.
6.6 The Client shall procure that any person to whom the
Services are made available shall notify Groundsure of any
request or requirement to disclose, publish or disseminate any
information contained in the Services in accordance with the
Freedom of Information Act 2000, the Environmental
Information Regulations 2004 or any associated legislation or
regulations in force from time to time.
7.Liability: Particular Attention Should Be Paid To
This Clause
7.1 This Clause 7 sets out the entire liability of Groundsure,
including any liability for the acts or omissions of its employees,
agents, consultants, subcontractors and Third Party Content, in
respect of:
(i) any breach of contract, including any deliberate breach of
the Contract by Groundsure or its employees, agents or
subcontractors;
(ii) any use made of the Reports, Services, Materials or any
part of them; and
(iii) any representation, statement or tortious act or omission
(including negligence) arising under or in connection with the
Contract.
7.2 All warranties, conditions and other terms implied by statute
or common law are, to the fullest extent permitted by law,
excluded from the Contract.
7.3 Nothing in the Contract limits or excludes the liability of the
Supplier for death or personal injury resulting from negligence,
or for any damage or liability incurred by the Client or
Beneficiary as a result of fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation.
7.4 Groundsure shall not be liable for
(i) loss of profits;
(ii) loss of business;
(iii) depletion of goodwill and/or similar losses;
(iv) loss of anticipated savings;
(v) loss of goods;
(vi) loss of contract;
(vii) loss of use;
(viii) loss or corruption of data or information;
(ix) business interruption;
(x) any kind of special, indirect, consequential or pure
economic loss, costs, damages, charges or expenses;
(xi) loss or damage that arise as a result of the use of all or
part of the Groundsure Materials in breach of the Contract;
(xii) loss or damage arising as a result of any error, omission or
inaccuracy in any part of the Groundsure Materials where such
error, omission or inaccuracy is caused by any Third Party
Content or any reasonable interpretation of Third Party Content;
(xiii) loss or damage to a computer, software, modem,
telephone or other property; and
(xiv) loss or damage caused by a delay or loss of use of
Groundsure’s internet ordering service.
7.5 Groundsure’s total liability in relation to or under the
Contract shall be limited to £10 million for any claim or claims.
7.6 Groundsure shall procure that the Beneficiary shall be bound
by limitations and exclusions of liability in favour of Groundsure
which accord with those detailed in clauses 7.4 and 7.5 (subject
to clause 7.3) in respect of all claims which the Beneficiary may
bring against Groundsure in relation to the Services or other
matters arising pursuant to the Contract.
8 Groundsure’s right to suspend or terminate
8.1 If Groundsure reasonably believes that the Client or
Beneficiary has not provided the information or assistance
required to enable the proper provision of the Services,
Groundsure shall be entitled to suspend all further performance
of the Services until such time as any such deficiency has been
made good.
8.2 Groundsure shall be entitled to terminate the Contract
immediately on written notice in the event that:
(i) the Client fails to pay any sum due to Groundsure within
30 days of the Payment Date; or
(ii) the Client (being an individual) has a bankruptcy order
made against him or (being a company) shall enter into
liquidation whether compulsory or voluntary or have an
administration order made against it or if a receiver shall be
appointed over the whole or any part of its property assets or
undertaking or if the Client is struck off the Register of
Companies or dissolved; or
(iii) the Client being a company is unable to pay its debts
within the meaning of Section 123 of the Insolvency Act 1986 or
being an individual appears unable to pay his debts within the
meaning of Section 268 of the Insolvency Act 1986 or if the
Client shall enter into a composition or arrangement with the
Client’s creditors or shall suffer distress or execution to be levied
on his goods; or
(iv) the Client or the Beneficiary breaches any term of the
Contract (including, but not limited to, the obligations in clause
4) which is incapable of remedy or if remediable, is not remedied
within five days of notice of the breach.
9. Client’s Right to Terminate and Suspend
9.1 Subject to clause 10.1, the Client may at any time upon
written notice terminate or suspend the provision of all or any of
the Services.
9.2 In any event, where the Client is a consumer (and not a
business) he/she hereby expressly acknowledges and agrees
that:
(i) the supply of Services under this Contract (and therefore
the performance of this Contract) commences immediately upon
Groundsure's acceptance of the Order; and
(ii) the Reports and/or Mapping provided under this Contract
are
(a) supplied to the Client's specification(s) and in any
event
(b) by their nature cannot be returned.
10 Consequences of Withdrawal, Termination or
Suspension
10.1 Upon termination of the Contract:
(i) Groundsure shall take steps to bring to an end the
Services in an orderly manner, vacate any Site with all
reasonable speed and shall deliver to the Client and/or
Beneficiary any property of the Client and/or Beneficiary in
Groundsure’s possession or control; and
(ii) the Client shall pay to Groundsure all and any Fees payable
in respect of the performance of the Services up to the date of
termination or suspension. In respect of any Support Services
provided, the Client shall also pay Groundsure any additional
costs incurred in relation to the termination or suspension of the
Contract. 11 Anti-Bribery
11.1 The Client warrants that it shall:
(i) comply with all applicable laws, statutes and regulations
relating to anti-bribery and anti-corruption including but not
limited to the Bribery Act 2010;
(ii) comply with such of Groundsure's anti-bribery and anticorruption
policies as are notified to the Client from time to
time; and
(iii) promptly report to Groundsure any request or demand for
any undue financial or other advantage of any kind received by
or on behalf of the Client in connection with the performance of
this Contract.
11.2 Breach of this Clause 11 shall be deemed a material breach
of this Contract.
12 General
12.1 The Mapping contained in the Services is protected by
Crown copyright and must not be used for any purpose other
than as part of the Services or as specifically provided in the
Contract.
12.2 The Client shall be permitted to make one copy only of
each Report or Mapping Order. Thereafter the Client shall be
entitled to make unlimited copies of the Report or Mapping
Order only in accordance with an Ordnance Survey paper map
copy license available through Groundsure.
12.3 Groundsure reserves the right to amend or vary this
Contract. No amendment or variation to this Contract shall be
valid unless signed by an authorised representative of
Groundsure.
12.4 No failure on the part of Groundsure to exercise, and no
delay in exercising, any right, power or provision under this
Contract shall operate as a waiver thereof.
12.5 Save as expressly provided in this Contract, no person
other than the persons set out therein shall have any right under
the Contract (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 to enforce any
terms of the Contract.
12.6 The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills
(“BIS”) or BIS’ successor body, as the case may be, acting
through Ordnance Survey may enforce a breach of clause 6.4(vi)
and clause 6.4(vii) of these terms and conditions against the
Client in accordance with the provisions of the Contracts (Rights
of Third Parties) Act 1999.
12.7 Groundsure shall not be liable to the Client if the provision
of the Services is delayed or prevented by one or more of the
following circumstances:
(i) the Client or Beneficiary’s failure to provide facilities,
access or information;
(ii) fire, storm, flood, tempest or epidemic;
(iii) Acts of God or the public enemy;
(iv) riot, civil commotion or war;
(v) strikes, labour disputes or industrial action;
(vi) acts or regulations of any governmental or other agency;
(vii) suspension or delay of services at public registries by Third
Party Data Providers;
(viii) changes in law; or
(ix) any other reason beyond Groundsure’s reasonable control.
In the event that Groundsure is prevented from performing the
Services (or any part thereof) in accordance with this clause
12.6 for a period of not less than 30 days then Groundsure shall
be entitled to terminate this Contract immediately on written
notice to the Client.
12.8 Any notice provided shall be in writing and shall be deemed
to be properly given if delivered by hand or sent by first class
post, facsimile or by email to the address, facsimile number or
email address of the relevant party as may have been notified
by each party to the other for such purpose or in the absence of
such notification the last known address.
12.9 Such notice shall be deemed to have been received on the
day of delivery if delivered by hand, facsimile or email (save to
the extent such day is not a working day where it shall be
deemed to have been delivered on the next working day) and on
the second working day after the day of posting if sent by first
class post.
12.10 The Contract constitutes the entire agreement between
the parties and shall supersede all previous arrangements
between the parties relating to the subject matter hereof.
12.11 Each of the provisions of the Contract is severable and
distinct from the others and if one or more provisions is or
should become invalid, illegal or unenforceable, the validity and
enforceability of the remaining provisions shall not in any way be
tainted or impaired.
12.12 This Contract shall be governed by and construed in
accordance with English law and any proceedings arising out of
or connected with this Contract shall be subject to the exclusive
jurisdiction of the English courts.
12.13 Groundsure is an executive member of the Council of
Property Search Organisation (CoPSO) and has signed up to the
Search Code administered by the Property Codes Compliance
Board (PCCB). All Risk Screening Reports shall be supplied in
accordance with the provisions of the Search Code.
12.14 If the Client or Beneficiary has a complaint about the
Services, written notice should be given to the Compliance
Officer at Groundsure who will respond in a timely manner.
12.15 The Client agrees that it shall, and shall procure that each
Beneficiary shall, treat in confidence all Confidential Information
and shall not, and shall procure that each Beneficiary shall not
(i) disclose any Confidential Information to any third party other
than in accordance with the terms of this Contract; and (ii) use
Confidential Information for a purpose other than the exercise of
its rights and obligations under this Contract. Subject to clause
6.6, nothing shall prevent the Client or any Beneficiary from
disclosing Confidential Information to the extent required by law.
© Groundsure Limited June 2013
Residential Coal Mining Interpretive Report
Thorogood & Co, Woking
DX: 148060
Woking 12
Client Ref: SAMPLE
Fax / E-mail: julia.nightingale@stlgroup.co.uk
Name and Address of Data Source:
Coal Authority
STL Reference: 1611831
Property:
13 Tirbach Road, Ystalyfera, Swansea, SA9 2HX
Received Date: 22/04/2015
Telephone: 01483 715355
This search complies with the requirements of the Search Code, further details of which can be found at
www.pccb.org.uk.
Edbrooke House DX: 148060 Woking 12
Fax: 01483 221854
Complete searches on property online ontime www.stlgroup.co.uk
Tel: 01483 715355
Woking
St Johns Road
Email: info@stlgroup.co.uk
STL Group plc
Surrey GU21 7SE
SAMPLE
Issued by:
The Coal Authority, Property Search Services, 200 Lichfield Lane, Berry Hill, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, NG18 4RG
Website: www.groundstability.com Phone: 0345 762 6848 DX 716176 MANSFIELD 5
STL GROUP PLC
11-13 ST. JOHNS ROAD
WOKING
SURREY
GU21 7SE
Our reference: 51000851302001
Your reference: 1611831
Date of your enquiry: 22 April 2015
Date we received your enquiry: 22 April 2015
Date of issue: 22 April 2015
This report is for the property described in the address below and the attached plan.
Mine Entry Interpretive Report
13 TIRBACH ROAD, YSTALYFERA, SWANSEA, SA9 2HX
I refer to the enquiry dated 22 April 2015, received 22 April 2015, in connection with the above.
All rights reserved. You must not reproduce, store or transmit any part of this document unless you have our written permission.
© The Coal Authority
Mine Entry Interpretive Report - 51000851302001 Page 1 of 4
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 --
 --
SAMPLE
MINE ENTRY INFORMATION
Interpretive Reports Reference: 51000851302001
13 TIRBACH ROAD, YSTALYFERA, SWANSEA, SA9 2HX
Shaft or adit: Adit
Mineral worked: Coal
Mine entry reference: 277209-006
Source: 1/2500 O.S Sheet Brec 43:10 1870 Ed
Colliery name: Unknown
Entry name: Old Coal Level
Date abandoned: Unknown
Depth of superficial deposits (m): 1.0
Depth of shaft (m): Unknown
Diameter/Maximum width (m): 3.0
Probable adit azimuth: 174
Treatment details: Unknown
Conveyance: Not Applicable
Other information: None
STABILITY REPORT
Risk of instability
If coal mining subsidence was to occur as a consequence of ground movement attributable to the
subject mine entry, then taking into account the thickness of superficial deposits, the potential for
any difference between the actual and plotted positions of the mine entry and its diameter/maximum
width, in the Authority’s opinion, the entire property (as shown on the attached plan) is outside the
zone of possible ground movement.
Conclusion
In the Authority’s opinion, the entire property (as shown on the attached plan) is not in the zone of
possible ground movement of the subject mine entry and is not at risk of coal mining subsidence
damage from its presence.
© The Coal Authority
Mine Entry Interpretive Report - 51000851302001 Page 2 of 4
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 --
SAMPLE
Our Ref: 51000851302001
Not to scale.
Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown copyright and database right 2015. All rights reserved. Ordnance
Survey Licence number: 100020315
This is a plan of the boundaries of the property in respect of which this report has been prepared. It is the responsibility of the user to ensure that
the boundaries shown correspond with those of the property.
APPROXIMATE POSITION OF DISUSED MINE ADITS SHOWN
APPROXIMATE POSITION OF PROPERTY BOUNDARY SHOWN
APPROXIMATE POSITION OF SUBJECT BUILDING SHOWN
This plan shows the approximate location of the disused mine entry / entries referred to in the attached mining report. For reasons of clarity,
mine entry symbols may not be drawn to the same scale as the plan.
Property owners have the benefit of statutory protection (under the Coal Mining Subsidence Act 1991). This contains provision for the making
good, to the reasonable satisfaction of the owner, of physical damage from disused coal mine workings including disused coal mine entries. A
DTI leaflet setting out the rights and obligations of either the Coal Authority or other responsible persons under the 1991 Act can be obtained by
telephoning 0345 762 6848.
If you wish to discuss the relevance of any of the information contained in the attached report you should seek the advice of a qualified mining
engineer or surveyor. If you or your advisor wish to examine the source plans from which the information has been taken these are available at
our Mansfield office, free of charge by prior appointment, telephone 01623 637235. Should you or your advisor wish to carry out any physical
investigations that may enter, disturb or interfere with any disused mine entry the prior permission of the owner must be sought. For coal mine
entries the owner will normally be the Coal Authority.
The Coal Authority, regardless of responsibility and in conjunction with other public bodies, provide an emergency call out facility in coalfield
areas to assess the public safety implications of mining features (including disused mine entries).
Our emergency telephone number at all times is 01623 646333.
© The Coal Authority
Mine Entry Interpretive Report - 51000851302001 Page 3 of 4
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SAMPLE
Mine Entry Information and Stability Report
EXPLANATORY NOTES
1. The Authority has made assumptions about mining information and its application. Where this has happened, the assumptions are explained in
these notes.
2. There can be several source documents for the same mining information and in many instances these documents are very old. As a general
principle, older sources are not as accurate as more recent records. Furthermore, the different types of plans can have varying standards of accuracy.
 As a consequence, the plotted positions of mine entries can be different, to varying degrees, to their actual positions on site. The assumptions made
for these variances are explained in 10 below.
3. The thickness of superficial deposits has been taken from the records of the Authority and/or those of the British Geological Survey. © NERC All
rights reserved.
 Where the Authority has information about activities such as infill operations or excavation, which may have affected the thickness of deposits above
rockhead, this will also be taken into account.
4. The Authority will only provide the depth of a mine entry where this is known.
5. Where information about the diameter of a shaft is not known, it will be assumed. The assumption will be based upon comparison with other shafts in
the vicinity, the likely date it was sunk and any other relevant information, e.g. the depth of seams the shaft is thought to have accessed.
 Where a shaft is not circular, the maximum diagonal dimension will be used.
6. The zone of possible ground movement of an adit will be calculated for the conjectured position of the mouth of the adit. It will not apply to the
underground length of the adit. The approximate adit direction, where applicable, will be quoted in degrees from North.
7. Where treatment details are recorded, this information will be given. Where records are not available, “Unknown” will be reported.
8. The issue of ownership of mine entries is extremely complicated. Where details of the sale of a mine entry by the Coal Authority, or its predecessors
in title, are known these will be provided. Where no sale details are available, in most instances, ownership will rest in the Coal Authority. Whatever
the position with ownership, if coal mining subsidence damage does occur, statute provides for the “responsible person” to provide a remedy. The
“responsible person” is either the Coal Authority or a licensed mining operator.
9. If the Authority holds other relevant information about the mine entry which is not referred to elsewhere, it will be provided as additional information in
the report.
10. The zone of possible ground movement of a mine entry is that area of ground which might be affected by coal mining subsidence if the mine entry
becomes unstable.
 The calculated zone of possible ground movement is a circle whose centre point is the centre of the plotted position of the mine entry and which has
a radius equivalent to the aggregate of:-
 a. the radius or assumed radius of the mine entry (for non circular mine entries the maximum distance from the centre of the opening to its edge
will be taken as the radius)
 b. the thickness of the deposits overlying rockhead (i.e. an assumed angle of draw of 45°)
 c. an assumed distance representing the potential difference between a mine entry’s plotted position and its true position. This assumed distance
will be between 0-10m and will depend, inter alia, on the age, scale, condition and status of the source plan from which the position of the mine entry is
taken.
 The above criteria will be applied also where the mine entry is an adit.
 There will be some instances where the variances will be greater than the assumed distances but the Authority consider that the range applied is a
reasonable and representative basis for its reports.
 Where special circumstances apply in calculating the zone of possible ground movement, e.g. where the plotted position of a mine entry lies within
an area where opencast mining has taken place and the mine entry no longer exists, the opinion in the Stability Report will take this into account.
11. The Authority’s records demonstrate that the statistical risk of a house suffering physical damage as a consequence of coal mining subsidence
from ground movement associated with a coal mine entry is very small. This includes houses which are within a zone of possible ground movement
related to a mine entry. Typically only one or two houses are so affected each year, out of the tens of thousands of houses which have mine entries
within 20m of their property boundaries.
 On those rare occasions where physical damage to a house does occur, the Authority will attend quickly to deal with any matters of an urgent or
emergency nature. Thereafter, the responsible person, usually the Coal Authority, will treat the mine entry and arrange for property repairs to be carried
out. It is important that any evidence of ground movement around a mine entry or any physical damage is reported to the Coal Authority immediately it
is observed. The 24 hour call out number is 01623 646333.
12. The statutory remedies for coal mining subsidence damage available to property owners are powerful. The nature of remedies provided by statute
includes:-
 i) a right to have property repaired
 ii) payments in lieu of repairs
 iii) depreciation payments for residual physical damage
 iv) home loss payments where a house is purchased by the responsible person
 v) payments for inconvenience (in certain circumstances)
 vi) compensation for loss of chattels or moveable property.
 Note: The statutory remedies provided by the Coal Mining Subsidence Act 1991 are not available in respect of subsidence damage caused by
extraction of minerals other than coal.
General note
The Authority’s opinion and advice is based upon its interpretation of the facts in its possession at the date of the report and on the Ordnance Survey’s
(O.S) improved data (OSPA). A site inspection has not been carried out. The report has been prepared by experienced mining surveyors with
knowledge in the management and interpretation of coal mining information. Notwithstanding this, because of the nature of old mining records and the
uncertainties about their preparation and accuracy, it is possible that others might apply different assumptions or interpretations to the facts. Please
note that any insurance given with earlier standard mining reports does not extend to cover this Mine Entry Interpretive Report.
© The Coal Authority
Mine Entry Interpretive Report - 51000851302001 Page 4 of 4
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SAMPLE
INITIAL SITE APPRAISALS – An essential tool
including NHBC Chapter 4.1 Assessments1
"Down to earth advice"
SCOPE OF APPRAISAL2
The data sources considered by the desk study include:
 Geology – British Geological Survey (BGS) mapping
 Radon status and protection
 Ground working, mining, extraction & natural cavities
 Natural ground stability (including BGS GeoSure data sets)
 Groundwater, surface water and flooding
 Land use, current & historical – OS maps, contemporary trade
directories and registers
 Statutory authorizations, consents, determinations, incident notices/prosecutions and registers –
Environment Agency and Local Authorities
 Landfill and other waste sites
 Ecological designated sites (sensitive land uses)
 Client’s own information
A walkover survey provides further valuable information about the condition of the site and its environs.
Our initial site appraisal reports provide a Conceptual Ground Model and an evaluation of the
findings together with a photographic record of current features of interest/concern, topographic
maps, geological maps and all the database search results.
OPTIONAL EXTENSIONS TO SCOPE
 BGS borehole records – Available borehole logs are purchased and reviewed
 Full reports, when relevant, from databases of coal mining, natural cavities and non-coal mining
 Soil type – Soil Survey of England & Wales mapping
 Aerial photographs, including ‘cover’ search, purchase and interpretation
 Manual searches of reference material in county records offices, libraries, museums and local history
sources
 Interviewing local officers for latest information (Planning, Environmental Health, Highways)
 Services searches – enquiries to all relevant utility companies for adopted services within the site
 Site-specific or client-specific services.
Notes:
1. The relevant standards and guidance documents include BS5930, BS10175, Eurocode 7 Part 2, Environment Agency
CLR11, NHBC Standards Chapter 4.1, Building Regulations (Part C), various TRRL/TRL and BRE publications, and the AGS
Client’s Guide to Desk Studies; full references are provided on the Gabriel GeoConsulting website.
2. The extent of searches for some topics will be adjusted, in agreement with the client, to suit the nature of the site and
the client’s wishes.
www.gabrielgeo.co.uk
Gabriel GeoConsulting Ltd * Phone: +44(0)1580 241044 * email: info@gabrielgeo.co.uk
Initial site appraisals save money, and they often save time
too! How? By enabling proper planning of an appropriate
investigation so that subsequent decisions regarding site
acquisition, development or disposal are soundly based.
Our initial site appraisals, also often called desk studies,
Phase 1 or preliminary investigations, are designed to
meet the core requirements of the major relevant
standards1 whilst, by offering a range of optional extensions
to scope, we provide the client with the flexibility to tailor
the scope of the appraisal to suit the nature of their project
and the level of information required.
Building Regulations Part C:
“Desk Study. A review of the
historical, geological and
environmental information about
the site is essential;” (Cls 1.1 b)


 Registered in England and Wales Number 7955621
Kirsty Gray
3 Wintergreen, Chilvester Park, Calne, Wiltshire SN11 0RS England
Tel: +44 (0) 1249 821999 or +44 (0) 7743 862751
Email: kirsty@family-wise.co.uk
Website: http://www.family-wise.co.uk
SKYPE: sillifantons
Websites
Population
www.histpop.org - Histpop - The Online Historical Population Reports Website
www.geograph.org.uk – Geograph Britain and Ireland, geographically representative photographs
www.visionofbritain.org.uk - A Vision of Britain Through Time - Great Britain Historical GIS Project
www.one-place-studies.org – One-Place Studies website
www.onlineparishclerks.org.uk - Online Parish Clerks
Seafaring
www.smuggling.co.uk – Smugglers’ Britain website
www.mariners-l.co.uk/UKFishermen.html - the website of the Mariners Mailing list
www.devonheritage.org - Devon Heritage website
Mining
www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/location/south-west - BBC Nation on Film South West Region, filled with clips on
mining
www.cornwallinfocus.co.uk/history/mindbase.php - Mining in Cornwall database
www.cmhrc.co.uk - Coal Mining History Resource Centre
www.balmaiden.co.uk – Bal Maidens of Cornwall and Devon
Lace making
www.bbc.co.uk/devon/content/articles/2007/06/25/honiton_lace_archive_video_feature.shtml -
 video demonstrating the art of lace making
www.honitonmuseum.co.uk – Honiton Museum
Cider making
www.sheppyscider.com - Sheppy’s Cider
www.ciderbrandy.co.uk – Somerset distillery
www.legendarydartmoor.co.uk/cider_moor.htm - Legendary Dartmoor - The Devil’s Brew
Publications
Waters, Colin, Dictionary of Old Trades, Titles and Occupations, 2nd edition, Countryside books, 2002 


 Registered in England and Wales Number 7955621
Archives, Libraries and Local Studies Centres
Bristol Record Office, B Bond Warehouse, Smeaton Road, Bristol, BS1 6XN
Email: bro@bristol.gov.uk
Website: www.bristol.gov.uk/page/records-and-archives
Somerset Heritage Centre, Brunel Way, Langford Mead, Norton Fitzwarren, Taunton, TA2 6SF
Email: archives@somerset.gov.uk
Website: www.somerset.gov.uk/archives
Bath Record Office, Guildhall, High Street, Bath BA1 5AW
Email: archives@bathnes.gov.uk
Website: www.batharchives.co.uk
Devon
Devon Heritage Centre, Great Moor House, Bittern Road, Sowton, Exeter, Devon, EX2 7NL
Email: devrec@devon.gov.uk
Website: http://www.devon.gov.uk/record_office.htm
North Devon Record Office, Tuly Street, Barnstaple, EX32 7EJ
Email: ndevrec@devon.gov.uk
Website: http://www.devon.gov.uk/index/community/the_county/record_office/north_record_office.htm
Plymouth and West Devon Record Office, Community Services Department, Unit 3, Clare Place, Plymouth PL4 0JW
Email: pwdro@plymouth.gov.uk
Website: http://www.plymouth.gov.uk/archives
Devon and Cornwall Record Society, Westcountry Studies Library, Great Moor House, Bittern Road, Sowton, Exeter,
Devon, EX2 7NL
Email: devrec@devon.gov.uk
Cornwall
Cornwall Record Office, County Hall, Truro, TR1 3AY
Email: cro@cornwall.gov.uk
Website: www.cornwall.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=24656
Cornwall Centre Library (Local Studies), Alma Place, Redruth TR15 2AT
Email: cornishstudies.library@cornwall.gov.uk
Website: www.chycor.co.uk/general/red-lib/
Other archives
The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU
Website: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk 
South Yorkshire
Countryside Directory
for people with disabilities
first edition
Whatever your needs, access to and enjoyment of the
countryside is rewarding, healthy and great fun. This
directory can help you find out what opportunities are
available to you in your area. Get yourself outdoors and
enjoy all the benefits that come with it…
Valley Park, Herringthorpe, Rotherham
Open Country
www.rotherhamweb.co.uk 
This directory was designed for people with a disability, though
the information included will be useful to everyone.
South Yorkshire is a landscape and culture steeped in a history
of coal mining, steel industry, agriculture and the slightly more
light hearted tradition of butterscotch production in Doncaster!
In recent years the major cities and towns have undergone
huge transformations but much of the history and industry is
still visible today including steel manufacturing in Sheffield, the
medieval streets of Rotherham and the weekly town centre
market in Barnsley – a tradition held since 1249!
For those that enjoy the outdoors South Yorkshire is equally
diverse. You can enjoy the many tracks and trails of the
spectacular Peak District National Park or the Trans Pennine
Trail, the ‘rolling fields of corn’ and windmills of Penistone and
the wildfowl and grassland delights of Rother Country Park – an
opencast coal mine turned local nature reserve.
Whatever your chosen form of countryside recreation, whether
it’s joining a group, getting out into the countryside on your
own, doing voluntary work, or investigating your local wildlife
from home, we hope you get as much out of it as we do.
There is still some way to go before we have a properly
accessible countryside. By contacting Open Country or another
of the organisations listed here, we help to encourage better
access for all in the future.
If you would like this Directory to be sent to you
on audio cassette, please contact Sam or David at Open
Country on 01423 507227.
Published in June 2006 
Using the Directory
Throughout the Directory you may see some symbols. These are to help you
see what kind of facilities or information is available. Please also contact
individual places to ask what they can offer people with disabilities.
Key:
A wheelchair accessible toilet is available
A Braille guide and / or tactile book is available

L Large print leaflets are available
Scooters / wheelchairs are available for loan
South Yorkshire covers a large geographical area. Sometimes we divide sections
into areas to make it easier for you to find local information.
These areas are:
• Barnsley
• Doncaster
• Sheffield
• Rotherham 
Contents
1. Walking and Outings 1
 Breakfree 2
Walking clubs and contacts 3 - 8
 Easy Going Walks 9 - 16
 Markets 17 - 19
Outings 20 - 32

2. Sports and Outdoor Pursuits 33
 Clubs & contacts 34 - 35
 Outdoor Pursuits 36- 45
 Cycling 46 - 49
 Cycle routes 50 - 55
Fishing 56 - 59
 Horse Riding 60 - 62

3. Wildlife & Conservation 63
Wildlife clubs and organisations 64 - 67
 Accessible wildlife watching 68 - 74

4. Volunteering 75

 Volunteering 76
 Volunteering in the countryside 77 - 78
Countryside employment 79
5. Useful Information 80
Travel information 81
 Community Transport 82 - 83
 Public Transport 84
RADAR, Blue Badge & wheelchair hire 85
 Shopmobility 86
 Braille guides 87
 Publications 88 - 91
Tourist Information Centres 92
Disability Links 93 - 94
Council for Voluntary Services 95
 Websites worth a surf… 96 - 97

6. The Country Code 98
7. The authors and funders 99 - 100
1 1. Walking and Outings
Breakfree 2
Walking clubs and contacts 3 - 8
 Easy Going Walks 9 - 16

 Markets 17 - 19
Outings 20 - 33



SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
2 Breakfree

Open Country have produced two Breakfree packs
for Harrogate District.
Great for short walks, nature trails, children,
cycles and people with disabilities.
The packs have clear, colour maps for each
place, with all the information you need to help
plan your day.
Get your packs from Harrogate Library, Tourist
Information Centres, Out & About (outdoor
shop near ASDA in Harrogate) and Cotswold
Outdoor, Harrogate or call
Open Country on 01423 507227 and
we will gladly post them to you.
Breakfree, get healthy and
discover your local green space!
Only
£2
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Walking Clubs & Contacts 3
Agewell Over 50s Walking Group
135 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield, S6 3EB
Tel: 0114 275 1212
www.agewell.co.uk
Meeting at the Cathedral Court, Church Street, the group provides a range of
walks for people over 50 years old, including people with limited mobility.
Disabled Ramblers
Contact: Dr Mike Bruton
Little Croft, Guildford Road, Shamley Green, Guildford, Surrey, GU5 0RT
Tel: 01628 621414
Email: disabledramblers@online.net
www.disabledramblers.co.uk/
The disabled ramblers use a wide range of equipment to enable people with
disabilities to enjoy countryside outings across the UK.
Doncaster Walking Festival
Contact: Doncaster MBC
Tel: 01302 737411 or 734519
Programmes available from public buildings and libraries, or contact
Countryside and Public Rights of Way Service on the numbers above for more
information or to get a programme sent out. "These walks are completely free
and there is something for everyone no matter what their age, interests or
ability. We would urge people throughout the borough to pick up a programme
and take advantage of the events in their area."
Foothills – Free Guided Walks
11 Edgedale Road, Sheffield, S7 2BG
Tel: 0114 2586228
www.foothills.co.uk
Norman Taylor leads walks on Wednesdays in the Peak District for both
beginners and experienced walkers. Can loan essential walking gear.
Halcyon Rambling Club
Tel: 0114 230 6109
Email: p.mellor@sheffield.ac.uk
Sunday walks and occasional weekends. Affiliated to the Ramblers Association.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
4 Walking Clubs & Contacts
Health Walks in Sheffield
Health Project Team, Sheffield CC, Sheffield, S8 9FL
Tel: 0114 245 6991
Email: healthwalks@pxsheffield.fslife.co.uk or south.rangers@virgin.net
Holds many short walks of 30 – 50 minutes in the parks and woodlands around
Sheffield with leaders. Everyone is welcome including all ages, ability and
children. Sign language and guides for the visually impaired can be arranged.
Also information in Bengali and Urdu can be provided by arrangement.
National Trust
Estate Office, The Old Goods Yard, Station Road, Marsden,
Huddersfield, HD7 6DH
Tel: 01484 847016
Email: marsdenmoor@nationaltrust.org.uk
www.nationaltrust.org.uk
The National Trust runs walks and events across Pennine Yorkshire. Contact the
Huddersfield office for more information.
Open Country, Harrogate
Contact: David Shaftoe & Sam Parkhouse
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
Open Country runs two different walking clubs and between them they should
be suitable for most people.
• The Walking Group consists mainly of people with learning disabilities and
mental health issues. They meet at least once a month for cross-country
rambles of about 7-9 miles.
• The Easy Going Walks group meets once a month for 2-3 mile walks along
fully accessible paths, so the walks are suitable for everyone, including
wheelchair users.
Peak Walking Group
Tel: 0114 247 1688
Walks, mostly on Sundays, in the White and Dark peak areas of Derbyshire.
Ramblers Association
2nd floor, Camelford House, 87 – 90 Albert Embankment, London, SE1 7TW
Tel: 020 7339 8500
Email: ramblers@london.ramblers.org.uk
www.ramblers.org.uk
The Ramblers Association provides information, publications and promotes
walking for all throughout England, Wales and Scotland.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Walking Clubs & Contacts 5
Ramblers Association (RA) - South Yorkshire & NE Derbyshire Area
www.syned-ramblers.org.uk
The South Yorkshire and North East Derbyshire Area of the Ramblers
Association has seven local groups. Each Group has its walks programme, with
walks ranging from easy to strenuous, and some groups have special walks for
the visually impaired and others with special needs. These groups include:
• Rotherham Metro District Group
Contact: Paul Clarke
Email: paul@upperdenby.org.uk
www.upperdenby.org.uk
The group covers the area from Thorpe Hesley in the West to
Dinnington and Wath-upon-Dearne in the North to Beckington.
• Dearne Valley Group
Email: ACJMill@talk21.com
www.dearnevalleyramblers.org.uk
The Dearne Valley covers the area between Rotherham, Barnsley
and Doncaster, and includes Swinton, Wath-upon-Dearne and
Mexborough.
• Barnsley & Penistone Group
Contact: Paul Clarke
Email: paul@upperdenby.org.uk
www.upperdenby.org.uk
Adjacent to the Peak District, the Yorkshire Dales, the Lake
District and the North York Moors, we are able to offer our
members a wide variety of scenic walks.
• Doncaster Group
Tel: 01302 371093
Email: donramblers2@yahoo.co.uk
The Group's designated area is the Doncaster Metropolitan
Borough, being one of the largest in the country at 224 square
miles, taking in such delights like the Danum Trail and
Doncastrian Way.
• Sheffield Group
Tel: 0114 239 8505
or
Bob McHale on 0114 230 1295
www.sheffield.ramblers.care4free.net
Graded walks during the week and weekends. Sheffield Ramblers
also support the Sheffield Visually Impaired Walking Group (see
over).
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
6 Walking Clubs & Contacts
Sheffield CHA Rambling

Tel: 0114 236 0419
Affiliated to the Country-Wide Holidays Association, walks are organised on
Thursdays and Saturdays.
Sheffield Visually Impaired Walking Group
SVIWG, Sheffield Royal Society for the Blind, 5 Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 4DT
Tel: 0114 234 1271
or
Kevin Green on 0114 247 2076
SVIWG offer two walks per month, approximately 6-7 miles, accompanied by
sighted guides.
Sheffield 20s & 30s Group
Contact : Charlie – Chair
Tel: 07786 916433
Email: sheffieldwalkinggroup@hotmail.com
www.sheffieldwalkinggroup.org.uk
A range of graded walks from 7 miles and up, including some residentials, this
group is predominantly for people aged 20 – 40 years old. Part of the Ramblers
Association.
Sheffield Parks, woodlands and countryside - guided walks
Ranger Service, Meersbrook Park, Brook Road, Sheffield, S8 9FL.
Tel: 0114 250 0500
Email: pwc.general@sheffield.gov.uk
www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside (for events)
Various walks throughout the year in the Sheffield area. See the Ranger Events
Programme for more information.
Step out to a Better Lifestyle
Health Project Team, Parks, Woodlands and Countryside, Sheffield, S8 9FL
Tel: 0114 245 6991 / 07720 510303
Email: healthwalks@pxsheffield.fslife.co.uk
Or
Sue Lee
Tel: 0114 283 9195 / 07769 913005
Email: south.rangers@virgin.net
23 health walks at 21 different locations across the city every week. Walks are
short – around 30 – 50 minutes and accompanied by two trained leaders.
Everyone is welcome. Sign language, guides and Bengali and Urdu can be
arranged.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Walking Clubs & Contacts 7
Trans Pennine Trail (TPT)
Trans Pennine Trail Office, c/o BMBC, Central Offices, Kendray Street, Barnsley,
S70 2TN
Tel: 01226 772574
Email: info@transpenninetrail.org.uk
www.transpenninetrail.org.uk
Or for local information contact you local countryside ranger/ public
rights of way:
Barnsley: 01226 772 567
Doncaster: 01302 734 586
Rotherham: 01709 822 932
Sheffield: 0114 273 6117
Peak Park: 01629 816 200
The TPT is part of the national cycle network and covers the first long-distance
multi-users trail in the U.K. from the Irish Sea near Liverpool to the North Sea
by Hull. As well as being great for cyclists, much of the trail is used by walkers
and horse riders and is ideal for people of all ages and abilities. Mostly following
old railway lines and canals, it is often fully accessible and being off road is
great for all the family. Detailed throughout this Directory is information about
some parts of the Trail that lie in and around South Yorkshire, but please
contact the addresses above for more information.
Walking the Way to Health Schemes
Contact: Julie Rhodes – Regional Case Officer
Tel: 0113 2469422
Email: Julie.rhodes@countryside.gov.uk
or
Contact: Pauline Todd – North Lincolnshire
Tel: 01724 297342
www.whi.org.uk
There are several schemes locally, with walks lasting between 30 and 60
minutes designed to provide people with a safe and friendly opportunity in
which to get exercise. Walks take place in the local community, mainly on level
ground and are lead by trained volunteer walk leaders.
Walks for Women
Parks, Woodlands and Countryside Service, Sheffield CC, Sheffield, S8 9FL
Tel: 0114 268 6196
Email: westernrangerteam@supanet.com
www.sheffield.gov.uk
A biannual programme of walks aims to encourage women of all ages and
abilities to join in walks and countryside events in a friendly, safe environment.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
8 Walking Clubs & Contacts
The Wednesday Ramblers
Contact: Edmund Staney
Tel: 0114 2366465
Offering walks for different ability levels, the group organises walks advertised
in the ‘Sheffield Star’ in the ‘Rambling Diary’ section on a Wednesday.
Women Only Walks and events in Rotherham, Doncaster & Sheffield
Doncaster contact: Kelly or Chris on 01302 300798
Rotherham contact: Avril on 0114 268 6169
Sheffield contact: Claire on 01709 365332
Or ring Avril on 0114 2686196
The Women Only Walks initiative is a highly successful project and new
members are welcome to join. We offer a warm welcome and gentle
encouragement to those who may be a little bit apprehensive to come along
and join us. A waterproof coat, stout walking shoes, (boots preferably), a bag
to carry your lunch in and a sense of humour is all that’s needed.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Easy Going Walks 9
Please note that paths are subject to natural erosion and their quality may vary
over time. Maintenance of the paths should be on-going. Please ring your local
Access Officer or Open Country if you would like to report or comment on any
accessible paths.
There are many local parks and recreation grounds that are accessible or have
accessible areas, in and around the towns and cities of South Yorkshire. A few
are mentioned here but please also contact your local authority or Tourist
Information Centre for more information and a full list. Sheffield has for
example 90 ‘parks’, which is beyond our scope and ability to detail here.
Barnsley
Barnsley Trans Pennine Trail (TPT)
The Countryside Unit, BMBC, Planning and Transportation Service, Central
Offices, Kendray Street, Barnsley, S70 2TN
Tel: Access Requirements 01226 772574
Email: info@transpenninetrail.org.uk
The Trans Pennine Trail in Barnsley provides a unique opportunity to explore
the area along linear and circular routes that take you from such points as the
‘Windle Edge’, the highest point on the whole of the Trail (which stretches from
the ports of Liverpool to Hull) to the heart of the South Yorkshire Forest.
Some routes to try include: the Upper Don Trail; the Dove Valley Trail from
Oxspring east to Wakefield and from Oxspring south to Wortley and Sheffield.
Cliffe Wood
About 1.5km east of Barnsley centre, Cliffe Wood is located between Old Mill
and Cundy Cross.
Map: OS Landranger 111 Grid ref: SE 362 068
www.heritagewoodsonline.co.uk
Forming the northern part of Dearne Valley Park Local Nature Reserve, the
wood is best accessed by the main car park for Dearne Valley Park off
Pontefract Road, where an accessible path leads across the River Dearne and
past the lakes of Dearne Valley. The wood is off a public bus route also. Access
in the southern, flatter half of the site is generally straightforward, but some
paths towards the northern edge can be steep. The flat, wide, grassy route of
the old Barnsley Canal provides easy access from west to east through the
centre. There are no toilet facilities at or in the immediate vicinity of the site.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
10 Easy Going Walks
Chesterfield Canal
www.chesterfield-canal-trust.org.uk
Built in 1777 the canal skirts the southern boundary between Norwood and
Turnerwood. Plentiful wildlife as you walk the towpath (known as Cuckoo Way).
Car parking on Bailey Drive on the Norwood Industrial Estate and access the
canal by crossing the A618 road or by Kiveton Park station and Shireoaks
marina.
Worsbrough Country Park
Leave the M1 at junction 36 and take the A61 North L
(Barnsley), follow the brown Worsbrough Mill and
Country Park signs. The site is approximately 2-3 miles from the motorway.
Contact: Friends of Worsbrough Mill & Country Park
Tel: 01226 774527
Email: worsbroughmill@barnsley.gov.uk
www.barnsley.gov.uk/tourism/Worsbrough/index.asp
Over 200 acres of country parkland with a large fishing reservoir, working water
powered corn mill and open farm, Worsbrough provides the ideal family day
out. The water and its margins attract a wide variety of bird life and are a
haven for wildlife. The restored working corn mill, dating from 1625, still
produces stone ground flour, (available in the shop). All paths on site are
suitable for wheelchairs and there is independent access to the top and bottom
of the mill museum. Please get the key for toilets from the Mill Shop.
Wigfield Farm, approximately 1 mile from the mill, is an open working farm with
rare and traditional breeds alongside more contemporary animals. See Outings
section page 25
Doncaster
Campsall Country Park
c/o Sandall Beat Community Environment Centre, Sandall Beat Road, Off Leger
Way, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 300798
Email: janet.blud@doncaster.gov.uk
Campsall Hall was the home of the Frank family for several generations. The
hall and grounds were extensively enlarged during the time of Richard Frank
(1698-1762). The fine Georgian house no longer stands, but we can still benefit
from the landscaped gardens. The once private pleasure gardens of Campsall
Hall are now accessible to everyone for enjoyment and recreation.
Howell Wood Country Park
c/o Sandall Beat Community Environment Centre, Sandall Beat Road, Off Leger
Way, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 300798
Email: janet.blud@doncaster.gov.uk
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Easy Going Walks 11
The northern part of the wood is now a Country Park and is open to the public
all year round. No longer the joy of just a few landowners, Howell Wood
Country Park is a well-loved place for local people; a place to walk the dog,
have a picnic, or spend time enjoying the seasonal pleasures this woodland
brings.
Melton Wood Country Park
c/o Sandall Beat Community Environment Centre, Sandall Beat Road, Off Leger
Way, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 300798
Email: janet.blud@doncaster.gov.uk
A woodland treasure for cyclists and walkers. Follow the A638 over North
Bridge for about one mile. Turn left immediately, before A635, along Cusworth
Lane, signposted Cusworth Hall and Country Park. Carry on under A1M bridge.
Turn first right and continue for just over one mile. You will see the car park
ahead of you, on the corner.
Sandall Beat
c/o Sandall Beat Community Environment Centre,
Sandall Beat Road, Off Leger Way, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 300798
Email: janet.blud@doncaster.gov.uk
The Beat lies close to the heart of Doncaster. This, together with its network of
rides and footpaths, makes it a favourite place for townspeople to walk their
dogs, go riding, picnic in summer, or simply explore the changing woodland.
The Covils Trail provides a hard level surface which is suitable for wheelchairs
and pushchairs. Accessible toilets are available at the community centre.
Sprotbrough and Cusworth Millennium Walk
Doncaster MBC, 2 Priory Place, Doncaster, DN1 1BN
Tel: 01302 734444
email: askus@doncaster.gov.uk
This is an easy to moderate 4 mile walk starting near Sprotbrough Road,
Sprotbrough. Sprotbrough and Cusworth Parish Council devised this walk to
commemorate the year 2000. The route, which links the two largest
communities of the parish, is way marked using locally quarried stone carved
with the symbol MM. The walk passes Cusworth Hall in Cusworth Country Park -
a pleasant place for rest and refreshment. Call in at the cafe alongside the Hall.
If you are a wildlife enthusiast, you can also take a detour to Sprotbrough Flash
and walk along the Don Gorge to rejoin the main route. If you are from further
afield, free car parking at the Goldsmith Centre and Cusworth Hall and Country
Park allows alternative starting and finishing points.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
12 Easy Going Walks
Rotherham
Doorstep Walks & Rides
Rotherham Rights of Way
Tel : 01709822932
www.rotherham.gov.uk/prow
10 ‘doorstep’ walks and 2 rides with varying degrees of accessibility, ease and
light are detailed in a leaflet and interactive CD.
Rother Valley Country Park
2 miles from M1 Junction 31
Tel: 0114 247 1452
www.rothervalleycountrypark.co.uk
A 5 mile walk around the park enjoying the sights and sounds of the
countryside with stop off and rest places and a café along the way. There are
other shorter walks including a family walk – ask at the visitor centre. Take care
as both bikes and horses use the tracks. Toilets are available with a RADAR key.
St Leger Walk around Letwell
From Junction 31 on the M1 take the A57 to Worksop and then a first left onto
the B6463 to Letwell.
www.rotherham.gov.uk
About 5 miles long, the walk takes 1 ½ hours to complete on average. Only the
first part of the walk is wheelchair friendly. The paths take you through
woodlands and fields of Letwell following way markers. It can get muddy.
Toilets are available in Langold.
Scholes Walk via Keppels Column
From Junction 35 on the M1 go to Rotherham on the A629 and turn left to
Scholes.
www.rotherham.gov.uk./prow
Follow a gently rolling landscape to Keppels Column – the tallest of the
Wentworth follies. Paths are to a good standard. The walk takes around 1 ½
hours following way markers. There is plenty to see on the way including
wildlife, woodlands and Caesars Camp – an Iron Age fort.
South Yorkshire Navigation Walk
A 4 mile walk along the canal through Rotherham that is accessible to
wheelchair users. The walk is between Aldwarke Lane in Dalton and Jordan Weir
near Sheffield with a number of access points. Contact Rotherham Visitor
Centre on 01709 835904 for more info.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Easy Going Walks 13
Thrybergh Country Park
Doncaster Road, Thrybergh, Rotherham, S65 4NU
Tel: 01709 850353
Email: thrybergh.countrypark@rotherham.gov.uk
A reservoir and park with events all year round, there is lots to do including bird
watching, walking, shops, visitor centre and café, kids parks and level footpaths
all round making it an accessible area for all. Free scooter loan.
Sheffield
Damflask Reservoir
Near Low Bradfield, off the B6077. Take J36 off the M1.
Tel: 0845 122 0572
www.yorkshirewater.com/yourenjoyment
Surrounded by woodland within the Peak District National Park, Damflask
Reservoir lies in the picturesque Loxley Valley. A 3 ½ mile low level walk with a
good surface suitable for wheelchairs.
Ecclesall Woods
Access from: Abbey Lane/Cow Lane/Abbeydale Road
Tel: 0114 221 1900
Sheffield is blessed with a remarkable number of ancient woodlands; Ecclesall
Woods, located between Ecclesall Road South and Abbeydale Road South, is the
largest, and one of the most accessible. There are many easy-going walks here,
along wide footpaths and bridleways and, as this area was used to produce the
charcoal and whitecoal used in Sheffield's early iron and lead working
industries, walkers are likely to come across remains of these works throughout
the woods. Native broadleaved trees including Oak, Beech and Sweet Chestnut
give a lovely dappled shade in the heat of summer and, in the autumn,
beautiful colours and lots of leaves to kick through. The woods are particularly
attractive in the springtime, with their annual carpeting of bluebells.
Five Weirs Walk - Sheffield
The walk is from Meadowhall along the banks of the River Don. A copy of a 5
Weirs Walk map can be obtained from Destination Sheffield, Tudor Square
(0114 281 4040)
Contact: Five Weirs Trust
Tel: 0114 273 4189
www.fiveweirs.co.uk
The full walk from Meadowhall along the banks of the River Don is 5 miles
where walkers can enjoy industrial architecture and semi rural areas. There is
an abundance of wildlife, so keep your eyes open and you may see herons or
maybe a flash of kingfisher. Punctuating the walk are information boards. The
Five Weirs Walk path is accessible to all.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
14 Easy Going Walks
Norfolk Park
The Centre in the Park, Norfolk Heritage Park,
Guildford Avenue, Norfolk Park, Sheffield, S2 2PL
Tel: 0114 273 5604
Email: eastrangers@hotmail.com
or
Park Rangers Office: 0114 275 1176
Café (Norfolk Park FED’s) : 0114 286 0405
Sheffield Wildlife Trust : 0114 286 0414
www.norfolk-park.com
Norfolk Heritage Park lies in the heart of Sheffield. In 1848 it was one of the
first public parks to be open, free to the general public, in the country. It was
laid out by the Duke of Norfolk and incorporates a main circular carriageway
with two avenues, leading to the main gates. The supertram runs around the
park's perimeter, and due to it's centralised location there are many bus routes
that pass close by. Disabled parking spaces are located in the main car park
and there is level access from here to the building.
Sherwood Forest
Close to Edwinstowe just off the B6034 Edwinstowe to Budby Road.
Tel: 01623 823202
Email: sherwood.forest@nottscc.gov.uk
www.sherwoodforest.org.uk
Although outside of South Yorkshire, the forest is worth a trip, with reasonable
accessible paths from and around the main visitor centre that has toilets, an
audio visual exhibition and nearby car park (free Blue Badge parking). All
assistance dogs are welcomed. A café is also available.
Ulley Country Park
Pleasely Road, Aughton, Sheffield, S31 0YL
Tel: 01709 365332
Email: ulley.countrypark@rotherham.gov.uk
Ulley Country Park is situated within the South Yorkshire Forest and is just 4
miles south of Rotherham town centre
A 2 mile circular walk with good resting areas. The full circular walk is not open
between March and October as part of it is in a nature reserve. Free Blue Badge
parking. Please see ‘Outings’ page 28 for more information.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Easy Going Walks 15
Permissive access
http://countrywalks.defra.gov.uk
Increasingly, permissive rights of access are created under the Department for
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) farm conservation schemes. On
the website you can find details and maps of more than 1,800 walks and rides
and areas of open access. Only a small proportion have access for all. Printed
copies are held by some councils. These rights of access are often only for a few
years, and more are being added.
There are 24 DEFRA sites with access in South Yorkshire, though only three are
listed as being possibly accessible to all. Many state good paths that are of a
short (less than 1 mile) distance. Look up the website for details of other walks
or contact DEFRA directly.
Lundhill Farm
Near Hoyland
Map: OS Landranger 111 Grid ref: SE399015
Tel: DEFRA on 020 7238 6907
Two permissive footpaths providing useful links and making local circular walks
around the farm a distinct possibility. A 0.5 mile walk. The land is fairly level
and the walks are easily wide enough to allow wheelchair or pushchair access,
although they are not specifically designed for this. A wide range of
conservation works are being carried out on the farm including hedge
restoration, creation of fallow areas for feeding birds and wildflower areas.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
16 Easy Going Walks
Moor Mill Farm
Near Worksop.
Map: OS Landranger 111 Grid ref: SK488960
Tel: DEFRA on 020 7238 6907
Best access is in summer and spring along this 0.4 mile walk. A circular walk
with both historical and wildlife interest and a viewing point.

Whirlow Hill Farm
Near Sheffield
Map: OS Landranger 110 Grid ref: SK309834
Tel: DEFRA on 020 7238 6907

1.4 mile circular paths available to disabled users connect with existing rights of
way and open up a variety of circular routes over attractive farmed countryside.
There are also new footpaths and an open area over which you are now free to
wander. On a good day you will have fine views over Sheffield to the east and
towards the hills of the Peak District in the west from the highest point in the
route, above the woodland in the Limb Valley.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Markets 17
Markets are a fun countryside outing and a chance to see a new place and buy
local fare. You could also join up the visit with a nice walk in the area.
Barnsley
Barnsley
Tuesday Second hand
Wednesday, Friday & Saturday General & new
Sunday Car boot
100 Open stalls, 119 Semi open and 110 indoor stalls.
Hoyland
Tuesday & Saturday General retail
Thursday Second hand
Contact: Mark Fretwell - Market Officer (Thursday) Tel: 01226 743926
64 outdoor stalls
Goldthorpe
Monday, Tuesday & Saturday General retail
Contact: Jenny Wraith, Market Officer Tel: 01226 772239
64 stalls
Penistone Community Centre
Thursday Country Market Place
Thursday General retail
2nd Sunday in every month Farmers market
Contact: Tony Lowry, Markets Officer Tel: 01226 370084
46 outdoor stalls
Thurnscoe
Monday & Friday General retail
Contact: Tony Lowry, Markets Officer Tel: 01226 370084
60 outdoor stalls & 6 shops
Wombwell Market
Tuesday, Friday & Saturday General retail
Contact: Mark Fretwell, District Officer Tel: 01226 772239
31 open stalls
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
18 Markets
Doncaster
Doncaster
Tuesday, Friday & Saturday General and Food indoor and outdoor
Monday – Saturday General and Food indoor
Contact: Mr I Hill, Markets Manager
Tel: 01302 349631
650 stalls
Antique and Bric-a-Brac Market
Wednesday Antique & Bric-a-Brac
200 open stalls
Racecourse Sunday
Sunday General & car boot
450 stalls
Rotherham
Contact: Rotherham Town Centre & Markets Management
Management Suite, Centenary Market Hall, Howard Street, Rotherham, S65 1EL
Tel: 01709 365021
www.rotherham.towntalk.co.uk/markets
Rotherham Centenary Market
Monday to Saturday General retail indoor
Contact: Ray Harrison, Assistant Markets Manager
Email: ray.harrison@rotherham.gov.uk
88 stalls
Rotherham Centenary Market
Monday, Friday & Saturday General retail outdoor
Contact: Robin Lambert, Markets Supervisor
Email: robin.lambert@rotherham.gov.uk
131 stalls

Town Centre Street Market
Tuesday
Along Effingham Street
40 Stalls
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Markets 19
Sheffield
Specialist Markets
Contact: Mr M Shepherd
Tel: 0114 273 6664
Run throughout the year including Bank Holidays selling antiques, crafts,
collectables both indoor and outdoor
Market stalls
Contact: Sheffield Markets
Castle Market Building, Exchange Street, Sheffield, S1 2AH
Tel: 0114 273 5281
Email: hq@sheffieldmarkets.demon.co.uk
Exchange Street/ King Street Market
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday General retail
Monday Bric-a-brac,
Wednesday Second hand clothes,

Castle Market
Monday to Saturday Fish, meat & general retail, indoor
The Market Place (Crystal Peaks)
Monday to Saturday Food & general retail, indoor

Moor Market
Monday to Saturday General retail, outdoor
Killamarsh
Thursday General retail, outdoor
Stocksbridge
Tuesday and Friday General retail, outdoor

Smithfield Car Park
Sundays Car boot sales, outdoor
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
20 Outings
Contacts
Breakaway
Contact: Mary Scurr
Tel: 01423 529153
www.aps-services.co.uk
Breakaway Holidays offer people who require support a unique holiday of their
choice. Holiday-makers are supported by a team of committed and trained
volunteers. Holidays include walking breaks, farmhouse holidays and stays at
Center Parcs.
British Red Cross Open Gardens Scheme
Tel: 24 hour update line 01609 766323
www.redcross.org.uk/opengardens
This programme offers a wonderful chance to see some of the best gardens in
the country.
Doncaster Countryside Activities
Contact: Countryside & Public Rights of Way Team
Tel: 01302 300798
www.doncaster.gov.uk
‘Countryside Activities’ is a series of varied events, put together by Doncaster’s
Countryside and Public Rights of Way Service, to help you explore Doncaster’s
beautiful countryside, green spaces, wildlife and heritage. The calendar of
events includes a Snowdrop Festival at Kirk Bramwith, Guided Walks across the
moors, a Teddy Bears Picnic and Doncaster’s annual Fresh Air Festival and
Country Fair. In addition to the Countryside Activities Leaflet, the Countryside
and Public Rights of Way Service has produced information on many of
Doncaster’s country parks.
Open Country Outings Group, Harrogate
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
This group is especially for those with limited mobility, wheelchair users and
people with visual impairments (though we don't refuse anyone else who’d
really like to join in). The group enjoys twice-monthly trips to country houses,
parks, gardens and other countryside places. Fully accessible transport is
provided.
Oughtbridge Ladies Group
Venue: Church Street, Sheffield, S35 0FU
Tel: 0114 271 6107
Support group for women in NW Sheffield with mental health problems. Monthly
trips to the countryside and coast.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outings 21
Contacts cont.
Penistone Events
Contact: Barnsley Tourist Information Centre
Tel: 01226 206757
For information about the organised events in and around Penistone District
including markets, exhibitions, shows, concerts and fairs organised around the
district each month – please check about the accessibility of individual venues.
Rotherham ‘Green Spaces Programme of Events’
Contact: Rotherhams Urban Parks contact the Urban Parks Ranger Service
Third floor, Norfolk House, Walker Place, Rotherham, S65 1AS
Tel: 01709 836844 / 01709 822453
Email: urbanparksrangerservice@rotherham.gov.uk
www.rotherham.gov.uk./graphics/Leisure/Countryside+and+Wildlife
Contact the Ranger Service for a fantastic array of events covering all interests,
ages and abilities.
Sheffield City parks and outings
Contact: Peter Slater
Tel: 0114 2734132
Email peter.slater@sheffield.gov.uk
or
Town Hall, Sheffield, S1 2HH
Tel: 0114 272 6444
http://www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside/events
With over 400 annual events, Sheffield Parks, Woodlands and Countryside
Service is host to a fantastic and varied programme of events. A programme is
downloadable from the website or call the council offices.
Sheffield City Council Events
Contact: Fun Working Group
Tel: 0114 203 9076
www.sheffield.gov.uk
For information on the many events, festivals and special markets held all year
round with Sheffield City Council.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
22 Outings
Barnsley
Cannon Hall Museum & Open Farm
(Maize Maze next door)
Bank House Lane, Cawthorne, Barnsley, S75 4AT
Off the A635 Between Barnsley and Denby Dale – from Junction 38 of M1.
Tel: 01226 790427 (Farm)
Tel: 01226 790270 (Museum, park & gardens)
Tel: 01226 791855 (Maize Maze - seasonal)
Email: cannonhall@barnsley.gov.uk
www.barnsley.gov.uk
Cannon Hall and the surrounding park, museum, maze and farm make a great
day out for people of all abilities and ages. Everything except some of the
grounds (due to steeper slopes) and the Maze (in fact a field) is wheelchair
accessible. Toilets are available in the tea room adjacent to the upper car park,
with disabled parking.
Elsecar Heritage Centre
Elsecar Heritage Centre, Wath Road, Elsecar, Barnsley, S74 8HJ
Leave M1 at Junction 36, and follow the brown 'Elsecar Heritage' signs
Tel: 01226 740203.
Email: elsecarheritagecentre@barnsley.gov.uk
http://www.barnsley.gov.uk/tourism/elsecar/index.asp
The award winning Elsecar Heritage Centre is an exciting History and Craft
Centre, set in the attractive conservation village of Elsecar and surrounded by
beautiful South Yorkshire countryside. Accessible toilet facilities are available
around the site and within our event venue, Building 21, for people with
disabilities. Please note that all the Centre run attractions are fully wheelchair
accessible. Tea room on site.
Monk Bretton Priory
Located 1 mile E of Barnsley town centre off A633 (OS Map 111; ref SE
373065) & found on the National Cycle Network
www.english-heritage.org.uk
A free site to visit with occasional events. Enjoy the sandstone ruins of a Cluniac
monastery founded in 1153, plus the remains of the 14th-century gatehouse.
Open March – November. Not wheelchair accessible. No amenities.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outings 23
Barnsley (continued)
Wentworth Castle Gardens
Wentworth Castle & Stainborough Park Heritage Trust,
Wentworth Castle, Lowe Lane, Stainborough, Barnsley, S75 3ET
Tel: 01226 776040
Email: kate.lynam@northern.ac.uk
www.wentworthcastle.org
Wentworth Castle and Gardens are presently undergoing renovation works to
restore the buildings and grounds to their former glory. Part of the works
includes improving the site for access for people with disabilities. The site is
quite hilly – motorised scooters should have no problems but otherwise a fit
pusher will be required. Disabled parking is close to the entrance to the
gardens. Guide dogs and hearing dogs are welcome.
Wigfield Farm
Haverlands Lane, Worsbrough, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, S70 5NQ
Tel: 01226 733702
Email: wigfieldfarm@barnsley.ac.uk
http://wigfield.barnsley.ac.uk
A mix of farm animals. horticulture and small animals makes this a lovely day
out with shop and café. The site is gently sloping and all buildings are single
storey. This makes the farm suitable for people with restricted mobility and
young children. Cycle parking facilities are provided outside the Café, and the
Trans-Pennine Trail (Dove Valley Trail section) provides a good and scenic cycle
route and bridleway to the Farm. Entrance to the cafe and shop is free. Wigfield
Farm is located approximately 2 miles to the South West of Barnsley, adjacent
to Worsbrough Country Park, and is easily accessible from both junctions 36
and 37 of the M1.
Worsbrough Country Park and Mill Museum
Leave the M1 at junction 36 and take the A61 North (Barnsley),
follow the brown Worsbrough Mill and Country Park signs. the site is
approximately 2-3 miles from the motorway.
Tel: 01226 774527
See ‘Easy Going Walks’ page 10 for more details. A great day out with lots to
amuse all ages and abilities, there has been a mill at Worsbrough since the time
of the Domesday Book! Set in impressive countryside and a haven for wildlife
(accessible bird hides near the lake) there is also cycle hire at the mill.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
24 Outings
Doncaster
Brockholes Farm
Brockholes Lane, Branton, Doncaster, DN3 3NH
Tel: 01302 535057 / 535450
Email: admin@brockholesfarm.co.uk
www.brockholesfarm.co.uk
Brockholes has been the site of a farm since 1759 and today, set in amongst
300 acres of semi-wooded countryside, the farm hosts an array of animals and
children’s play area. Most of the paths are concrete and bridges are ramped.
The café is accessible and the adjacent riding stables have disabled toilets and
also host Riding for the Disabled.
Brodsworth Hall & Gardens
Brodsworth, Doncaster, DN5 7XJ
5 miles NW of Doncaster off A635 Barnsley Road, from junction 37 of A1(M)
Tel: 01302 722598
www.english-heritage.org.uk
Open March – November, this Victorian mansion shows life in the house, from
the servants to the families that lived there. The terrace and formal gardens are
accessible, though the Quarry garden has restricted access. Many artefacts and
materials are available to touch, and most of the house except the servants
quarters are accessible by wheelchair. Toilets and tea room are accessible.
Wheelchairs available at the front door of the house.
Cusworth Hall, Museum & Country Park
Cusworth Lane, Cusworth, Doncaster, DN5 7TU
Tel: 01302 782342
Tel café: 01302 390959
Fax: 01302 782342
Email: museum@doncaster.gov.uk
www.doncaster.gov.uk
Cusworth Hall is an imposing 18th century country house set in extensive
landscaped parklands, once home to the Battie-Wrightson family and now home
to the Museum of South Yorkshire Life. The Museum and Hall are closed for
restoration at the moment until early 2007 and works will include lifts and other
access improvements. The tea room, which has an accessible toilet remains
open as does the park which has a number of accessible paths. Wheelchair loan
available.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outings 25
Doncaster (continued)
Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery
Chequer Road, Doncaster, DN1 2AE
Tel: 01302 734293
Home to collections of the Kings Own Yorkshire Infantry and various arts and
sculptures, the museum has accessible shop and toilets.
Elsham Hall Country and Wildlife Park
Near Brigg, North Lincolnshire, DN20 0QZ
B1206, B1084, near to Junction of Humber Bridge / M180
Tel: 01652 688 698
www.elshamhall.co.uk/
Open March to September this is a popular countryside park and zoo set in
lakeside gardens by Elsham Hall. Including shop, butterfly gardens, farm and
falconry and conservation centre there is a shop, café, picnic area and toilets.
The park is fully accessible. Guide dogs on leads permitted.
Normanby Hall Country Park
Normanby, Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire, DN15 9NU
Tel: 01724 720588
Email: normanbyhall@northlincs.gov.uk
www.northlincs.gov.uk/normanby
Something for everyone here with a mix of history, wildlife, gardens and
events. Enjoy the walled garden, kids adventures, the Hall, golf and a farming
museum. Wheelchair access is available to the shop, café, the Hall and most of
the park and gardens. However, scooters are not permitted in the Hall and
there isn’t a lift to the first floor. Two wheelchairs and two scooters are
available for loan with prior booking and the accessible toilet can be found in
the main block.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
26 Outings
Rotherham
Clifton Park & Museum
Clifton Lane, Rotherham, S65 2AA
Tel: 01709 336633
Email: cliftonparkmuseum@rotherham.gov.uk
www.rotherham.gov.uk
Re-opened in 2005, Clifton Park and museum is fully accessible to wheelchair
users. Free admission every day but Friday (closed), you can enjoy learning the
history of Rotherham Borough, the house, its owners and their servants.
Toilets, café and baby changing facilities on site.
Conisbrough Castle
Castle Hill, Conisbrough, Doncaster, DN12 3BU.
Situated between Doncaster & Rotherham, just off the A630.
Accessible by public transport.
Tel: 01709 863329
Email: info@conisbroughcastle.org.uk
www.conisbroughcastle.org.uk
One of Europe’s finest examples of medieval castle architecture, Conisbrough
castle has over 800 years of history. Visitor centre, tea room, and toilets are all
accessible. Guided tours and family events as well as picnic areas makes it a
day out for all ages. Some paths have loose gravel chippings, slopes or smooth
grass. Audio visual programme has a fitted loop system. Please contact if you
have a particular accessibility requirement.
MAGNA
Sheffield Road, Templebrough, Rotherham, S60 1DX
Junction 33 from the M1, Magna is 1 mile from
Meadowhall Shopping Centre
Tel: 01709 720002
www.visitmagna.co.uk
The UK's first science adventure park, MAGNA has something for all ages. Set
within a former steel works. Please remember to bring a coat as it can be chilly.
Café on site and toilets. The attraction and all facilities are accessible to visitors
who use wheelchairs. Visitors with special needs may wish to phone in advance
to discuss their requirements.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outings 27
Roche Abbey
Abbey House, Maltby, Rotherham, S66 8NW
1½ miles S of Maltby off A634
Tel: 01709 812739
www.english-heritage.org.uk
Founded in 1147, the fine early Gothic transepts of this Cistercian Abbey in
South Yorkshire still survive to their original height. Access is available to most
parts on grassy paths and some slopes – please be aware of low walls.
Accessible toilets are available in the Abbey House. Refreshments are available
and picnics welcome. A tape tour with hearing loop is also available.
Rosehill Victoria Hall and Country Park
Rawmarsh
Contact: Paul Spriggs (Ranger)
Tel: 01709 524111
Rosehill Victoria Park is Rotherham's third major Victorian park. The park
stretches over 36 acres and includes mature woodland for walking, a bandstand
and drinking fountain, bowling green and tennis courts, children's play areas
and a miniature railway. Rosehill Victoria Hall, at the centre of the park, is not
currently open to the general public, but is to be the subject of a restoration
and refurbishment programme with the help of National Lottery funding.
Rotherham Art Gallery / Yorkshire and Lancaster Regimental Museum
Rotherham Arts Centre, Walker Place, Rotherham, S65 1JH
Tel: 01709 823635
www.rma.org.uk
A regularly changing exhibition of contemporary and fine art with disabled toilet
and other facilities.
Thrybergh Country Park
Doncaster Road, Thrybergh, Rotherham, S65 4NU
5 miles from the A1(M) and M1 and 3 miles from
the M18 on the A630 Doncaster to Rotherham road.
Tel: 01709 850353
Accessible paths (though not circular) take you round the park. Shop and café
are available most of the year and there is also fishing. Scooter hire with
advance booking.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
28 Outings
Ulley Country Park
Pleasely Road, Aughton, Sheffield, S31 0YL
Tel: 01709 365332
Email: ulley.countrypark@rotherham.gov.uk
Ulley Country Park is situated within the South Yorkshire Forest and is just 4
miles south of Rotherham town centre
A scenic haven for wildlife and the public alike. An opportunity for the whole
family to get out and enjoy the British countryside. A park, reservoir and nature
reserve all in one, offering walks, fishing and picnics, there is a centre and shop
and events all year round. There is a 2 mile circular walk with good resting
areas. The full circular walk is not open between March and October as part of it
is in a nature reserve. Free Blue Badge parking.
Wentworth Family Farm
Wentworth Garden Centre, Hague Lane, Wentworth
Tel: 01226 749790 or 741172
Rare breeds of sheep and poultry with a small heritage museum and falconry
displays. The farm is accessible with accessible toilets and café found in the
garden centre.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outings 29
Sheffield
Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet
Abbeydale Road South, Sheffield, S7 2QW
Tel: 0114 2367731
www.simt.co.uk
Authentic 18th century scythe works with waterwheels and tilt hammers. Closed
Friday and Saturday. Object and photograph displays, together with
interactives, CD-Rom and research folders with extra information provide
something for everyone. There is plenty to touch and handle, and Braille labels
on all of the object and interactive displays. Gift shop and café all with good
access. Accessible toilets to be put in early 2006. As a listed building, access is
limited to wheelchairs but please contact for tailored guided walks.
Bolsover Castle
Sign posted from the A632 Chesterfield – Bolsover road
Tel: 01246 822844
www.english-heritage.org.uk
Disabled parking is available close to the castle and although access is open to
all in the ruins, terraces, exhibition room, riding centre and fountain garden
there is limited access to the little castle. Audio tapes are available at the
entrance and there is an audio visual display of the whole site in the castle.
Café and toilets on site. One scooter is available for use and for those unable to
walk the few steps into the castle there is a 10 minute video of the interior.
City Museum and Mappin Art Gallery
Weston Park, Sheffield, S10 2TP
Tel: 0114 2768588
The museum and gallery house important collections of cutlery, ceramics,
natural history and archaeology amongst other features. No parking is
available. Disabled access is from Mushroom Lane and the disabled toilet is at
the Museum reception.
Graves Park & Animal Farm
Tel: Ranger Service for the park and scooter: 07866 605426
Tel: Animal Farm: 0114 258 2452
Email: pwc.parksandcountryside@sheffield.gov.uk
Graves Park is Sheffield's largest park and occupies over 200 acres on the
southern edge of the city. Graves Park is a full day out with a number of
activities to partake of from the well-kept mini golf course to a hedge-bordered
bowling green. Accessible paths and scooter loan via the ranger service.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
30 Outings
Graves Park's Animal Farm is near the Hemsworth Road entrance and provides
a home to some of the rarest breeds of farm animals in the country. You can
get close to the animals and there's a children's 'pets corner'. The Farm is open
every day between 8.00am and 4.00pm (except Christmas Day). There is no
entry charge and car parking is available nearby. Accessible paths and toilet on
site.
Hodsock Priory Gardens
4m north of Worksop, well sign posted off the B6045
at Blyth, Notts less than 2m from junction 34 of the A1(M)
Tel: 01909 591204
www.snowdrops.co.uk
Hodsock Priory gardens are opened to the public once a year through late
January to early March to allow enjoyment of their snowdrop spectacular. The
tea room is accessible and disabled toilets are nearby. Bark chips line the
grassy paths but in the woodland there is no wheelchair access. Tree roots are
highlighted in white.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outings 31
Peak District National Park
Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell, Derbyshire DE45 1AE
Telephone: 01629 816200
Fax: 01629 816310
Minicom: 01629 816319
Email: customer.service@peakdistrict.gov.uk
www.peakdistrict.gov.uk
The Peak District was Britain's first National Park, established in April 1951.
Around 38,000 people live in the Park in 125 parishes and visitors from all over
the world come to the Park to find peace and tranquillity and to reconnect with
the natural world.
You can also find adventure, experiencing some of England’s finest climbing,
caving, walking and cycling. The National Park Authority aims to make
recreational facilities available to as many people as possible. This includes
providing special parking bays at popular car parks, accessible information
centres and picnic sites, toilets with facilities for disabled people and, where
practical, access onto suitably surfaced paths.
Free Access for All guides are available in booklet form, on audio tape and in
Braille. There are also good interactive maps giving details of parking, toilets
and ‘easy access walks’ on the website or call for information. Adapted bikes to
suit most abilities and scooters are available at the Cycle Hire centres at
Ashbourne, Parsley Hay and Derwent.
Peace Gardens
Town Hall, Sheffield, S1 2HH
Tel: 0114 272 6444
Email: citycentre.management@sheffield.gov.uk
The Peace Gardens were officially opened by His Royal Highness The Prince of
Wales in 1998. The plantings draw inspiration from the rich tradition of English
flower gardening. A variety of soil types and microclimates have been created in
order to grow a wide variety of herbaceous plants, shrubs and bulbs - over one
hundred and fifty species of plant have been used in carefully constructed
associations - to produce a constantly changing succession of pictures
throughout the seasons. Accessible to wheelchair users with accessible toilets
at the nearby Winter Gardens (see page 32).
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
32 Outings
Rother Valley Country Park
Mansfield Road, Wales Bar, Rotherham, S26 5PQ - M1 motorway junction 31
Tel: 0114 247 1452
Email: rangers.rvcp@rotherham.gov.uk
www.rothervalleycountrypark.co.uk
Visit Rother Valley Country Park and its 750 acres of young woodland, lakes and
parkland and link it up with a trip to the Bedgreave Mills, Craft Centre, Nature
Reserve and children’s play area. There is cycle hire, cycle routes and fishing
available as well as water sports. Wheelchair access throughout most areas and
motability scooters on loan with prior booking.
Sheffield Botanical Gardens
Clarkehouse Road, Sheffield, S10 2LN
Tel / Fax: 0114 267 6496
www.sbg.org.uk
Sheffield Botanical Gardens is a 19 acre garden, first opened in 1836.The site
contains the largest collection of listed buildings in a Sheffield garden and a
number of other interesting features. There is disabled access throughout the
majority of the Gardens. Parking for disabled visitors is available via the
Thompson Road entrance. Toilet facilities are available. Restaurant and tea
room within the garden grounds.
Tropical Butterfly House, Wildlife and Falconry Centre
Woodsetts Road, North Anston, Sheffield, S25 4EQ
Tel: 01909 569416
Email: info@butterflyhouse.co.uk
www.butterflyhouse.co.uk
The centre is currently home to the Tropical House, Bird of Prey centre, baby
animal nursery, pets corner and a mature nature trail. The Butterfly House is
fully accessible with toilets, shop and café.
Winter Garden & Galleries
Winter Garden, 90 Surrey Street, Sheffield, S1 2LH
Tel’ Bessemer Gallery: 0114 278 8637
www.bessemergallery.com
or
Tel’ Millennium Gallery: 0114 278 2600
www.sheffieldgalleries.org.uk/coresite/html/millennium.asp
The multi award-winning Winter Garden is one of the largest temperate
glasshouses to be built in the UK during the last hundred years and has created
a stunning green world in the heart of the city. It is also adjacent to both the
Bessemer and Millennium Galleries each known for their outstanding arts and
crafts. A ramp from the Winter Garden gives entry to the Galleries. The winter
garden and Millennium Gallery have accessible toilets and cafe. Free admission
all week and good access.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
33 2. Sports and Outdoor Pursuits
Clubs & contacts 34 - 35
 Outdoor Pursuits 37 - 45
 Cycling 46 - 49
Cycle routes 50 – 55
 Fishing 56 - 59
 Horses 60 - 62
NB: There is a relative scarcity of outdoor pursuits venues that are accessible
and so not all venues listed here are in South Yorkshire. Included are venues
and clubs we are aware of throughout Yorkshire.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
34 Clubs & Contacts
Breaking Bounds
Stocksbridge Connextions Centre, Coalpit Lane, Stocksbridge, S36 1AW
Contact: Kevin Seaman Tel: 0114 2883470
http://www.stocksbridgeconnexionscentre.co.uk/
The Breaking Bounds club is aimed at 13 – 25 year olds specifically in the
Sheffield area and takes part in walking, cruises, camping, sailing and skiing.
British Blind Sport
Tel: 08700 789000
British Deaf Sports Council
Tel: 01943 850214
British Wheelchair Sports Foundation
Tel: 01296 395995
Federation of Yorkshire Sport
Fairfax Hall, Becket Park, Leeds, LS6 3QS
Tel: 0113 2837418
Email: m.welch@yorkshiresport.org.uk
Represents the voluntary sports organisations in the region.
Independent Sports Club for Disabled Adults and Children
Yew Lane Community Centre, Creswick Lane, Sheffield, S35 8NN
Tel: 0114 2332335
Promotes sport and social activities for adults and children with physical or
learning disabilities
Open Country, Harrogate District
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
Join the Adventure Club and turn your hand to rock climbing, canoeing,
orienteering, boating, archery and much more. Activities run once per month
and are open to anyone regardless of your abilities.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Clubs & Contacts 35
Phab
National contact: Anne Joyce - 0208 667 9443 / www.phabengland.org.uk
Sheffield contact: 0114 269 9079 / 105 Grange Crescent, Sheffield, S11 8AZ
Can provide information about local groups where disabled and non-disabled
people can meet and undertake activities on equal terms. Suitable for all ages,
abilities and with a wide range of activities.
The Federation of Disability Sports Organisations
Yorkshire Contact: Unit 9, Milner Way, Ossett, Wakefield, WF5 9JN
Tel: 01924 279305 Minicom: 01924 275070
Email: staff@fdso.co.uk
The national body responsible for developing sport for disabled people in
England. The federation works closely with seven disability sporting
organisations in order to achieve its aims.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
36 Outdoor Pursuits
Archery
Aire Valley Archers & Aire Valley Disabled Archers
(formerly - St Ives Bowmen)
Contact: Mike & Maureen Howsen
Tel: 01282 860071
www.aire-valley-archers.co.uk
The club encourages people of all abilities to try Archery. Courses for beginners
are available.
Panda Bowmen Club & Panda Disabled Archery Club
Contact: Barbara Skinner
32 Springfield Rise, Horsforth, Leeds, LS18 5DS
Tel: 0113 2585624
www.Panda-Bowmen.org.uk
Club runs sessions for all levels based at West Park and Bramhope Rugby Club,
Bramhope, Leeds. Attendees should have use of the upper part of the body and
good concentration skills. Please come with a carer or friend to assist if needed.
Pinderfields Paraplegic Archery Club
Pinderfields NHS Trust, Aberford Road, Wakefield, WF1 4DG
Contact: Pauline Betteridge
Tel: 01924 862779
Provides archery sessions for people with physical disabilities.
Yorkshire Archery Association
Email: dave@davephillips.freeserve.co.uk
For a list of clubs and contacts plus tips on how to get started.
Ballooning
The Yorkshire Ballooning Centre
Contact: Mr Stables – Balloon Pilot
Moor Lane, Arkendale, Knaresborough, HG5 0RQ
Tel: 01423 340664
May be able to provide balloon flights to disabled people.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outdoor Pursuits 37
Camping
Camping for the Disabled
c/o Mobility Information Service, Unit B1, Greenwood Court, Cartmel Drive,
Shrewsbury, SY1 3TB
Tel: 01743 761889
For information about accessible camp sites and practical help and information.
Caravanning for the Disabled
www.caravan-sitefinder.co.uk/features/disabled
Check out this site for information, tips and lists of accessible caravan sites
across the country.
Canals & River Cruises
Skipton & Craven Action for Disability (SCAD)
46/48 Newmarket Street, Skipton, BD23 2JB
Tel: 01756 701005
Their canal cruiser, ‘SCAD’s Endeavour’ has been purpose built for people with
disabilities, and is based at Skipton on the Leeds - Liverpool canal. Trips run
from May to September. Up to 12 people including 3 wheelchair users.
Caving
Ingleborough Cave
Clapham, LA2 8EE
Tel: 01524 251242
Fairly accessible, although motorised scooters are not admitted on safety
grounds. Wheelchair users should ring in advance as a risk assessment may be
required. Some parts are steep and/or narrow. Guided tours leave every 50
minutes from the cave shop. At least a 30-minute walk to cave entrance. It is
possible to drive up by arrangement. Note: on the way up, there is a raised
hump that is hard to negotiate in low floor buses. Nearest accessible toilets in
Clapham Village. Entry charge. Open daily March to October, weekends in
winter.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
38 Outdoor Pursuits
Climbing
The Edge Climbing Centre
John Street, Bramall Lane, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, S2 4QU
Tel: 0114 275 8899
Email: theedge@sheffieldclimbing.com
No specific accessibility with stairs to the ‘wall’ but please phone for help and
advice. Wheelchair users may need to complete a risk assessment form before
attending so please get in touch in advance of a visit.
The Foundry Climbing Centre
Unit 2a, 45 Mowbray Street, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, S3 8EN
Tel: 0114 279 6331
The climbing facilities including the ‘wall’ and toilets are accessible as is the café
when staff are alerted to open a side door. The shop has stairs to the entrance.
‘The Wall’, Leeds
100a Gelderd Road, Leeds, LS12 6BY
Tel: 0113 234 1554
The Leeds Wall has a range of climbing walls suitable for both beginners and
experts of all ages. The Wall does cater for groups including those whose
members may have a disability. There is a disabled toilet. Equipment is
available for hire. Please call for information and advice about individual
support.
The BMC for climbers, hill walkers and mountaineers
www.thebmc.co.uk
For information about clubs, equipment and how to get involved in climbing and
walking check out the BMC website.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outdoor Pursuits 39
Flying
York Gliding Centre
Rufforth Aerodrome, York YO23 3NA
Tel: 01904 738694
Organises flights for disabled people often through the BDFC but also from
individuals and other groups. Group booking is required, though individuals may
join an organised group with agreement of the group leader.
Frank Morgan's School of Flying
Contact: Chris Stringer
13a Hall Way, Humberside International Airport, Kirmington, N Lincolnshire
Tel: 01652 688859
www.flyatfranks.co.uk
Lessons and one-off flights available and equipped for people without the use of
their legs. Toilets and club are fully accessible.
British Disabled Flying Club (BDFC)
Building 165, Biggin Hill Airport, Main Road, Westerham, Kent TN16 3BN
Tel: 01959 576769
www.fly.to/bdfc
or
Contact: Steve Derwin, Regional coordinator for NE England and Yorkshire
Tel: 01642 898989
The BDFC promote opportunities in aviation for disabled people.
Paragliding
Active Edge, Austwick
Tel: 01423 711900
www.activeedge.co.uk
Can cater for certain disabilities. Please ‘phone to discuss your needs.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
40 Outdoor Pursuits
Orienteering
South Yorkshire Orienteers
Contact: Alan Goddard (Chairman)
Tel: 01423 507227: 01246 230244
Email: alan_goddard@tiscali.co.uk
www.southyorkshireorienteers.org.uk
South Yorkshire Orienteers can boast over 200 members with an age range of
5-75 years. There is a wide range of ability within the club.
Herringthorpe Valley Park
Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council, Civic Building, Walker Place
Rotherham, S65 1UF.
Tel: 01709 382121
A large urban park landscaped in the early 1970's with a pavilion with planted
shrubbery, large numbers of maturing trees and facilities include bowling
greens, tennis courts, putting green and pitch & putt. Standard park features
plus a putting green and car park near the foot of the park. A site often used
for orienteering practice.

SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outdoor Pursuits 41
Outdoor Centres
Bendrigg Trust, Kendal
Bendrigg Lodge, Old Hutton, Kendal, Cumbria, LA8 0NR
Tel: 01539 723766
www.bendrigg.org.uk
The Bendrigg Trust specialises in a range of indoor and outdoor courses and
activities for disabled and disadvantaged young people.
Carlton Lodge Outdoor Centre
Carlton Miniott, Thirsk, YO7 4NJ
Tel: 01845 522145
Carlton Lodge is classified as an ‘Adventure for All Centre’. For both day visitors
and residential groups, Carlton Lodge is able to offer a wide range of activity
programmes, using the Centre's twelve acres of grounds.
Herd Farm
Eccup Reservoir, Harrogate Road, Leeds, LS17 7RJ
Tel: 0113 393 0012
An outdoor education centre that runs residential activities for young people
and people with disabilities. Activities include a new wheelchair abseil wall, low
and high rope courses and accessible archery.
Low Mill Outdoor Centre
Askrigg, Leyburn, DL8 3HZ
Tel: 01969 650432
www.lowmill.com
Low Mill is classified as an ‘Adventure for All Centre’. Based in the heart of the
Yorkshire Dales, programmes of activities are designed from a wide range of
outdoor activities, catering for those with disabilities and special needs.
Parson House Outdoor Pursuits Centre
Parson House Farm, Longshaw, Sheffield, S11 7TZ
Tel: 01433 631017
Fax: 01433 630794
www.parsonhouse.co.uk
Accommodates up to 30 people on a variety of courses with specialist outdoor
courses for people with disabilities.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
42 Outdoor Pursuits
Rock Lea Activity Centre
Peak Activities Ltd., Rock Lea Activity Centre, Station Road, Hathersage,
Derbyshire, S32 1DD
www.iain.co.uk
Based in the Peak District Park the centre runs and leads events for groups and
individuals of all abilities from gorge walking to potholing.
The Calvert Trust
Calvert Trust Kielder - Tel: 01434 250232
Calvert Trust Keswick - Tel: 01768 772254
www.calvert-trust.org.uk
The Calvert Trust runs two outdoor pursuits centres for people with disabilities
from 12 years upwards.
Underbank Outdoor Activity Centre
Stocksbridge, Sheffield, S36 4GH
Tel: 01226 370509
A range of outdoor pursuits including canoeing, windsurfing and sailing as well
as archery, hiking and conservation tasks. Each activity is under the supervision
of a trained instructor and sign language is available.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outdoor Pursuits 43
Scuba diving
Scuba Diving for All
Contact: Archie or Yvonne Covell
Tel: 01765 606244
Scuba Diving for All is a voluntary group aimed at enabling people of all abilities
to enjoy the freedom and excitement of diving. Training evenings take place
weekly in Ripon in a swimming pool with a maximum depth of 7’6”. Participants
are supported by trained staff and volunteers. A video demonstrating the
opportunities offered is available. The video is inspiring – take the opportunity
to learn more.
Skiing
The Up-Hill Ski Club of Great Britain
• National Contact: Fiona Young
Cairngorm Mountain, via Aviemore, Inverness-shire, PH22 1RB
Tel: 01479 861272
www.disabilitysnowsport.org.uk
• Nearest Contact: Ski Rossendale
Haslingden Old Road, Rawtenstall, Rossendale, Cheshire, BB4 8RR
The Up-Hill Ski Club allows people with disabilities the chance to learn and
master skiing in a safe and supported environment whilst allowing you to
experience the joy and freedom of the sport. The club also runs skiing holidays.
British Ski Club for the Disabled
45 Rusham Road, Berwick St John, Egham, Surrey,TW20 9LP
Tel: 0777 568 7648
Email: edski@bscd.org.uk
Sheffield Ski Village
Vale Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, S3 9SJ
Tel: 0114 276 9459
Email: info@sheffieldskivillage.co.uk
www.sheffieldskivillage.co.uk
Provides full instruction for skiing and snowboarding at all levels. Accessible
throughout though some paths for access to slopes are steep. Accessible toilets
are available. If a club member, Breaking Bounds use specialist ski equipment
at the Ski Village to access the slopes for young people with disabilities. See
page 35 for details.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
44 Outdoor Pursuits
Water Sports
Disabled Sailors Association
RoRo, Conifer Grove, Gosport, Hampshire, PO13 OTP
Tel: 077 3424 6385
E-mail: rorohq@ntlworld.com
www.disabledsailing.org
Otley Sailing Club
The Club House, Weston Water, Bridge End Quarry, Otley.
Tel: 01943 850391
Working with the Royal Yachting Associations ‘Sailability’, the club provides
access to sailing for people with disabilities and has trained helpers who can
assist with the hoist for transferring wheelchair users onto a boat. Please
contact for further information about membership and events.
Pugneys Country Park
Asdale Road, off Denby Dale Road, Wakefield
Tel: 01924 302360
Email: pugneyscp@wakefield.gov.uk
www.wakefield.gov.uk
A state of the art water sports centre. Facilities include a hoist from quay to
boats, specialist boats and tuition available, accessible loos and an electric
launch available for use with a coxswain.
Paddle-Ability – The British Canoe Union
Contact: Viv Kendrick
8 Yew Grove, Huddersfield, HD4 5XG
Tel: 01484 226235
Email: viv.Kendrick@wvnrush.co.uk / www.bcu.org.uk
The British Canoe Union promotes 'canoeing for all' and aims through PaddleAbility
to focus on the individuals' ability in canoeing rather than disability.
Paddle Sport for All
Contact: Mike Twiggs
Address: 38, Badger Gate, Threshfield, Skipton, BD23 5EN
Tel: 01756 753812
Email: miketwiggs@hotmail.com
www.bcu.org.uk/yorkshire
The British Canoe Union promotes ‘Paddle sport for all’.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Outdoor Pursuits 45
Royal Yachting Association (RYA) Sailability
Tel: 0845 345 0403
www.rya.org.uk/sailability
The RYA Sailability exists to bring boating to people with any disability. They
can provide financial support to groups, training and advice.
Rother Valley Country Park
Tel: 0114 247 1453
A wide range of accessible water sports are on offer with instructors and
courses also available. See page 30 for more information.
Sailing for the Disabled
Hatfield Water Park, Old Thorne Road, Hatfield, Doncaster, DN7 6EQ
Tel: 01302 841572
Activity packages include raft-building, kayaking, canoeing, problem solving and
archery. A new 40 bed residential facility is fully accessible. No age limit. Have
got facilities for disabled people but do not have any tutors for the disabled.
White Rose Canoe Club
Contact: Norman and Pam
Fearnville Sports Centre, Leeds
Tel: 0113 273 7393
Email: taylor@hotmail.com
www.whiterose-canoeclub.org.uk
The club provides a safe and supportive environment for people of all ages with
disabilities. In the spring / summer the club meets at Roundhay Park Lake and
the River Wharfe. You must be able to swim and be happy in the water.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
46 Cycling
Clubs and contacts
Doncaster Cycling Promotion Group
Tel: 01302 851955
Secretary: Jim Drake - 01302 817459 / Email: admin@dcpg.org.uk
Membership Secretary: Keith Whittaker - 01302 360483
www.dcpg.org.uk
Whether you're a cycling commuter, a sports or leisure cyclist, skateboarder,
rollerblader or a friend of the environment then DCPG can help you - and you
can help DCPG!

Doncaster Cyclists Touring Club
Tel: 01302 846530
Open Country
Contact: David Shaftoe and Sam Parkhouse
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
• The Cycling Club is a monthly off-road cycle club for people with
disabilities. We have bicycles, tandems, wheelchair accessible Duet and
adult tricycles for loan.
• The Tandem Club provides tandems for people with visual impairments,
and, together with a sighted volunteer, members can enjoy the freedom
and excitement of cycling.
Pedal Pushers
The Sheffield Cycle Campaign
07855 194238
www.pedalpushers.org.uk
Rotherham – Cycling in Rotherham
Tel: 01709 822951
Sheffield – Cycling in Sheffield
Tel: 0114 273 4286
SUSTRANS
National Cycle Network Centre, 2 Cathedral Sq, College Green, Bristol, BS1 5DD
Tel: 0845 113 0065
Email: info@sustrans.org.uk
www.sustrans.org.uk
SUSTRANS works on practical projects to encourage more people to walk and
cycle. They also produce information on the National Cycle Network.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Cycling 47
Clubs and contacts cont.
The Tandem Club
Contact: Miriam Woodland, Disabilities Liaison Officer
Tel: 01908 282 485
www.tandem-club.org.uk
For information, advice and referrals please contact the club.
Trans Pennine Trail
Contact: Trans Pennine Trail Officer
Tel: 01226 772574
Books / Information
Cycle routes in Yorkshire
Contact: YHA
Tel: 0870 7708868
Cycling without traffic: NORTH
Colin & Lydia Speakman
Dial House Books, ISBN 0711024499
Price £9.99
Publisher: Ian Allan Publishing Ltd.
One of a series of books detailing cycle routes for all ages and abilities.
More Cycling Without Traffic: Midlands / Peak District
Contact: Sustrans
Tel: 0117 929 0888
www.sustrans.org.uk
30 various free routes including canal routes, converted railway paths and
forest trails. Various sections of the Trans Pennine Trail are also covered. Can
be ordered from Sustrans.
Wilde’s Cycle Route Guide to Yorkshire Dales, Humberside, North &
West Yorkshire.
Gillian Rowan-Wilde
Price £7.50
Publisher: Gildersleve Publishing Ltd.
www.wildes-guides.co.uk
34 laminated trail descriptions being just one of a series of guides detailing
cycle routes for all ages and abilities. Look up the website for other books, and
ordering.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
48 Cycling
Maps
Cycling in Sheffield’s Lower Don Valley
Contact: Sheffield City Council
Tel: 0114 273 4286
A guide to the cycle network linking the city centre with key work and leisure
destinations in the Lower Don Valley.
Doncaster Cycle Map & Cycling in Doncaster
Contact: Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
Tel: 01302 735151 / 735122
Ask for the Don Valley Leaflet also.
Doncaster Greenway North
Contact: Sustrans
Tel: 0845 113 0065
Or download from: www.sustrans.org/webfiles/leaflets/doncaster_north.pdf
Ask for the Don Valley Leaflet also.
Rotherham Cycle Map
Contact: Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council
Tel: 01709 822 951 / 835 904
Sheffield Cycle Map & Cycling in Sheffield
Contact: Sheffield City Council
Tel: 0114 273 4286
Email: transport@sheffield.gov.uk
Your comprehensive guide as to how to get around the city by bike. Due for
revision in 2006.
Timberland Trail (Elsecar – Wortley)
Contact: Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council
Tel: 01226 772567
Trans Pennine Trail
Tel: 01226 772574
Email: transpenninetrail@barnsley.gov.uk
A variety of leaflets with maps and information on walks and cycles throughout
South Yorkshire.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Cycling 49
Events
Great Yorkshire Bike Ride
Contact: John Taylorson MBE
Tel: 07774 806023
www.gybr.org.uk
An annual ride from Wetherby to Filey, the Bike Ride is one of the biggest
around. A fantastic route across the best of Yorkshire. A great day out raising
money for charity.
National Bike Week
Contact: Nick Harvey
Tel: 01243 527444
Email: nick@bikeweek.org.uk
www.bikeweek.org.uk
Bike Week brings together cyclists for events and a celebration of cycling all
around the country. Contact the National Help Line above to find out what is
happening local to you.
York Cycle Show
Tel: 0870 873 0066
www.yorkcycleshow.co.uk
The York Cycle Show is ‘Britain’s Biggest Cycle Show’, bringing together cyclists
from all walks of life and interest, clubs, events, rides and equipment. Normally
held each June, the show lasts 2 days and is based at York Racecourse. Free
parking and events.
Tulip Tandem Marathon
Contact: Mary Eastwood
Tel: David Shaftoe – Open Country – 01423 507227
Organised by Blind Outdoor Leisure Development, the Tulip Marathon is a 26 ½
mile time trial for tandem cyclists, one of whom must have a visual impairment.
It takes place near Spalding.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
50 Cycle Routes
The following are the longest, best-surfaced and most enjoyable traffic-free
routes that we know of in South Yorkshire. Most of them are fully accessible to
wheelchair users.
Most routes are part of the National Cycle Network. Maps of all these routes can
be downloaded in the ‘Route Mapping’ section of the SUSTRANS website –
www.sustrans.org.uk
Cyclists using canal towpaths must carry a cycling permit, obtainable from
www.waterscape.com/cycling/permit.html or obtained from British
Waterways on 01923 201120.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Cycle Routes 51
Barnsley
Trans Pennine Trail
Trans Pennine Trail Office, BMBC, Central Offices, Kendray Street, Barnsley,
S70 2TN
L Tel: 01226 772574
Email: info@transpenninetrail.org.uk
The Trans Pennine Trail (TPT) provides a unique opportunity to explore the area
along linear and circular routes that take you from such points as the ‘Windle
Edge’, the highest point on the whole of the Trial (which stretches from the
ports of Liverpool to Hull) to the heart of the South Yorkshire Forest. Some
routes to try include: the Upper Don Trail; the Dove Valley Trail; from Oxspring
east to Wakefield; and from Oxspring south to Wortley and Sheffield. Free
Access for All guides are available in booklet form, on audio tape and in Braille.
There are also good interactive maps giving details of parking, toilets and ‘easy
access walks’ on the website or call for information. Adapted bikes to suit most
abilities and scooters are available at the Cycle Hire centres at Ashbourne,
Parsley Hay and Derwent. TPT link to Barnsley- The sections of the TPT from
North, South, East and West all meet here. Sections of the path have their own
local names such as Dove Valley Trails, but they are all part of the coast to
coast route.
Timberland Trail
Contact: BMBC Planning Services L
Tel:01226 772574
www.barnsley.gov.uk
A 14km route for walkers, cyclists and horseriders linking the villages of Elsecar
and Wortley. The trail also accesses other paths and bridleways within the
South Yorkshrie Forest. Parts are accessible to wheelchair users. Other parts
are steep and on-road. At Elsecar, you can join the Elsecar Greenway section of
the TPT and follow Dearne and Dove to Broomhill and Old Moor Wetland Centre.
At the other end by Finkle Street Lane you can join the Upper Don Trails.
The Upper Don Trail
Trans Pennine Trail Office, BMBC, Central Offices, Kendray Street, Barnsley,
S70 2TN
L Tel: 01226 772574
Email: info@transpenninetrail.org.uk
Goes traffic free right through to Barnsley from Penistone. Travelling east from
Penistone, for the most direct route you'll leave the railway at Oxspring and
follow the old packhorse way at Willow Lane and the railway path along the
Dove Valley. After passing Worsbrough Country Park (see page 10) and Wigfield
Farm (see page 23) where you can take a break, you can head north to
Barnsley or continue on the coast-to-coast route towards Doncaster.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
52 Cycle Routes
Doncaster
L Doncaster Greenway North
Contact: Sustrans
Tel: 0845 113 0065
www.sustrans.org/webfiles/leaflets/doncaster_north.pdf
The Doncaster Greenway is a 9 mile high quality, mostly traffic free route,
which also links into the Trans Pennine Trail. You can go to Sykehouse, Selby,
York and Hull at one end to the old Earth Centre, Liverpool and Southport at the
other!
A 4 mile traffic free path for the whole community, including Woodlands,
Highfields and Scawthorpe in the north of the borough, it passes through the
town centre to the Dome Leisure Park, the Lakeside Leisure District, Bessacar
and Rossington in the south. It also links a lot of routes including local
transport, other cycle routes and local bridleways and green space such as
Highfields Country Park and the ancient monument at Castle Hills.
Doncaster Greenway South
The Southern Greenway route is now complete but is awaiting signing. Although
not totally traffic free the entire route from Highfields Country Park in the north
to Rossington in the south represents a real investment to the borough as a
dedicated Cycling/ Walking highway. Sustrans should be publishing the
Southern route shortly.
Trans Pennine Trail (TPT) near Old Moor Wetland Reserve
Tel: 01226 772574
Email: info@transpenninetrail.org.uk
The TPT runs more or less across the RSPB Old Moor Reserve (see page 66)
which now stocks cycling necessities with ample space to stop off, rest and fix
your bike. The cafe on site also provides a welcome rest.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Cycle Routes 53
Rotherham
14 miles of National Cycle Network have been introduced in the Rotherham
area. 28 miles of the Trans Pennine Trail is also part of the cycle network. A
large-scale street map specifically designed for cyclists is available, showing
these cycle routes and more. To obtain a copy, contact the Tourist Information
Centre on 01709 835904.
Rother Valley Country Park
See page 12 / 30 L
Tel: 01709 822168
A 5 mile ride around the park, much of which is off-road and accessible. Bikes
are available for hire at the park. An experienced cyclist may cycle for an hour
or so, whereas a family may take a couple of hours to go round enjoying the
many rest places and park café on the way. This is a good route for beginners
and you do not need to read a map – simply follow the bright yellow Doorstep
Ride waymarks.
Sheffield and Tinsley canal
The canal towpath is a dedicated cycle route between Rotherham Town Centre
and the Rotherham Sheffield Boundary. To cycle on the towpath within Sheffield
however, you must get a permit from British Waterways. Tel: 0114 258 8564 or
the Canal Basin on 0114 258 8564 as it is not a designated cycle way.
The route along the towpath of the South Yorkshire Navigation Canal also offers
an 8 mile traffic-free route between Rotherham and Sheffield. The Rotherham
Cycling Map, a large-scale street map specifically designed for cyclists, is
available showing these cycle routes and more. To obtain a copy, contact the
Tourist Information Centre on 01709 835 904. The site is accessible by public
transport.
L The Poolsbrook Trans Pennine Trail Ride
Tel: 01709 822168
www.rotherham.gov.uk./prow
Enjoy a 10 mile cycle from Rother Valley Country Park to Poolsbrook Country
Park. The route is entirely off road and will take non-experienced cyclists up to
half a day to cycle. You do not need a map, just follow the bright yellow
Doorstep Ride waymarkers. The site is accessible by public transport.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
54 Cycle Routes
Sheffield
Five Weirs
This path runs from Meadowhall along the banks of the River Don
Contact: Five Weirs Trust
Tel: 0114 273 4189
www.fiveweirs.co.uk
The full distance from Meadowhall along the banks of the River Don is 5 miles
where walkers and cyclists can enjoy industrial architecture and semi-rural
areas in a traffic free environment often used by people going to work. Disabled
access is possible. The path connects to the Sheffield and Tinsley canal
towpath, the Upper Don Walk, the riverside path to Rotherham and the Trans
Pennine Trail.
Sheffield City Centre to the Peak District National Park
Escape to the beauty of the countryside on the Sheffield's doorstep by following
this 11-mile cycle route to Hathersage.
Trans Pennine Trail (TPT)
Trans Pennine Trail Office, BMBC, Central Offices, Kendray Street, Barnsley,
S70 2TN
L Tel: 01226 772574
Email: info@transpenninetrail.org.uk
www.transpenninetrail.org.uk
For local information in East Yorkshire, ring 01482 612373
A 215 mile coast to coast route between Liverpool and Hull, with extensions to
the seaside towns of Southport and Hornsea. Much of the trail has level,
surfaced, traffic-free paths detailed in three maps which you can order from
from the TPT office. Locally, there are links from Barnsley and Sheffield.
Disabled people with particular access requirements can contact – 01226
772567.
TPT link to Sheffield L
The trail is accessible to disabled people at this point including wheelchair and
scooter users. A leaflet is available from Sheffield City Council on 0114 2734286
/ countryside planning officers 0114 273 5030 or public rights of way 0114 273
4448 for more information. In Sheffield the TPT crosses the Lower Don Valley.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Cycle Routes 55
Other notable trails
Howden and Derwent Reservoirs
Although narrowly outside South Yorkshire, we have included this trail as it
represents some of the best and most accessible off road cycling we know of.
An 11 ½ mile circular route is available. Start and finish at Fairholmes Car Park,
where there is cycle hire, toilets and a leaflet. Most of the route is on tarmac
road or forest trail. Only the far end is inaccessible to wheelchairs. The tarmac
road is closed to traffic at weekends. The area was the scene of preparations by
the ‘Dambuster Squadron’ prior to the Ruhr Valley raid in 1943.
Longdendale Trail
We have included this 6 ½ mile trail as it represents some of the best and most
accessible off road cycling anywhere. The trail takes you along part of the
former Great Central Manchester to Sheffield Railway, and offers magnificent
panoramic views of the Upper Longdendale Valley. Start at Torside car park on
the B6105 off the A628. Here there are accessible toilets, leaflets and a café
(seasonal). From here you can head for either the historic Woodhead Tunnels or
Hadfield Railway Station. Leaflets are available from Torside or North West
Water on 01457 864187
L
Peak District National Park
Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell, Derbyshire DE45 1AE
Telephone: 01629 816200
Fax: 01629 816310
Minicom: 01629 816319
Email: customer.service@peakdistrict.gov.uk
www.peakdistrict.gov.uk
The Peak District National Park has some amazing accessible cycle tracks. It
also has cycle hire centres at Derwent, Ashbourne (where you can also hire a
scooter), Parsley Hay and the High Peak & Tissington Trails. The centres have
wheelchair accessible DUET bikes, hand-cranks, tricycles and tandems as well
as solos, so there’s little excuse not to give it all a go!
John Charles Centre for Sport
Middleton Grove, Leeds, LS11 5DJ
Tel: 0113 3950000
http://www.leeds.gov.uk/visiting/sport/menu.aspx?style=
The stadium has a variety of adapted cycles, including hand cycles, quad cycles
and wheelchair tandems. There are regular sessions through the week. Booking
can be made through the stadium. A small charge is made for use of the bikes,
but carers come free. A bar area and accessible toilets are available.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
56 Fishing
Open Country does not profess to be an authority on fishing. The entries here
are just a sample of fishing area that we know are accessible. For more
information please call the Environment Agency on 08708 506506 or visit
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Inclusion in this guide may indicate easy access, wheelchair accessible
platforms and toilets. We would always advise you to contact the site
management before visiting.
Do remember you must have a National Rod Licence from the Environment
Agency to fish anywhere. They are available from post offices or by ringing
0870 1662662. You may be eligible for a concessionary licence.
Another place for good information and feedback on fishing spots is:
www.yorkshirefishing.net.
Key:
W Some fisheries now own ‘wheelyboats’, designed to enable disabled
anglers to fish on equal terms. For more details contact the Handicapped
Anglers Trust on 01798 342222 or email wheelboats@tiscali.co.uk
T Trout fishing only
C Coarse fishing only
British Disabled Anglers Association
Tel: 01922 860912
Email: information@bdaa.co.uk
www.bdaa.co.uk
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Fishing 57
Athersley Memorial Lake BARNSLEY C
Located on the Athersley Estate. Contact 01226 774529
Barnby Dun, Long Pond DONCASTER C
Adjacent to South Yorks Navigation Canal. Contact: 01302 856249
Barnsley Canal, Twibel Street BARNSLEY C
Contact Brian McGraw: 01274 247131
Bolton Brickponds, Goldthorpe DONCASTER C
A pleasant place to fish with a number of disabled pegs available. There is no
fee for disabled anglers and good car parking facilities. Contact: 01709 895263.
Burcroft Ponds DONCASTER C
Located at Conisborough between Rotherham and Doncaster. Four wheelchair
accessible platforms available connected by a boardwalk from the car park.
Contact Rotherham Angling Association: 01226 351852 / 01709 862558
Candy Corner Fisheries DONCASTER C
This complex consists of four well stocked lakes and is situated near Wroot, in
the outskirts of Doncaster. Disabled access pegs available. Contact: 01302
775062
Campsall Country Park, Askern DONCASTER C
Sign posted off the A19 near Askern. Parking available, concessions for disabled
anglers. Contact 01302 701241
Cusworth Park Lake DONCASTER C
Three miles from Doncaster off the A638 towards Wakefield, look out for the
lane to Cusworth House Museum. Toilet facilities at the Hall.
Damflask reservoir SHEFFIELD C
A large reservoir with many different fish. £2.80 for the day, £2.00 for disabled,
OAPs or under 16s. A two-month ticket is £11.00 and £6.50 respectively.
Purchase tickets from machine before you fish, change needed. Specialist
disabled facilities are open. Contact: 0114 2592005 or 07973 442953.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
58 Fishing
Dearne Valley Park Lake BARNSLEY C
Pontefract Road, Barnsley. Contact: Barnsley MBC 01226 774529
Delves Lake THORNE C
The lake is close to the centre of Thorne on the Selby Road leading towards
Snaith on the A614. Good facilities with a toilet available. Refreshments can be
bought on site from the clubhouse.
Elsecar Canal BARNSLEY C
Brampton, Nr Wombwell. Contact Barnsley and District A.A: 01226 203090
Elsecar Reservoir BARNSLEY C
Elsecar Park, Hoyland Nether, Barnsley. Contact: 01226 746002 or Mr Ian
Hodgson 01226 743933
Elm Tree Farm, Hooton Roberts ROTHERHAM C
Good facilities for disabled anglers, accessible toilets, café and pegs. Contact:
01709 855973
Highfield Country Park DONCASTER C
A nice venue which is really good for disabled access. Contact Doncaster Council
for details.
Lewden Spring Fishery BARNSLEY C
A fairly young but family run fishery with good disabled facilities including pegs
and toilets. Contact Claire Nuttall: 01226 249174
Nether Mill Fishery, Penistone BARNSLEY C
A good fishery that is disabled angler friendly. Can be busy so get there early.
Accessible toilet on site. Contact Mr Adam Hinchliffe: 07770670042
Ravenfield Park ROTHERHAM C
Arbour Lane, off Garden Lane, Ravenfield. Contact: 01709 363788
Rother Valley Country Park ROTHERHAM C
Mansfield Road, Wales Bar, Sheffield, S26 5PQ. M1 motorway junction 31.
Contact: 0114 247 1452 or email: rangers.rvcp@rotherham.gov.uk.
www.rothervalleycountrypark.co.uk. Facilities for disabled anglers. Please
contact for more information.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Fishing 59
Thyrbergh Country Park ROTHERHAM T
Doncaster Road, Thyrbergh. The Country Park lies between the villages of
Thyrbergh and Hooton on the A630. Toilet facilities in the Park. Accessible
fishing. Contact: 01709 850353
Tin Mill Dam SHEFFIELD C
(Stockbridge Work AC)
Between Deepcar and Wortley, Sheffield. Parking within 20 yards accessible to
wheelchair users only with active helper.
Ulley Country Park SHEFFIELD C
Pleasely Road, Aughton, Sheffield, S26 3XL. Facilities for disabled anglers. For
more information contact: 01709 365332 or email:
ulley.countrypark@rotherham.gov.uk
Willow Garth Arksey DONCASTER C
Tel: 07739922042
Turn off the A19 in Bentley sign posted Arksey, the lake is down Shaftholme
Lane.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
60 Horse Riding
Riding Stables
Riding for the Disabled Association (RDA)
Tel: 0845 658 1082
Email: info@rda.org.uk
www.riding-for-disabled.org.uk
or
RDA Yorkshire & Cleveland Region
Tel: 0845 241 6311
http://www.rda-yorkshire-cleveland.org.uk/
The Association’s objectives are to provide disabled people of all ages with the
opportunity to ride and /or carriage ride for the general benefit of their health
and well-being. There are several centres in Yorkshire offering riding for
disabled sessions.
The British Horse Society
British Riding Clubs, The British Horse Society, Stoneleigh Deer Park,
Kenilworth, Warwickshire CV8 2XZ.
Tel: 08701 202244
The riding stables listed below are taken from a list by the British Horse
Society’s website – www.bhs.org.uk. These are not listed as stables specifically
for people with disabilities.
Key:
Level of approval:
A1: Basic Instruction in Riding and/or Jumping.
A2: Instruction in Riding and Jumping.
A3: Instruction in Riding and Jumping up to and including BHSAI Exam.
A4: Instruction in Riding and Jumping up to and including BHSII Exam.
A5: Instruction in Riding and Jumping up to and including BHSI Exam.
A6: Instruction in Riding and Jumping to all BHS Exams including Fellowship.
Scope of Establishment:
B: Trekking.
C: Hacking.
D: Livery.
J: Riding Holidays.
E: Stud.
F: Facility Centre.
See next page for listed stables.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Horse Riding 61
Barnes Green Riding School Key: A2/C/D
Woodseats Farm, Barnes Green, Grenoside, Nr Sheffield S30 3NA
Tel: 0114 240 2548
Brockholes Farm Riding Centre Key: A2/C/D
Branton, Doncaster DN3 3NH
Tel: 01302 535 057
See Brockholes Farm page 24.
Glebe Field Riding Establishment Key: A2/D
Forecourt Park Road, Mexborough S64 9PE
Tel: 01709 583377
Email: jhemingway@rotherham.ac.uk
Grove House Stables Key: A3/C/D/F/J
Grove Wood Road, Misterton, Doncaster DN10 4EF
Tel: 01427 890802
Email: admin@grovehousestables.co.uk
Moorhouse Equestrian Centre & Saddlery Key: A1/C/D
Gap Farm, Moorhouse, Doncaster DN6 7HA
Tel: 01977 642109/642008
Plumtree School of Equitation Key: A2/D
Bircotes, Nr Doncaster, South Yorkshire DN11 8EL
Tel: 01302 710734
www.plumtreeequestrian.com
Smeltings Farm Riding Centre Key: A2/C/D
Ringinglow Road, Sheffield S11 7TD
Tel: 0114 230 7661
www.equestrian-training.co.uk
Snowdon Farm Riding School Key: A3/D
Snowdon Lane, Troway, Marsh Lane, Nr Sheffield S21 5RT
Tel: 01246 417172
www.snowdonfarmequestrian.co.uk

SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
62 Horse Riding
Horse racing
In the UK there are races which involve obstacles (either hurdles or fences)
called steeplechase and those which are unobstructed races over a given
distance (flat racing). For details about horse racing, events, individual horses
and contact details for tracks around the country check out the website –
www.horseracing.com.
Doncaster Race Course
The Grandstand, Leger Way, Doncaster, DN2 6BB
Tel: 01303 320066
Accessible bar, restaurant and toilets with a disabled stand position by the
winning post.
British Open
Sheffield Hallam FM Arena, Broughton Lane. Sheffield, S9 2DF
Tel: Box office: 0114 256 5593
www.hallamfmarena.co.uk
or
Tel: General enquiries: 0870 777 4567
www.britishopenshowjumping.co.uk
An annual event held in Sheffield with Polo competitions, show jumping and
displays. There are wheelchair bays for viewing and spaces can be booked for
people with special needs. Please book in advance to avoid disappointment and
make the arena aware of your needs.
Accessible routes
Doorstep Rides
Tel: 01709 822168
The Doorstep Rides series put together by Rotherham Metropolitan Borough
Council are details of accessible parks and paths suitable for walkers, cyclists
and horse riders with added details of trailer parking and disabled mounting
ramps.
Donkeys
The Elisabeth Svendsen Trust for Children and Donkeys
Swan Lane, off Black Hill Lane, Eccup, Leeds. LS16 8AZ
Tel: 0113 2619249
www.thedonkeysanctuary.org.uk
The riding arena is indoors, centrally heated and has large, safe indoor and
outdoor play areas. During school holidays and Saturday Clubs there is the
chance for special needs children to ride the donkeys with brothers and sisters.
Children can also drive in a wheelchair accessible cart.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
63 3. Wildlife and Conservation
 Clubs and organisations 65 - 68
Accessible wildlife watching 69 - 75
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
64 Wildlife Clubs & Organisations
BTO – British Trust for Ornithology
BTO, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU
Tel: 01842 750050
www.bto.org
The BTO involve people in their National Garden Bird Survey. The survey
involves noting which birds and how many you have seen over a given time.
The surveys are fun and a great way to help wildlife from your home.
Local Groups
There are dozens of local environmental and natural history groups in South
Yorkshire. Contact your local Volunteer Centre or Council for Voluntary Services
(page 96) for details or try this home-made website called EASY –
Environmental Action around South Yorkshire:
www.btinternet.com/~rb.freelance/easy/orgs.htm
Open Country
46 East Parade, Harrogate, HG1 5LT
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
• The Conservation Volunteers group meets every Friday to ’work for wildlife’.
Tasks include scrub clearing, bracken control and clean-ups. Most members
have learning disabilities and mental health issues.
• Wild Things is a club open to everyone. We aim to make all the activities
wheelchair accessible. The group meets once per month to study wildlife,
especially animals in their natural environment.
RSPB
North West England Regional Office
Westleigh Mews, Wakefield Road, Denby Dale, Huddersfield, HD8 8QD
Tel: 01484 861148
www.rspb.org.uk
RSPB Doncaster Local Group
Doncaster Rovers Social Club, Bawtry Road, Doncaster, DN4 5HT
Contact: Sue Clifton
Tel: 01302 854956
E-mail: sue@wlwad.wanadoo.co.uk
The group's aim is to support the work of the RSPB in the local community and
to involve RSPB members and the wider public in the Society's conservation,
public affairs, education, fundraising and other activities. Regular monthly
indoor meetings locally throughout the year and have occasional day trips to
local nature reserves.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Wildlife Clubs & Organisations 65
RSPB Old Moor Wildlife Explorers
Contact: Joanne Hearne
Tel: 01226 273832
Email: Jo.hearne@RSPB.org.uk
A group for the younger supporters.
RSPB Sheffield Local Group
Central United Reformed Church, Norfolk Street, Sheffield, S1 2JB
Contact: Malcolm Dyke
Tel: 0114 2476622
www.rspb-sheffield.org.uk
The group's aim is to introduce new member to the RSPB and raise money to
help our local nature reserves. We have our main indoor meetings on the first
Thursday in each month except June, July and August. We have monthly day
trips by coach to reserves from September to July and easy going mid-week
walks in our local area.
Sheffield Bird Study Group
Contact: Secretary – Richard Dale
109 Main Road, Wharncliffe Side, Sheffield, S35 0DP
Email: richarddale9@hotmail.com
www.sbsg.org
The groups intention from the outset was always to work with and complement
other local natural history societies and to promote an interest in birds within
the community.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
66 Wildlife Clubs & Organisations
Sheffield Wildlife Trust
Sheffield Wildlife Trust HQ, 37 Stafford Road, Sheffield, S2 2SF
Tel: 0114 263 4335
Fax: 0114 263 4345
Email: mail@wildsheffield.com
www.wildsheffield.com
The Sheffield Wildlife Trust aims to promote the conservation, protection and
improvement of the physical and natural environment of Sheffield, as well as to
advance education in environmental matters, so that the public becomes more
aware of how the environment can be better conserved and improved.
SORBY – Sorby Natural History Society, Sheffield
Contact: R Butterfield
The Sorby Natural History Society, 159 Bell Hagg Road, Sheffield, S6 5DA
Email: secretary@sorby.org.uk
www.sorby.org.uk
SORBY has many events, publications, news and information about local wildlife
and conservation. The Society includes groups on bats, invertebrates, mammals
and much more.
South Yorkshire Forest
Thorncliffe Park, Chapeltown, Sheffield, S35 2TH
Tel: 0114 2571199 / 0114 2463346
www.syforest.co.uk
There are 12 special areas in England called ‘Community Forests’ where local
residents can join forces to protect their environment. For more information on
how you can help please contact us.
South Yorkshire Badger Group
Contact: Derek Whitcher
Tel: 01226 753271
Badger helpline: 07778 660065
www.sybadgergroup.f9.co.uk
The SYBG was formed in the summer of 1985 and aims to protect the badger
and its environment throughout South Yorkshire.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Wildlife Clubs & Organisations 67
Yorkshire Bat Group
Contact: John Drewitt
Tel: 01325 718133
Email: johndrewett@btinternet.com
www.nyorkbats.freeserve.co.uk
The Yorkshire Bat group holds regular indoor meetings, with talks by bat
experts. There are also practical events such as bat box making, conservation
work, surveys and bat walks. They can provide advice and information about
bats and also care for sick and injured bats, as well as being able to provide
training for anyone wishing to become a licensed bat worker.
Yorkshire Mammal Group
Contact: Ann Hanson
Tel: 0113 2811286
The Yorkshire Mammal group is affiliated to the Mammal Society. They take
part in all sorts of field and conservation work parties, including surveys.
Meetings are held regularly through the winter months with a wide range of
guest speakers.
Yorkshire Wildlife Trust & Wildlife Watch
1 St. Georges Place, York, YO24 1GN
Tel: 01904 659570
www.yorkshire-wildlife-trust.org.uk
The aim is to conserve and promote the diversity of Yorkshire wildlife and
habitats, for the benefit and well being of both wildlife and people. A new
reserves guide details all the reserves, their interest and accessibility. Look out
on the website for information related to disability access as improvements are
planned for a number of nature reserves in the future.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
68 Accessible Wildlife Watching
Wildlife watching is an enjoyable and peaceful past time where you can develop
your skills in your own time. Below are some of the best accessible sites
(though a few which aren’t fully accessible are listed) in which you can enjoy,
watch and study wildlife and nature.
This picture denotes an accessible bird hide is on site:
Blackburn Meadows Nature Reserve
Holmes Lock, Steel Street off Psalters Lane, Holmes, Rotherham
Tel: 01709 723127
Once derelict land but now a ‘green oasis’, there are 2 lakes, 3
bird hides, wetland areas and a meadow. Fully accessible but no
on site facilities. Entry is free. Close to the Magna centre –see page 26.
Denaby Ings
Yorkshire Wildlife Trust
Tel: 01904 659570
www.visitdoncaster.co.uk
www.yorkshire-wildlife-trust.org.uk
The reserve lies between Mexborough and High Melton. Access is from Pastures
Road which links these two settlements. Travelling from Mexborough, leave the
A6023 Doncaster Road, turning left before the railway bridge on to Pastures
Road. The reserve car park is on the right just before the road crosses the River
Dearne.
A 100 acre reserve with habitats ranging from wetlands to hay meadows and
supporting a wide range of birds, insects and flowers. A good footpath takes
visitors around the reserve and there are three viewing hides offering excellent
opportunities to enjoy the wildlife. There is no entry charge.
Ecclesall Woods
Contact: Woodlands Officer
Tel: 0114 273 6387
Email : pwc.treesandwoodlands@sheffield.gov.uk
www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside/trees--
woodlands/ecclesall-woods
Ecclesall Woods is the largest ancient, semi-natural woodland in South
Yorkshire, covering over 140 hectares (300 acres) in the west of the city.
Current project work involves improving the extensive public rights of way
network, archaeological research and reintroducing active woodland
management as well as working with local community groups. There is an easy
going trail signposted which is the more accessible route. Leaflet available on
0114 2734138 or download from website.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Accessible Wildlife Watching 69
Melton Wood Country Park
c/o Sandall Beat Community Environment Centre, Sandall Beat Road, Off Leger
Way, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 300798
Email: janet.blud@doncaster.gov.uk
From Doncaster: Follow the A638 over North Bridge for about one mile. Turn
left immediately before A635, along Cusworth Lane, signposted Cusworth Hall
and Country Park. Carry on under A1M bridge. Turn first right and continue for
just over one mile. You will see the car park ahead of you, on the corner.
A woodland treasure for cyclists and walkers. Long ago the place now called
Melton Wood was part of a vast, broad leaved forest which cloaked a limestone
ridge near Doncaster. A wheelchair accessible path has been recently laid and
most woodland rides have a hard surface. Leaflets are available from Sandall
Beat Community Environment Centre.
Old Moor Wetland Centre, near Bolton upon Dearne
From Junction 37 on the M1 and A1 follow the A635 then
follow brown signs on the A6195 to the reserve.
Old Moor Lane, Wombwell, Barnsley, S73 0YF
Tel: 01226 751593
Email: old.moor@rspb.org.uk
www.rspb.org.uk/reserves
A great reserve with a new childrens area, ponds, café, bird garden and organic
garden centre. This area has a wide variety of wetland habitats with
accompanying bird, plants and animal life. All paths, five hides and the visitor
centre are fully accessible. Electric scooters and folding wheelchairs are
available free of charge. Also nearby are Wombwell Ings and Gypsy Marsh. Call
the centre for more information.
Potteric Carr Nature Reserve
White Rose Way, Doncaster, DN4 5JB
From Junction 35 of the A1(M) follow the M18 along to
junction 3 where you turn off onto the A6182 and follow
signs to the reserve. L
Tel: 01302 364152
Email: info@yorkshirewt.cix.co.uk
www.potteric-carr.org.uk
Potteric Carr has much to offer the avid bird watcher with around 70 breeding
bird species, but it also hosts an array of interesting flowers, plants, insects for
anyone interested. The new visitor centre and café is fully accessible, offering
some of the best bacon baps in Yorkshire! Cafe open Thursday – Sunday.
Reserve open 7 days a week. A bottom car park is available for people with a
disability. Some paths and routes are wheelchair friendly, though work still
needs to be completed. 6 of the 10 bird hides have ramped access.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
70 Accessible Wildlife Watching
Rother Valley Country Park
Mansfield Road, Wales Bar, Sheffield, S26 5PQ
M1 motorway junction 31
Tel: 0114 247 1452
Email: rangers.rvcp@rotherham.gov.uk
www.rothervalleycountrypark.co.uk
Rother Valley Park amongst an array of other leisure and wildlife interests has
accessible bird hides. Please contact for details and see page 12 for more
information about the park.
Roche Abbey
Abbey House, Maltby, Rotherham, S66 8NW
1½ miles S of Maltby off A634
Tel: 01709 812739
www.english-heritage.org.uk
As well as an interesting day out (see Outings page 27 for more detail) the
grounds of the Abbey are a designated SSSI – Site of Special Scientific Interest
- and so wildlife watching adds another level of enjoyment.
Sandall Beat Wood
c/o Sandall Beat Community Environment Centre,
Sandall Beat Road, Off Leger Way, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 300798
Email: janet.blud@doncaster.gov.uk
Sandall Beat Wood was planted in the early years of the 19th century on open
land, and a patchwork of heath, fen, and rough pasture. This afforestation was
part of a national campaign during the Napoleonic Wars. The young trees
flourished, and by the end of the century both fen and heath were gradually
disappearing. Now only a small area of fen still remains on the eastern edge of
the wood, and the open heath has more or less vanished. The area has been
designated a Site of Special Interest (SSSI) because of the woods rare insects
The Beat lies close to the heart of Doncaster. This together with its network of
rides and footpaths, makes it a favourite place for towns people to walk their
dogs, go riding, picnic in summer, or simply explore the changing woodland.
The Covils trail provides a hard level surface which is suitable for wheelchairs
and pushchairs.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Accessible Wildlife Watching 71
Shirebrook Valley, Sheffield
Tel: 0114 275 1176
Email: pwc.communities@sheffield.gov.uk
The Shirebrook Valley is designated as a Local Nature Reserve and covers 100
hectares. This is a ‘Wildspace’ project managed by the Parks, Woodlands and
Countryside Ranger Service and local groups with funding from English Nature.
The site consists of a variety of habitats including wetland, woodland, lowland
heath and ancient meadows. There are two Visitor Facilities available, one at
Shirebrook Valley and one at Birley Spa Bath House. Opening hours for both
these facilities are by arrangement only.
Sites managed by Sheffield Wildlife Action Partnership (S.W.A.P.)
C/o Parks, Woodlands and Countryside, Meersbrook Park, Brook Road,
Sheffield, S8 9FL
Tel: (0114) 273 4703
Email: sheffieldwildlife@yahoo.co.uk
website: www.sheffieldwildlife.org.uk
Sheffield Wildlife Action Partnership (S.W.A.P.) manage the sites listed below.
Please contact for further information.
• Twentywellsick Wood
• Wharncliffe Heath
• Woodhouse Washlands
• 70 Acre Hill
• Crystal Peaks Meadows
• Hammond’s Field
• Agden Bog
Sprotbrough Flash
Contact: Yorkshire Wildlife Trust
1 St. George’s Place, York, YO24 1GN
Tel: 01904 659570
www.yorkshire-wildlife-trust.org.uk
Sprotbrough Flash, one of the spectacular features of the Don Gorge is
accessible by riverside paths and trails leading from Sprotbrough Lock and can
be viewed by walkers enjoying the Trans Pennine Trail. The reserve, located
alongside the River Don in the Sprotbrough Gorge, comprises a large area of
open water created by mining subsidence along with areas of broadleaved
woodland and grassland which are particularly rich in plants. Bird life is prolific
with over 60 regular breeding species. Several permissive and public footpaths
give excellent access to the reserve and there are three viewing hides, two of
which are available for wheelchair users. Food and drinks can be obtained from
the Boat Inn adjacent to the car park.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
72 Accessible Wildlife Watching
Thorpe Marsh, Doncaster
Near Doncaster
Map: OS Landranger 111 Grid Ref : SE 594090
Yorkshire Wildlife Trust
1 St. George’s Place, York, YO24 1GN
Tel: 01904 659570
www.yorkshire-wildlife-trust.org.uk
A wide variety of animals, insects, butterflies and plants in the meadows and
lake. Footpaths, nature trail and field centre. Permits may be necessary –
please contact the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust. Entrance via Marsh Lane is not
always available and so you will have to use the entrance off Forstead Lane
(close to the only pylon on the southern side of the road). Disabled visitors are
allowed to drive onto the reserve (the tracks are fine for cars) and can reach at
least two of the hides and the Field Centre. The hides are not specially adapted.
There are a number of further hides that require you to cross open fields, which
can get very muddy. For non-disabled visitors, it is necessary to park at the
roadside, and follow the public footpath onto the reserve – this being the same
track as for vehicular access. NB: Fires at the reserve have burned the
visitor centre and one of the hides. Please call the Trust for up to date
information (as at January 2006).
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Accessible Wildlife Watching 73
Notable Others…
Outside South Yorkshire, these Yorkshire reserves have been included as they
offer some of the finest and most accessible bird watching sites in the country.
For more ideas go to www.rspb.org.uk for more information.
Askham Bog
The reserve lies off the A64 west slip road into York, bound on one side by
Askham Golf Course and by the turn off to Copmanthorpe from York.
Contact: Yorkshire Wildlife Trust
1 St. George’s Place, York, YO24 1GN
Tel: 01904 659570
A dirt parking area and slightly rough track takes you down to an accessible
boardwalk that creates a short circular route stopping at one of the newest peat
ponds. Askham Bog is an amazing reserve – a peat bog remaining from the last
ice age with all the attendant flora and fauna. The reserve is in constant change
with the seasons making it a wonderful place to visit all year round.
Bempton Cliffs
RSPB, Flamborough
On the cliff road from Bempton village,
on the B1229 from Flamborough.
Tel: 01262 851179
This sea-cliff bird reserve gives great views, especially from April to July. There
is an accessible information centre and toilet. A 200 yard path gives wheelchair
access to two cliff-top viewpoints.
Blacktoft Sands
RSPB On a minor road off the A161 to Redness &
Ousefleet, South of Goole.
Tel: 01405 704665
A reserve of tidal reed beds and salt marsh, there is lots of specialised wildlife.
There are six accessible hides and an adapted toilet. There is also wheelchair
loan available.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
74 Accessible Wildlife Watching
Notable Other cont…
Fairburn Ings
Map: O.S. Explorer 289, Grid ref: 452 277
RSPB, Newton Lane, Ledston, Castleford
Tel: 01977 603796
Email: fairburn.ings@rspb.org.uk
www.rspb.org.uk
600 acres of wetland close to the A1. There is a 500m boardwalk over marshy
ground which leads to a bird hide. The visitor centre is accessible, with an
adapted toilet and wheelchair loan. The picnic area has one accessible table,
although it is sited on grass. There is a nice viewing platform over the main
lake. Towards the village, a small public car park offers an excellent viewpoint
for observing a great number of waterfowl at the roadside.
Woodhouse Washlands
Yorkshire Wildlife Trust, 1 St. George’s Place, York, YO24 1GN
Tel: 01904 659570
A grassland reserve, rich in wildlife which straddles the River Rother on the
Sheffield Rotherham boundary. The name refers to its origins as seasonally
flooded grazing land but it has also played host to small-scale coal mining
activities as well as supplying water to local mills. Two and a half miles from
Junction 31 on the M1. Take A57 Sheffield Road. At the second roundabout take
the Woodhouse Mill Road. Turn left at next roundabout onto Retford Road. Turn
Left at the lights into Furnace Lane. Car Park on Left. Part of Trans-PennineTrail,
which is wheelchair accessible, runs through the site..
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
75 4. Volunteering

Volunteering advice and contacts 76
Volunteering in the countryside 77 - 78
Countryside employment 79

SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
76 Volunteering

There are always lots of opportunities to get involved in your local countryside
through volunteering for a conservation or community group. Try the following
places and contacts to find out about local groups and projects in your area.
Websites
Two websites worth a look at for volunteering opportunities are -
• ‘Do It!’
www.do-it.org.uk
• Volunteering England
www.volunteering.org.uk
Volunteer Centres
Your local Volunteer Centre will have someone on hand to discuss your interests
and abilities and help you make the right choices about where and how you
would like to volunteer. The centres have up to date contact information about
small and local groups as well as national charities.
Barnsley Volunteer Bureau
33 Queens Road, BARNSLEY, South Yorkshire, S71 1AN
Tel: 01226 295 905
Fax: 01226 206 580
Email: volunteer@barnsleyvb.demon.co.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday - 9.00am - 4.30pm
Doncaster CVS Volunteer Bureau
Units 5 & 6 Trafford Court, DONCASTER, South Yorkshire, DN1 1PN
Tel: 01302 343300
Fax: 01302 365 081
Email: doncastervb@doncastercvs.org.uk
Opening Hours: Monday – 10am - 2pm. Tuesday – 10am – 3pm.
Thursday - 2pm – 7pm.
Sheffield, Volunteer Centre
69 Division Street, SHEFFIELD, South Yorkshire, S1 4GE
Tel: 0114 249 3362
Fax: 0114 249 3361
Email: vb@vas.org.uk
www.vas.org.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday – 10am – 4pm
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Volunteering in the Countryside 77
British Trust for Conservation Volunteers, South Yorkshire Office
Contact: Stephen Mulhall - South Yorkshire Project Officer
BTCV, Bessemer House, 59 Carlisle Street East, Sheffield S4 7QN
Tel: 0114 2723591
Email s.mulhall@btcv.org.uk or south-yorkshire@btcv.org.uk
BTCV is the country's leading organisation enabling volunteers from all sections
of the community to take practical environmental action in towns, cities and the
countryside. The BTCV South Yorkshire office runs a mid-week group, training
events in both practical and organisational skills and supports community-based
environmental projects.
Countryside Rangers / Parks Wardens
Most local authorities have countryside rangers and / or park wardens who work
with volunteers to help keep local green space accessible and diverse for both
people and wildlife. Contact your local authority for more information.
National Trust
The Regional Volunteers Department – Yorkshire & NE
The National Trust, County Durham, Northumberland, Newcastle & Tyneside
Tel: 01904 702021 / 01904 771963
Email: y&ne.volunteering@nationaltrust.org.uk
The National Trust has many voluntary options open including gardening,
leading walks, holiday assistance, wardening, information stewards and
conservation tasks. Training provided.
Open Country, Harrogate
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
• Trailblazers. The Trailblazers meet each Tuesday to help create and maintain
accessible paths for all in the Harrogate District. Many of the volunteers have
mental health issues and learning disabilities.
• Conservation. The Conservation Volunteers meet each Friday on
conservation projects around Harrogate District and beyond. We work closely
with many wildlife organisations. Many of the volunteers have mental health
issues and learning disabilities.
• Volunteer on activities. We run many activities in the countryside for people
with disabilities and are always looking for volunteers who can help lead a
member with a visual impairment, help push a wheelchair or provide moral
support.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
78 Volunteering in the Countryside
Sheffield Wildlife Trust
Sheffield Wildlife Trust HQ, 37 Stafford Road, Sheffield, S2 2SF
Tel: 0114 263 4335
Fax: 0114 263 4345
Email: mail@wildsheffield.com
www.wildsheffield.com
Local communities are the focus for all the Trusts urban regeneration work in
north and south Sheffield. Their nature reserves are managed in partnership
with Reserve Advisory Groups consisting of residents local to the reserves and
other interested people.
South Yorkshire Forest
Thorncliffe Park, Chapeltown, Sheffield, S35 2TH
Tel: 0114 257 1199
There are 12 special areas in England called ‘Community Forests’ where local
residents can join forces to protect their environment.
Yorkshire Wildlife Trust
Contact: Volunteer Development Officer
1 St. George’s Place, York, YO24 1GN
Tel: 01904 659570
There are many voluntary opportunities with the Trust. Some of these may be
done from home e.g. lobbying local MPs. Tasks include running Wildlife Watch
groups, practical work on reserves, office work and help fundraising.
Woodland Trust
The Volunteer Team
Tel: 01476 581111
Email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk
www.woodland-trust.org.uk/getinvolved
The Woodland Trust is the UK’s leading woodland conservation charity.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Countryside Employment 79
For details of work in or related to the countryside and wildlife we recommend
the following:
Countryside Jobs Service
Niall Larson & Team
CJS, The Moorlands, Goathland, Whitby, North Yorkshire YO22 5LZ
Tel: 01947 896007
Email: ranger @ countryside-jobs.com
The CJS brings together available countryside jobs, both paid and voluntary,
from a wide range of sources and organisations.
Employment Opportunities Sheffield
Manor Development Centre, 40 Alison Crescent, Sheffield, S2 1AS
Tel: 0114 2652070
Minicom: 0114 2652070
Email: Sheffield@eopps.org
www.backdrop.tv
Helps people with disabilities find employment through independent advice,
WORKSTEP and New Deal for Disabled People.
Environment Post
ADC Environment, 58 Kingsley Close, Wickford, Essex, SS12 0EN
Tel: 01268 468000
Email: andy@pathcom.co.uk
Includes job and voluntary vacancies from environmental journals and papers
worldwide. Also details student placements.
Environmental jobs & volunteering
www.environmentjob.co.uk
Web based information about both paid and voluntary job opportunities.
Guardian newspaper
Find details of environmental and conservation jobs available on Wednesdays.
Yorkshire Post
On a Thursday, details of local job opportunities are advertised.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
80 5. Useful Information
Travel information 81
Community Transport 82 - 83
Public Transport 84
 RADAR, Blue Badge & wheelchair hire 85
Shopmobility 86
 Braille guides 87
 Publications 88 - 91
 Tourist Information Centres 92
Disability Links 93 - 94
Council for Voluntary Services (CVS) 95
 Websites worth a surf… 96 - 97

SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Travel Information 81
Rural Transport Partnerships
• Coalfields Rural Transport Partnership
Barnsley MBC, Central Offices, Kendray Street, Barnsley, S70 2TN
Tel: 01226 718384
• South and West Yorkshires Mets Rural Transport Partnership
40-50 Wellington Street, Leeds, LS1 2DE
Tel: 0113 2517413
Travel Information Centres
The Transport Executive operates a countywide network of Travel Information
Centres (TICs) to allow you to meet helpful and knowledgeable staff members
who are there to make your journey as free from hassle as possible. Your first
point of call for all public transport enquiries, including timetables, travel
tickets, concessionary passes and any help you need. The larger TICs also offer
a range of coach holidays in the UK and Europe, including day trips.
• Barnsley
Barnsley Interchange

• Doncaster
Duke Street
• Meadowhall
Meadowhall Interchange
• Rotherham
Rotherham Interchange
• Sheffield
1. Exchange Street
2. Cambridge Street
3. Sheffield Interchange
Traveline
Traveline, P.O. Box 801, Exchange Street, Sheffield, S2 5YT
Tel: 01709 515151 (local call rate from within South Yorkshire)
Tel: 0870 608 2 608
Minicom: 0114 272 2878 (for speech and hearing impaired customers)
Traveline is the Transport Executive's contact centre for local public transport
information. Open 7 am – 10 pm seven days a week.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
82 Community Transport
Community Transport organisations provide transport services to people who do
not have easy access to other forms of transport, including the elderly, those
with disabilities, people with special needs, or people living in remote
communities with little or no public transport. A small membership fee normally
applies.
Barnsley
Barnsley Dial-a-Ride & Community Transport
Pontefract Road, Hoyle Mill, Barnsley, S71 1LA (Top of Market Street near the
Headon Rock Cafe and Wellington House.)
Tel: 01226 786006
Tel: 01226 298675 (for the Penistone Rural ride service only)
Tel: 01709 888 991 (for the Dearne Valley service only)
Fax: 01226 290316
Email: info@barnsleydialaride-ct.org
Barnsley Dial-a-Ride & Community Transport is a not-for-profit company with
charitable status and provides safe, friendly, flexible, accessible transport for
those residents who have mobility problems and are living in the Barnsley and
District areas. The list of services includes:
ƒ Dearne Valley Community Transport
ƒ Penistone Rural Ride
ƒ Coalfields Community Transport Initiative
ƒ Dial-a-Ride
ƒ Dial-a-Bus
ƒ Volunteer Access/Social Cars
ƒ Group Hire
Doncaster
Doncaster Community Transport
Leger House, Brooke Street, Doncaster, DN1 2SW
Tel: 01302 328 687 / 01302 342 400
Fax: 01302 361 966
Services include ‘Dial - A – Ride’ and ‘Dial - A – Bus’
Comet Community Transport Ltd.
Church Balk Pavilion, Church Balk, Thorne
Tel: 01405 741 401
Fax: 01405 818 406
Mobile: 07771 662 461
Three minibuses available for hire with or without driver. The service can be
used to travel anywhere in the country on a regular or occasional basis. Escorts
can be provided if required for shopping / wheelchair pushing.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Community Transport 83
Sheffield
Sheffield Dial-A-Ride Club (DARC)
Bessemer House, 59 Carlisle Street East, Sheffield, S4 7QN
Tel: 0114 275 5489
www.sheffieldct.co.uk
The service aims to improve the quality of life for elderly and disabled people by
giving them their own travel facility with a choice of when and where to travel.
Regular transport to luncheon clubs as well as longer journeys to visit relatives,
go on holiday, trips or shopping.
Rotherham
Rotherham Community Transport
Tel: 01709 517100
If you have mobility problems, which make using ordinary buses and trains
difficult, then Rotherham Community Transport can help. They can provide
door-to-door services, a voluntary car service, transport for community groups
and a Shopmobility scheme. A dedicated service, RotherRide, also operates in
South Rotherham and is available to anyone living in the area. Bikes can also be
carried on the special racks fitted to the RotherRide vehicles.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
84 Public Transport
Rail
Doncaster Railway Station
Tel: 01302 362 793
Intercity trains have wheelchair spaces available but must be booked in
advance. Both manual and electric wheelchairs can be conveyed to any staffed
station. Please check for details regarding Scooters.
First North Western (Special needs)
Tel: 0845 6040231
Great North Eastern Railway
Tel: 0845 7225 444
Disabled assistance can be booked.
Midland Mainline (special needs)
Tel: 0114 2537654
TRAMS (Sheffield)
Accessible to wheelchairs
Mobility Passes
If you live in South Yorkshire, are under 65 and have a disability which
seriously impairs your ability to walk, cannot drive on medical grounds, are
without the use of both arms, are profoundly Deaf or are registered partially
sighted or blind then you could qualify for a Mobility Pass or a Half Fare Bus
Pass.
Contact your local authority for more information:
Barnsley District – 01226 775656
Doncaster District – 01302 735322
Rotherham District – 01709 823907
Sheffield District – 0114 2734897
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
RADAR & Blue Badge parking & 85
Wheelchair Hire
RADAR
Contact: RADAR (Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation)
12 City Forum, 250 City Road, London, EC1V 8AF
Tel: 020 7250 3222
Minicom: 020 7250 4119
Fax: 020 7250 0212
Email: radar@radar.org.uk
www.radar.org.uk
The RADAR National Key Scheme ensures that one key will open wheelchair
accessible toilets throughout the country. Radar padlocks are also increasingly
used on nature reserves and cycle paths. Radar keys can be obtained from
many Town Halls or direct from RADAR.
There are now too many accessible toilets for them to be listed individually.
However a directory is published annually. The National Key Scheme Guide is
available from RADAR either online or by post. Either way, keys cost £4.11 each
and the guide is £10.70. Both prices include P&P.
Parking with a Blue Badge
Blue badge holders may:
• Park as long as they wish in a disc parking zone provided that the blue badge
is displayed.
• Park on a single or double yellow line for up to three hours, provided that the
blue badge and disc is displayed and the vehicle causes no obstruction.
• Always check individual car parks to see of you are required to pay or not, as
practice differs widely throughout East Yorkshire.
NB: remember your blue badge, blue badge disc and identity card at all times.
Wheelchair Hire
Many of the places in this Directory have wheelchairs and scooters available for
loan either free or relatively cheaply. For other outlets ring your local Tourist
Information Centre - see page 93.
Alternatively, you can contact your local Shopmobility unit. See page 87.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
86 Shopmobility
Shopmobility schemes allow anyone who has difficulty walking,
access to manual or powered wheelchairs and scooters. The
Shopmobility units can also provide you with useful information
about accessible areas within the city or town centre.
www.justmobility.co.uk/shop/
Barnsley Shopmobility
1. Unit 3 B, Market Street, Barnsley, S70 1SN
From Junction 37 off the M1 and other major roads into Barnsley. If you
do get lost please telephone 01226 786006.
Tel: 01226 786006 Fax: 01226 290316
2. Albert Street East, Barnsley, S70 1RS
Tel / Fax: 01226 280580
A satellite scheme for Barnsley District General Hospital. Free service but
please register with Barnsley Shopmobility first.
Doncaster Shopmobility
1. Thorne & Moorend, Comet Community Transport, Church Balk Pavilion,
Church Balk, Thorne, Doncaster, DN8 5BU
Tel: 01405 741401 Fax: 01405 818406
2. Lower Mall Frenchgate Centre, St Sepulchre Gate, Doncaster
Tel: 01302 760742
Meadowhall Shopmobility
Management Suite, 1 The Oasis, Meadowhall Centre, Sheffield, S9 1EP
Tel: 0845 600 6800 Fax: 0114 256 8666
Rotherham Shopmobility
2 Effingham Square, Rotherham, S65 1AP
Tel: 01709 517 111 Fax: 01709 517 200
Sheffield Shopmobility
www.sheffieldshopmobility.org.uk
1. Westhill Lane Car Park, Eldon Street, off West Street, Sheffield, S1 4GX
Tel: 0114 281 2278 Fax: 0114 2812377
2. 12 Waigate, Castle Market, Sheffield
Book through main Sheffield Shopmobility above as this is just a satellite.
3. Meadow Hall, Management Suite, The Oasis, Meadowhall Centre,
Sheffield, S9 1EP. Assisted visits subject to prior booking.
Tel: 0845 600 6800 Fax: 0114 256 8666
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Braille Guides 87
Open Country and Henshaws College in Harrogate work together to produce a
number of Braille Guides about local areas of interest. If you would like to
borrow one or would like to see a Braille guide for a site we haven’t covered,
please contact Sam or David at Open Country on 01423 507227.
South Yorkshire Braille Guides
• Broomhill Flash (near Barnsley)
• Potteric Carr Nature Reserve (near Doncaster)
Other Braille Guides available
• Introduction to Brimham Rocks & Moor (Nidderdale)
• Askham Bog (near York)
• Bishop Monkton Railway Cutting (a reserve near Ripon)
• Bolton Percy Station Nature Reserve (near Tadcaster)
• Cumberland Trail - Strid Wood, Bolton Abbey to Wharfedale
• Easy Going Trail Alongside the River Wharfe at Ilkely
• Filey Dams Nature Reserve
• Grimwith Reservoir Walk (near Hebden, Yorkshire Dales)
• High Batts Nature Reserve (near Ripon)
• Hookstone Wood (Harrogate)
• Kirkstall Valley Nature Reserve (Leeds)
• Lotherton Hall Estate Guide
• Moorlands Nature Reserve (near York)
• Pateley Bridge to Glasshouses Easy Going Trail (Nidderdale)
• Rossett Nature Reserve (Harrogate)
• Roundhay Park (Leeds)
• Spofforth to Wetherby Footpath and Cycle Route
• Spurn, The Moving Story (East coast of Yorkshire)
• Toft Gate Lime Kiln (near Pateley Bridge)
• The National Trust Hudswell Woods (Richmond, North Yorkshire)
• Wheldrake Ings (wetland site near York)
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
88 Publications
Publications specific to South Yorkshire
Access Bolsover’s – Guide to level of accessibility of some countryside
trails, parks, houses and their gardens
Contact: Access Bolsover
Tel / fax: 01246 825809
Tel: 01246 811730
A pamphlet giving details of accessible venues in and around Bolsover.
Doorstep Walks & Rides
Rotherham Rights of Way
Tel : 01709822932
www.rotherham.gov.uk/prow
10 ‘doorstep’ walks and 2 rides with varying degrees of accessibility, ease and
length are detailed in a leaflet and interactive CDrom.
Penistone Line Trail
- Sheffield to Huddersfield by the Penistone Line Partnership, supported by
South Yorkshire and North Derbyshire Ramblers. 95km/60 miles divided into
several sections ranging from 2.5km/1.5 miles to 7.5km/4.75 miles, all between
stations on this attractive railway branch through the south Pennines, linking
Lincoln and Huddersfield. Route descriptions, background on the line,
overprinted OS maps. £4.95 + 55p p&p (or £2.95 + 55p p&p for RA or
Partnership members) from PLP, St Johns Community Centre, Church Street,
Penistone, S36 9AR. Cheques payable to Penistone Line Partnership.
Rotherham Ring Route
- By Rotherham Metro Ramblers. An 80km/50-mile circular walk through the
gently rolling landscape around the boundary of Rotherham Borough including
many fine country parks. Pack of 10 leaflets in a plastic wallet plus bus details
and additional useful information for beginners, £2 + £1 p&p from Rotherham
Visitor Centre, 40 Bridge Gate, Rotherham S60 1PQ. Tel 01709 835904.
Cheques payable to Rotherham TIC. Badges and completion cards from same
source.
Sheffield Country Walks
- 3rd edition by Sheffield Ramblers and Sheffield City Council. 87km/54.5 miles
through the countryside round Sheffield via Eckington, Dronfield, Burbage,
Grenoside and Meadowhall, in ten sections of around 8km/5 miles each, linked
by public transport, all with separate colour route cards in an attractive folder.
£3.95 + 55p p&p from Ramblers’ Association Sheffield Group, 33 Durvale Court,
Sheffield S17 3PT. Cheques payable to Ramblers' Association Sheffield Group.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Publications 89
Other useful publications
Access for All in the Yorkshire Dales
Contact: Rachel Mozley
Tel: 01969 650456
Also available in large print, Braille or audio cassette format. Pick up a copy
from any of the Yorkshire Dales National Park Centres or from Rachel Mozley.
A Practical Guide for Disabled People
For free copies as a book, audio cassette and Braille please contact:
Department of Health, PO Box 410, Wetherby, LS23 7LN
A Sense of Place 2004
www.sensorytrust.org.uk/information/publications
Price: £10 for email PDF version or £15 for a printed version including P&P
This publication, based on conference proceedings from an international event
in Cornwall and Devon, draws on excellent examples developed by people
around the world, all working to make sense of place a reality.
Breakfree
Contact: David Shaftoe or Sam Parkhouse
Community House, 46 East Parade, Harrogate, HG1 5LT
Tel: 01423 507227
Two Harrogate District Breakfree packs grade fully accessible walks and
places of interest by the gradient and surface of the paths whilst also
detailing all amenities and potential obstacles on clear, colour maps.
Especially suitable for parents, wheelchair users, cyclists and anyone with
limited mobility. Packs are £2 each and are available at Tourist Information
Centres, local outdoor shops, Harrogate Library, or call Open Country.
Countryside Directories
Contact: Open Country
Tel: 01423 507227
Š North Yorkshire Countryside Directory of Opportunities for People with
Disabilities
Š East Yorkshire Countryside Directory of Opportunities for People with
Disabilities
Š South Yorkshire Countryside Directory of Opportunities for People with
Disabilities
Š West Yorkshire Countryside Directory of Opportunities for People with
Disabilities
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
90 Publications
Directory for Disabled People
By Ann Darnbrough & Derek Kinrade
Prentice Hall, Campus 400, Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire,
HP2 7EZ
A comprehensive handbook of information for anyone concerned with disability.
Easy Going North York Moors
Tel: 01439 770657
www.visitthemoors.co.uk
‘Probably the best access guide ever printed!’ Telephone: 01439 770657 to get
a hold of a copy – cost £4.50.
Gowrings Mobility Smooth Ride Guide – UK
By July Ramsey
Smooth Ride Guides, Duck Street Barns, Duck Street, Furneux Pelham, Herts,
SG0 OLA
ISBN: 0-9521982-9-0
www.smoothrideguides.com
An ‘invaluable reference book for anyone involved in travel’ in the UK. Detailing
accessible places of interest as well as local hotels and transport contacts. One
of a series of similar books for other countries. £14.95 with £1 to charity.
Guide for Disabled Visitors, English Heritage.
English Heritage Postal Sales, PO Box 229, Northampton, NN6 9RY
Tel: 01604 781163
Free to members or £3.50 from staffed properties or from English Heritage
Postal Sales, PO Box 229, Northampton NN6 9RY. For details of their Yorkshire
Events, visit www.english-heritage.org.uk
Guide to Accessible Greenspace
Contact: Sensory Trust, Watering Lane Nursery, Pentewan, St. Austell,
Cornwall, PL26 6BE
www.sensorytrust.org.uk
ISBN: 0 9526745 3 X
Price: £15.00 GBP (Students, charities and voluntary organisations £12.00 GBP)
Including UK p&p.
This book combines survey results with existing literature and examples of good
practice in a variety of green space sites. It covers issues such as how
information and interpretation are best provided, what motivates people to visit
sites, how people can be encouraged to use and get involved in sites, relevant
legislation and policy and aspects relating to site layout.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Publications 91
Leaflets available from Open Country:
Tel: 01423 507227
• Open Country Information leaflet
• Harrogate & Knaresborough Cycle Map
• York Cycle Route Map
• Spofforth to Wetherby footpath and cycle route
• The York to Selby Cycle Path
• Easy Going trail from Pateley Bridge to Glasshouses
• Easy Going Nature Trails along Skipwith Common
• Easy Going facilities and routes around Bolton Abbey
Outdoors Adventure for Handicapped People - RADAR
A book available by order from Hammicks Bookshop (£5.95):
15 James Street, Harrogate
Tel: 01423 531953
Published by Souvenir Press. Author Mike Cotton. ISBN 0285649787
RADAR – Accessible Holidays in the British Isles
RADAR, 12 City Forum, 250 City Road, London, EC1V 8AF
Tel: 0207 2503222
Minicom: 0207 2504119
An annually updated production.
The National Trust - Information for Visitors with Disabilities
Access for All Office, Heelis, Kemble Drive, Swindon, SN2 8YL
Tel: 0870 242 6620
Email: accessforall@nationaltrust.org.uk
www.nationaltrust.org.uk
An annually updated booklet containing very useful information about access
and amenities for everyone throughout the National Trust properties. Can be
used in conjunction with the ‘National Trust Handbook for Members and
Visitors’.
Yorkshire Dales – Guide for Visitors with Disabilities
Tel: 01756 752748
Email: info@yorkshriedales.org.uk
www.yorkshiredales.org.uk
A leaflet detailing visitor centres amenities and their accessibility.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
92 Tourist Information Centres

Barnsley
46 Eldon Street, Barnsley,
Tel: 01226 206757
Email: Barnsley@ytbic.co.uk
Doncaster
Central Library, Waterdale, Doncaster, DN1 3JE
Tel: 01302 734309
Rotherham
Central Library, Walker Place, Rotherham, S65 1JH
Tel: 01709 835904
Sheffield
1 Tudor Square, Sheffield, S1 2LA
Tel: 0114 2211900
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Disability Links 93
Access Bolsover
c/o 11 Cherry Tree Close, Bolsover, Chesterfield, Derbyshire S44 6ET
Tel: 01246 - 825809
Email: accessbolsover@yahoo.com
A Local Access Group which meets socially and campaigns formally on all
matters relating to accessibility in the built environment and countryside.
They continually work on group projects for example compiling Access Guides.
As fully qualified and accredited Access Auditors they can offer a professional
service, expert advice and guidance on all access related issues from a disabled
persons perspective.
DIAL
Offers a free, impartial and confidential information service to people with
disabilities, their families and professionals.
Barnsley Doncaster Rotherham DIS
Tel: 01226 240273 Tel: 01302 327800 01709 373658
Disabled Peoples Forum
116 Wicker, Sheffield, S3 8JD
Tel: 0114 275 5679
Fax: 0114 275 5679
Minicom: 0114 275 5679
Aims to increase the number of disabled people in voluntary work and raise
awareness of disability and access issues.
Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
For information on toilet facilities and access for all local attractions why not
telephone for more details before you travel?
Tel: 01302 734309
Fieldfare Trust
Contact: Andy Johnson
Tel: 01788 536653
Email:info@fieldfare.org.uk
www.fieldfare.org.uk
Raising awareness of access issues for people of all abilities.
MCW Consultancy
3 Apple Blossom Court, Acomb, York, YO24 3HH
Tel: 01904 783992
Email: martyn.weller@ntlworld.com
Advice on how to make your business accessible.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
94 Disability Links
Sensory Trust
Watering Lane Nursery, Pentewan, St. Austell, Cornwall, L26 6BE
Email: enquiries@sensorytrust.org.uk
www.sensorytrust.org.uk
Sheffield Local Access Forum
C/o Public Rights of Way, Howden House, Sheffield, S1 2SH
Contact: Steve Tivey
Tel: 0114 273 4448
Upperthorpe Healthy Living Centre Trust
Upperthorpe Library, Sheffield, S6 3NA
Tel: 0114 270 2040#
Email: kate@uhlc.org.uk
www.uhlc.org.uk
Aims to promote a holistic model of health and well-being incorporating health
education, recreation and leisure for local people.
Tourism For All
The Hawkins Suite, Enham Place, Enham Alamein, Andover, SP11 6JS
Tel: 0845 1249971
Email: info@holidaycare.org
www.tourismforall.org.uk
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Council for Voluntary Services 95
A Council for Voluntary Service (CVS) is a voluntary organisation which is set
up, owned and run by local groups to support, promote and develop local
voluntary and community action. CVS support their members by providing them
with a range of services and by acting as a voice for the local voluntary and
community sector.
Barnsley Voluntary Action
35 Queens Road, Barnsley, S71 1AN
Tel: 01226 242726
Email: info@vabarnsley.org.uk
www.vabarnsley.org.uk
Boothferry CVS
The Courtyard Boothferry Road, Goole, DN14 6AE
Tel: 01405 837123
Email: cvs@boothferrycvs.demon.co.uk
Doncaster CVS
Unit 5& 6, Trafford Court, Doncaster, DN1 1PN
Tel: 01302 343300 / 813333
Email: enquiries@doncastercvs.org.uk
www.doncastercvs.org.uk
Humber & Wolds Rural Community Council
14 Market Place, Howden, Goole, DN14 7BJ
Tel: 01430 430904
Email: info@hwrcc.org.uk
www.hwrcc.org.uk
Rotherham Voluntary Action
Durlston House, 5 Moorgate Road, Rotherham, S60 2EN
Tel: 01709 829821
Email: admin@varotherham.org.uk
www.varotherham.org.uk
Sheffield Voluntary Action
69 Division Street, Sheffield, S1 4GE
Tel: 0114 2493360
Email: admin@vas.org.uk
www.vas.org.uk

SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
96 Websites worth a surf…
Ability Online
www.abilityonline.net
Bringing together information for people with disabilities on the Internet.
English Heritage
www.english-heritage.org.uk
English Nature
www.english-nature.org.uk
Fieldfare Trust
www.fieldfare.org.uk
Works with people with disabilities and countryside managers to improve
access.
Forestry Commission
www.forestry.gov.uk
Museums information
www.information-museums.co.uk
National Trust
www.nationaltrust.org.uk
Open Country
www.opencountry.org.uk
Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council
www.rotherham.gov.uk
Sensory Trust
www.sensorytrust.org.uk
Provides creative solutions to the problems of access to public green space for
both landowners/managers and the public.
South Yorkshire Community Information
www.syci.org.uk
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Websites worth a surf… 97
Sheffield City Council
www.sheffield.gov.uk
Sheffield City Council Help Yourself database
http://dis.shef.ac.uk/help_yourself/
SYCOP – South Yorkshire’s Community Online Project
www.sycop.gov.uk
A well laid out website giving advice, information and guidance on a range of
community services throughout Barnsley, Doncaster and Rotherham.
SUSTRANS
www.sustrans.org.uk
Information on the national Cycle Network and sustainable transport.
The Trans Pennine Trail
www.transpenninetrail.org.uk
The lnland Waterways Association
www.waterways.org.uk/festivals
For information on events along canals and other areas
Travel Line
www.yorkshiretravel.net
The Yorkshire Dales
www.yorkshiredales.org

Yorkshire Great Houses, Castles and Gardens
www.castlesandgardens.co.uk
Yorkshire Net
www.yorkshirenet.co.uk
The Internet gateway to Yorkshire
Yorkshire Tourist Board
www.ytb.org.uk
Yorkshire Water sites for public enjoyment
www.yorkshirewater.com/foryourenjoyment
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
98 6. The Countryside Codes
For anyone visiting the countryside it is worth remembering
the Countryside Code. By following these basic guidelines, the
countryside stays open to everyone whilst helping the people,
animals and wildlife who live there. For more information visit
www.countrysideaccess.gov.uk or Telephone: 0845 100 3298
D Be safe – plan ahead and follow any signs
D Leave gates and property as you find them
D Protect plants and animals, and take your litter home
D Keep dogs under control
D Consider other people
D To avoid erosion keep to the trail
Cyclists also have a code to help guide them whilst in the
countryside
D Always give way to walkers
D Give adequate warning of your approach
D Always ride in control and wear a helmet
D Be extra careful when approaching bends and path junctions
D Ensure that your bike is safe to ride
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
99 7. The Funders and Authors
The Funders
This project received funding from the Environment Agency. We thank them for
supporting our project and enabling us to share this information with others, so
that many more people can enjoy the great outdoors as much as we do.
Open Country
Open Country was set up in 1990 to enable anyone with any disability to access
and enjoy the countryside.
There are only two members of staff, aided by over fifty fantastic volunteers.
Most people have joined the charity from a countryside background of work and
personal interest, which they want to share with others. This Directory is just
one of the ways that we try to let people know about what is available to them
and how they can get involved.
We hope you use this Directory to get more involved with the countryside and
enjoy all the benefits and fun that comes with it.
Can you help us?
As a small charitable organisation, we are heavily dependent on the generosity
of our supporters. Any donation, no matter how small, will help us to continue
our valuable work.
Additionally, if you give us your name and address and indicate that you are a
UK taxpayer and are happy to ‘Gift Aid’ your donation, we can claim more
money from the government on your donation. Thank you.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
100 The Funders and Authors
Disclaimer
The authors of this Directory have made every effort to ensure that the
information included was right at the time of going to print. However, we
cannot accept any responsibility for any errors or omissions, or any loss or
damage arising from the use of this information. We advise Directory users to
ensure the suitability of all services described for their individual needs.
Open Country Walking Weekend 2005
We hope to be able to up-date this Directory in the future. If you have any
comments, additions, up-dates or suggestions as to how we may improve this
directory please contact us at:
Open Country
David Shaftoe and Sam Parkhouse
Community House, 46 East Parade, Harrogate, HG1 5LT
Tel: 01423 507227
Email: info@opencountry.org.uk
www.opencountry.co.uk
Open Country is a Company Limited by Guarantee No: 05155859 and a Registered Charity No:
1107331 and is partly supported by North Yorkshire Social Services as well as a number of
other grant giving bodies.
SOUTH YORKSHIRE DIRECTORY FOR THE DISABLED
Appendix I
Useful contact
names and addresses
 The following professional body is willing to provide general and informal
advice about the Act. However, any advice given should not be seen as being
endorsed by the UK government.
The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
Parliament Square
London SW1P 3AD
Tel: 0870 333 1600
Fax: 020 7334 3811
The following bodies hold lists of their members who may be willing to provide
professional advice or act as a ‘surveyor’ under the Act – again with the
proviso that any advice given should not be seen as being endorsed by the UK
government.
Architecture and Surveying
Institute
Register of Party Wall Surveyors
St Mary House
15 St Mary Street
Chippenham
Wiltshire SN15 3WD
Tel: 01249 444505
Fax: 01249 443602
The Association of Building Engineers
(ABE)
Private Practice Register
Lutyens House
Billing Brook Road
Weston Favell
Northampton NN3 8NW
Tel: 0845 126 1058
Fax: 01604 784220
The Pyramus & Thisbe Club
Florence House
53 Acton Lane
London NW10 8UX
Tel: 020 8961 3311
Fax: 020 8963 1689
The Royal Institute of British
Architects (RIBA)
Clients Advisory Service
66 Portland Place
London W1B 1AD
960 Appendix I
Tel: 020 580 5533
Fax: 020 255 1541
The Royal Institution of Chartered
Surveyors (RICS)
Parliament Square
London SW1P 3AD
Tel: 0870 333 1600
Fax: 020 7334 3811
Professional contacts
Asbestos specialist
Asbestos Information Centre Ltd
5a The Maltings
Stowupland Road
Stowmarket
Suffolk 1P14 SAG
Tel: 0904 517 0156
Concrete specialist
British Ready Mixed Concrete
Association
The Bury
Church Street
Chesham
Buckinghamshire HP5 1JE
Tel: 01494 791050
Damp, rot, infestation
British Wood Preserving & Damp
Proofi ng Association
Building No. 6
The Offi ce Village
4 Romford Road
Stratford
London E15 4EA
Tel: 020 8519 2588
English Nature
Northminster House
Northminster Road
Peterborough PE1 1VA
Tel: 01733 340345
Countryside Council for Wales
Maps y Ffynnon
Penrhosgarnedd
Bangor
Gwynedd LL57 2DW
Tel: 01248 355782
Scottish Natural Heritage
12 Hope Terrace
Edinburgh EH9 2AS
Tel: 0131 447 4784
Local Department of
Environmental Health
Refer to your local directory.
Decorators
British Decorators Association
32 Coton Road
Nuneaton
Warwickshire CV11 5TW
Tel: 0247 635 3776
Scottish Decorators Federation
Castlecraig
Business Park
Players Road
Stirling FK7 7SH
Tel: 01786 448838
Electricians
National Inspection Council
for Electrical Installation
Contracting
Warwick House
Houghton Hall Park
Houghton Regis
Dunstable LUS SZX
Tel: 0870 013 0382
Professional contacts 961
Fencing erectors
Fencing Contractors Association
Warren Rd
Trellech
Monmouthshire NP25 4PQ
Tel: 07000 560722
Glazing specialists
Glass and Glazing Federation
44–48 Borough High Street
London SE1 1XB
Tel: 020 7403 7177
Heating installers
British Gas Regional Offi ce
Refer to your local directory.
Electricity Supply Company
Refer to your local directory.
British Coal Corporation
Hobart House
Grosvenor Place
London SW1X 7AE
Tel: 020 7235 2020
Heating and Ventilating
Contractors’ Association
Esca House
34 Palace Court
London W2 4JG
Tel: 020 7229 2488
National Association of Plumbing,
Heating and Mechanical Services
Contractors
Ensign House
Ensign Business Centre
Westwood Way
Coventry CV4 8JA
Tel: 01203 470626
Home security
Local Crime Prevention Offi cer
Refer to your local directory.
Local Fire Prevention Offi cer
Refer to your local directory.
National Approval Council for
Security Systems
Queensgate House
14 Cookham Road
Maidenhead S16 8AJ
Tel: 01628 37512
Master Locksmiths Association
5d Great Central Way
Woodford Halse
Daventry
Northants NN1 3PZ
Tel: 01327 262 255
British Security Industry
Association
Kirkham House
John Comyn Drive
Worcester WR3 7NS
Tel: 0845 389 3889
Insulation installers
Draught Proofi ng Advisory
Association Ltd
PO Box 12
Haslemere
Surrey GU27 3AH
Tel: 01428 654011
External Wall Insulation
Association
PO Box 12
Haslemere
Surrey GU27 3AH
Tel: 01428 654011
962 Appendix I
National Insulation Association
2 Vimy Court
Vimy Road
Leighton Buzzard
Beds LU7 1FG
Tel: 08451 636363
National Association of Loft
Insulation Contractors
PO Box 12
Haslemere
Surrey GU27 3AH
Tel: 01428 654011
Plasterers
Federation of Master Builders
Gordon Fisher House
14–15 Great James Street
London WC1N 3DP
Tel: 020 7242 7583
Plumbers
National Association of Plumbing,
Heating and
Mechanical Services Contractors
Ensign House
Ensign Business Centre
Westwood Way
Coventry CV4 8JA
Tel: 01203 470626
Robust Detail
Robust Details Ltd
Davy Avenue
Knowlhill
Milton Keynes MK5 8NB
Business line: 0870 240 8210
Technical support line: 0870 240
8209
Fax: 0870 240 8203
Technical email support: technical@
robustdetails.com
Administrative email support:
administration@robustdetails.com
Other support: customerservice@
robustdetails.com
Roofers
Builders’ Merchants Federation
15 Soho Square
London W1V 3HL
Tel: 020 7439 1753
National Federation of Roofi ng
Contractors
24 Worship Street
London EC2A 2DY
Tel: 020 7638 7663
Ventilation
Heating and Ventilating
Contractors’ Association
Esca House
34 Palace Court
London W2 4JG
Tel: 020 7229 2488
Other useful contacts
British Board of Agrément (BBA)
Bucknalls Lane
Garston
Watford WD5 9BA
Tel: 01923 665300
Fax: 01923 665301
Email: contact@bba.star.co.uk
Internet: http://www.bbacerts.co.uk
British Standards Institution (BSI)
389 Chiswick High Road
London W4 4AL
Tel: 020 8996 9001
Fax: 020 8996 7001
Email: csenices@bsigroup.com
Internet: http://www.bsigroup.com
Fenestration Self-Assessment
Scheme
Fensa Ltd
54 Agres Street
London SE1 1EU
Tel: 020 7645 3700
Fax: 020 7407 8307
HETAS Ltd
Orchard Business Centre
Stoke Orchard
Cheltenham
Gloucestershire GL52 7RZ
Tel: 0845 634 5626
Note: Registration scheme for companies
and engineers involved in the
installation and maintenance of domestic
solid-fuel-fi red equipment.
HMSO
The Stationery Offi ce
PO Box 29
Norwich NR3 1GN
Tel: orders/general enquiries 0870
600 5522
Fax: orders 0870 600 5533
Internet: http://www.tsoshop.co.uk
Institute of Plumbing
64 Station Lane
Hornchurch
Essex RM12 6NH
Tel: 01708 472791
Fax: 01708 448987
Note: Approved Contractor Person
Scheme (Building Regulations).
OFTEC
Oil Firing Registration Scheme
Foxwood House
Dobbs Lane
Kesgrave
Ipswich IPS 2QQ
Tel: 0845 658 5080
Fax: 0845 6585181
Robust Details Limited
Davy Avenue
Knowlhill
Milton Keynes MK5 8NB
Tel: customer service 0870 240 8210
Tel: technical support 0870 240 8209
Fax: 0870 240 8203
UKAS
United Kingdom Accreditation
Service
21–47 High Street
Feltham
Middlesex TW3 4UN
Tel: 0208 917 8400
WIMLAS
WIMLAS Limited
St Peter’s House
6–8 High Street
Aver
Buckinghamshire SL0 9NG
Tel: 01753 737744
Fax: 01753 792321
Email: wimlas@compuserve.com
Useful websites
The Building Act and Building Regulations: http://www.communities.gov.uk
(the new DCLG site)
Approved Documents: http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/buildingregulations/
approveddocuments
Useful websites 963
964 Appendix I
Air Tightness Testing and
Measurement Association
(ATTMA)
http://www.attma.org
Building Research Establishment
Ltd (BRE)
http://www.bre.co.uk
British Flue and Chimney
Manufacturers Association
(BFCMA)
http://www.feta.co.uk/bfcma
British Standards Institution (BSI) http://www.bsigroup.com
Building Services Research and
Information Association (BSRIA)
http://www.bsria.co.uk
Centre for Window and Cladding
Technology (CWCT)
http://www.cwct.co.uk
Chartered Institution of Building
Services Engineers (CIBSE)
http://www.cibse.org
Department for Education http://www.education.gov.uk
Department for Business,
Innovation and Skills
http://www.bis.gov.uk
Department of Energy and
Climate Change (DECC)
http://www.decc.gov.uk
Department for Transport (DFT) http://www.dft.gov.uk
Energy Saving Trust (EST) http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
English Heritage http://www.english-heritage.org.uk
Environment Agency http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Gas Safe Register http://www.gassaferegister.co.uk
Heating Equipment Testing and
Approval Scheme (HETAS)
http://www.hetas.co.uk
Health and Safety Executive
(HSE)
http://www.hse.gov.uk
Heating and Ventilating
Contractors’ Association (HVCA)
http://www.hvca.org.uk
Institution of Gas Engineers &
Managers
http://www.igem.org.uk
Metal Cladding and Roofi ng
Manufacturers Association
(MCRMA)
http://www.mcrma.co.uk
Modular and Portable Buildings
Association (MPBA)
http://www.mpba.biz
National Association of Roofl ight
Manufacturers (NARM)
http://www.narm.org.uk
Local councils (A–Z list) http://www.idea.gov.uk/idk/org/
la-data.do
Oil Firing Technical Association
Ltd (OFTEC)
http://www.oftec.org
Solid Fuel Association (SFA) http://www.solidfuel.co.uk
Thermal Insulation Manufacturers
and Suppliers Association
(TIMSA)
http://www.timsa.org.uk
TrustMark http://www.trustmark.org.uk
Assessable thresholds http://www.tso.co.uk
British Standards http://www.bsonline.techindex.co.uk
Building near trees http://www.nhbc.co.uk
Building research http://www.bre.co.uk
Carbon dioxide from natural
sources and mining areas
http://www.bgs.ac.uk
http://www.tso.co.uk
http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
Cladding http://www.mcrma.co.uk
Concrete in aggressive ground http://www.bre.co.uk
Contaminated land http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
http://www.hse.gov.uk
Contamination in disused
coal mines
http://www.tso.co.uk
Demolition http://www.ciria.org.uk
Electrical safety http://www.theiet.org
Environmental aspects http://www.arup.com
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Excavation and disposal http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
Flood protection http://www.ciria.org.uk
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Flooding from sewers http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
Foundations http://www.bre.co.uk
Gas contaminated land http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.bre.co.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
Useful websites 965
966 Appendix I
Geoenvironmental and
geotechnical investigations
http://www.ags.org.uk
Glass and glazing http://www.ggf.org.uk
Hardcore http://www.bre.co.uk
Health and safety http://www.hse.gov.uk
http://www.defra.gov.uk
Land quality http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Landfi ll gas http://www.ciwm.co.uk
http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.gassim.co.uk
Laying water pipelines in
contaminated ground
http://www.fwr.org
Low-rise buildings http://www.bre.co.uk
Materials and workmanship http://www.tso.co.uk
Methane http://www.bgs.ac.uk
http://www.tso.co.uk
http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
Oil seeps from natural sources
and mining areas
http://www.bgs.ac.uk
http://www.tso.co.uk
http://www.defra.gov.uk
http://www.ciria.org.uk
Petroleum retail sites http://www.petroleum.co.uk
Pollution control http://www.communities.gov.uk
Protection of ancient buildings http://www.spab.org.uk
Radon http://www.bre.co.uk
Robust construction details http://www.tso.co.uk
Roofi ng design http://www.mcrma.co.uk
Shrinkable clay soils http://www.bre.co.uk
Soil sampling http://www.defra.gov.uk
Soils, sludge and sediment http://www.ciria.org.uk
Subsidence http://www.bre.co.uk
Thermal bridging http://www.bre.co.uk
http://www.tso.co.uk
Thermal insulation http://www.bre.co.uk
Timbers http://www.bre.co.uk
Legislation
SI 1991/1620 Construction Products Regulations 1991
SI 1994/3051 Construction Products (Amendment) Regulations 1994
SI 1994/3260 Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 1994
SI 2000/2531 The Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010
SI 2000/2532 The Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2000
SI 2006/3418 Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulations 2006
SI 2007/991 Energy Performance of Buildings (Certifi cates and Inspections)
(England and Wales) Regulations 2007
Decision No 1/95 of the EC–Turkey Association Council of 22 December 1995
Legislation 967
Groundsure
Ground Stability
Report
Address: Specimen Address
Date: Feb 8, 2013
GroundSure Reference: Report Reference
Your Reference: Client Reference
Client: GroundSure
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Overview of Findings
For detailed guidance on each dataset, please refer to the Summary of Findings sections listed
below.
Factor Assessment Section
Ground Workings and Infilled land
Historical Surface Ground Workings In Need of Further Assessment 1.1
Historical Underground Workings In Need of Further Assessment 1.2
Current Ground Workings Passed 1.3
Mining and Extraction
Historical Mining In need of Further Assessment 2.1
Coal Mining Passed 2.2
Shallow Mining In Need of Further Assessment 2.3
Mining Cavities Passed 2.4
Natural Cavities Passed 2.5
Brine Extraction Passed 2.6
Gypsum Extraction Passed 2.7
Tin Mining In Need of Further Assessment 2.8
Clay Mining Passed 2.9
Natural Hazards & Additional Factors
Natural Ground Subsidence Negligible - Very Low 3.1
Landfills
Operational or non-operational landfills Passed 4
Geology
Artificial None 5.1
Drift None 5.2
Bedrock Yes 5.3
Boreholes No 5.4
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Expert Assessment
Consultant's Overview and Guidance
From the information within this report we consider it possible that Ground Stability Issues
may affect the property.
The BGS have identified a low-moderate potential for shallow mining. This means that the
rocks underlying the area are of a type known to have been mined at shallow depth in some
parts of the UK, and that such working may be possible in your area. In these cases it is
recommended that you seek further advice from a Royal Institute Chartered Surveyor (RICS),
the local Building Control Officer, or by ordering a Geological Report from the BGS. It is also
recommended that you obtain a Coal Authority mining search, which will provide a
comprehensive search of former mining activity, including coal mining at deeper levels. For
further information regarding Tin Mining GroundSure recommends obtaining a Tin Mining
report. This can be ordered by contacting Mining Searches UK, Highburrow Lane, Wilson Way,
Pool Industrial Estate, Redruth, Cornwall. TR15 3RN Tel: 01209 218861
You may wish to check that any structural surveys performed on the property have taken the
potential for ground instability into consideration. If such factors have not been considered,
you may wish to contact the local Building Regulations Officer, Planning Department and if
recently constructed, the site developers. Newer developments may benefit from an NHBC
guarantee or other environmental warranty which often covers structural issues.
Unless suitable information is available confirming that suitable ground engineering techniques
have been used at the site, you may wish to seek further more detailed assessment of stability
and / or structural issues through a Chartered Surveyor or Chartered Engineer.
If you need any further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact our helpline on 08444
159000 quoting the above GroundSure reference number.
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Aerial Photograph
NW
▲
N NE
◄W E►
SW S
▼
Aerial photography supplied by Getmapping PLC.
© Copyright Getmapping PLC 2003. All Rights Reserved.
SE
Site Name: Specimen Address
Grid Reference: 123456,123456
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Detailed Findings
1. Ground Workings
NW
▲
N NE
◄W E►
SW S
▼
SE
Crown Copyright. All Rights
Reserved
Licence Number: 100035207
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1. Ground Workings
1.1 Historical Surface Ground Working Features derived from the Historical
Mapping
This data set is derived from GroundSure's unique Historical Map Land Use Database
Are there any Historical Surface Ground Working Features within 250m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
Guidance: The study site has been identified as lying in proximity to areas potentially affected by surface ground workings.
Areas that have undergone ground workings may cause ground instability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses,
mass movement and landslides etc, depending on the nature of the workings and / or backfilling.
The following Historical Surface Ground Working Features derived from the Historical Mapping information is provided
by GroundSure:
ID Distance (m) Direction Use Date
2A 4.0 SE Refuse Heap 1958
3A 4.0 S Refuse Heap 1906
4A 4.0 S Unspecified Heap 1879
5 52.0 NE Cuttings 1879
6B 85.0 E Refuse Heap 1906
7B 85.0 E Unspecified Heap 1879
8B 87.0 E Unspecified Heap 1976
9B 87.0 E Unspecified Heap 1990
10B 90.0 E Refuse Heap 1958
11I 112.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1906
12C 112.0 N Cuttings 1906
13C 115.0 N Cuttings 1958
14D 120.0 SW Refuse Heap 1958
15D 123.0 SW Unspecified Heap 1879
16D 123.0 SW Refuse Heap 1906
17 139.0 E Unspecified Ground Workings 1879
18E 144.0 W Cemetery 1990
19E 144.0 W Cemetery 1976
20 155.0 NW Unspecified Heap 1879
21F 162.0 NW Refuse Heap 1906
22F 162.0 NW Unspecified Heap 1879
23G 165.0 NW Refuse Heap 1906
24G 165.0 NW Refuse Heap 1958
25H 172.0 NE Unspecified Heap 1879
26H 172.0 NE Refuse Heap 1906
27 176.0 NE Refuse Heap 1958
28J 245.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1879
1.2 Historical Underground Workings Features from Detailed Mapping
This data set is derived from GroundSure's unique Historical Map Land Use Database
Are there any Historical Underground Working Features within 250m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
Guidance: The study site has been identified as lying in proximity to areas affected by underground workings. Areas that
have undergone underground workings may cause ground instability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses, mass
movement and landslides etc, depending on the nature of the workings and / or backfilling.
The following Historical Underground Working Features from Detailed Mapping information is provided by
GroundSure:
Distance (m) Direction Use Date
17.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
17.0 S Unspecified Shafts 1879
18.0 SE Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
94.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1879
112.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1906
132.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
134.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
206.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
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245.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1879
1.3 Current Ground Workings
This data set is derived from the BGS BRITPITS database covering active, inactive mines, quarries, oil wells, gas
wells, mineral wharves, and rail deposits throughout the British Isles.
Are there any Current Ground Workings within 250m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
The following Current Ground Workings information is provided by British Geological Society:
Distance (m) Direction Use Date Updated
1 212.0 E Tin //
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2. Mining and Extraction
2.1 Historical Mining
Are there any Historical Mining features within 500m of the study site boundary? Yes
Risk Assessment In need of Further Assessment
Guidance: The study site has been identified as lying in proximity to areas affected by historical mining. Areas that have
undergone mining may cause ground instability problems such as subsidence, surface collapses, mass movement and
landslides etc, depending on the nature of the workings and or backfilling. Unless suitable information is available confirming
that suitable ground engineering techniques have been used at the site, it would be prudent to contact the Local Authority
Planning department to confirm that suitable design measures were implemented at the site during construction, or you may
wish to have a detailed structural survey undertaken at the site by a RICS accredited surveyor.
The following Historical Mining information provided by Groundsure :
Distance (m) Direction Details Date
17.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
17.0 S Unspecified Shafts 1879
18.0 SE Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
94.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1879
112.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1906
132.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
134.0 SW Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
206.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
245.0 NW Disused Tin and Copper 1879
272.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
330.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1879
330.0 E Unspecified Shaft 1906
334.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1906
338.0 E Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
373.0 NW Unspecified Shaft 1879
379.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
392.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
392.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
395.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
395.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
395.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
395.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
396.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
397.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
397.0 S Unspecified Old Shaft 1958
399.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1906
410.0 SE Unspecified Shaft 1879
420.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
427.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
427.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1958
428.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
428.0 S Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
430.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1906
430.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
431.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1958
432.0 S Disused Tin 1906
433.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1906
435.0 SE Unspecified Shaft 1879
435.0 SE Unspecified Old Shafts 1906
437.0 SE Unspecified Old Shafts 1958
437.0 SE Unspecified Disused Shafts 1976
437.0 SE Unspecified Disused Shafts 1990
448.0 S Unspecified Shaft 1879
460.0 W Unspecified Disused Shaft 1990
460.0 W Unspecified Disused Shaft 1976
461.0 S Engine Shaft 1906
467.0 W Unspecified Shaft 1879
469.0 S Engine Shaft 1879
475.0 S Unspecified Disused Shaft 1990
475.0 S Unspecified Disused Shaft 1976
2.2 Coal Mining
Are there any coal mining areas within 75m of the study site? No
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Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance:The study site is not located on or in proximity to an area which is affected by surface or sub-surface coal mining.
No further action is recommended.
2.3 Shallow Mining
What is the maximum hazard of subsidence relating to shallow mining within 175m* of the study site?
Low - Moderate
Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
The following shallow mining information provided by the British Geological Survey is not represented on Mapping:
Distance[m] Direction Details
0.0 On Site Low-Moderate
Guidance: Many types of mining such as ironstone or limestone extraction take place close to the surface. These types of
mining can pose a subsidence risk as they sometimes cause surface collapses. Where low-moderate is indicated, this means
that the rocks underlying the area are of a type known to have been mined at shallow depth in some parts of the UK, and
that such working may be possible in your area. In these cases it is recommended that you seek further advice from a Royal
Institute Chartered Surveyor (RICS), the local Building Control Officer, or by ordering a Geological Report from the BGS. It is
also recommended that you obtain a Coal Authority mining search, which will provide a comprehensive search of former
mining activity, including coal mining at deeper levels.
2.4 Mining Cavities
Is the site located in an area of mining cavities? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: This risk rating is obtained from the mining cavities dataset, which is supplied and digitally combined by Peter
Brett Associates. There are no records within 250m of the site.
2.5 Natural Cavities
Is the site located in an area of natural cavities? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: This risk rating is obtained from the mining cavities dataset, which is supplied and digitally combined by Peter
Brett Associates. There are no records within 250m of the site.
2.6 Brine Extraction
Is the site located in an area of brine extraction? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
2.7 Gypsum Extraction
Is the site located in an area of gypsum extraction? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
2.8 Tin Mining
Is the site located in an area of tin mining? Yes
*
This Includes an automated buffer of 150m.
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Risk Assessment In Need of Further Assessment
Guidance: This site is within a postcode where tin mining is reported to have occurred. This may or may not mean that this
site has been affected by tin mining. For further information you may wish to consider obtaining a Tin Mining report. This can
be ordered by contacting Mining Searches UK, Highburrow Lane, Wilson Way, Pool Industrial Estate, Redruth, Cornwall. TR15
3RN Tel: 01209 218861
2.9 Clay Mining
Is the site located in an area of clay mining? No
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No further action required.
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3. Natural Ground Subsidence
3.1 Natural Ground Subsidence
What is the potential for natural ground subsidence* within the search area? Negligible - Very Low
Guidance
This hazard rating is obtained from the amalgamation of six datasets which are supplied and digitally
combined by the British Geological Survey (BGS). These datasets indicate the hazard posed by the
occurrence of: Swell-Shrink Clay, Landslide, Compressible Ground, Collapsible Ground, Dissolution of
Soluble Rocks and Running Sands. Many Factors may contribute to ground subsidence problems. For
instance significant problems can arise in conurbations underlain by clay rich bedrock, such as over clay
strata in the South East of England, or South Wales. Whilst surveyors are normally aware of local
problem areas, data provided by the BGS can highlight areas where a significant potential for natural
ground subsidence exists and which may need particular consideration.
Where negligible - very low potential is indicated, this means that you need take no further action in
relation to natural ground subsidence in this area.
*The term “Subsidence” refers to ground movement that could cause damage to foundations in domestic
or other properties.
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4. Landfill and Waste Sites
NW
▲
N NE
◄W E►
SW S
▼
SE
Landfill & Waste Sites Legend Crown Copyright. All Rights
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4.1 Landfill Sites
Are there any operational or non-operational landfill sites within 500m of the search centre? Yes
Risk Assessment Passed
Guidance: No action required.
4.2 British Geological Survey / DoE Landfill Site Survey
Database searched and no data found.
4.3 Environment Agency Active Landfill Sites
Database searched and no data found.
4.4 Environment Agency Historic Landfill Sites
The following records are represented as points and polygons on the Landfill and Waste Sites
map. Only points or polygons within 500m of the property are detailed.
ID Distance [m] Direction Site Name Site Reference Data Type
1 334.0 NW Former Railway Cutting, Redruth Hospital,
Redruth, Cornwall
- Polygon
4.5 GroundSure Local Authority Landfill Sites Data
Database searched and no data found.
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5. Geology
5.1 Artificial Deposits/Made Ground
Database searched and no data found.
5.2 Superficial Deposits/Drift Geology
Database searched and no data found.
5.3 Bedrock Deposits/Solid Geology
Records of Bedrock Deposits/Solid Geology within 25m of the study site:
ID Distance (m) Direction LEX Code Description Rock Description
1 0.0 On Site MRSL-HSSL MYLOR SLATE FORMATION HORNFELSED SLATE AND
HORNFELSED SILTSTONE
2 0.0 S MRSL-MBAR MYLOR SLATE FORMATION METABASALTIC-ROCK
(Derived from 1:50,000 scale BGS Geological Survey Mapping)
5.4 Borehole Records
The systematic analysis of data extracted from the BGS Borehole Records database provides
the following information.
Records of boreholes within 250m of the search centre: 0
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Contacts
GroundSure Helpline
Telephone: 08444 159 000
info@4c.groundsure.com
Environment Agency
Tel: 08708 506 506
Devon and Cornwall
Exminster House - Miller Way, Exeter, EX6 8AS Tel: (01392)
444 000
South West Tel: (01392) 444000
Web: www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Email: enquiries@environment-agency.gov.uk
Local Authority
Cornwall Council. Address: County Hall, Treyew Road, Truro,
TR1 3AY.
Web: http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/
Tel: 0300 1234 100
British Geological Survey Enquiries
Kingsley Dunham Centre
Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG
Tel: 0115 936 3143. Fax: 0115 936 3276.
Email: enquiries@bgs.ac.uk
Web: www.bgs.ac.uk
BGS Geological Hazards Reports and general geological
enquiries
The Coal Authority
200 Lichfield Lane, Mansfield, Notts NG18 4RG
Tel: 0845 762 6848
DX 716176 Mansfield 5
Web: www.groundstability.com
Ordnance Survey
Romsey Road, Southampton SO16 4GU
Tel: 08456 050505
Getmapping PLC
Virginia Villas, High Street, Hartley Witney,
Hampshire RG27 8NW
Tel: 01252 845444
CoPSO
29 Harley Street, London W1G 9QR
Tel: 020 7927 6836
(www.copso.org.uk)
Peter Brett Associates
Caversham Bridge House, Waterman Place, Reading
Berkshire RG1 8DN
Tel: +44 (0)118 950 0761 E-mail: reading@pba.co.uk
This report is produced by GroundSure Ltd, whose correspondence address is Lees House, 21 Dyke Road, Brighton,
BN1 3FE (Tel: 08444 159 000, Fax: 01273 763569, Email: info@groundsure.com). GroundSure's registered address
is Greater London House, Hampstead Road, London NW1 7EJ. Registration Number: 3421028. VAT Number 486 4004
42.
Acknowledgements
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PointX © Database Right/Copyright, Thomson Directories Limited © Copyright Link Interchange Network Limited ©
Database Right/Copyright and Ordnance Survey © Crown Copyright and/or Database Right. All Rights Reserved.
Licence Number [03421028].
This report has been prepared in accordance with the GroundSure Ltd standard Terms and Conditions of business for
work of this nature.
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Search Code
IMPORTANT CONSUMER PROTECTION INFORMATION
This search has been produced by GroundSure Ltd, Lees House, 21 Dyke Road, Brighton, BN1 3FE. Tel: 08444 159
000. Email: info@4C.groundsure.com which is registered with the Property Codes Compliance Board (PCCB) as a
subscriber to the Search Code. The PCCB independently monitors how registered search firms maintain compliance
with the Code.
The Search Code:
·provides protection for homebuyers, sellers, estate agents, conveyancers and mortgage lenders who rely on the
information included in property search reports undertaken by subscribers on residential and commercial property
within the United Kingdom
·sets out minimum standards which firms compiling and selling search reports have to meet
·promotes the best practice and quality standards within the industry for the benefit of consumers and property
professionals
·enables consumers and property professionals to have confidence in firms which subscribe to the code, their
products and services.
By giving you this information, the search firm is confirming that they keep to the principles of the Code. This
provides important protection for you.
The Code’s core principles
Firms which subscribe to the Search Code will:
·display the Search Code logo prominently on their search reports
·act with integrity and carry out work with due skill, care and diligence
·at all times maintain adequate and appropriate insurance to protect consumers
·conduct business in an honest, fair and professional manner
·handle complaints speedily and fairly
·ensure that products and services comply with industry registration rules and standards and relevant laws
·monitor their compliance with the Code
COMPLAINTS
If you have a query or complaint about your search, you should raise it directly with the search firm, and if
appropriate ask for any complaint to be considered under their formal internal complaints procedure. If you remain
dissatisfied with the firm’s final response, after your complaint has been formally considered, or if the firm has
exceeded the response timescales, you may refer your complaint for consideration under The Property Ombudsman
scheme (TPOs). The Ombudsman can award compensation of up to £5,000 to you if he finds that you have suffered
actual loss as a result of your search provider failing to keep to the Code.
Please note that all queries or complaints regarding your search should be directed to your search
provider in the first instance, not to TPOs or to the PCCB.
TPOs Contact Details:
The Property Ombudsman scheme
Milford House
43-55 Milford Street
Salisbury
Wiltshire SP1 2BP
Tel: 01722 333306
Fax: 01722 332296
Email: admin@tpos.co.uk
You can get more information about the PCCB from www.propertycodes.org.uk.
PLEASE ASK YOUR SEARCH PROVIDER IF YOU WOULD LIKE A COPY OF THE SEARCH CODE
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COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE
If you want to make a complaint, we will:
·Acknowledge it within 5 working days of receipt.
·Normally deal with it fully and provide a final response, in writing, within 20 working days of receipt.
·Keep you informed by letter, telephone or e-mail, as you prefer, if we need more time.
·Provide a final response, in writing, at the latest within 40 working days of receipt.
·Liaise, at your request, with anyone acting formally on your behalf.
Complaints should be sent to: Operations Director, GroundSure Ltd, Lees House, 21 Dyke Road, Brighton, BN1 3FE.
Tel: 08444 159 000. Email: info@4C.groundsure.com
If you are not satisfied with our final response, or if we exceed the response timescales, you may refer the complaint
to The Property Ombudsman scheme (TPOs): Tel: 01722 333306, E-mail: admin@tpos.co.uk.
We will co-operate fully with the Ombudsman during an investigation and comply with his final decision.
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Standard Terms and Conditions
1 Definitions
In these conditions unless the context otherwise requires:
“Beneficiary” means the Client or the customer of the Client for whom the Client has procured the Services.
“Commercial” means any building which is not Residential.
“Commission" means an order for Consultancy Services submitted by a Client.
“Consultancy Services” mean consultancy services provided by GroundSure including, without limitation, carrying out interpretation of third party and in-house environmental
data, provision of environmental consultancy advice, undertaking environmental audits and assessments, Site investigation, Site monitoring and related items.
“Contract” means the contract between GroundSure and the Client for the performance of the Services which arises upon GroundSure's acceptance of an Order or Commission and
which shall incorporate these conditions, the relevant GroundSure User Guide, proposal by GroundSure and the content of any subsequent report, and any agreed amendments in
accordance with clause 11.
“Client” means the party that submits an Order or Commission.
“Data Provider” means any third party providing Third Party Content to GroundSure.
“Data Report” means reports comprising factual data with no professional interpretation in respect of the level of likely risk and/or liability available from GroundSure.
“GroundSure” means GroundSure Limited, a company registered in England and Wales under number 03421028 and whose registered office is at Greater London House,
Hampstead Road, London NW1 7EJ.
“GroundSure Materials” means all materials prepared by GroundSure as a result of the provision of the Services, including but not limited to Data Reports, Mapping and Risk
Screening Reports.
“Intellectual Property” means any patent, copyright, design rights, service marks, moral rights, data protection rights, know-how, trade mark or any other intellectual property
rights.
“Mapping” an historical map or a combination of historical maps of various ages, time periods and scales available from GroundSure.
“Order” means an order form submitted by the Client requiring Services from GroundSure in respect of a specified Site.
“Order Website” means online platform via which Orders may be placed.
“Report” means a Risk Screening Report or Data Report for commercial or residential property available from GroundSure relating to the Site prepared in accordance with the
specifications set out in the relevant User Guide.
“Residential” means any building used as or suitable for use as an individual dwelling.
“Risk Screening Report” means one of GroundSure’s risk screening reports, comprising factual data with interpretation in respect of the level of likely risk and/or liability,
excluding “Consultancy Services”.
“Services” means the provision of any Report, Mapping or Consultancy Services which GroundSure has agreed to carry out for the Client/Beneficiary on these terms and conditions
in respect of the Site.
"Site" means the landsite in respect of which GroundSure provides the Services.
“Third Party Content” means any data, database or other information contained in a Report or Mapping which is provided to GroundSure by a Data Provider.
"User Guide" means the relevant current version of the user guide, available upon request from GroundSure.
2 Scope of Services
2.1 GroundSure agrees to carry out the Services in accordance with the Contract and to the extent set out therein.
2.2 GroundSure shall exercise all the reasonable skill, care and diligence to be expected of experienced environmental consultants in the performance of the Services.
2.3 The Client acknowledges that it has not relied on any statement or representation made by or on behalf of GroundSure which is not set out and expressly agreed in the Contract.
2.4 Terms and conditions appearing on a Client’s order form, printed stationery or other communication, including invoices, to GroundSure, its employees, servants, agents or other
representatives or any terms implied by custom, practice or course of dealing shall be of no effect and these terms and conditions shall prevail over all others.
2.5 If a Client/Beneficiary requests insurance in conjunction with or as a result of the Services, GroundSure shall use reasonable endeavours to procure such insurance, but makes
no warranty that such insurance shall be available from insurers or offered on reasonable terms. GroundSure does not endorse or recommend any particular insurance product,
policy or insurer. Any insurance purchased shall be subject solely to the terms of the policy issued by insurers and GroundSure will have no liability therefor. The
Client/Beneficiary should take independent advice to ensure that the insurance policy requested and/or offered is suitable for its requirements.
2.6 GroundSure's quotations/proposals are valid for a period of 30 days only. GroundSure reserves the right to withdraw any quotation at any time before GroundSure accepts an
Order or Commission. GroundSure's acceptance of an Order or Commission shall be effective only where such acceptance is in writing and signed by GroundSure's authorised
representative or where accepted via GroundSure’s Order Website.
3 The Client’s obligations
3.1 The Client shall ensure the Beneficiary complies with and is bound by the terms and conditions set out in the Contract and shall provide that Groundsure may in its own right
enforce such terms and conditions against the Beneficiary pursuant to the Contracts (Rights of Third parties) Act 1999. The Client shall be liable for all breaches of the Contract
by the Beneficiary as if they were breaches by the Client. The Client shall be solely responsible for ensuring that the Report/Mapping ordered is appropriate and suitable for the
Beneficiary’s needs.
3.2 The Client shall (or shall procure that the Beneficiary shall) supply to GroundSure as soon as practicable and without charge all information necessary and accurate relevant data
including any specific and/or unusual environmental information relating to the Site known to the Client/Beneficiary which may pertain to the Services and shall give such
assistance as GroundSure shall reasonably require in the performance of the Services (including, without limitation, access to a Site, facilities and equipment as agreed in the
Contract).
3.3 Where Client/Beneficiary approval or decision is required, such approval or decision shall be given or procured in reasonable time as not to delay or disrupt the performance of
any other part of the Services.
3.4 The Client shall not and shall not knowingly permit the Beneficiary to, save as expressly permitted by these terms and conditions, re-sell, alter, add to, amend or use out of
context the content of any Report, Mapping or, in respect of any Services, information given by GroundSure. For the avoidance of doubt, the Client and Beneficiary may make
the Report, Mapping or GroundSure’s findings available to a third party who is considering acquiring the whole or part of the Site, or providing funding in relation to the Site, but
such third party cannot rely on the same unless expressly permitted under clause 4.
3.5 The Client is responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of its user name and password if using GroundSure’s internet ordering service and accepts responsibility for all
activity that occurs under such account and password.
4 Reliance
4.1 Upon full payment of all relevant fees and subject to the provisions of these terms and conditions, the Client and Beneficiary are granted an irrevocable royalty-free licence to
access the information contained in a Report, Mapping or in a report prepared by GroundSure in respect of or arising out of Consultancy Services. The Services may only be
used for the benefit of the Client and those persons listed in clauses 4.2 and 4.3.
4.2 In relation to Data Reports, Mapping and Risk Screening Reports, the Client shall be entitled to make Reports available to (i) the Beneficiary, (ii) the Beneficiary's professional
advisers, (iii) any person providing funding to the Beneficiary in relation to the Site (whether directly or as part of a lending syndicate), (iv) the first purchaser or first tenant of
the Site (v) the professional advisers and lenders of the first purchaser or tenant of the Site. Accordingly GroundSure shall have the same duties and obligations to those
persons in respect of the Services as it has to the Client and those persons shall have the benefit of any of the Client's rights under the Contract as if those persons were parties
to the Contract. For the avoidance of doubt, the limitations of GroundSure's liability as set out in clauses 7 and 11.6 shall apply.
4.3 In relation to Consultancy Services, reliance shall be limited to the Client, Beneficiary and named parties on the Report.
4.4 Save as set out in clauses 4.2 and 4.3 and unless otherwise agreed in writing with GroundSure, any other party considering the information supplied by GroundSure as part of
the Services, including (but not limited to) insurance underwriters, does so at their own risk and GroundSure has no legal obligations to such party unless otherwise agreed in
writing.
4.5 The Client shall not and shall not knowingly permit any person (including the Beneficiary) who is provided with a copy of any Report, (except as permitted herein or by separate
agreement with GroundSure) to,: (a) remove, suppress or modify any trade mark, copyright or other proprietary marking from the Report or Mapping; (b) create any product
which is derived directly or indirectly from the data contained in the Report or Mapping; (c) combine the Report or Mapping with, or incorporate the Report or Mapping into any
other information data or service; or (d) re-format or otherwise change (whether by modification, addition or enhancement) data or images contained in the Report or Mapping.
4.6 Notwithstanding clause 4.5, if the Client acts in a professional capacity, it may make reasonable use of a Report and/or findings made as a result of Consultancy Services to
advise Beneficiaries. However, GroundSure shall have no liability in respect of any opinion or report given to such Beneficiaries by the Client or a third party.
5 Fees and Disbursements
5.1 GroundSure shall charge the Client fees at the rate and frequency specified in the Contract together, in the case of Consultancy Services, with all proper disbursements incurred
by GroundSure in performing the Services. For the avoidance of doubt, the fees payable for the Services are as set out in GroundSure's written proposal, Order Website or
Order acknowledgement form. The Client shall in addition pay all value added tax or other tax payable on such fees and disbursements in relation to the provision of the
Services.
5.2 Unless GroundSure requires prepayment, the Client shall promptly pay all fees disbursements and other monies due to GroundSure in full without deduction, counterclaim or set
off together with such value added tax or other tax as may be required within 30 days from the date of GroundSure’s invoice or such other period as may be agreed in writing
between GroundSure and the Client ("Payment Date"). GroundSure reserves the right to charge interest which shall accrue on a daily basis from 30 days after the date of
Payment Date until the date of payment (whether before or after judgment) at the rate of five per cent per annum above the Bank of England base rate from time to time.
5.3 In the event that the Client disputes the amount payable in respect of GroundSure’s invoice it shall notify GroundSure no later than 28 days after the date thereof that it is in
dispute. In default of such notification the Client shall be deemed to have agreed the amount thereof. As soon as reasonably practicable following receipt of a notification in
respect of any disputed invoice, a member of the management team at GroundSure shall contact the Client and the parties shall use all reasonable endeavours to resolve the
dispute.
6 Intellectual Property and Confidentiality
6.1 Subject to the provisions of clause 4.1, the Client and the Beneficiary hereby acknowledge that all Intellectual Property in the Services and Content are and shall remain owned
by either GroundSure or the Data Providers and nothing in these terms purports to transfer or assign any rights to the Client or the Beneficiary in respect of the Intellectual
Property.
6.2 The Client shall acknowledge the ownership of the Third Party Content where such Third Party Content is incorporated or used in the Client's own documents, reports,
systems or services whether or not these are supplied to a third party.
6.3 Data Providers may enforce any breach of clauses 6.1 and 6.2 against the Client or Beneficiary.
Report Reference: ReportReference
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6.4 The Client acknowledges that the proprietary rights subsisting in copyright, database rights and any other intellectual property rights in respect of any data and information
contained in any Report are and shall remain (subject to clause 11.1) the property of GroundSure and/or any third party that has supplied data or information used to create a
Report, and that these conditions do not purport to grant, assign or transfer any such rights in respect thereof to a Client and/or a Beneficiary.
6.5 The Client shall (and shall procure that any recipients of the Report as permitted under clause 4.2 shall):
(i) not remove, suppress or modify any trademark, copyright or other proprietary marking belonging to GroundSure or any third party from the Services;
(ii) use the information obtained as part of the Services in respect of the subject Site only, and shall not store or reuse any information obtained as part of the Services provided
in respect of adjacent or nearby sites;
(iii) not create any product or report which is derived directly or indirectly from the data contained in the Services (save that those acting in a professional capacity to the
Beneficiary may provide advice based upon the Services);
(iv) not combine the Services with or incorporate such Services into any other information data or service; and
(v) not reformat or otherwise change (whether by modification, addition or enhancement), data contained in the Services (save that those acting in a professional capacity to
the Beneficiary shall not be in breach of this clause 6.5(v) where such reformatting is in the normal course of providing advice based upon the Services),
in each case of parts (iii) to (v) inclusive, whether or not such product or report is produced for commercial profit or not.
6.6 The Client and/or Beneficiary shall and shall procure that any party to whom the Services are made available shall notify GroundSure of any request or requirement to disclose,
publish or disseminate any information contained in the Services in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000, the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 or
any associated legislation or regulations in force from time to time.
6.8 Save as otherwise set out in these terms and conditions, any information provided by one party ("Disclosing Party") to the other party ("Receiving Party") shall be treated as
confidential and only used for the purposes of these terms and conditions, except in so far as the Receiving Party is authorised by the Disclosing Party to provide such
information in whole or in part to a third party.
7 Liability THE CLIENT’S ATTENTION IS DRAWN TO THIS PROVISION
7.1Subject to the provisions of this clause 7, GroundSure shall be liable to the Beneficiary only in relation to any direct losses or damages caused by any negligent act or omission of
GroundSure in preparing the GroundSure Materials and provided that the Beneficiary has used all reasonable endeavours to mitigate any such losses.
7.2GroundSure shall not be liable for any other losses or damages incurred by the Beneficiary, including but not limited to:
(i) loss of profit, revenue, business or goodwill, losses relating to business interruption, loss of anticipated savings, loss of or corruption to data or for any special, indirect or
consequential loss or damage which arise out of or in connection with the GroundSure Materials or otherwise in relation to a Contract;
(ii) any losses or damages that arise as a result of the use of all or part of the GroundSure Materials in breach of these terms and conditions or contrary to the terms of the
relevant User Guide;
(iii) any losses or damages that arise as a result of any error, omission or inaccuracy in any part of the GroundSure Materials where such part is based on any Third Party
Content or any reasonable interpretation of Third Party Content. The Client accepts, and shall procure that any other Beneficiary shall accept, that it has no claim or
recourse to any Data Provider in relation to Third Party Content; and/or
(iv) any loss or damage to a Client’s computer, software, modem, telephone or other property caused by a delay or loss of use of GroundSure’s internet ordering service.
7.3 GroudSure’s total liability in contract, tort (including negligence or breach of statutory duty), misrepresentation, restitution or otherwise, arising in connection with the
GroundSure Materials or otherwise in relation to the Contract shall be limited to £10 million in total (i) for any one claim or (ii) for a series of connected claims brought by one
or more parties.
7.4 For the duration of the liability periods set out in clauses 7.5 and 7.6 below, GroundSure shall maintain professional indemnity insurance in respect of its liability under these
terms and conditions provided such insurance is readily available at commercially viable rates. GroundSure shall produce evidence of such insurance if reasonably requested by
the Client. A level of cover greater than GroundSure’s current level of cover may be available upon request and agreement with the Client.
7.5 Any claim under the Contract in relation to Data Reports, Mapping and Risk Screening Reports, must be brought within six years from the date when the Beneficiary became
aware that it may have a claim and in no event may a claim be brought twelve years or more after completion of such a Contract. For the avoidance of doubt, any claim in
respect of which proceedings are notified to GroundSure in writing prior to the expiry of the time periods referred to in this clause 7.5 shall survive the expiry of those time
periods provided the claim is actually commenced within six months of notification.
7.6 Any claim under the Contract in relation to Consultancy Services, must be brought within six years from the date the Consultancy Services were completed.
7.7 he Client accepts and shall procure that any other Beneficiary shall accept that it has no claim or recourse to any Data Provider or to GroundSure in respect of the acts or
omissions of any Data Provider and/or any Third Party Content provided by a Data Provider.
7.8 Nothing in these terms and conditions:
(i) excludes or limits the liability of GroundSure for death or personal injury caused by GroundSure’s negligence, or for fraudulent misrepresentation; or
(ii) shall affect the statutory rights of a consumer under the applicable legislation.
8 GroundSure right to suspend or terminate
8.1 In the event that GroundSure reasonably believes that the Client or Beneficiary as applicable has not provided the information or assistance required to enable the proper
performance of the Services, GroundSure shall be entitled on fourteen days written notice to suspend all further performance of the Services until such time as any such
deficiency has been made good.
8.2 GroundSure may additionally terminate the Contract immediately on written notice in the event that:
(i)the Client shall fail to pay any sum due to GroundSure within 28 days of the Payment Date; or
(ii)the Client (being an individual) has a bankruptcy order made against him or (being a company) shall enter into liquidation whether compulsory or voluntary or have an
Administration Order made against it or if a Receiver shall be appointed over the whole or any part of its property assets or undertaking or if the Client is struck off the
Register of Companies or dissolved; or
(iii) the Client being a company is unable to pay its debts within the meaning of Section 123 of the Insolvency Act 1986 or being an individual appears unable to pay his debts
within the meaning of Section 268 of the Insolvency Act 1986 or if the Client shall enter into a composition or arrangement with the Client’s creditors or shall suffer distress
or execution to be levied on his goods; or
(iv)the Client or the Beneficiary breaches any material term of the Contract (including, but not limited to, the obligations in clause 4) incapable of remedy or if remediable, is
not remedied within 14 days of notice of the breach.
9 Client’s Right to Terminate and Suspend
9.1 Subject to clause 10.2, the Client may at any time after commencement of the Services by notice in writing to GroundSure require GroundSure to terminate or suspend
immediately performance of all or any of the Services.
9.2 The Client waives all and any right of cancellation it may have under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000 (as amended) in respect of the Order of a
Report/Mapping. This does not affect the Beneficiary's statutory rights.
10 Consequences of Withdrawal, Termination or Suspension
10.1 Upon termination or any suspension of the Services, GroundSure shall take steps to bring to an end the Services in an orderly manner, vacate any Site with all reasonable
speed and shall deliver to the Client/Beneficiary any property of the Client/ Beneficiary in GroundSure’s possession or control.
10.2 In the event of termination/suspension of the Contract under clauses 8 or 9, the Client shall pay to GroundSure all and any fees payable in respect of the performance of the
Services up to the date of termination/suspension. In respect of any Consultancy Services provided, the Client shall also pay GroundSure any additional costs incurred in
relation to the termination/suspension of the Contract.
11 General
11.1 The mapping contained in the Services is protected by Crown copyright and must not be used for any purpose outside the context of the Services or as specifically provided in
these terms.
11.2 GroundSure reserves the right to amend these terms and conditions. No variation to these terms shall be valid unless signed by an authorised representative of GroundSure.
11.3 No failure on the part of GroundSure to exercise and no delay in exercising, any right, power or provision under these terms and conditions shall operate as a waiver thereof.
11.4 Save as expressly provided in clauses 4.2, 4.3, 6.3 and 11.5, no person other than the persons set out therein shall have any right under the Contract (Rights of Third Parties)
Act 1999 to enforce any terms of the Contract.
11.5 The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government acting through Ordnance Survey may enforce breach of clause 6.1 of these terms and conditions against the
Client in accordance with the provisions of the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999.
11.6 GroundSure shall not be liable to the Client if the provision of the Services is delayed or prevented by one or more of the following circumstances:
(i) the Client or Beneficiary’s failure to provide facilities, access or information;
(ii) fire, storm, flood, tempest or epidemic;
(iii) Acts of God or the public enemy;
(iv) riot, civil commotion or war;
(v) strikes, labour disputes or industrial action;
(vi) acts or regulations of any governmental or other agency;
(vii) suspension or delay of services at public registries by Data Providers; or
(viii) changes in law.
11.7 Any notice provided shall be in writing and shall be deemed to be properly given if delivered by hand or sent by first class post, facsimile or by email to the address, facsimile
number or email address of the relevant party as may have been notified by each party to the other for such purpose or in the absence of such notification the last known
address.
11.8 Such notice shall be deemed to have been received on the day of delivery if delivered by hand, facsimile or email and on the second working day after the day of posting if
sent by first class post.
11.9 The Contract constitutes the entire contract between the parties and shall supersede all previous arrangements between the parties.
11.10 Each of the provisions of the Contract is severable and distinct from the others and if one or more provisions is or should become invalid, illegal or unenforceable, the validity
and enforceability of the remaining provisions shall not in any way be tainted or impaired.
11.11 These terms and conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English law and any proceedings arising out of or connected with these terms and
conditions shall be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts.
11.12 If the Client or Beneficiary has a complaint about the Services, notice can be given in any format eg writing, phone, email to the Compliance Officer at GroundSure who will
respond in a timely manner.
©GroundSure Limited January 2012
Report Reference: ReportReference
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NUNEATON AND NORTH WARWICKSHIRE
FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY
Member of the Federation of Family History Societies
http://www.nnwfhs.org.uk
JOURNAL JANUARY 2006
Price £1.50 (first copy free to members)
Oldbury Hall, Near Mancetter
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 1
NNWFHS COMMITTEE
CHAIRMAN PETER LEE, P O Box 2282, Nuneaton, Warwicks CV116ZT
 Tel: (024) 7638 1090 Email: Nuneatonian2000@aol.com
INDEXING PROJECTS CO-ORDINATOR CAROLYN BOSS, Nuneaton Library, Church Street, Nuneaton,
& VICE CHAIR Warwickshire CV11 4DR Tel: (024) 7638 4027
MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY JOHN PARTON, 6 Windmill Rd, Atherstone, Warwickshire CV9 1HP
 Tel: (01827) 713938 Email: JAParton@aol.com
TREASURER & CELIA PARTON, 6 Windmill Rd, Atherstone, Warwickshire CV91HP
NORTH WARWICKSHIRE CO-ORDINATOR Tel: (01827) 713938 Email: CEParton@aol.com
JOURNAL & PUBLICATIONS EDITOR PAT BOUCHER, 33 Buttermere Ave, Nuneaton,Warwicks CV11 6ET
& MICROFICHE LENDING LIBRARIAN Tel: (024) 7638 3488 Email: editor@nnwfhs.org.uk
PUBLICATIONS MANAGER ROBERT BUTLER, 16 Dovecote Close, Solihull, West Midlands
 B91 2EP Tel 0121 743 8526
 Email: bobbutler@16dovecote.freeserve.co.uk
WEBSITE MANAGER BILL BOSWELL, 21 Randle Road, Stockingford, Nuneaton,Warwicks
 CV10 8HR Tel: (024) 7634 3596 Email: bill.boswell@btinternet.com
COMMITTEE ALAN F COOK
 Tel (mobile): 07813615522 Email: alanfcook_geo@btinternet.com
COMMITTEE JACQUI SIMKINS, Langley Mill Farm Sutton Coldfield W Midlands
 B75 7HR Tel: (0121) 311 0455
 Email: jas@langleymill.freeserve.co.uk
COMMITTEE VAL PICKARD, 108 Lister Road, Atherstone, Warwicks CV9 3DF
 Tel: (01827) 711863 Email: vpickard1@aol.com
COMMITTEE LINDA BODEN, 45 Grove Road, Atherstone, Warwicks, CV9 1DJ
 Tel: (01827) 709015 Email: theones.beforme@ntlworld.com
COMMITTEE CAROL HUGHES, Millstone, Mill Lane, Wolvey, Nr Hinckley,
 Leicestershire LE103HR
 Tel: (01455) 220408 Email: petalhughes@aol.com
NORTH AMERICAN REPRESENTATIVE HARLOW G FARMER, 7101 Bay Front Dr. #124 Annapolis, MD
 21403 USA. Email: HGFarmer23@CS.com
CONTENTS PAGE
NNWFHS Committee 1
NNWFHS Diary - A Report From The Chairman, Peter Lee 2
Recycling And Football And Cricket - By Brian Mitchell 3
Griff - By Peter Lee 6
What’s New 7
My Early years In Atherstone - By Horace William Lewis 8
Modern Day Hunter-Gatherers 11
The Bull Ring - By Peter Lee 11
Down Memory Lane, An Old Railway Engine - By Peter Lee 12
Notices of Births, Marriages and Deaths from Nuneaton Observer 1936 13
Genealogical FAQs - What Are Bastardy Bonds? 14
Craddock & Bull, Bankers, Nuneaton - By Peter Lee 15
Notice Board 16
Publications 17 
Page 2 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
 First of all I would like to wish you all a Happy New
Year and, with a new year upon us, it is time to look
back and reflect on the old. To see if we have learned
anything new or compromised in some way our efforts
in that quest we have undertaken in search of our
ancestors. On reflection I have learned something new
and dwelt upon it. In December I was traumatised to
discover that an old correspondent of mine, whose
family were big people in Nuneaton and district in the
17th and 18th century, had, due to advancing years, and
not having an immediate family to leave it to, trashed
his archives. Forty odd files of family records, 135 fully
transcribed wills, correspondence and a mass of
information of the most breathless importance, at a
whim, gone. I could not believe it, and then I did
understand because such a legacy had become a huge
burden to him.
I hesitated when he told me of his plans, I said I would
try and find an archival home for it as it was certainly a
Warwickshire matter, but in the wink of an eye he lost
heart and it had gone. Therefore, here is a plea. If you
find yourself in that position please contact the
NNWFHS and let us help you find the best repository
for your records. There must be somewhere that will
take them. It calls into question what will happen to our
precious archives. A pause for thought as we plan for
the year ahead.
On a lighter note I was pleased to receive a new book
recently published by the Friends of Atherstone
Heritage – “Hats, Coal and Bloodshed” by John Austin
one of our leading local historians from an ancient
Atherstone family. It is in effect a potted history of
Atherstone, its street names, important local families,
ancient buildings, collieries and pubs including the
surrounding villages, hamlets and of Atterton,
Baddesley Ensor, Baxterley, Bentley, Dordon, Fenny
Drayton, Grendon, Mancetter, Merevale, Pinwall,
Ratcliffe Culey, Ridge Lane, Sheepy, Weston,
Whittington and Witherley. It is packed with information.
A mine of knowledge for anyone whose family come
from this area.
What struck me from John’s work is the intense
concentration of history in the area we are interested in.
Few places in England can boast two crucial battles,
which turned the course of events so forcibly in this
island. At Mancetter the battle where Boadicea was
routed by a small Roman garrison of just 11,000 highly
trained and amply equipped soldiers against 120,000
tribal Britons. It is said that over 80,000 of Boadicea’s
people were killed but only 400 Romans lost their lives.
Then, of course, the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, which
might equally have been called the Battle of Atherstone,
as it now seems the killing field was as close to that
town as it was formerly believed to be near Market
NnwFHs Diary
A Report From The Chairman, Peter Lee
Bosworth. Although it is highly likely the main drama
was played out at the field of Redesmore on the Fen
Lanes, the battle and various minor skirmishes might
have lapped over towards Fenny Drayton.
Battles were not clear-cut events and although the king
was dead, the vanquished might have been chased and
stood rearguard action over a wide area. The two
camps of historical devotees, The Ricardians and the
Tudor supporters, are noisily fighting this battle in print
520 years later!
Another thing we can now see is the way that various
country estates which once were a feature of the
glorious Warwickshire/Leicestershire borderlands have
disappeared; with many grand old houses and
mansions of ancient families bulldozed out of existence;
notably: Baxterley Old Hall, 1849; Grendon Hall, 1932;
Oldbury Hall, 1941; Atherstone Hall, 1963; Mancetter
Lodge, 1965; Hall End Hall, 1969; Mancetter House,
1970; these are all illustrated in John’s book. John does
not mention other great houses in the Nuneaton area,
for example as it is outside the scope of his book, but in
that area the following fascinating old buildings:
Attleborough Hall, Bretts Hall, Camp Hill Hall, Caldwell
Hall, Weddington Hall, etc. are now mere footnotes in
the historical records
Copies of the book are available through:
Friends of Atherstone Heritage, The Heritage Centre
The Market Square, 20 Church Street
ATHERSTONE, Warwickshire CV9 1HA
Book reference: ISBN 0-9538532-2-5 and ISBN 978-0-
9538532-2-9
Price: £12.95 + carriage and packing. Or through your
usual book retailers.
NNWFHS
HELPLINE
Peter Lee
(024) 7638 1090
6.30 - 8.00pm
Mon to Sat
Or email:
Nuneatonian2000@aol.com 
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 3
“While England’s cricketers strive to
build Jerusalem in their green and
pleasant land, the nation’s footballers
seem intent on reconstructing
Hogarth’s London. Depravity and
degradation are everywhere...” was
Patrick Barclay’s view, published in the
Sunday Telegraph of September 11,
2005, the day before the England
cricket team beat Australia in the Fifth
Test and clinched the series - at which
Simon Briggs argued “this Ashes
summer has redefined sport in the 21st
century”, Daily Telegraph, Tuesday
September 13th. But by this point, even
before the middle of September, there
was a growing disenchantment with
‘the winter game’, football. A fall in
Premiership attendances, claims that
the football was negative and boring,
ticket prices too high because of the
greed of clubs and players - their
excessive weekly wages set alongside
their underperformance - not to
mention the behaviour of certain
footballers on and off the pitch! Too
much soccer on television turning more
spectators into armchair viewers and
then, to cap it all, poor performances by
the England team in preparation for
their World Cup qualification
culminating in what was regarded by
aficionados as “one of the worst defeats
in history”, losing 1- 0 to N Ireland in
Belfast.
All this reminded me of a report my
eyes lit upon recently while searching
for the notice of a particular wedding in
old newspapers. There, in a 'Special
Supplement to the Atherstone News' of
Friday December 18th, 1896, were not
only the wedding details but also this,
which I will now recycle:
The first meeting of the Atherstone
Debating Society was held at the Mixed
Board School on Wednesday evening,
the subject for discussion being - “Is
football as an exercise superior to
cycling?” Mr W J W Bourne presided,
but the attendance was not so large as
might have been expected, considering
the popularity of the winter pastime.
The Rev W Northcott opened the
debate on behalf of football, his
contention being that the game, if
played in a sportsmanlike manner, was
more likely to produce beneficial
results as a physical exercise than
cycling.
I found it rather surprising that the
minister should argue for football, even
though he made his support conditional
upon it being “played in a
sportsmanlike manner”, unless he was
playing devil’s advocate, whereas
p e r h a p s t h e m o r e t y p i c a l
(stereotypical?) view of football was
made by a renowned local gentleman:
Mr Charles Vero took up the negative
view of the question, and argued that
football, as played at the present time,
appeared to him to be more of a fight
than a game, and that it often led to
betting and other evil influences. He
spoke in high terms of cycling, and said
it was a grand thing that such a useful
pastime was within reach of the present
generation.
Following on from the “hobby-horse”
in the early part of the 19th Century,
the next major development in bicycle
design was the “velocipede” initially
developed in France but which didn’t
achieve its greatest popularity until the
late 1860s. Its most significant
improvement was the addition of
cranks and pedals to the front wheel,
making it easier for riders to propel the
machine at faster speeds. The use of
metal frames reduced the weight and
different braking mechanisms were
used according to the manufacturer. In
England the velocipede became known
as “the Boneshaker” because of its rigid
frame and iron-banded wheels. The
high bicycle was the logical extension
of the boneshaker design, the front
wheel enlarging, the rear wheel
shrinking and the frame being made
lighter. John Kemp Starley (the nephew
of James Starley, who was regarded as
the father of the British cycling
industry and who, in Coventry, had
added the tangent spokes and mounting
step to his famous bicycle named
“Ariel” - of the fast but unsafe highwheeler
type which were nicknamed
“Penny Farthings”) produced the first
successful safety bicycle, “the Rover”,
which he never patented, in 1885,
featuring equally sized wheels and a
chain drive to the rear wheel. It was
widely imitated and had replaced the
h i g h - w h e e l e r b y 1 8 9 0 . T h e
combination of the chain drive, the
pneumatic tyre (re-invented by John
Boyd Dunlop in 1888) and the diamond
frame all helped for a smoother, more
comfortable and safer ride and so
bicycles became very popular among
the elite and middle classes in the
middle and late 1890s. Bicycle
historians often call this period the
“golden age or the “bicycle craze”. By
the beginning of the 20th century
bicycling had become an important
means of transportation and recreation
with the establishment of clubs - of
which Atherstone had one.
The town had only one cycle agent
listed in Kelly’s Directory for 1896 - J
Porter, who in the 1899 Street
Directory was listed under “Church
Street - west side” below “the Angel
Hotel”. F J Deeming, “Certificated
Repairer to the C T C, Agent for the
Royal Ensign, New Ensign, Royal
Enfield and other high grade cycles”,
placed an advertisement in the
(Continued on page 4)
Recycling And Football And Cricket!
By Brian Mitchell
Ad No 1 
Page 4 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
(Continued from page 3)
Atherstone News in April 1898 for his
Cycle Depot on the south side of Long
Street (next to Avin’s Yard). He was
listed in the 1899 Street Directory, as
were Eaton and Tingay on the east side
of Market Place. Over a decade later, in
May 1910 George Eaton was indulging
in startling self-promotion in his
advertisement - “While you are talking
about GEORGE EATON, you are not
talking about anyone else. EATON is
the man you want to talk about. He is
the CHEAPEST MAN IN TOWN for
Cycles and Cycle Accessories. It is all a
rumour that EATON has given up
selling cycles. He has sold this season
more than any other EATON is the
man for value” Eaton and Tingay were
advertising in the local newspaper in
May 1899 and they were accompanied
in May 1900 by Brown Bros who in the
1900 edition of Kelly’s Trade Directory
are listed as ‘pawnbrokers and
clothiers’ in Long Street. In April 1898
they were advertising clothing, readymade
or to measure for the cricket and
cycle season as well as cycles - as sole
agents for Wulfruna, the Moseley and
Sharpshooter cycles. Various travelling
bags, baskets and trunks were also on
offer for spring (see featured ad No.1).
In May the same year F Deeming &
Co, Cycle Stores were advertising
“Premier, Humber, Singer, Coventry
Challenge, Coventry Avon and other
Coventry Machines; also Royal Ensign
and New Ensign, with B S A or Eadie
Fittings; Royal Enfield and the New
Howe.” He was offering second-hand
machines from £4 (see featured ad No
2).
In May 1899 Eaton and Tingay were
offering at special prices for
Whitsuntide Star Cycles - a
Wolverhampton make, Al value, a
“grand machine” (Ladies’ or Gents’)
for £7.10.00 with a 12 months’
guarantee. There were different prices
for different tyres - £6.10 for cushion
tyres, £7.10 for clipper tyres, hollow
rim, £8.10 for Warwick tyres,
Westwood rim and £10.10 for 1899
Dunlop tyres - even boys’ and girls’
models. The following year they were
offering for the “Cycle Season, 1900”
new models apart from Star Cycles at
the increased price of £8.10: Eagle
Cycle at £9.10 and Centaur - high grade
from one of the oldest firms in
Coventry at £10.10. In addition,
machines could be taken in exchange or
for hire. (See featured ad No 3) Above
this, in the same column, Brown Bros’
stock was advertised starting at
£7.15s.0d: Lady’s or Gent’s cycles for
the 1900 season (how fashionable!) - a
little cheaper than Eaton and Tingay’s
cheapest model but then they did make
it clear that “our prices cannot be
beaten”, “better value never offered”,
“fully warranted” - there was even a
gradual payment system available on
application. Customers were invited to
call and inspect their stock “before
purchasing your New Machine for
1900” (see featured ad No 4).
In the Atherstone News of May 28th,
1897, F J Deeming placed a notice of a
meeting to be held at the Red Lion
Hotel on Monday 31st with a view to
the re-construction of the Atherstone
Cycling Club, including a Ladies’
Section. He was the Hon. Sec. pro tem.
This period of the late 1890s then
reveals the growth of a new,
competitive market in Atherstone -
much like that of mobile phones in the
late 1990s.
But, back to that first debate of the new
Debating Society: A very interesting
discussion followed, the advantages of
football being championed by Messrs.
Clarence Bourne, A Swann and R
Thomason; Mr Thomason, if I have the
correct individual, was also interested
in fishing and cricket. Fifteen years on
from this first debate, the following
note appeared in the Atherstone News
o f F r i d a y F e b 2 4 t h , 1 9 1 1 :
PISCATORIAL - Mr Ralph Thomason
landed a fine pike, weighing just over
15lbs, in the River Anker, near King
Dick’s Hole, on Saturday last.
The annual dinner of the Atherstone
Cricket Club was held at the Corn
Exchange on the last Friday in
February 1897, the attendance
numbering about 70. Considerable
efforts had been made to place the club
on a substantial successful footing and
the 1896 season had been of a very
satisfactory character. Mr R Stafford
(Vice-Chairman and Secretary) was
pleased to inform the members that
they would begin the new season with a
(Continued on page 5)
Ad No 2
Ad No 3
Ad No 4 
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 5
(Continued from page 4)
balance in hand, unlike the previous
year when they “had not a penny with
which to start the season”. They looked
at cricket as a game which should be
played under friendly circumstances
and the club had decided to play only
“friendly” matches in the coming
season. Much toasting and singing took
place during the proceedings before the
Chairman, Mr Gerald Hardy, M F H
handed out a considerable number of
prizes. Less than a fortnight later, a
meeting was held at the Cricketers'
Arms to form “The Atherstone Town
Cricket and Athletic Club” with fifty in
attendance. A Chairman (Mr Kingesley
Johnson), President (Mr C Atherton
Brown) and Secretary, (Mr Benjamin
Greaves, subject to his consent) were
appointed as well as eleven men to the
Committee - which included R
Thomason. The general fee for
membership was set at 2s.6d. ‘Benny’
Greaves, as he was affectionately
known, was Headmaster of the Boys’
School, South Street, from his arrival
in Atherstone in 1873 for a period of
45 years until 1929 when he left the
district. He was a keen sportsman and
cyclist - he was, apparently, the first
Captain of the Bicycle Club formed in
Atherstone in the days of the
Boneshaker and Penny Farthing.
The first annual Atherstone Athletic
sports (under A A A Laws and N C U
Rules) in connection with the recentlyf
o r m e d A t h e r s t o n e A t h l e t i c
Association were held on the Ratcliffe
Road Football Ground on an
excessively hot Tuesday afternoon,
August 3rd, 1897. The president was,
again, Mr Gerald H Hardy, M F H and
the Committee of fifteen included F
Deeming and E Porter.
The weather.., had a somewhat
depressing effect both upon the
competitors and spectators (about 2,
000), who would undoubtedly have
been more numerous had the elements
provided a cooler and more inviting
afternoon.., there were close upon 250
entries for the various events, including
some of the foremost athletes in the
country The intrinsic value of the
prizes was, without doubt, a great
inducement to many competitors in the
open events, the winners being highly
pleased with the costliness and beauty
of the articles.
There were eight events altogether but
some involved heats first - and they
included a One Mile Bicycle Race
Handicap (Local), a Half-Mile Bicycle
Race Handicap (Open) and a One Mile
Bicycle Race Handicap (Open). To
give a flavour, here is a brief account of
the first: A Horton, Humber C C (150
yards) maintained the lead for close
upon three laps, when he was passed by
E J Porter, Coventry Cross C C (65
yards) and N Brownson, Humber C C
(140 yards), both of whom ran to a
good finish. Porter, however, waited
too long before putting on a spurt, and
was unable to catch his opponent: 1st,
M Brownson; 2nd, Porter (Atherstone);
3rd, Horton. Time 3mm 53 secs. For
this, Porter of Atherstone won a “pair
of field glasses in case” worth £2 and
missed out on the marble clock with
ivory dial and gong, value £3.
A little earlier that year, Nuneaton was
advertising its own Amateur Athletic
Association Festival - its Twelfth - of
‘Bicycle and Pony Races’ in the
newspaper of May 28th, 1897 to be
held on Whit-Monday June 7th
including four bicycle races of eight
listed as ‘Open’, one of which was “for
Novices” and another one of three in
the Local Events category.
Back to the Debating Society: cycling
was considered a superior exercise by
Miss Vero, Miss Masser, Rev P H
Taylor and Messrs V S Allen, T Slack,
jun, J Parry, V R Franklin, T B
Betteridge and V Wilson. One speaker,
who urged the claims of the Rugby
game, remarked that Association
football was now nothing less than a
huge business transaction, players
being bought and sold by clubs at
tremendous prices.
This seems a very contemporary point
of view - expressed 109 years ago - at
the fag end of the 19th century! I
wonder what this unnamed speaker
would think of early 21st century
Chelsea? I note also that there is a
minister in favour of cycling at the
debate!
Whilst some of the cycling advocates
advanced the somewhat novel idea that
unless there was a system of general
football kicking, in which anyone could
take part, the game could not be
considered a physical exercise for the
community at large.
Well, this seems rather ironic coming
from the inhabitants of a town with the
even then centuries-old Ball Game
where the rules of Association football
do not apply and during which from
time to time in the past there have been
outbreaks of the kind of pugilism Mr
Vero abhorred from ‘general football
kicking’ not to mention organised Ball
smuggling before time. Fortunately,
though, the Game is played only once a
year on Shrove Tuesday and this could
not be regarded in anyone’s book as
minimal annual exercise!
After a lengthy debate, Messrs Vero
and Northcott replied, and the voting
resulted as follows: For cycling, 17;
football, 10.
I couldn’t leave it there, as I was
interested to see what the question for
the next debate was. In the Atherstone
News, Friday January 15th, 1897:
DEBATING SOCIETY - The fortnightly
meeting was announced to be held at
the Mixed School on Thursday evening,
the 7th inst., the subject for discussion
being - “Should fishing and hunting be
characterised as cruel?”
I wonder if Mr Thomason or the
Chairman of the Cricket Club and
President of the Athletic Association,
Mr Gerald Hardy, Master of
Foxhounds, turned up to give their
views on field and blood sports? The
outings of the local Hunt, of course,
were regularly reported in season.
Indeed, at the head of the same column
in the newspaper, was the following:
The Atherstone Hunt - Specimens of the
three successful and beautiful
photographs of “The Hounds” and
“The Meet” recently taken at Merevale
Hall by Messrs. Elliot & Fry, London,
are on view in Mr Calladine’s window,
and copies can be obtained from him at
7s. 6d. each.
That’s three times the price of a
season’s membership to the new cricket
club for one photograph! John H
Calladine was, of course, the printer
and publisher of the Atherstone News
whose General Printing Offices were in
Long Street. Sadly, however, the
anticipated debate did not take place:
Owing, probably, to other attractions,
the attendance was so small that the
debate had to be abandoned. Next
Thursday evening Mr Wilson will open
a discussion as to the best means of
commemorating the Queen’s Diamond
Jubilee in Atherstone.
It is instructive to note how the ancient
art of debate turned into a mere
‘discussion’ so soon in the brief annals
of the Society! 
Page 6 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
Until the 21st century the hamlet of
Griff remained a tiny enclave of the
original parish of Chilvers Coton.
Thatched houses and cottages, an
ancient pub, old pit tips, remains of
waterways which formerly connected
up to the Arbury estate, serve as a
reminder of its former days. A large
house now a hotel, Griff House was
where Henry Beighton who made the
first 1"/1mile map of Warwickshire
lived in the early 18th century. George
Eliot came to live here in 1820 and left
when her father retired to Foleshill in
1841. Afterwards the house was
inhabited by her brother Isaac Pearson
Evans (1816-1890), and his family,
who carried on with the work his father
had undertaken as land agent to the
Arbury estate.
The round pond which featured in
“Mill on the Floss” still remains in the
grounds close to Court Farm.
There is the site of Griff (Sudeley
Castle) Manor House now buried under
the large island at the junction of the
A444 and other roads. About 1154
Ralph de Sudeley gave land to found a
priory which is now under Arbury Hall
and also land in 1185 to the Knights
Templar in the vicinity of Bermuda
Village. The manor house was decayed
by 1380.
At Griff Lodge Farm part of the
building dates back to 1642. Griff
Lodge One of three entrances to Arbury
Hall.Built in the late 16thC, it was
gothicised in Sir Roger Newdigate’s
day.
Arbury Mill was built in the late 17th
or early 18th century. It was recalled as
the “Mill on the Floss” by George
Eliot.
Along the road to Bedworth there is a
thatched Cottage This has been
completely renovated. It dates back to
the early 1600's. It is often referred to
Bob Jakin's cottage after a character in
George Eliot's “Mill on the Floss”. The
Griffin Inn dates back to 1654.
As you look around either side of the
road towards Bedworth there are
remains of spoil banks of the old
collieries which supplied coal to the
local district and the nearby great city
of Coventry. Some of these collieries
are very old and dated back to before
1600.
The names of the various shafts which
make up what was then Griff Collieries
were:
Griff Nos. 1, 3 and 4, Griff Clara, Deep
Foundation Gin, Barbara, Caroline,
Barrel Gin, Wheel Pit, Horse Gin,
Whimsey, Bassett Engine Pit, Three
Gins
The Arbury Communication canal was
opened in August 1771. A horse drawn
tramway built in 1819 connected
outlying pits to a wharf on the Arbury
Communication Canal.
BERMUDA VILLAGE
Bermuda village is a pit village built
over a period of 12 weeks in 1891. It
was so named because Lieutenant
General Sir Edward NewdigateNewdegate
was Governor of Bermuda
between October 1888 and June 1892.
NOTABLE GRIFF PEOPLE
GEORGE ELIOT (1819-1880)
The Victorian novelist was born Mary
Ann Evans at South Farm on the
Arbury estate on 22nd November 1819.
She moved with her father Robert
Evans (1773-1849) to Griff House early
in 1820. Her first series of novellas
“Scenes of Clerical Life” were
serialised by William Blackwood in
1857. These stories were thinly
disguised stories and events, about the
people she knew, in Chilvers Coton,
Nuneaton and on the Arbury estate
during her formative years. Other
stories with local connections were:
“Silas Marner”, “Mill on the Floss”,
“Middlemarch” and “Felix Holt the
Radical”.
HENRY BEIGHTON (1687-1743)
Henry Beighton, Fellow of the Royal
Society, Surveyor and Engineer, was
born and lived the whole of his life in
the parish of Chilvers Coton, in the
Hamlet of Griff. Considering the
humble surroundings of the district he
had a distinguished academic career.
He developed the modern method of
recording meteorology and weather
science. He was a brillia n t
cartographer, and has been described as
the “Father of Modern Map Making”.
He was also Editor of the “Ladies
Diary”. He illustrated Thomas’s edition
of Sir William Dugdale’s “Antiquities
of Warwickshire”. He lived variously at
Griff House (the original farmstead)
and later at a house called
“Berresteads” now demolished.
SALE CATALOGUES
NNWFHS wishes to make available the
valuable information found in estate
sale catalogues. Many estates, large
and small, were sold up during the
1800s, and even more in the early
1900s. The catalogues that
accompanied these sales were large
format documents – containing vast
amounts of information of use to family
historians, local studies specialists and
those unravelling the history of
property. Estate sales catalogues can
be a goldmine: that for Middleton Hall
estate in 1924 provides what is
effectively a census of heads of
household as practically the entire
village was owned by the estate – and
every farm and cottage is detailed.
And we need your help. This is a
request for you to please raid your attic;
talk to your contacts, friends and
neighbours; check the holdings of your
local library, museum and anywhere
else you can think of. If you know
local solicitors, auctioneers, land or
estate agents – please ask them what
they have hidden away! We are
seeking any catalogues that relate to
north Warwickshire – and to the
immediately surrounding area, as
landowners often held property in
various places.
It is amazing who has one of these
catalogues “in a box”…some are held
in local studies sections of libraries and
local museums. Some catalogues still
have the original ground plans and
maps. It is this original material that
we hope to find – and we ask all
members to do their bit in locating
material and establishing what can be
made available on loan to the Society.
Whether the final production format is
scanned images on CD or transcribed
lists of tenants will depend much on
what we can find – and costs to
reproduce. This Society has always
worked hard to make lesser-known
local sources available – and we need
your help to find copies of original
documents: your personal contact and
goodwill will achieve more than public
appeals!
If you can help, initially please confirm
which catalogue you can provide access
to: the condition, date and if it has any
plans or maps. Once we know how
many can be borrowed we can plan the
most effective way of making the
material available to others.
Please send details to Jacqui Simkins
jas@langleymill.freeserve.co.uk or via
post to Langley Mill Farm, Sutton
Coldfield, B75 7HR.
Griff
By Peter Lee 
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 7
Wartime Women
“Wartime Women : A MassObservation
Anthology” edited by
Dorothy Sheridan. Hardback 1990;
paperback 2000 published by Phoenix
Press ISBN 1 84212 213 4.
Great insight into the life and times of
our forebears can be gained by reading
contemporary diaries and books based
on same. One resource rarely
considered – perhaps because of its
modernity – is the archive of MassObservation
– an organisation that was
formed in 1937 and which actively
recruited observers to keep diaries on
specific aspects of life. Some diaries in
the archive at Sussex University
continue beyond 1949 when MassObservation
became a commercial
company much-involved with market
research.
Wartime Women is an anthology edited
by Dorothy Sheridan who has taken
extracts on a range of topics and
periods of World War II. She
introduces each topic briefly and then
lets the women’s own writing, with
little editing, tell the story – be it from a
coastal village or inland city, rural area
or urban sprawl; working class or
middle class; married or single – all the
fears, hopes and attitudes to War are
covered.
The book was first published in 1990,
with a paperback version in 2000. You
can find it on remaindered lists, or
perhaps even at a second-hand dealer.
All women will enjoy reading the
thoughts of their fellow beings. Those
of a “certain age” will have memories
jogged; those a little younger will get a
feel for the hardships and sacrifices
made in WW2 – and the varying ways
individuals coped. The men should
read it, too!
********************************
A Guide To Jewish Genealogy
In The United Kingdom
ISBN: 09537669 7 7
Paperback - 144 pages
Published by the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Great Britain (Jan 2006)
Price: £5.95 plus 80p p&p (UK) £3.00
p&p/US$16.00 includes postage
(Overseas) Also available from FFHS
Website: www.jgsgb.org.uk
This new guide in the 'Jewish Ancestor'
series is hot off the press and packed
with an abundance of helpful
information. If you don't know what a
specific archive, library, museum,
record office, organisation etc in the
UK may hold in the way of Jewish
genealogical material and resources,
then this guide will give you the
answer. If you need to find a Jewish
cemetery within the UK, then I believe
we have listed most of them giving
some indication on when they opened
and closed, who is responsible for their
up-keep and records plus details of the
location in order to help people visiting
the UK from overseas. You may just
find the vital clue you are looking for to
continue your research.
This enlarged publication updates and
augments our previous Beginner's
Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Great
Britain. It now incorporates the whole
of the UK and not just Great Britain
and is designed specifically with the
family historian in mind, (whether or
not a beginner) since the majority of
information is given under town
headings - invaluable for anyone
researching their family in the UK.
T he Guide include s detaile d
information about the (Jewish) holdings
of the various resource centres
throughout the UK with a large section
specifically on London and the home
counties (details of the records of the
Anglo-Jewish community held at the
London Metropolitan Archives)
including Archives, Libraries,
Museums, Record Offices, Synagogues
etc.
It has a very large section on Using
Public Records (vital records, passport
records, adoption records, census
records, wills/probate, electoral
registers, naturalization records,
shipping records, trade directories,
military records etc) plus information
on Cemeteries, Computers and the
internet, Mormon family history centres
(including a list of films of Jewish
interest held at the LDS in London)
Hospital records, Burial records and
Marriage records. A full list of Jewish
cemeteries throughout the United
Kingdom is given with information
about each and where they are located.
There is a Bibliography; where many of
the books relate specifically to
individual towns and much, much
more.
********************************
Coventry's Criminal Past
CD book
There is a new book on CD called
Coventry's Criminal Past, by John
Russell (aka CovKid). It is very
interesting indeed, I have found out a
tremendous amount of information
from it. Including a page by myself on
Mary Ball.
It can be purchased from Ottekers in
Coventry or direct from CovKid price
£14.99 + p&p. Further details from
www.covkid.org.uk or email me, Clive
Ball: clive@dobx46.freeserve.co.uk
New Websites
www.Homesreuniteduk.co.uk.
A new website comprising an
occupancy record of people and
addresses at home and abroad, where
one or more families from Britain &
Ireland once lived and occupied a
particular residence. Dating from pre-
1600 to present day. Registering an
address is free; searching the index
(when this becomes available) will be
subject of a fee.
The content and basis of the site is to
establish where ancestry from the past
lived - British census is every ten years
and of course people do move house
between the census periods whether at
home or abroad. The Census neither
caters for the personal memories that
many families have at their disposal,
memories and stories handed down
through the generations. There will be
many more headings and subjects to be
added in the coming months and new
associate web sites for specific
services. We believe there needs to be a
greater emphasis on the person than
just a name from the past, as it is clear
from research and contact that
considerable information is going to
waste and ought to be preserved.
We are also open to ideas and
suggestions to improve a future service
for those researching their family trees.
Wherever your ancestors lived, you can
look back more than 400 years and link
your family to bricks & mortar today.
It’s free to register so start searching
now . David Sykes
New from the National Archives
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
documentsonline/wills.asp
The complete series of PCC
(Perogative Court of Canterbury)wills
is now available for searching and
downloading on DocumentsOnline.
This brief overview should help you
understand what the PCC wills are
about and what they can add to your
family or local history research.
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
census/
You can now search for over 17.7
million names in the 1851 census -
online for the first time. Search by first
name, surname, birthplace, county and
date. Once you've tracked your ancestor
down you can find out where they were
living. You can also see who they lived
with and how they made a living.
Through ancestry.co.uk. Note: only the
index is free to search.
What’s New 
Page 8 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
Horace William Lewis is my name,
and I was born on the 19th January
1920 to Horace William Lewis and
Florence Lewis (nee McCarthy). My
first recollections of life came to me at
about four years of age. I remember
tinkling sounds like bells; it was a vase
on the chiffonier with glass crystal
droplets. In the summer when the back
door was open, those glass crystal
droplets would chink together. Back
door did I say! We only had one door -
it was a tiny terraced cottage with one
room down and two-up. The main
bedroom had a door, the other room
was a continuation of the landing, no
gas, no electric, only paraffin to light
the room downstairs, and candles were
used to go to bed. In my later years
there, I could and did, push reading
comics through the wall into the next
cottage. My friend next door Joe King
would push one back to me. The
plaster had gone from the corners of
the room and only batons remained,
leaving it accessible for such antics.
My father Horace William Lewis
(1897 - 1927) was a coal miner who
worked a night-shift at Baxterley Pit.
He also had work during the day
selling green grocery to the outlying
villages with a pony and cart. He
would travel miles around the
countryside selling to earn some extra
money. My dad would say "We need
the money and we are going to get out
of this place for something better".
The pony and trap were kept in a barn
down Sheepey Road. We also had a
nanny goat, which was walked half a
mile to our abode for milking and back
again. Milk to supplement our diet.
After the Great War (1914-18) poverty
was everywhere, people did not fuss
about what to eat! It was more a case
of "Have you anything to eat?"
I recall the beautiful flowers my father
grew in his allotment down Sheepy
Road. He took prizes I've been told at
the local flower show for his sweet
peas and was a prizewinner most years.
We lived in Hand and Bottle Yard at
this time, things had improved
somewhat - there was a communal
washhouse where all the laundry was
done, and each family was allotted a
certain time. The lavatories were at the
top of the yard (four families to one
lavatory!) There was no flush and it
had to be cleaned out regularly by the
council. The smell on some days was
really dreadful.

My father Horace William Lewis was a
trained soldier when the Great War
broke out, and was serving in the
King's Royal Rifle Brigade, which was
one of the first to go to France. Whilst
in France he was wounded twice and
was mentioned in dispatches having
saved a wounded officer under fire in
no man's land. I believe he finished his
war service as a stretcher bearer and
finally came home a bag of bones
according to my grandmother Lewis
(Annie Lloyd who married William
Lewis 24/09/1893). He fell ill with
consumption and passed away at the
early age of twenty-seven years. His
doctor was a Dr. Fisher who had five
bothers, and one of them eventually
became the Archbishop of Canterbury.
 My mother received a widow's pension
of 21 shillings plus public relief of ten
shillings and six pence. I recall our
basic diet was bread and margarine,
jam sometimes, and for dinner every
day we had stew made from available
veg and three pennies worth of bits and
pieces from Frost's the butcher. At
dinnertime I would complain about the
fat on the top of my stew, to which she
would reply "Eat it, the fat will grease
your lungs".
I was always hungry, and as I was
going down Long Street, Atherstone I
passed a shop that sold animal feeds,
Chapman's I think it was. A large sack
of dog biscuits was outside with a price
tag on the sack. I walked past those
lovely biscuits a couple of times and
then I snatched one out of the sack and
ran for dear life. The proprietor came
out of the shop and ran after me. I
nearly gave up as my heart was
pounding so much, but fortunately he
gave up first. But, when I got home my
mother told me she knew about it. The
owner had been to see her and I was in
for a hiding!
My grandparents were William Lewis,
a hatter, born about 1871 & Annie
Lloyd born about 1875. My grandfather
was a superintendent at Vero & Everits
Factory. He was apprenticed and
became a master hatter. He held an
important position at the factory in
Atherstone, which employed about two
hundred people. I saw my grandfather
on his way to work one day, he was
dressed in an "Anthony Eden" hat, a
lovely suit with spats and polished
shoes and a bow tie.
About that time I joined the Boys'
Brigade. I was told on Armistice Day I
could wear one of my dad's medals. I
spoke to Grandma Lewis about
borrowing one for Armistice Day and
she was in agreement providing I
brought it back the very next day. This
I dutifully did, and was allowed to
borrow it on a number of occasions.
On the last occasion though my mother
said to me, "Don't take the medal back
I'm going to have it made into a brooch
for myself". Next year I went to
Grandma to ask for a medal and she
said, "Horace, you did not bring it back
from last year!". I, of course, had
forgotten that Mam kept it and had it
made into a brooch. That was the last
time I got a medal for Armistice Day.
Many years later (forty or more) I
called around to see my uncle Bill
(William Joseph Lewis), my dad's
eldest brother, when he had moved to
the new estate down Sheepey Road.
He looked me up and down and said,
"Yes, you are Horace's lad" and he
gave me a glass of whisky and the other
two of my dad's medals!
At the bottom of our Hand & Bottle
Yard was a pawn shop. This was a real
benefit to people short of money. They
would pawn their belongings on
Mondays, things like sheets, shoes,
suits, all types of items, and get them
back on payday. Then do the self-same
thing the following week. An old lady
from the next yard would collect all
things for pawning on a regular basis.
She placed all the goods in a
perambulator, which by the time she
reached us would be overloaded.
Money was given for these items
according to value, and a ticket.
Failure to redeem would then become
the property of the Pawn Shop. So, on
Fridays the old women would reverse
the perambulator and collect monies
(Continued on page 9)
My Early Years In Atherstone - 1920 - 1939
By Horace William Lewis 
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 9
(Continued from page 8)
from the pawns. That is, of course, if
there was money to redeem their
pledges. The old lady received a penny
or tuppence on each item for this
service.
A good friend of my mother was Nan
Sweet, a jolly woman who lived at the
top of the yard with her husband Jack,
and the other neighbours I can
remember were Robert and Frank
Moundford (twins) they were very nice
chaps.
On market days (Tuesday) I would take
the opportunity to earn a penny or two
if I could. This was possible because
the farmers brought their cattle, sheep,
pigs, chickens, ducks, goats and other
livestock for sale to the cattle market.
Farmers also came to buy and other
people would leave a horse and trap for
hours on end, this was where my
opportunity was. I used to say, "Can I
hold the horse's head mister?" He
replied, "Well I shall be gone for a
couple of hours or so, hold the halter
and don't let him run away". The
farmer may be gone for three hours or
more, depending on his fortunes that
day, good or bad, I would be paid
accordingly half a penny or maybe
even two pence.
As the Watling Street ran through our
town the road was always busy - no
cars, but carts and people etc. If this
chore finished early for me I would go
to the cattle market where cattle, sheep
etc had already been sold. If I saw a
farmer with a number of cattle or sheep
trying to drive them through the town, I
would ask him if he needed help and
where to. If he said "Yes" I would get
a stick and drop into droving them to
where the farmer was going, maybe
three or four miles away. I could get
six pence for this job! I was dead beat
at the end of the drove, but had money
in my pocket!
Another happening in our town was the
annual visit of Pat Collins' Fair. As
kids we would walk miles to see this
menagerie of steam engines, pulling
huge containers coming into town
along the Watling Street from
Tamworth. They set up in the "back
way" to the Market, the atmosphere of
the fair ground was electrifying with
helter skelters, swings, roundabouts,
carousels, winking lights, noise, music
blaring out, the making of butter
creams, ginger snaps, side shows,
coconut shies were a joy to behold!
Those wonderful smells, reminds me of
an advertisement - these two
youngsters smelling the aroma and
saying "Ah Bisto" for those old enough
to remember.

Atherstone Town was our football
team, and on this day a match was on.
One of my dodges to get into seeing the
team play, would be to stand outside
and say, "Take me in mister?" to a
likely man who would say "Catch hold
of my jacket pocket" I would hear the
kind man say on entrance to the
grounds, "He's with me". "All right"
was the answer and I was in to see the
whole game! All gates were open at
half time so anyone could enter free
after that, but I wanted to see all the
game! Sometimes this worked for me
and at other times it did not, so I
resorted to get through the fencing or
hedge to see as such of the match as I
could.
When I was about ten and a half years
old we were told that these hovels (a
house is too good a word for them)
were to be pulled down, and all those
living in certain yards were going to be
rehoused in new homes. We could not
believe our good fortune, and looked
forward to our move to Westward
Road. On entering our new home we
had gaslight, an indoor toilet and
bathroom (cold water only) and
kitchen, sitting room and three
bedrooms. Marvellous! Gracious living
at last. Of course, our rent had gone up
but we would manage.
During my school days I became
Prefect at Bracebridge House as I was
in the "A" grade. My duties were to
ring the bell walking down the
corridors and into the playing grounds
at 9:00 a.m. Monday to Friday.
Atherstone School was new, built to
cater for pupils from villages around
Atherstone. As bus services were nonexistent,
the Warwickshire Educational
Authority gave these children new
bicycles so that they could attend
school. I thought how lucky they were.
My old lady's bike was falling to bits!
These pupils stayed for dinner midday
(I believe the first school dinners ever).
The cookery class provided the food at
a nominal cost.
I was playing football and cricket for
the school and enjoyed it immensely. I
could not afford football boots, or
socks, some boys could, but there was
no money available for these items in
our home. Our football coach was a
Mr. MacManus, a teacher at our school
who also played for the Corinthian
Casuals, a powerful college team at that
time. On this particular day we were
playing at Tamworth in a cup-tie.
Lining up to kick off, my position was
left back, I noticed their outside right
coming into the field wearing his
school boy International cap with
yellow tassels. As I would be defending
against him my adrenalin shot up, my
nerves in a mess. The whistle blew,
and the game commenced by the
opposing team passing the ball to their
"STAR" player. He came down the
wing beating one defender, and as he
came to me he did a twist and a shuffle
passed me then scored a goal! This
happened twice in the first half, so we
ended up at half time 2 goals down.
The trainer gave me a talking to. It was
my fault we had two goals against us.
However, during the next half I closed
up on their "star" player, only a foot or
less parted us for the rest of the game.
I brought in my power and skill to quell
this International cap! He was not a
power on the field after that. The
moment he touched the ball he was
tackled head on, or I would get the ball
from him and clear the ball up field. I
believe we won that day 3-2, cheering
all the way home on the bus. It was a
happy ending for us.
All my school days were not as happy
as these, I had a teacher "Bonzo
Saunders" a portly gentleman, a
brilliant mathematician who tried to
impart on us his skill of mathematics by
tapping us on the head with his big
ring. Most of it sank in, but a lot did
not! When Bonzo was sick or having
time off, the Headmaster's wife Mrs
Guy would take our class. She took an
instant dislike to me, and I would not
do anything right for her. One day she
brought her son into class. He was on
term leave from Oxford University and
he came into the classroom with his
blazer on, and on his breast pocket was
the University Emblem - a very
impressive sight to a poor boy. He
looked down on us all, I believe, and I
can say I looked at him green with
envy; he was so far above me it hurt.
He gave us the full benefit walking
about with his adoring mother looking
on.
(Continued on page 10) 
Page 10 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
(Continued from page 9)
By this time, I was nearing school
leaving age at 14 years and, during this
"waiting time", I was sent at times to
help the Caretaker burn the term books.
The stoker/boiler was way down the
end of the school near the bike sheds. I
looked forward to this chore, but one
day falling foul of the Head Master's
wife, Mrs. Guy. She said, "Go and
stand at the foot of the Head Master's
stairs, and when he comes down tell
him to give you the cane." Whilst
waiting ten minutes or so, not looking
forward to being caned, Mr. Guy came
down the stairs. He was short, stout
with a ruddy complexion, a kindly man.
Upon seeing me at the foot of the stairs
he said, "Hello Lewis, come to burn
some more exercise books?", "Yes Sir,"
I replied. "All right" he said, “Go and
help the Caretaker in the boiler room."
"Thank you Sir" I said and off I went
not getting back into the classroom till
going home time.
When I left school there was work
about in the factories, coal mining,
shops etc. or casual labouring. One of
my first paid jobs was helping to carry
coal on a lorry. My job was to block
the lorry from running backwards on
steep hills when it ran out of power. I
used to ram a big wooden wedge under
the back wheels, it was dangerous but I
had to earn money. I soon gave this job
up and went as an errand boy to the
Star Supply Stores in Long Street. I
had to bag up all the oats, lentils, beans,
peas etc in half-pound bags upstairs,
also uncrate the butter and skin the
cheeses. I would load up my stores'
bicycle with a large carrier in front,
with orders that I would deliver daily.
After six months of this work, paying
little money, I thought I would try the
coalmines. They paid better! I cycled
to Polesworth to obtain an interview at
Hall End Pit. The Colliery Office sent
me to Tamworth for a medical about
eight or nine miles away from
Atherstone. This old lady's bike was all
I had to go from A to B so it was biking
everywhere. I obtained a job as pit
boy; my duties were feeding the empty
tubs as they came down the pit shafts
and attending the phone at the pit
bottom. The moment the phone rang I
would get to it immediately, as all the
outlying districts were connected to the
pit bottom. I had a phone board with
about eight districts. The flap would
fall I would plug into it and say "Pit
Bottom, Horace Lewis here" The
foreman would say "Patch me through
to 2 west or 1 north"
As I was reaching the age of 17 years
my thoughts turned to earning even
more money, so that I could spend
more and enjoy myself. I wanted to
buy a motorbike and my wages at Hall
End Pit would not run to that so, I had
to find a better job! I heard through the
grape vine you could be employed at
Ansley Pit as a tub filler and getter.
This coal mine was not as modern as
some were. Tubs were pushed into the
coalfaces in this pit, against belts,
which were used to carry the coal to the
tubs in the modern pit. So, I had to
make a choice and I decided to go to
Ansley. The work was exceedingly
hard, but my wages made up for that,
being a man's wage of three pounds and
one shilling per week. The Pit
deducted six pence a week for health
services, which entitled my family and
me to free treatments in Nuneaton
Hospital, operations and medicine. We
also had a free Doctor who would make
up his own prescriptions and perform
minor surgery.
My night shift work was getting me
down, when my friends were going out
for the evening I was getting ready to
go to the pit. This situation could not
last! So, I made an application to see
the Colliery Foreman and told him my
reasons for seeing him. I would say
that everyone was much older, most
were married men and I had nothing in
common with them. He gave me a
sympathetic ear and I was transferred to
the day shift, making up any coalface
shift that was short of a man. This did
not happen too many times, as the coal
surfaces were run on a piece work
basis, and on many of the shifts the
miners were related and they did not
want any casual labourer. So, if I were
not needed on the coalface, I would
help out George and Albert Wilson
(Father & Son) maintaining the
airways.

I was 6ft tall and weighed about 10
stone 6 lbs. Having been disappointed
with romance, I decided to join the
army as war had been declared. My
best pal was Bert Whitaker, the
Whitaker's incidentally had a shoe &
repair shop run by father & son in
Ridge Lane. So I told Bert that I had
decided to join the army, he said to me,
"Don't be silly, we work in a reserved
occupation coal mining!" I said, "I am
still going to try", "You won't get into
the army," he said. "We'll see" I
replied.
The following Saturday I rode to
Nuneaton where the recruiting office
was. Parking the bike I strolled in.
"Yes" said the Colour Sgt. in a brisk
fashion. "Could I join the army Sir?"
"Yes, what would you like to join in?"
he said Having seen the lovely and
grand uniforms of the Scots guards I
said, "The Scots Guards please Sir" He
said "All right, but do you have
relatives in Scotland?" I said "No"
"Well" he said, "You would not fit in
with the Scots Guards!" "Now" he said,
"I would recommend you join the
Grenadiers, a great British Regiment.
Name, age, where do you live,
occupation" I told him these things and
said "Coal Miner". He said "Laddie,
don't waste my time". "Is there no
chance?" I said. He could see I was
keen to join up, giving me a knowing
look he said, "Go and have a walk
around the town, have a cup of tea, I
may see you later".
A nod is as good as a wink to me, so
whilst looking for a cup of tea, I
thought, and came up with a grocer’s
assistant. I did work as one a long time
ago. So I duly presented myself at the
Recruiting Office again. He looked at
me as though he had never seen me
before, his questions were the same as
before, when the question as to
occupation arose I said "Assistant
grocer Sir". "Yes" he said and filled in
the form. "Sign here" he said. I did, he
gave me four shillings and said,
"Report to Coventry on Monday at this
address for an eye examination" I was
in the Army!
An exciting and more prosperous life
began for me, I was lucky in romance,
married a gorgeous lady who is a
wonderful cook so I am never hungry!
I think back on my early years in
Atherstone with great affection. I am
now 85 and live in Windsor, Berkshire.
I look forward to getting my magazine
every quarter, it feels like getting
something from home! Keep up the
good work, it is much appreciated.
Submitted by Mr Lewis’s daughter
Pauline Jones of British Columbia,
Canada member 192. 
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 11
As a member of several family history
groups, I see quite a few family trees.
Some are superb hand-drawn works of
art; many are computer generated –
which is no disadvantage. Often I
spend ages reading these, enjoying the
detail and appreciating the hours of
hard-slog research required to prove
all the links.
Recently I was looking at one tree generated
from a genealogical software
program onto A4 sheets carefully
taped together: it looked impressive by
its sheer size and colourful presentation.
Browsing, I noticed an absence
of detail…most named individuals had
at best one date and few of these
showed any place. In fact, one branch
of this extended tree was outside England,
in “foreign parts” of which I happened
to have a reasonable geographic
knowledge, so I soon spotted place
names incorrectly entered, and some
questionable birthplaces for consecutive
children. Being a brave soul, I
enquired on the sources of information.
Response: IGI and the ‘net!
This individual obviously felt that the
tree was the result of carrying out
‘research’. Great pride in the work
and its several hundred people was
obvious. Yet a large proportion of it
was based on hearsay without any apparent
consultation of original
sources – looking at a map should
have raised questions of probability,
requiring at least birth certificates to
check parentage of the children born at
opposite ends of a country with little
infrastructure at that time of the 19th
century.
In the autumn I was involved in a local
family history event. To provide a “bit
of visual”, I displayed a small number
of articles about individual members
of two families along with a couple of
short trees for the same. It was rewarding
to have comments along lines
of: “This is what it is about…telling
the story”. It takes many hours and
trips to several record repositories to
track individuals through wills, apprenticeship
records, census, parish
registers, registration documents,
newspapers, directories, maps – and,
of course, often using local history resources
to see who was in that place
before and after the family, and even
what the area generally was like. As
yet, I cannot link these two families –
the well-to-do and the poor ag labs. If
I was a ‘name-gatherer’ using material
on the net or IGI in isolation, I may
have been lured to link them due to
similarity of given names and their
location in the same small village.
And they may be linked – but as yet
there is no concrete evidence to hand:
my hunt has to continue. A hunt that
is spasmodic, depending on time available.

The ‘name gatherers’ may end up with
a tree of which they feel proud - it may
be reasonably correct; if it is, it will be
by pure chance. However, they miss
the joy of the hunt for each scrap of
proof: the hard evidence that tells
much about the life of the individual
and enables the researcher to make an
informed judgement to prove a link.
They also miss the exhilaration at the
end of a long drawn out chase when
that final snip of detail comes to light
and ties all the rest together; they
never know the sheer delight of holding
a document (or electronic copy) in
the hand knowing that the named person
is the one who has driven them to
distraction for months. Without the
proof from original sources, nobody
can produce a family tree that they can
verify.
On the web you will find many family
trees: be wary in what you accept as
“gospel”. If given a tree, always work
through it and prove each link for
yourself by checking with original
sources – unless, of course, your
source allows you sight of all the references
and copy certificates they have
amassed, which would speed up your
checking process.
Although many embark on their research
as ‘name gatherers’, I hope they
soon become aware of the wealth of
information that, with some effort and
a few pounds’ expenditure, can be accumulated.
This information provides
colour, depth and a degree of truth:
bringing your ancestors virtually alive
again thus enabling you to understand
their life and times. I say “degree of
truth” because in the documents, what
we read is what was written down –
and can be wrong: deliberately or accidentally.

Please be a genealogical huntergatherer:
hunt for every scrap of verifiable
detail and gather all together to
put flesh onto the bones of your ancestors.
This will enable you to make an
informed decision on who begat
whom, where and when. Those
“special” discoveries often result in a
new avenue opening up for continued
research. I do hope you do continue:
the hunt may well take you into unexpected
areas – geographical or otherwise.

There were two Bull Rings in
Nuneaton, one in the parish of
Nuneaton, and the other Chilvers
Coton.
Both were used for the ancient and
barbaric sport of bull baiting.
Essentially bulls were tethered to iron
rings and were baited by our
unwashed ancestors as a sort of sport.
There was no ring as such but the bull
must have gone around in a circle as it
strained on the cast iron ring which
was fastened down into the ground. I
dare say that occassionally the wear
and tear on the ring meant that the
angry bull yanked it clear of the
ground and the beast ran amok in the
crowd, but no-one has provided a
written account of that happening.
There were several uncouthed and
ancient sports like this in Nuneaton:
street football (Atherstone still retains
its ancient game, Nuneaton banned it
in the 1870's because the town was
being wrecked by the participants).
Cock Fighting was another. Pugilism
or bare knuckle fighting - this was
attended by huge crowds in the
thousands in the 1820's and bull
baiting.
Fortunately new sports for the
labouring classes such as football and
cricket supplanted the rough games of
our ancestors.
The Nuneaton bull ring was at the top
of Abbey Street on Abbey Green. This
is why the street opened out at the top
to allow sufficient clearance for this to
go on. In the 1870's there were still
people alive in the town who could
remember the big cast iron ring to
which the bull was attached in Abbey
Street.
When the Bull Ring stopped being a
Bull Ring I cannot say but it must
have been in the very early 1800's if
not before. Cock Fighting went on
much later because it was easier to
hide a cock fight in someon'es back
yard or cellar, so although banned it
went on into the early 1900's locally.
In the late 1800's I understand the
vicar of Weddington used to dabble in
cock fighting and had quite a
reputation for it.
Modern Day Hunter-Gatherers
By Jacqui Simkins
The Bull Ring
By Peter Lee 
Page 12 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
or a station porter. The bods in civvies may have been yard
staff or alternatively permanent way workers.
Notice too that the ballast almost reached the top of the rails.
This was common practice then but was stopped later
because it was impossible to examine the rail fastenings and
sleepers. These were wood in those days and rapidly
deteriorated as the water seeped into them. Rotten rail
chocks and sleepers could give way under the weight of
trains causing derailments. That was the reason that ballast
was placed later only up to the top of the sleepers. So P.W.
men could examine them properly.
My attention was brought to these photos by my good friend
Gordon Webster, chairman of the Stoke Golding Heritage
Group, who had found them locally, there are two in his
collection, and he also found another picture of a similar
location, but a water colour, which was so accurate he
deduced could only have been based on an original photo.
Who this Houlston, photographer was I cannot say, other
than to comment upon the fact that there was an Edward
Houlston, stationer, in Nuneaton who preceded Cawthorne
& Sons (Cawthorne’s business dates back to the 1830’s
through Thomas Short, his widow Mary Short by 1850,
Edward Houlston
and then c. 1868
Cawthorne’s).
The locomotives so
depicted might have
been the part of or
t h e e n t i r e
compli me nt of
a l l o c a t i o n t o
Nuneaton’s little
single road (three
engine) loco shed at
the time.
The reason for this
deduction is that G.
P.Neele, L.N.W.R.
superintendent of the
line wrote in his memoirs that he had authorised the
extended use of the locomotives based on the Coventry &
Nuneaton loco depot (at Nuneaton) to work the new
Hinckley service when it opened in 1862.
But what was the occasion? Why so much photographic
interest in these otherwise mundane everyday events in the
life of the station. I wonder, in fact, if the photo was taken in
the 1862-1864 period when the rails only extended as far as
Hinckley, and the line had not been opened through to
Leicester. What reinforces this thought is that all the photos
show the trains running wrong line. They are parked at the
platform face which would now be used for Leicester trains
running in the opposite direction. It makes sense if you use
the platform nearest the station building if this is a terminal
station, and being used as such at that time so that the
passengers did not have so far to walk.
In the April 2005 NNWFHS journal Mrs. Brenda Adams of
Shirley, Solihull sent in a photo of an old steam engine
believed to have been taken near Nuneaton. The loco and
rolling stock were positively antiquated, one or two of the
carriages being one up from stage coaches depicting a very
early period of railway development.
The photograph I believe was taken at Hinckley and maybe
one of several photos taken there about 1862-67 by a local
photographer, surname of Houlston. We can pin the period
down to between 1862 when the Hinckley station on the
branch from Nuneaton opened, and 1867 when the
locomotive was re-numbered again 1271. The locomotive
itself is very interesting as it appears to be an old McConnell
0-4-2 well tank built for the Southern Division of the L.N.
W.R. with a McConnel Patent boiler and raised firebox and
left Wolverton works in 1860 as their nr. 110, it was renumbered
710 in May 1862. It is remarkable to think that
this loco was renumbered four times in its short career of 12
years. It was one of the fifteen locos of this class built at
Wolverton works, the last, before production of L.N.W.R.
steam locos was centred at Crewe. The reason for the
numerous renumberings was that as built it had a Southern
Division nr. 110, (the Northern Division also had a nr. 110 a
2-2-2 built at
Crewe) but when
consolidation of the
railway company’s
numbering lists
occurred it was renumbered
to avoid
the clash, then as it
became outmoded
as a small class on
a railway which
w a s r a p i d l y
standardising its
loco types into a
small number of
large standard
types it was put on
the duplicate list as
an obsolete type -
1271. When the duplicate list filled up with older engines
they rapidly ran out of numbers, and the duplicate list started
again at 1800, and the older more redundant locos shuttled
back into the higher numbering series, so in December 1871
it became nr. 1871. Within twelve months of that it was
rendered down at Crewe into molten metal for use in a new
batch of locos then in production.
The photograph can be analysed further by looking at the
various men gathered about the permanent way and on the
engine. Of course, we do not know their names but some of
their jobs can be deduced. The man on the front of the
footplate is the driver; his fireman can just be seen peering
out behind him. The man by the large driving wheel with the
light jacket on maybe a footplate man off another engine. He
appears in another one of these picture series. The man with
the black uniform and a row of buttons a breaksman (the L.
N.W.R. used this term for what was later known as a guard)
Down Memory Lane - An Old Railway Engine A reply from Peter Lee
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 13
Abbreviations:
21i = 21st of this month/21u = 21st of
last month
dbw(hsd)o = dearly beloved wife
(husband son dau) of
e(y)d(s)o = eldest(youngest)dau(son) of
botc(t) = both of this city(town)/itc = in
this city
3/1/1936
Death:
MOLE 27/12/1935 7 Bloomfield Rd
Glos, Gertrude nee WHITE, bwo
Donald B
In memory:
BILLINGHAM Husband & father
31/12/1933. Wife and daus Annie,
Nellie, Gertie
CLEMENTS Son & bro 4/1/1934.
Mother, bro & sisters, Hartshill,
Coventry & Bham
CLEMENTS Husband Jack 4/1/1934.
Wife Dolly, also Mother & Dad, Bridge
House, Hartshill nr Nuneaton
COLLINS Mother Hannah. Children
Mary & Jim, 9 Chequers, Bulkington
COLLINS Mother 6/1/1935. Beatrice,
Bertha, Dulcie, Bulkington
FINCH Sister Hannah 29/12/1933,
Ansley Common, Chapel End,
Coventry, Hinckley & Stockingford
10/1/1936
In Memory:
BROOKS Dau Edith Emily 7/1/1932.
Parents, sisters & bros 60 Marstone
Lane, Collycroft
CUNDY Son & bro Cecil 11/1/1935.
Mother, father, Doris, Albert, 119
Ivanhoe Ave., Attleborough, also Ruth
& Dick, Will & Rose
HARRIS Husband Walter 9/1/1932.
Wife, children, 83 St Pauls Rd,
Stockingford
JOINER Husband Harry 12/1/1935.
Wife Maud, also Arthur 10/1/1920. 42
Webb St Stockingford
TURNER Edd 11/1/1930. All at 94
Gadsby St Nuneaton
17/1/1936
Birth:
BLAND 13/1/1936 at 23 Shipston Rd,
Stratford on Avon to Ethelfrida wo
Thomas, a dau Patricia Lynne
In Memory:
ATKINS Son & bro Frank Albert
14/1/1935. Mother, Dad, Billy, 14
Chapel St. Nuneaton; also Sid & Hilda,
Strathmore Rd, Hinckley
BENNETT Wife & mother 16/1/1934.
Husband & children, 9 Kem St
Attleborough
BICKNELL Dau Nellie 15/1/1932.
Father, sisters & bros 80 Attleborough
Rd, Nuneaton
BUTLER Wife Elizabeth Minnie
17/1/1934. Husband 188 College St
COPE Wife and mother Minnie
18/1/1934. Husband Bill & son Johnny
& all at Cemetery Lodge, Bucks Hill,
Nuneaton
CORBETT Husband James, father
14/1/1931. Wife, children, gchildren
158 Heath End Nuneaton
EASON (nee STRINGER) Dau Tod
12/1/1935. Mother, 48 Coton Rd
EASON (nee STRINGER) Sister Tod
12/1/1935. Grace & George 48 Coton
Rd
FLOWER Husband Edward Harold
17/1/1934. Wife, 'Detroit', 23
Athelstan Rd, Hemel Hempstead, Herts
HANDLEY Dad Charles 13/1/1933.
Ernie, Nell, Elsie, Alexandra St.
HANDLEY Charles 13/1/1933. Cath
& Herbert, 69 Cheverel St, Nuneaton
HORTON Dau Dorothy 17/1/1934.
Dad, Mother, bros & sisters. Arbury &
Stockingford
LAWRENCE Norah, killed on the
Long Shoot 13/1/1927. Mam, Dad,
sisters & bros, Bermuda Rd; Croft Rd;
& Gadsby St.
PERKINS Son (Jackie) John Samuel
18/1/1935. Mam, Dad, Kenneth, 191
Bucks Hill, Stockingford
24/1/1936
In Memory:
BAGGOTT Charles 26/1/1933. Wife
& family, Gadsby St
BATTS Wife & mother 27/1/1933.
Husband & children, Ansley Village
BICKERTON Son Leslie Ronald
19/1/1933. Mam, Dad, bros, sisters &
Ivy, 48 Barton Rd, Hill Top, Coton, &
North St
CURRIN Wife & mother 21/1/1934.
Husband, children and mother 2
Waverley Square, Attleborough
KENDALL Wife Mary Elizabeth
24/1/1932. No 2 Grove Rd,
Stockingford
LOVERING Harry 29/1/1935. Mother,
sisters and bros, 118 Bermuda Rd,
Nuneaton
WALTON Died 1933. Husband &
family, 55 Henry St Nuneaton
WINBRIDGE Wife & mother
24/1/1935. Husband & children, 128
Westbury Rd; also 182 Westbury Rd
Stockingford
WOOD Husband William Thomas
19/1/1935. Wife & children 255
Gadsby St. Attleborough, Nuneaton
31/1/1936
In Memory:
COPSON Thomas 29/1/1935. Wife &
son
HILL Albert William so William/Ellen
27/1/1927 age 23. Mother, father,
sisters, bro; 11 Westbury Rd
Stockingford
KING Wife Clara 31/1/1932. Husband,
also Eric, Jack & Alice of Ansley; and
all at Plough Hill Rd, & Nuneaton
SHILTON Husband & father
28/1/1933. Wife & family; 26
Whittleford Rd Nuneaton
THOMPSON James 22 Bentley Rd
Nuneaton 31/1/1934. Wife & dau, The
School House, Burford nr Tenbury
Wells, Worcs
7/2/1936
In Memory:
CARTER Wife & mother Lucy
10/2/1929. Husband & children, 2 Park
Avenue
CASH Only dau Kathleen Emily
4/2/1931. Mam, dad & bro Fred; 18
Princes St Nuneaton
CHUTER Wife R.A. 3/2/1934. 44
Charles St. Arley
FALCONBRIDGE Son & bro Corp.
Sidney. Father, mother, bros, sisters,
88 Sunningdale Castle Rd, Weddington
HALL Mother & father 1/2 &
22/2/1935. Sons, daus; 3 Glebe Rd,
Nuneaton, also Nottingham & Hinckley
HARVEY Sapper (Harry) G.H.L.,
killed 6/2/1916, Mazingarbe, France.
Mother & sisters, The Manse, Bond
Gate
HUDSON Wife 8/2/1934. Alf &
children, 71 Whitehouse Cres.
Stockingford
HUDSON Sister Annie 8/2/1934.
Mary & Will, Eadie St./Hetty, Jack &
Babs, Ivanhoe Ave; also Joe & Gladys,
Exhall
RANDALL Mother Rachall 6/2/1929.
Florrie, Ben, Joe
SHARP William 5/2/1933. Wife &
c h i l d r e n , I v a n h o e A v e n u e ,
Attleborough
14/2/1936
Death:
GRAY MAITLAND 6i Welbeck
House, Dudley, Vivian (M.R.C.S., L.R.
C.P., D.P.H. late M.O.H. Nuneaton)
58th yr, Cremation at Perry Barr
10/2/1936
In Memory:
BICKNELL Wife Ada 11/2/1921.
Husband, children; 80 Attleborough,
Nuneaton
BURDELL Wife, mother 17/2/1927.
Husband, dau & son in law Ada & Ted
9-11 Tennant St Attleborough,
Nuneaton
OSBORNE 2 yrs ago. Husband &
children; Ivinghoe, Higham Lane
DICKENS Son & bro Capt G.W.W.
(Continued on page 14)
Notices of Births, Marriages and Deaths from Nuneaton Observer 1936 
Page 14 Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal
(Continued from page 13)
12/2/1935. Dad, Mam, sister & bros;
63 Coventry Rd Nuneaton
PENNEY Mother 14/2/1923, brother
Joseph 8/2/1930. Sister & bro Polly/
Ted, 51 Park Rd, Coalville
RICHARDS (nee ASHTON) Queenie
13/2/1933. Mother, dad, Aubrey &
Norma, Coton Arches, Nuneaton
THOMAS Bronwen 15/2/1933. Mam,
dad, David; Lynwood, Hinckley Rd
WILSON Muriel Ursula 16/2/1935 age
19. Mam, uncle, gma; 176 Plough Hill,
Nuneaton
WILSON Ursula 16/2/1935 (to the one
I loved but lost), Alec, Wellesbourne,
Camp Hill
WOODING Wife 16/2/1933. Husband
& children; 6 School Lane, Galley
Common
21/2/1936
Birth:
WILSON 12i Mr & Mrs Wilson (nee
CHAPMAN) at Nuneaton General
Hospital, a dau, Belgrade, Edward St
Nuneaton
Death:
DUMBLETON 19i Nellie do James
William & Nellie passed peacefully
away. Mr & Mrs Dumbleton wish to
thank the nurse & doctor for their kind
atten. to their dau, 22 Short St,
Stockingford
WHITEHOUSE 20i Lizzie widow of
Alderman J.H., age 71
In Memory:
BURDETT Mother 17/2/1927. Tom &
Gertie, 141 Overton Rd, Leics.
HALL Brother William 22/2/1934; also
brother Ernest 24/3/1932. Sisters &
bros, 298, 306 Queens Rd & 41 Croft
Rd
WOODWARD Wife & mother
23/2/1932. Husband, children,
gchildren, Plough Hill Rd, Chapel End;
Hartshill & Arley
28/2/1936
In Memory:
WHITMORE Madeline 26/2/1932.
Father, brother & sister; 'Snowdon'
Tuttle Hill
BLYTHE Husband 27/2/1935. Wife &
children, Priory St
BYARD Wife & mother Harriet Eliza
28/2/1930. Dad, Alex, Ada; 36
Highfield Rd, Nuneaton
MERRILL Wife, mother 25/2/1927.
Husband, children; 7 Fife St, Nuneaton
MERRILL Mother 25/2/1927. Daus,
sons & gsons; Ethel, Ted, Edwin;
Phyllis & Charlie 45 Eadie St,
Stockingford
POTTER Dau Mabel 13/2/1928; also
son Samuel 14/2/1936 of Pelham Rd
Bham. Dad, mother, sisters & bro, 31
William St Nuneaton
Bastardy records "bonds" they are
sometimes called, were created under
an Act of Parliament which required
the churchwardens/overseers of poor in
a parish to ensure all women producing
illegitimate children who MIGHT
become chargeable to the parish relief
were made to name the father of the
child. The bond then determined which
male adult was to support the child.
The bonds date from 1601 to 1834.
At some point (I think in 1700s) an Act
was introduced which stopped a parish
sending a heavily pregnant woman
back to her parish of settlement - till
one month after the birth! The
overseers then applied to the Justices
for an order on the father for that child.
In 1834 the law changed and the Poor
Law Unions were created. Bastardy
bonds and other parish bastardy
documents ceased to be used after this
date. From 1834 - 1839 the workhouse
administrators initiated bastardy
proceedings through the Quarter and
Petty Sessions Courts. After 1839 they
were only heard in Petty Sessions
Courts and were initiated by the
mother, who had to produce
corroborative evidence to convict the
putative father.
Trying to find details of bastardy cases
after 1839 is quite difficult. The
records, where they exist, will be part
of the County Archives.
The following categories or types of
Bastardy Papers can assist the family
historian:
Bastardy Examination - mother
examined before a magistrate, or by
midwife whilst in labour (early 18th
century) to determine the name of the
child's father.
Bastardy Warrant - Constable ordered
to find the man named by the mother
and bring him before magistrate to
organise recognizance - OR - to find
the putative father who has absconded,
escaped from custody, hasn't paid up,
etc.
Bastardy Recognizance - like a bail
bond - the father is to appear at next
Quarter Sessions and case continued
until child born.
Bastardy Summons - tells a Constable
to bring a man to court.
Bastardy Order - made out after the
child was born - gives details of who is
to pay what. An example of Bastardy
orders can be seen at: Lincolnshire Lent
Assizes.
Bastardy Certificate - overseers of
parish to which the child is chargeable
certify that the man has paid up - OR -
certifies that an Order has been made
out - in both cases the father is released
from the recognizance.
Bastardy Bond - entered into by a
bondsmen and sureties to say that they
will indemnify the parish to which the
child is chargeable from all costs
(mainly found before 1800).
Notice of Application for Bastardy
Order (used after 1834) sent to the
putative father (Quarter Sessions only).
If a bastard child died, the overseers of
the parish in which it was legally
settled would have paid for the burial,
even in another parish. This should be
noted in the Overseers' Accounts if they
survive.
Bastardy payments would have been
made until the child was of age to be
apprenticed - fourteen at the most. If
you have a copy of a bastardy order it
should say for how long the money was
to be paid. Payment was usually made
to the parish supporting the child, but
after 1834 some payments were made
directly to the mother.
Resources:
An Introduction to Poor Law
Documents before 1834" by Anne Cole
(available from the Federation of
Family History Societies).
Family Tree Magazine has books on
this subject: Eve McLaughlin's
"Illegitimacy" and "Annuls of the Poor"
deal with pre-1834 poor law. £2 each.
"The Parish Chest" by W. E. Tate,
1983, 3rd edition, published by
Phillimore & Co Ltd. (ISBN 0 85033
507 8), 400 pages for £20 that should
be available at all good libraries.
"The Handy Book of Parish Law", first
published in 1859 and republished by
the Wiltshire FHS is available from the
Federation of FHS.
Genealogical FAQs - What Are Bastardy Bonds?
Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society - Journal Page 15
It is hard to imagine that a town the
size of Nuneaton, which was, in the
middle of the nineteenth century, no
larger than a modern village, had a
commercial bank, which printed its
own banknotes, including white fivers
and tenners.
The ancestor of our current branch of
Barclays Bank was started by a
partnership of three local businessmen
on 12th October 1815. The proprietors
were William Craddock, his son John
Craddock and their business
partner, William Bull. Successful it
was too, because it survived the
many vicissitudes of the nineteenth
century banking trade, which saw
our Hinckley town's bankers,
Charles Jervis & Co. go out of
business in 1830; and it later
transcended through several name
changes into the Barclays Bank we
know today. Although we do not
know it now, but Barclays Bank's
location on the corner of Coventry
Street and the Market Place has
quite a story attached to it in its
own right. Its elegant terra-cotta
facade provides us with one of
Nuneaton's finest building
frontages.
William Craddock was a wealthy
corn factor, maltster and cheese
merchant; he also owned a
considerable amount of property in
and around the town. With this
thriving trade he was able to provide
the capital for Nuneaton's first bank.
By August 1817 premises in Bye
Corner (now Nedwigate Square) on the
opposite corner to what is now the
Midland Bank were acquired by
Craddock & Bull for £996.
The bank's history was not without
incident. In 1821 when the Coventry
Bank failed there was a one-day run on
the Nuneaton bank and Mr. J.Craddock
brought down £10,000 from London to
meet any demands upon them.
Another story relating to a run on the
bank during these early years talks of
sovereigns being heated up in the hope
that our Nuneaton ancestors would
accept that their warm coinage was
"hot straight from the mint". It seems to
have worked and again the bank
survived.
An anecdote relates to Robert Arnold,
the licensee of the Newdigate Arms
Hotel traveled to London, who bravely
set out, armed with a handgun to
exchange Craddock & Bull notes for
Bank of England notes. He rode on
Horseback to the George at Hinckley
where he caught the London
stagecoach.
Craddock & Bulls Bank continued to
prosper but in September 1833,
William Craddock died age 84, the
richest man in the history of Nuneaton,
said to have been worth £120,000.
Which was a fortune in the 1830's! John
Craddock, William’s son, carried on the
banking business.
The Coventry Herald newspaper
reported on January 15th 1847 that
there was £5723 worth of Craddock &
Bull's banknotes in circulation.
Fourteen years afterwards in May 1861,
Craddock and Bulls was merged with
the Coventry Union Banking Co. "The
age and infirmity of Mr. Craddock
having induced him to retire from
banking."
It is thought that when Mr. John
Craddock gave up banking in 1861 the
local office of Coventry Union bank
was closed.
This was, of course, very unsatisfactory
as the local townsfolk were without
commercial banking facilities so that
anyone wishing to cash a cheque or
make a deposit had to travel to
Coventry or Atherstone. With large
sums of money about ones person a
worrying journey.
In later years the bank occupied the
law offices of John Craddock, next
to Smith's Charity School (where
Marks & Spencer is now).
In 1863 a branch of the Midland
Banking Co was set up in Craddock
& Bull's Market Place offices.
The original Bye Corner premises,
formerly owned by Craddock &
Bull but by then a freehold
warehouse were sold in 1883.

The manager of the new branch of
the Midland Banking Co. was
Henry Bull, son of the old bank's
partner, William Bull. So the line
back to Craddock and Bull's was
connected through this new bank.
On January 1st. 1881 the Midland
Banking Co. was taken over by the
Birmingham, Dudley and District
Banking Co. Ltd. Further banking
acquisitions continued so that by 1907
the name was changed again to the
United Counties Bank Ltd. At that time
the London banking house of Barclay
& Co acted as agents for the new bank
until the two merged in 1916 giving
rise to the Barclays Bank we know
today.
The modern Barclays Bank was
commenced in 1896 on the site of an
old fashioned shop, which may have
dated back to the 18th century. This
old premises was owned by Hanbury's
charity. At the same time they gave up
their old bank offices next to Smith's
Charity School, formerly the law
offices of John Craddock and the whole
of the two sites were redeveloped.
Craddock & Bull, Bankers, Nuneaton
By Peter Lee
Birmingham District and Counties Bank,
Market Place, Nuneaton. Taken from
“Nuneaton Past & Present” published by The
Nuneaton Observer c1899. 
THE
JOURNAL
OF THE LAW SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND
ADR SPECIAL
EDITION
MEDIATION:
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR LEGAL PROFESSION
FAMILY CASES
LET MEDIATION TAKE
THE STRAIN
VOLUME 46 NO 8 AUGUST 2001
Regulars
THE
JOURNAL
OF THE LAW SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND
AUGUST 2001 VOLUME 46 NO 8
Features
contents
21 Mediation Revolution
John Sturrock and David Semple
argue for a simpler, cheaper, quicker
and less stressful solution
24 Family Cases
Guide to referring clients to mediation
27 Adjudication in
Construction Disputes
Murray Shaw on reducing adversarial attitudes
in the construction industry
32 Judging Mediation
In Falkirk and Pennsylvania judges
are encouraging alternatives to litigation
34 Financial Services
Essential guide to gearing up for N2 Day
From the
editor
ALTERNATIVE forms
of
dispute resolution have long been with us,
but the announcement earlier this year that
Government Departments will only go to
court as a last resort could be viewed
as something of a watershed.
Many of you may well be sceptical about the
merits of mediation, arbitration, adjudication and
other alternatives to court, and might be concerned
about possible loss of fee income.
Yet as mediation, in particular, becomes an
increasing part of the legal landscape in Scotland -
in recent months the FSA have announced a
mediation service as part of their new regulatory
regime and Lord Ross is chairing an independent
group of senior medical, legal and public health
leaders established by The Royal Society of
Edinburgh to explore the use of mediation to help
resolve disputes between patients and health
services in Scotland - we devote much of this
edition to ADR.
John Sturrock and David Semple commence our
coverage by exploring the arguments for mediation
and outlining where it is likely to offer broader
opportunities for the legal profession.
They suggest embracing mediation “can put
Scotland amongst the world leaders in providing a
creative, efficient and cost-effective dispute
resolution service to its citizens and to those who
do business here”.
In two articles, we focus more specifically on the
use of mediation in family cases, and Murray Shaw
examines the increasing use of adjudication on
construction disputes.
Finally, and on a different theme, for all of you who
engage in financial services business, our article on
N2 day and the steps you need to take is required
reading.
5 President’s Report
7 News
16 People
18 Letters
30 Web Reviews
38 Information Technology
40 Risk Management
42 Europe
44 Books
Front cover photography: Brian McDonough
Journal
Viewpoint President’s
REPORT
At first it seemed strange that China, with its huge
population, (the number of people in Beijing alone
is double that in Scotland) could have anything in
common with us, but whilst fundamental
differences were very apparent, there were areas
where information could be shared and experiences
discussed. The Chinese seem to be
intrigued with the fact that Scotland has a different
legal system from the rest of the United
Kingdom and now its own parliament. China has
Self Administered Regions (SARs) in Hong Kong
and Macau and the phrase that we heard often in
connection with these was “one country, two
systems”.The Chinese were interested in comparing
our experiences with theirs.They had specific
interests in discussing certain matters - juvenile
justice, resettlement of offenders, regulation of
lawyers and
the continuing development of the rule of law in
China. In all of those areas we had a great deal to
contribute and welcomed the discussion and the
debate which followed.
When we were in Hong Kong, the decision to
hold the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing was
announced and it is clear that there will be huge
developments in China over the next decade.The
law is set to develop and one of the principal
areas will be in business law. Companies doing
business in the country will need certainty in
commercial activity and that is where the legal
framework and the legal profession are so important.
We visited the office of the All China
Lawyers’ Association, which regulates the
profession and which is under the jurisdiction of
the Ministry of Justice. We also went to East
Associates which was the first legal firm
established in the Peoples Republic of China. It is
only six or seven years old and indeed the
profession, as we would recognise it, has only
existed for twenty years or so.
It will be interesting to watch developments
because what was underlined to me was the
importance of an independent legal profession and
its place in any developed society.The Chinese
have made huge strides but an independent
legal system does not yet exist and
as matters develop there must be
situations where the Government
will need to be challenged.
Sometimes we forget to appreciate
what we have and our Justice
Minister was able to tell the
Chinese about challenges he
has faced in such matters as
temporary sheriffs and prison
conditions.
I think that these issues
would be almost impossible
to raise if the Scottish legal
profession was not independent
and proudly so. Involvement with China is
challenging and there is always the huge issue of
human rights to be considered. Jim Wallace didn’t
shirk from raising the subject and I think it is right
that lawyers throughout the world have dialogue
with each other, especially on controversial issues.
The rule of law should be universal and can only
reach full maturity where lawyers can operate
independently from the state.
The international debate about MDPs continues
and the opinion of the Advocate-General in the
Nova case in the European Court of Justice may
have significant consequences for Scotland.
Although the court’s final decision is awaited,
many hope it will follow the thrust of the
Advocate-General’s conclusions and vindicate the
Dutch Bar’s position of not permitting MDPs -
a view which mirrors the Society’s own policy.
I don’t want to dwell on this but I do wonder if
the debate on MDPs has masked an extremely
important problem for firms in Scotland and that
is their inability to form multi-national
partnerships or MNPs.
Legislative change is required before this is
possible and I hope that the Scottish Executive
will recognise that need as a priority and essential
if Scottish firms are to retain their competitive
edge in international business.
Much of my role involves communication. The
more I meet solicitors, whether Scottish or not,
the more I am reminded of the importance of
sharing information, listening and learning. Many
Scottish solicitors have latched on to the benefits
of good communication and one of the developing
areas of law which involves solicitors assisting
their clients to communicate is mediation.
Mediation is by no means the easy way out, but it
can be the most constructive to tackle a problem
for clients. Increasing numbers of solicitors are
training as mediators or referring disputes to
trained mediators after discovering the benefits it
can bring clients. It is now increasingly popular
with those who are prepared to resolve a dispute
rather than fight it out. I commend the articles on
mediation in this month’s Journal to you and look
forward to watching developments in this exciting
area of practice.
I WAS privileged to accompany Jim Wallace, Scotland’s Justice Minister and Deputy First
Minister, who led the British Council delegation to Beijing and Hong Kong in July.
We were in Beijing as guests of the Chinese Ministry of Justice.The visit was at the invitation of
China following on a visit from the Chinese Ministry of Justice Scotland earlier this year.
Martin McAllister describes his visit to Beijing to share experiences with members
of China’s embryonic legal system
Martin McAllister
PUBLISHERS
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Telephone: 0131 226 7411
Facsimile: 0131 225 2934
President
Martin McAllister
Vice-President
David Preston
Secretary
Douglas Mill
Editor and Editorial Office
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PA1 1TJ
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Email: roger@connectcommunications.co.uk
Review Editor
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Disclaimers
The views expressed in the Journal of the Law Society of Scotland are those of invited contributors and not necessarily those of the Law Society of Scotland.The Law Society of Scotland does not endorse any goods or services advertised, nor any claims or representations made in any advertisement,
in the Journal and accepts no liability to any person for loss or damage suffered as a consequence of their responding to, or placing reliance upon any claim or representation made in, any advertisement appearing in the Journal. Readers should make appropriate enquiries and satisfy
themselves before responding to any such advertisement, or placing reliance upon any such claim or representation. By so responding, or placing reliance, readers accept that they do so at their own risk. © The Law Society of Scotland, 2001 ISSN: 0458-8711
Journal
News inside
8 Marketing help for
small firms
8 Conveyancing update
9 Member services
9 South African visit
10 AGM & Conference
diary dates
10 CII AGM
11 Pro bono lawyers
wanted
12 Forthcoming events
12 Poinding and warrant
sale consultation
13 SLAB report
13 Obituaries
14 Terms of business
letters
15 Land Register update
Embracing
Leadership
Challenge
CHIEF Executive of The Law Society of Scotland Douglas Mill has signed up to the
Commission for Racial Equality’s Leadership Challenge, aimed at encouraging those
at the top of institutions to take personal ownership of racial equality issues.
Recognising the role of leaders in influencing change, the
Challenge is designed to promote good practice and
develop organisational effectiveness.
Leaders are asked to demonstrate their commitment to
racial equality by raising the profile of racial equality
issues and supporting events and campaigns where the
issue might not be raised.
The Challenge also asks leaders to ensure they and
their organisations are at the forefront of best practice
and encourage leadership among colleagues and
contemporaries.
Douglas Mill said:“Not only must the Society convey the
importance of equal opportunities to the profession, but
as their representative body, we must lead by example.
“The Society’s own procedures and policies regarding
equal opportunities are rigorous. The Society has also
adopted a policy dealing with sexual and racial
harassment issues that seeks to ensure the working
environment is sympathetic to all employees.
“The Society, both internally and externally, is committed
to ensuring that equal opportunities are a fact of life for
the Scottish solicitors’ profession.”
Implementation of the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000
“…if racism is to be eliminated from our society there must be a co-ordinated effort to prevent its growth”
THIS statement, taken from the
Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report
highlights the importance of
effective implementation of the
Race Relations (Amendment) Act
2000 and the need for all public
authorities to adopt a pro-active
role in the promotion of race
equality and the elimination of
race discrimination.
The Race Relations Act 1976
outlawed discrimination in employment
and training, the provision of
goods, facilities and services, education,
housing and certain other
specified activities. It did not,
however, extend to all functions of
public authorities. The Race
Relations (Amendment) Act 2000
seeks to correct this.
Section 71(1) of the 2000 Act
creates a general duty to “eliminate
unlawful racial discrimination and to
promote equality of opportunity
and good relations between
persons of different racial groups”.
The application of this section is,
however, currently limited to those
public bodies specified in the 2000
Act, principally government departments,
the devolved administrations,
the armed forces, the police, local
government, educational authorities
and the National Health Service.
To ensure wider applicability of this
provision, the Government issued a
consultation document in February
2001, proposing the extension of
this general duty to a number of
other organisations, including the
Law Society of Scotland.
The Society responded to this
document in May 2001, confirming
its belief that this general duty
should be extended if a co-ordinated
approach in addressing diversity
issues is to be developed by
public bodies.
The Society is actively considering
ways in which it can fulfil this
general duty. The Society’s Chief
Executive, Douglas Mill has signed
up to the Commission for Racial
Equality leadership challenge and is
in the process of developing a
framework document to identify
specific objectives and projects
which the Society wishes to
complete within a given timescale.
The Society hopes that by the
development of these projects, and
indeed the acceptance of the
general duty under the 2000 Act,
that it will be in a position not only
to offer guidance to its members
on diversity issues but hopefully to
lead the way for the profession.
Douglas Mill with Dharmendra Kanani, Head of CRE Scotland
Journal
News
IT is a well known fact that many firms find the idea of
marketing themselves rather daunting or may even feel
that it is irrelevant to them. However, we all know that
neither view can be entertained for long, if a firm
wishes to survive in today’s market.
Many firms now have dedicated marketing teams but
many others do not have
such in-house expertise to
guide them along the path
to being more successful
and more profitable. To this
end, a new section has
been launched in the
Society’s website
(www.lawscot.org.uk) to
offer those firms who do
not have a dedicated
marketing resource a “first
aid” guide on marketing -
what it is and what to do
about it.
Linsey Lewin, Secretary to the Marketing Committee at
the Society, said: “The Directory gives primary information
and advice on marketing - both from a strategic and
tactical point of view. Our aim is to provide useful information
to members who may not have other sources
for this sort of expertise. The on-line directory can be
found in the Members’
section of the web site, and
we have produced it in
easily managed “chunks” of
information, which can be
printed off in sections, if
required. We hope it will be
well received and as always,
I would welcome any
further suggestions which
firms may find useful in their
day-to-day business.”
Suggestions and comments
can be forwarded to
linseylewin@lawscot.org.uk
Council of
Mortgage Lenders
Representatives of the
Society’s Conveyancing
Committee are meeting with
members of the Council of
Mortgage Lenders on
September 5th.
If any practitioners are
experiencing difficulties with
the CML handbook or have
matters they would like raised
at the meeting, please contact
Linsey Lewin, Secretary of the
Conveyancing Committee, on
0131 476 8174, e-mail
linseylewin@lawscot.org.uk
Conveyancing essentials
AROUND 30 solicitors attended the third Conveyancers’ Question Time, held in Oban in July. Practitioners joined members of the Oban Faculty
from as far afield as Dunoon to question the line-up of expert speakers.As part of the session, Roddy Paisley, Professor of Commercial Property Law
at Aberdeen University, sparked off a lively debate about the effect of the Abolition of Feudal Tenure etc (Scotland) Act 2000 and the ways in which
people might try to secure conditions previously created in feudal titles.There was a debate between the Deputy Keeper Alistair Rennie and some of
the local practitioners about the creation of servitudes and the way that these are dealt with by the Registers of Scotland. Janette Wilson, Church of
Scotland solicitor, delivered an informative talk about the Title Conditions Bill and urged members to contribute a response to the Scottish Law
Commission during the current consultation period.
“The feedback from Oban was very positive.
There was no shortage of questions and we could
have done justice to a number of other topics. I
am pleased to say that many solicitors said that
they found the question and answer session
helpful. Some said that the amount of new legislation
in contemplation and the effect this is going
to have on their current practice was a little
'scary' but I think that is only natural and the
purpose of the Roadshow is in part to alert solicitors
to the number of changes there will be.
Finally there is no doubt that they found the
speakers both informative and amusing”, said
Committee Secretary, Linsey Lewin.
The Committee now plans to take the roadshow to
Glasgow, Edinburgh and southwest Scotland as part
of a nationwide-tour. Roadshows have already been
successfully held in Inverness and Dundee. In the
next Roadshow the format will be developed using
the experience of the first three sessions and plan
to say more about electronic conveyancing and to
give some more practical examples of the ways that
the new legislation, both that proposed and now
enacted, will affect practitioners
The Committee is also continuing to develop its
web site section ‘Conveyancing Essentials’ on
lawscot.org.uk after receiving encouraging initial
feedback from the members. The most recent
additions being the Committee’s responses to the
Scottish Law Commission Discussion Papers on
Conversion of Long Leases, Law of the Foreshore
and Seabed, and to the Report on Real Burdens.
All of these can be found in the news section of
‘Conveyancing Essentials’ on www.lawscot.org.uk.
Marketing help for small firms on-line at lawscot.org.uk
Coal Authority On-Line Mining Reports Service
AS part of their ongoing drive for
improved customer service and
delivery performance, and in
response to customer demand, the
Coal Authority have developed an
Internet service for the ordering
and delivery of coal mining reports.
This service removes the dependence
on conventional mail delivery,
and combined with alternative
payment methods, will significantly
contribute to reducing the time and
effort needed by you to complete
property searches.
Using the on-line mining reports
service provides the following
benefits:
● immediate on-line confirmation
as to whether a coal
mining report is required or
not, avoiding the purchase of
unnecessary searches;
● optional facility to receive a
Coal Authority certificate
confirming a mining report is
not needed;
● improved turnaround times -
same day receipt & processing
of property searches and same
day or next working day
despatch;
● improved convenience of
requesting reports - no letter,
copy of plan, no need to write
cheques;
● user-friendly front-end and
service functionality (e.g. utilising
post-code data);
● alternative payment methods,
either by secure credit/debit
card facility or, where a formal
credit agreement exists, by
customer account/monthly
invoice;
● extended out-of-hours service
availability.
The on-line service is at www.coalminingreports.co.uk
Please visit the site and
test it out for yourself. Pre-registering as
a regular user will save you even more
time since it avoids the need to input
your name and contact details each
time you visit the site. If you wish to
pre-register, or arrange customer account
facilities, contact the Coal Authority’s
Helpline Team on 0845 762 6848.
Journal
News Fundraising starts for new charity
THE Scottish Huntington’s
Association has been nominated
by the Society’s staff as this year’s
charity.
Staff voted to support the charity in
2001/02 after a number of suggestions
were put forward.
Hugh Docherty, chairman, said: “We
have asked people to come up with
some ideas for fundraising and have
had some really good suggestions.
“Every year, the staff really get
behind the nominated charity and
last year we raised more than
£2,000 for MS Scotland.”
Ian Anderson, special project
manager at the Scottish Huntington’s
Association, said: “We are delighted
that the Society has chosen to
support the Association. Because
Huntington’s Disease is an inherited
condition it tends to be with families
through generations and is a constant
factor in the lives of family members.
“It has been called mankind’s worst
disease, with physical, emotional and
behavioural symptoms which can be
very difficult to live with.
“Our role is to provide support,
specialist knowledge and advice for
families via our specialist Advisory
Services.This can make a huge difference
to the quality of life of those
living with HD. SHA also campaigns
vigorously to raise awareness of HD
and to seek better care for those
affected. Some 500 to 600 people
have the faulty gene in Scotland and
many more in families are affected
by being at risk, or by being carers.
“We would like to say a very big
thanks to all at the Society who are
helping us as their chosen charity.”
For more information about Huntington’s
Disease or the Association, contact
01505 322245.
For the past 15 months I have been
acting as a filter for new ideas for
services to the profession and
although I have come up with a
number of products and services
myself a great number of suggestions
have been received from
other members of Council and
members of the profession but
even still there has not been as
many as one new idea a day. In
reality my committee is not in a
position to process that volume of
ideas anyway and in a magical sort
of way good ideas easily commend
themselves.
You will be aware of the Microsoft
deal which was negotiated last year
and ran until May of this year and a
great number of members of the
profession took advantage of this
and saved literally tens of thousands
of pounds. This deal has been
extended and considerable savings
on Microsoft software are available
to members. Contact Angela at
Global Direct Licensing on 0870
729 2107.
My committee is currently working
on a number of projects which I
hope to bring to fruit in the next
few months and these include
amongst other things a secure email
system for use by members
including the provision of digital
signatures which are will be aware
have recently been recognised
across Europe as having legal
validity. We are also considering a
range of distance learning products
which might reduce the cost of
delivery of certain aspects of CPD
and also be of interest to those
who are “geographically challenged”.
Also under investigation is
the possibility of various telecoms
deals that will save members costs
in that area which is becoming a
more and more significant item of
expenditure in the modern
practice.
In the meantime I would commend
you to visit the society’s website
where the latest deals on computers
from Systemax and NEC can be
seen including in particular a truly
outstanding offer from NEC for a
1GHz PC including Word 2000
Works 2000 and other productivity
software for just £499 plus VAT
(Phone NEC on 0870 333 6320
and quote product code BLSS1).
The discount arrangement with
Hertz also continues to prove to be
valuable and attractive to members.
I would hope to make this item a
regular contribution to the Journal
as a means of keeping you up to
date with new products and
services as they come on line and to
save bombarding you with flyers and
e-mail! I welcome ideas and suggestions
for products and services that
members feel would be useful and
appreciate the support of those
who have used the services to date.
Please contact George Samson at
the Society with your ideas, georgesamson@lawscot.org.uk
James Ness - Convener Business
Development Committee
EACH morning my day is made slightly brighter by my cashier’s “Larson”
cartoon diary.This provides a new cartoon every morning and is a cheery
way to start the day.What astonishes me is how Mr Larson can come up
with a new idea for every morning in life.
MEMBERS’ SERVICES COLUMN
THE Law Society of Scotland welcomed representatives
of the South African solicitors’ profession.
The delegation was seeking to share information
with other law societies to assist their
ongoing review of the South African regulatory
system. Greg Kruger, President of the Law Society
of Natal, David Randles, President of the Board of
Control of the South African Attorneys’ Fund and
John Moorhouse, General Manager of the
Attorneys’ Fund spent three days learning about
the work of the Guarantee Fund monitoring team
and its regulatory work on client accounts.
The delegation met with David Preston, the
Society’s Vice President and Heather Gibbings, the
Convener of the Guarantee Fund Committee as
well as Leslie Cumming, the Chief Accountant and
members of his team. They asked to see the
Society’s monitoring system at first hand after
hearing of a report presented to the International
Bar Association last year and also plan to visit the
New Zealand Law Society.
David Preston welcomed the visitors saying he
was delighted that our system of monitoring and
accountancy regulation was of such interest to
other jurisdictions and that the international
exchange of experiences was interesting and
useful.
Heather Gibbings explained the work of the
Guarantee Fund Committee and discussed the
current review of the Society’s rules and procedures.
She said: “The interest from South Africa
shows the international regard for the Scottish
system as well as recognition that the Society is at
the forefront of this type of work in the world.”
Journal
News
By-Election for Council
Sheriff Court District of Glasgow and Strathkelvin
New Journal
Advertising Agent
appointed by the
Society
THE Law Society of Scotland
has appointed Connect
Communications as the
advertising agent for the Journal
of the Law Society of Scotland
with effect from 1 November
2001.Connect Communications’
appointment is the result of a
full tender for this agency
contract which was conducted
by the Society’s Journal Advisory
Board. Connect
Communications had previously
won the five year contract for
the production of the Journal
from 1 November 1998 when
that contract was put out to
tender in Spring 1998.The
contract for the advertising
agency is for a five year period
from 1 November 2001.
Further details are available
from David Cullen –
davidcullen@lawscot.org.uk
AGM and Conference News
Society hosts mock court procedure at CII AGM
FOR the first time since the 50th Anniversary, the Conference and the Annual General Meeting of the
Law Society of Scotland will be split.This will enable delegates of the Conference to focus on a full
CPD programme as well as the golf and socialising.
NOTICE is hereby given that,
pursuant to the Solicitors
(Scotland) Act 1980 and the
Constitution of the Law Society
of Scotland, a by-election of one
member of Council representing
solicitors having a place of
business in the above named
constituency is about to be held.
Every member of the Society
having a place of business as
defined in Article 2 of the
Constitution of the Society in
the above constituency as at
November 1, 2000, is entitled to
one vote for one candidate to be
elected by that constituency.
The Returning Officer for the
purpose of this election is:
The Secretary, The Law Society
of Scotland, 26 Drumsheugh
Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7YR.
No person may be elected a
member of Council unless he or
she is a member of the Society and
unless a Nomination Paper in
respect of such person is sent or
delivered by hand as to reach the
offices of the Returning Officer at
or before Noon on Friday 28
September 2001.
Forms of Nomination Papers may
be obtained from the Returning
Officer on application.
Every person proposed for election
for a constituency must be nominated
by a separate Nomination
Paper in the appropriate form
contained in Part II of the Second
Schedule to the said Constitution,
and every Nomination Paper must
be subscribed by two Proposers,
being electors in the constituency,
and shall contain a statement
subscribed by the candidate that he
or she consents to be nominated
and that, if elected, he or she accepts
office as a member of the Council.
No person may sign more
Nomination Papers than the
number of members to be elected
by the constituency
Douglas R. Mill (Returning Officer)
The Law Society of Scotland is
hosting a mock court procedure,
under Scots law, at the Annual
Conference of the Chartered
Insurance Institute, which takes
place at the Edinburgh
International Conference Centre
on 19th - 21st September 2001.
The event will be held on
Wednesday 19th September and is
open to all Society members
without charge.
Society members are also being
offered preferential terms for attendance
at the full CII Conference.
They will pay a discounted rate of
£595.00 - a saving of £155.
Details of the CII conference are
included with this edition of the
Journal.
Further information is also available
from www.financialservicesconference.co.uk,
the dedicated website.
The CII conference is the event at
which to meet decision-makers in the
insurance and financial services sector.
Delegates will include senior executives
from leading companies, representatives
from IT systems and
software suppliers, management
consultants, loss adjusters, brokers,
lawyers and other professionals.
You can register for the conference at the
discounted rate by calling 020 8332
7696, or you can book
online at the address above.
The Annual General Meeting of the Law Society of
Scotland for 2002 will be held in the Lecture Theatre of
the National Museums of Scotland, Chambers St,
Edinburgh, on Friday March 22nd. Registration with tea,
coffee and pastries will be in the Bird Hall at 10am. A
finger buffet will be served in the European Art Gallery
at 1pm.
The Council Dinner will be held on the evening of Friday
March 22nd in the Signet Library.
Scotland play France at Murrayfield on Saturday March
23rd, so why not make a weekend of it?
The Annual Conference will be held at the new hotel
development,The St Andrews Bay Golf Resort and Spa,
St Andrews, on May 10th/11th 2002.This luxury hotel’s
facilities are boundless. Over 200 bedrooms equipped
with satellite TV, high speed Internet connections and
with panoramic views.Three restaurants to choose from,
and a spa offering a range of body and beauty treatments;
and not forgetting the Sam Torrance golf course
which will open next month.
Further details on the Conference in next month’s Journal, so
watch this space.
Journal
News
THE Society of Solicitor Advocates has revamped its
organisation and is to be running a training day for
anyone interested in gaining extended civil rights of
audience. Until now there has been no structured
assistance for candidates who have been very much left
to their own devices. The SSA event will be very much
a practical guide, with contributions from experienced
Solicitor Advocates who undertake regular appearance
work. Other speakers will, it is hoped, include members
of the bench.The morning will focus on the practicalities
of applications, exam preparation, topical issues such as
QC status & ‘Mixed Doubles’, and the assessment
course; whereas the afternoon will include practical
sessions in relation to Court of Session’s pleading
requirements and its Rules of Evidence.The date is to be
7th September 2001, hosted by the SSA at the Law
Society of Scotland’s headquarters, 26 Drumsheugh
Gardens, Edinburgh. For further details contact Paul
Motion, Ledingham Chalmers, on 0131 200 1057, or
Frank Maguire,Thompsons, 0141 221 8840; or visit the
Society’s website at www.solicitoradvocates.com
THE Foreign and Commonwealth
Office is looking for volunteers in
setting up a panel of pro bono
lawyers to work on cases involving
British nationals in prison overseas.
They are seeking to set up a
network of qualified lawyers ideally
with criminal or international human
rights experience to help promote
and protect the human rights of
British prisoners overseas by
working with local lawyers and
providing legal advice to the FCO.
Further information is available by
calling Nia James, Human Rights coordinator
in the FCO’s Consular
Division on 020 7008 0242, e-mail
nia.james@fco.gov.uk.
To apply to get on the panel, send your
CV by e-mail to Nia James or post it to
Foreign and Commonwealth Office,
Consular Division (Room G63), Old
Admiralty Building, London, SW1A 2PA.
Criminal Legal Aid Duty Plans 2002
Becoming a Civil Solicitor Advocate – made easy!
Pro bono lawyers wanted
THE Scottish Legal Aid Board is preparing duty plans for
the sheriff/district courts from 1 January 2002 to 31
December 2002. Any solicitor who has not already
received a letter about this and wishes to be included in
the duty plan should contact the Scottish Legal Aid Board.
Copies of the application form for the duty plans 2002
can also be obtained from the Board’s website for the
legal profession at www.slabpro.gov.uk
Please note that all applications for inclusion in next
year’s plans must be received by 31 August 2001.
To be included in the duty plan contact Lindsay Frame or Carol
Moffat, SLAB, 44 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh, EH3 7SW,
tel 0131 226 7061 ext 220 or 419
Journal
News
A Replacement for Poinding
and Warrant Sale: Consultation
THE Scottish Executive has issued for consultation the report of the
Working Group on a Replacement for Poinding and Warrant Sale, Striking
the Balance: a New Approach to Debt Management.
Poinding and warrant sale will be abolished on or before 31 December 2002
as a result of the Abolition of Poindings and Warrant Sales Act 2000 passed
by the Scottish Parliament. The Scottish Parliament deferred the Act’s
coming into effect to enable an alternative means of enforcement to be
created and introduced. The Working Group was set up to look for a
workable and humane alternative to poinding and warrant sale.
Copies of the consultation paper and Working Group report can be
obtained from Julie McKinnon, Scottish Executive Justice Department,Access
to Justice, Diligence and European Co-Ordination Division, Hayweight
House, 23 Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DQ (tel 0131 221 6764; fax
0131 221 6894; e-mail julie.mckinnon@scotland.gsi.gov.uk), or from the
Scottish Executive web site (www.scotland.gov.uk).
Comments are invited and should be sent by 17 October 2001 to Julie McKinnon
at the above address.
SCL Conference
THE Scottish Society for Computers
& Law are holding their AGM on
September 27th 2001 at a venue to
be decided. After the AGM the
speakers will be John Gailey of
Pilgrim Systems who will do a
review of cutting edge legal web
sites and David Gardner of Holt
Marketing who will have a look at
what makes a good web site.
October 18th 2001 sees the first in
a series of events for the 2001/2002
programme looking at cyber crime.
“On-Line Fraud” takes place at the
MacKenzie Building, off High Street,
Edinburgh.
The event is a joint meeting with
Faculty of Advocates IT Group.
Speaker is DS David Reid, Head
of Lothian and Borders Police
Computer Squad.
Further information for both meetings can
be obtained from Brandon Malone on
0131 226 6703.
THE opening meeting for the 2001 – 2002
Session will be on Thursday 4th October 2001
at 6pm for 7 at The Assembly Hall,
Strathclyde Police, Pitt Street, Glasgow.
The debate will be “This house considers that
sentencing is too important a matter to be left
to the judges”. All, whether members of SASD
or not, are welcome.
The Honourable Lord MacLean will be in the
chair, debaters will be Professor Neil Hutton,
Strathclyde University Law School, Sue Moody,
Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Dundee,
Vincent Smith, Solicitor, Glasgow, Sheriff Nigel
Thomson, CBE, QC.
There will be light refreshments, including a glass
of wine, from 6pm till 7.
Admission is free and formal advance notice is
not essential, but it would be much appreciated
if those intending to come would advise the
Secretary, preferably by e-mail or fax, in order to
assist the catering arrangements.
Ms Carol Kelly, Secretary
SASD, Glasgow Branch,
Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, 5th Floor,
Portland House, 17 Renfield Street, Glasgow G2 5AH -
e-mail: ckelly@sccrc.org.uk fax: 0141 270 7040;
tel: 0141 270 7030
THE Chartered Institute of
Management Accountants and the
University of Edinburgh are inviting
Journal readers to the annual
“Edinburgh Exchanges” lecture.
Professor Jan Mouritsen,
Copenhagen Business School, will
speak on Measuring and Reporting
Intellectual Capital. Jan Mouritsen is
the professor of operations management
and an acknowledged expert
in this ever growing and increasingly
relevant area. He has recently
carried out research in this field in
co-operation with many of
Denmark’s leading firms. One of the
key objectives has been to develop a
practical approach to measuring and
evaluating intellectual capital and this
will be the subject of his Edinburgh
Exchanges talk.
If you would like to know more
about how this impacts on you and
your business, you are welcome
along to the Playfair Library,
Edinburgh University, on 12
September 2001. Registration is at
18.00.
The lecture will be followed by a
reception.
To book your free place, contact Jackie
Walker on 01875 320879 or
Jackie.Walker@cimaglobal.com.
Scottish Association for the Study of Delinquency
Measuring and Reporting Intellectual Capital
Journal
News
Obituaries
JOHN MAIR
Wishaw
On 11th June 2001, John Mair,
formerly partner of and
consultant of the firm Morison
& Smith and latterly consultant
of the firm Freelands,Wishaw.
AGE: 69
ADMITTED: 1953
THOMAS ALEXANDER
McGHIE
(retired solicitor), Falkirk
On 11th July 2001,Thomas
Alexander McGhie, formerly
partner of the firm Dan McKay
& Norwell, SSC, Edinburgh, and
latterly Honorary Sherriff,
Airdrie.
AGE: 83
ADMITTED: 1969
THE Law Society of Scotland
welcomed last month’s publication
of the Scottish Legal Aid Board’s
annual report.
President Martin McAllister said:
“The past year has seen progress
in communications between the
organisations involved in legal aid as
well as new initiatives to assist those
who provide and receive assistance.
The Society regularly meet with the
Board and members of the Scottish
Executive in the Tripartite Group to
discuss legal aid issues in general. I
welcome the dialogue and progress
being made.
“The Society is working with the
Board on exciting proposals for a
new e-commerce system. We are
also represented on the Community
Legal Services Working Group,
which is progressing ideas for
co-ordinating advice services in
Scotland.”
The report revealed that for the
third successive year the cost of
criminal legal aid has fallen despite
an increase in the number of grants
to 79,000, a rise of four per cent.
Total spending on civil legal aid also
fell, with a reduction of almost 2,000
in the number of applications. The
Society has raised concerns about
eligibility in civil cases as part of its
evidence to the Scottish Parliament
Justice 1 Committee.
General Insurance Standards Council
The General Insurance Standards Council (GISC) has announced a further postponement to its proposed
registration system for solicitors who conduct general insurance business.The system is now unlikely to be
operational until early 2002. Further details are available from David Cullen - davidcullen@lawscot.org.uk
Criminal code
The unofficial draft criminal code for Scotland has now been revised in the light of the successful
consultation conference held in Edinburgh in November 2000. Comments on the revised draft are invited
by 7 September 2001 after which the draft will be further revised and submitted to the Minister for Justice
and the Scottish Parliament.Anyone who would like a copy of the revised draft can obtain one on request
by sending their e-mail address to eric.clive@ed.ac.uk.
IIP renewed
MANAGING Partner of Brechin
Tindall Oatts,Willie Young, is
pictured with colleagues Douglas
Cowie and Carolyn Flavelle
accepting a quaich on behalf of the
firm from Frank Pignatelli, Chief
Executive Officer of Scottish
University for Industry, in
recognition of their re-accreditation
as Investors in People.
Society welcomes SLAB report
Authors Wanted
The Society has a joint books
agreement with the publishers
Butterworths, the express purpose
of which is “to ensure that there
continues to be made available to
the Society’s members and the
legal profession in Scotland a range
of books and publications on
Scots law and legal practice and
related subjects.”
The Society and Butterworths
would welcome suggested book
topics and authors willing to write
under the joint books programme.
All suggestions should be sent to:
Carole Dalgleish, Commissioning
Editor (Scotland), Butterworths,
4 Hill Street, Edinburgh
EH2 3JZ or DX ED 211
or
e-mail Carole at
caroledalgleish@butterworths.co.uk
Multiple claim
deep vein
thrombosis
Solicitor Alistair Mackie has been
consulted by a client who suffered a
deep vein thrombosis which has
resulted in her hospitalisation.
Any other solicitors who might
consider pooling resources in
submission of claims for compensation
to airline companies should
contact him at Brooke & Brown
Solicitors, 42 High Street, Dunbar,
East Lothian, EH42 1JH, tel 01368
862746, fax 01368 864150, e-mail
brookeandbrown@talk21.com
The new regime for the training of Scottish
solicitors is now underway. Trainees who gained
the Diploma in Legal Practice this year are required, as
part of the new regime, to complete training logbooks.
Logbooks are available in a wide range of practice areas.
The full range of logbooks, the Quarterly Performance
Review sheet and the accompanying guidelines for
trainees and trainers are now available on the Society’s
website, from where they can be downloaded. Go to
www.lawscot.org.uk and look under Training and
Education.
Any trainee or firm or training organisation without
Internet access should contact the Legal Education
Department on 0131 226 7411,
e-mail legaleduc@lawscot.org.uk to request paper copies.
Training Logbooks
Terms of Business Letters
THE Society’s Professional Practice Committee and
Pensions Law Committee recently considered the
implications of the Pensions Act 1995 and the
requirements it imposes on the legal profession.
Section 47 of the Pensions Act 1995 together with the
relevant regulations, requires trustees of occupational
pension schemes to have a written agreement in place
with their advisers. If there is no such agreement,
trustees cannot rely on the terms of the Pensions Act
1995 for protection.
Following a recommendation by the Pensions Law
Working Party and the Professional Practice Committee,
the Council of the Law Society of Scotland agreed that
solicitors should enter into a written agreement with
trustees as required by the Act. Consequently, there is a
duty on solicitors to advise pensions trustee clients of
the terms of the Pensions Act 1995, including the
requirement to enter into a written agreement with
their legal advisers.
Those solicitors carrying out work in terms of the
Pensions Act 1995 are reminded of this obligation and
advised to incorporate reference to this professional
obligation in terms of business letters.
Journal
News
Social Security Appeals
A Practice Memorandum on the Human Rights Act
1998 has been issued by the Chief Social Security and
Child Support Commissioner for guidance in appeals to
the Commissioner in Scotland. In addition, the Senior
Commissioner (Scotland) has issued a Practice
Memorandum dealing with Written Observations on
Appeals in Social Security and Tax Credit Cases in
Scotland. A copy of both memoranda can be found on
lawscot.org.uk or copies obtained from The Secretary,
Office of the Social Security Commissioners, 23 Melville
Street, Edinburgh EH3 7PW
THE next Diet of Examinations for
Solicitors seeking Rights of
Audience in the Supreme Courts
will take place on Monday 19
November for applicants in the
Court of Session and Tuesday 20
November 2001 for applicants in
the High Court of Justiciary.
If you wish to sit these exams but
have not already applied for Rights
of Audience, please contact Lisa
Anderson on 0131 476 8164 as
soon as possible for an application
form.
Rights of Audience in the Supreme Courts
turnaround times
The current average turnaround
times in working days from the
Registers of Scotland are
as follows:
Sasine Writs
27 working days
with a maximum of 57 days
for the latest County
Unattached Dealings with Whole*
27 working days
with a maximum of 39 days
for the latest County
* An unattached Dealing with whole
is a Dealing which is not dependent
on the processing of a prior
First Registration,Transfer of Part or
Dealing with Whole for its
completion.
Information from
the Registers
Journal
News
Land Register Update
– certified plans
PARAGRAPH 4.16 of the Registration of Title Practice Book (2nd edition)
refers to the situation where the title deeds do not contain
sufficient information to enable the Keeper to confirm the location or extent of a property which is the
subject of an application for first registration in the Land Register. In that situation, the applicant’s solicitors
may elect to submit an appropriate scale plan, bearing a docquet signed by the solicitors, in which they
certify that the plan shows the extent of the property for which registration is sought.
In recent years, the Keeper has
found it necessary to request certified
plans on an increasing number
of occasions. As a result of operational
difficulties and – unfortunately
– as a consequence of a variety of
claims on the Keeper’s indemnity
resulting from circumstances in
which a certified plan has been
accepted, the Keeper has now found
it necessary to reconsider this policy.
The Keeper is required under
section 4(2)(a) of the Land
Registration (Scotland) Act 1979 to
reject an application for registration
if it does not contain sufficient to
enable him to identify the property
by reference to the Ordnance Map.
Where the extent to be registered
cannot be established by any other
means, the applicant’s solicitors may
continue to supply a separate certified
plan, and the Keeper will
continue to requisition such plans
where he considers that they may
assist the identification process.
However, the following guidelines
now apply to the submission of such
plans:
● The plan should be drawn in
conformity with the criteria in
appendix 1 to chapter 4 of the
Practice Book. Subject to the
relevant copyright restrictions,
solicitors may if they wish base
the plan on an extract from the
current edition of the
Ordnance Map, at the appropriate
scale referred to in the
Practice Book.
● The solicitor submitting the
plan is responsible for
ensuring that the extent
depicted on the plan accurately
reflects the current
occupied extent, and also for
ensuring that this coincides
both with the extent which
the prior titles are believed to
support and with the extent
which has been possessed for
the prescriptive period on the
strength of those titles.The
Keeper will read the answers
to the relevant questions on
Form 1 in the light of this
responsibility.
● The plan should bear a
docquet certifying that it
depicts the subjects to which
the application for registration
relates. This docquet should
be signed by the granter(s) and
the grantee(s) of the deed
inducing registration.
(Solicitors should particularly
note this change of practice:
the docquet should no longer
be signed by the applicant’s
agents, but must instead be
signed personally by both
parties to the transaction).
● The Keeper reserves the right
to request further supportive
evidence in the course of his
examination of title, and – if
necessary – to exclude indemnity
and/or to restrict the
extent of the subjects included
in the title sheet.
These guidelines will be adopted by
the Keeper’s staff with immediate
effect. However, the Keeper wishes
to reassure solicitors that he will
continue to look sympathetically at
cases on their individual merits. He
will also of course honour any
commitment he may already have
made in a particular case,as the result
of a written pre-registration enquiry.
If it is obvious before the application
for registration is made that the
description in the titles is not going
to be sufficient to enable the Keeper
to confirm the location and or
extent of the subjects it is permissible
to prepare and attach a plan to
the deed inducing registration. Any
such plan should be drawn in
conformity with the criteria noted
above, but will not require to be
signed by the purchaser. The
subjects should be described in such
a way as to make it clear that the
plan defines the extent of the
subjects possessed on the basis of
the description which is believed to
be habile to comprehend that
extent. Some such formula as the
following is suggested:
“All and Whole the subjects
delineated/coloured …………….
on the plan annexed and subscribed
by me/us as relative hereto, which is
hereby declared to be taxative and
which defines the extent of the
subjects possessed by me/us and
my/our predecessors in title as [here
insert the description from earlier
titles noting any exceptions that are
necessary]”.
Naturally, if this approach is used the
same caveats noted at the fourth
bullet point above apply. In particular
any exception from warrandice
will almost certainly result in an
exclusion of indemnity.
Solicitors who have questions about the
new guidelines are invited to contact the
Pre-Registration Enquiries Section at the
Keeper’s office at Meadowbank House,
153 London Road, Edinburgh, EH8 7AU
(direct telephone line 0845 6070163).
ABERDEIN CONSIDINE &
COMPANY, 8 & 9 Bon Accord
Crescent, Aberdeen, also at
Aboyne, Ballater, Banchory, Culter,
Dyce, Ellon, Inverurie, Kingswells,
Peterhead, Stonehaven,Torry and
Westhill, are delighted to announce
that with effect from 24th August
2001 their associates Mark McCall,
Rhona MacLean and Lynne Mulcahy
have been assumed as partners of
the firm and Lynn Bentley has
joined the firm as an associate.
Stuart Beveridge resigned as a
partner of the firm with effect from
2nd August 2001.
ADAMS WHYTE, Edinburgh and
Livingston, are pleased to intimate
that as of 3rd June 2001 they have
moved to new Edinburgh premises
at 14/16 Frederick Street,
Edinburgh, EH2 2HB, telephone
0131 225 8813, fax 0131 226 0949
and DX ED212. The e-mail and
web address remain unchanged as
do the Livingston office details.
ANDERSON STRATHERN,WS,
Edinburgh, are pleased to intimate
that Michael Joseph Ferrie was
appointed an associate of the firm
with effect from 1st March 2001.
BOYDS, Glasgow and Edinburgh,
are pleased to announce that with
effect from 1st July 2001, Robert
Weir has been assumed as a
partner in the firm.
CAESAR & HOWIE, Bathgate and
elsewhere, are pleased to announce
the assumption as partners of their
associates Hamish Alexander
Davidson and Sarah Helen Patrick
with effect from 1st July 2001.
CAMERONS, 160A High Street,
Irvine, KA12 8AN, intimate the
retiral of their senior partner, Colin
Cameron from the partnership
with effect from 31st May 2001.
Mr Cameron continues to be associated
with the practice as a
consultant.
Michael Joseph Ferrie intimates that
he resigned as a partner of
BOYDS, Glasgow with effect from
28th February 2001.
Robert Howat, formerly Company
solicitor of SCOTIA HOLDINGS
PLC is pleased to announce his
appointment as Company
Secretary and In-House Legal
Adviser to CELTIC PLC, with effect
from 18th June 2001.
KEEGAN WALKER & CO, SSC,
Livingston & Bathgate, have transferred
their head office in
Livingston. With effect from 4th
June 2001 the new address is
Torridon House, Civic Square,
Almondvale Boulevard, Livingston,
EH54 6QJ. Telephone 01506
415333, fax 01506 416116, e-mail:
livingston@keeganwalker.co.uk,
Legal Post: LP1 Livingston.
Journal
People
PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE
Intimations for the people section should be sent to:
Denise Robertson, Records Department, Law Society of Scotland,
26 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7YR
e-mail: deniserobertson@lawscot.org.uk
LEDINGHAM CHALMERS,
Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Inverness,
Baku, Istanbul and Falkland Islands,
intimates that on 1st July 2001,
Claire MacLeod, Melanie Sara
Reynolds and John Douglas Smart
(Aberdeen) were appointed as
associates in the firm.
LOW BEATON RICHMOND,
Glasgow, intimate the retiral of
Ronald B. Low as a consultant with
the firm with effect from 31st July
2001.
Ann McKechin, Glasgow, intimates
that following her election as the
Member of Parliament for Glasgow
Maryhill she has retired from
private practice with effect from
8th June 2001. Telephone 0207
219 8239
MACLAY MURRAY & SPENS,
Glasgow, Edinburgh, London and
Brussels, intimate that with effect
from 1st June 2001 Kirsti Olson
and Gregor Mitchell were assumed
as partners of the firm. Kirsti, as
part of the Construction &
Engineering Department, is a
construction litigator with considerable
experience of advising and
representing clients in relation to all
types of dispute resolution. Gregor,
as a member of the Tax & Private
Capital Department, is head of the
firm’s Rural Property unit, as well as
advising clients on partnership
disputes and succession planning. In
addition, the following assistants
were assumed as associates on the
same date: Craig Darling – IP &
Technology, Douglas Milne –
Commercial Litigation & Advocacy,
George Pennel – Employment,
Pensions & Benefits and Iain
Sutherland - Corporate
The partners of McFADYEN &
SEMPLE, Paisley, are pleased to
announce that their principal court
assistant, Frances Marie McCartney,
has been assumed as a partner in
the firm with effect from 1st August
2001.
On 31st July 2001 Adam More
retired from MURRAY BEITH
MURRAY,WS, Edinburgh. Adam
spent twenty three years as a
partner of the firm, of which seven
were spent as Managing Partner.
He leaves us to take up a course in
e-commerce at Strathclyde
University and we wish him well.
The firm would also like to
announce the appointment of Neil
Addis, who joined the firm on 1st
August 2001 as an associate in the
Commercial Property department.
HELEN M NICOLSON, 6 Bridge
Street Wynd, Kirkwall, is pleased to
announce that with effect from 1st
August 2001 she has retired from
the firm, and that as from that date
the business has been taken over
by her assistant, Edward T C
Nicolson, who will be trading under
the existing firm name of HELEN M
NICOLSON. The address,
telephone and fax number
remain unchanged.
NICOLSON O’BRIEN, Airdrie are
pleased to announce that with
effect from 1st July 2001 John S.
Hunter has been assumed as a
partner in the firm.
PATTISON & SIM, Paisley, are
pleased to intimate that George
Jamieson, formerly of WALKER
LAIRD, Paisley, joined the firm as a
consultant with effect from 8th May
2001.
The PRG PARTNERSHIP, Glasgow,
Clydebank, Kirkintilloch and
Lennoxtown, are pleased to
intimate the appointment of their
assistant, Sheila Munro, as an
associate of the firm. Mrs Munro is
based at the firm’s offices at 12
Royal Crescent, Glasgow.
SCOTTISH ENTERPRISE, Legal
Team, Glasgow, intimate that with
effect from 25th September 2001
they will move to new premises at
150 Broomielaw, Atlantic Quay,
Glasgow, G2 8LU. Telephone
numbers and e-mail addresses will
remain unchanged.
SHAUN PRINGLE & CO,WS, 15
Ainslie Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6AS,
are pleased to announce that with
effect from 1st July 2001 their
associate John Welsh Stewart
Macfie has been assumed as a
partner in the firm.
SIMPSON & MARWICK, WS,
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and
Dundee, are pleased to announce
that Henry T D Boyle joined the
firm on 28th May 2001 as an
associate in their Dundee office, and
with effect from 1st May 2001 have
appointed Mark Donaldson as an
associate in their Aberdeen office.
WM. SKELTON & CO, Rothesay,
Isle of Bute, are pleased to
announce the appointment of their
qualified assistant, Marianne
Deighan, as an associate of the firm
with effect from 1st June 2001.
TURNBULL, SIMSON &
STURROCK,WS, Jedburgh,
intimate the retiral of their partner,
Martin George Ritchie Edington,
WS, as a partner with effect from
12th July 2001, following upon his
appointment to the Shrieval bench.
A C WHITE, Ayr, are pleased to
announce that with effect from 2nd
July 2001 Morven Cumming, assistant
in their Conveyancing and
Trusts and Executries Department,
and Gregor Forbes, until recently
Court Partner in R & J A
MacCallum, Ayr, have been
appointed as associates of the firm.
 PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE
Journal
Photographs of people featured can be sent to:
The Journal, Studio 62, Sir James Clark Building,Abbeymill Business Centre, Paisley PA1 1TJ
Correction
In the People section last month
at page 14, Alexander Neil
Wilson, accredited as a specialist
in Commercial Leasing Law,
was wrongly designated as
Andrew Neil Wilson.
Write to:
The Editor,The Journal,
Studio 62, Sir James Clark Building,
Abbeymill Business Centre, Paisley PA1 1TJ
Journal
Letters
LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS
Alistair Rennie acknowledges in his
article that the pilot scheme
requires the solicitor to prepare
two parallel applications, the paper
one which will effect registration
and that carried out online. I can
reassure colleagues that the online
transaction, even in pilot form, takes
very little time. One can view the
duplicate copy of the Title
Certificate entry on screen and
when necessary, completion of the
Form 2 in its modified electronic
form takes only a few seconds. I can
assure Austin Lafferty that, provided
one is reasonably adept with a
mouse, the online Form 2 used in
connection with ARTL transactions
can be completed far more quickly
than a handwritten Form 2, as the
layout has been simplified and many
of the questions have a default
answer, for example when not applicable.
There is no form 4 as no
documents would be lodged in the
event of an on line registration.
Purchasers’ details, standard security
and discharge details must be
inserted by the purchasing or selling
agent as required but some of these
are simply a matter of using drop
down boxes and highlighting the
appropriate entry. My firm is at
present looking at whether our case
management software could
complete some of the entries in the
ARTL forms with information
already held on our electronic file,
which again would save time.
I think some of the doubts
expressed in connection with the
use of ARTL have arisen from
misunderstanding as to the process.
One must remember that ARTL is
only applicable at present for transfers
of whole. Transfers of part
would provide various difficulties.
Further, in its pilot form, the
Embrace e-conveyancing
I READ with interest that section of The Journal of June 2001 devoted to conveyancing and in particular
Alistair Rennie’s article on ARTL. I thought it appropriate that, as an enthusiastic participant
in the pilot scheme, I should provide some further information to fellow practitioners.
Fax on: 0141 561 0400
E-mail: roger@connectcommunications.co.uk
Conveyancing Committee
 LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS
Journal
conveyancing process in its present
form is unchanged. One simply
completes an online application in
parallel with the paper one.
However, if one takes the concept
to its logical conclusion, one would
have to consider whether, for
example, any form of Disposition
would be required as there would
be no need to record a hard copy
deed. Similarly, missives should be
much simplified, and may be in an
electronic form. Changes to legislation,
however, would obviously be
required to allow a fully electronic
transaction.
The benefits of ARTL would be
many, principally in saving of time.
Purchasers would have a registered
title instantly, and lenders would
similarly be secured at point of
registration.
Also, as many of the documents
involved could be completed with
default answers or information from
files held electronically elsewhere,
the opportunity for error should
hopefully be reduced. One should
not overlook the ecological aspects.
I am constantly amazed at how
much paper is wasted in any legal
office. Storage of paper files (and
the cost of same) would be
reduced and lenders would only
require electronic copies of the
charge entry as a hard copy Charge
Certificate could be downloaded at
any time.
With regard to David Adie’s
concerns regarding the virtual
office, I would agree that many
clients will still expect to come to a
functioning office. However, in a
standard transaction through ARTL
as envisaged, it is unlikely that one
would ever need to meet the client
other than for the purpose of
money laundering checks and this
may be negated where a client has
a biometric or other verifiable
electronic signature. If lenders
become involved, the funding may
be controlled by the solicitors in
the transaction and transferred
electronically, automatically paying
the purchase price and also automatically
supplying the redemption
monies to the discharging lender.
It may all seem pie in the sky but
one only has to look at the huge
increase in interest in Internetbased
transactions for any
commodity, be it CDs, the weekly
shop or even the family holiday or
motor car.
All in all I think that E-conveyancing
is something which the profession
should welcome and I would
encourage colleagues to sign up for
the pilot scheme. Using the system
in pilot form will help to ensure that
the finished product reflects the
practice of its users.
John Leyden
Morton Fraser
No member of the Conveyancing
Committee has ever said that the
Society has given up the fight to
preserve the position of solicitors in
the conveyancing process in
Scotland. Such comments are
without foundation and lead to
unnecessary anxiety in the
profession. Indeed, the Committee's
commitment to assisting the profession
is clear from current developments.
These include the new
conveyancing section on the
Society's website, the current series
of conveyancing roadshows across
the country, the many responses
to consultation papers which may
lead to changes affecting all
conveyancers such as the Feudal
Reform package. In addition the
committee are in dialogue with
agencies, including the Council for
Mortgage Lenders (CML), Stamp
Office, Scottish Executive, Scottish
Consumer Council and individual
lenders.The Society's Council has
approved and supports these initiatives
and receives reports of
progress at the monthly Council
meeting.
Conveyancing Essentials, the
Committee’s section of
www.lawscot.org.uk, now gives
members news and information
which will be of practical use and
assist busy practitioners to keep
abreast of developments in the law.
It also provides a forum for practitioners
to tell the Committee about
difficulties encountered and request
matters to be raised with agencies
such as the CML or Registers of
Scotland.The Committee communicates
regularly with many practitioners
and and addresses concerns
they raise with the various
agencies.The Committee's representations
have ensured that
conveyancing practitioners’ interests
as well as those of their clients are
strongly represented.
In this regard, I am pleased to be
able to confirm that the Keeper and
the Conveyancing Committee have
agreed to create a Fast Response
Focus Group to represent the interests
of conveyancers in relation to
the Registers and to canvas their
opinions with regard to proposed
changes in practice. If you would like
to be a member of this Focus
Group I would urge you to contact
me at linseylewin@lawscot.org.uk
(0131 476 8174).
Mr McCormick's reference to the
fee order is a little misleading in
suggesting that change is imminent.
The Deputy Keeper has advised me
that he undertook to raise the
question of a fixed fee for remortgages
when the next fee review
commences. He will report the
views of the profession as
expressed by Mr McCormick to the
Justice Department at the outset
and, as with all fee orders, there will
be consultation before the order is
finally made.
If Mr McCormick or any conveyancing
practitioner would like to clarify
any of the issues raised in this correspondence
or would like to discuss
a particular issue with members of
the Committee, then the ideal
opportunity to do so is at the
Conveyancing Roadshows.The next
event will be in Edinburgh on
Wednesday, 7th November, at the
Society. Details will be posted on
lawscot.org.uk in due course.
Linsey J. Lewin
GRAEME MCCORMICK'S letters have given me the opportunity,
as Secretary of the Conveyancing Committee, to correct his
understanding of some matters and to inform Journal readers of the
work of the Conveyancing Committee.
MEDIATING
a cultural revolution
Introducing our coverage of alternative forms of dispute resolution, John Sturrock QC and David Semple
examine the merits of mediation and the lawyer’s role in facilitating its success
Setting the Scene
“Very often, there will be alternative ways of settling the issues at stake which
are simpler, cheaper, quicker and less stressful to all concerned
than an adversarial court case.”
Of course, alternatives to litigation have been available
for a long time: many lawyers pride themselves on being
able to negotiate settlements without a court hearing.
Arbitration and expert determination are well established
and tribunals of all kinds have popped up.
Ombudsmen have appeared. Adjudication has arrived
on the construction scene.“Dispute Resolution” departments
are replacing Court departments. Litigation is
seen by many lawyers and, perhaps more importantly, by
their clients, as only one of the many ways by which
disputes may be resolved.
Mediation represents a further means for resolving
disputes where traditional negotiation is not working
effectively. In England, in commercial and public sector
disputes, professional negligence claims and even in
personal injury cases, mediation is now part of the landscape,
following trends in the United States, Australia
and elsewhere. In some States in the US, in Hong Kong,
Canada,Australia and England, courts have the power to
refer cases to mediation. In England, the arrival of the
new Civil Procedure Rules, following the enquiry by
Lord Woolf, resulted in a large increase in referrals to
mediation. In the year after their introduction (1999)
the number of mediations handled by the Centre for
Dispute Resolution (CEDR) increased by 140%. CEDR’s
statistics reveal an overall successful settlement rate for
cases referred to mediation in excess of 80%.
In Scotland, for the first time in non-family cases, alternative
dispute resolution (of which mediation is the
most commonly used method) is now referred to in
court rules. The Act of Sederunt (Ordinary Cause
Rules) Amendment (No 3) (Commercial Actions) 2000
provides at Rule 40.12(3)(m) that the Sheriff has the
power to make any order which he thinks will result in
the speedy resolution of the action, including the use of
alternative dispute resolution.
There is already increasing use of mediation in Scotland
in non-family cases. Recently, disputes involving web site
design, building contracts, local authority services and
employment have been resolved successfully by mediators.There
is currently a review of the use of mediation
in disputes involving patients and the health services in
Scotland. It seems likely that mediation will become a
fact of professional life for Scots lawyers. How is that
going to affect the profession? Will it result in a loss of
lucrative work or is it an opportunity for lawyers to
embrace a further line of business and provide a
valuable additional service for their clients?
What is mediation?
Mediation is a flexible, voluntary and private process, in
which an impartial third party (the mediator) seeks to
help the parties to negotiate a satisfactory outcome to
their dispute. Unlike litigation and many other adjudicative
processes in which a decision is given by a third
party, the mediator assists the parties to communicate
and negotiate but does not issue a decision or make a
ruling. The parties themselves are usually involved and
can identify and explore the real issues with the
mediator, in total confidence, and address any problem
areas in the case. They can also gain a greater understanding
of each other’s situation. If the mediation is
successful, the parties will sign an agreement which is
binding like any other legal agreement.
What are the advantages of mediation?
● Mediation provides speedy resolution of conflicts:
most mediations are completed within one day.
Preparation beforehand is important but will tend
to be far quicker than for a court case.
● The costs of mediation are relatively low
compared to litigation: in a recent mediation, one
party identified cost savings of between £10,000
and £50,000 compared to litigation.The costs of
organising a mediation and providing a mediator
are readily ascertainable from mediation providers.
● The parties retain control over the procedure,
which is flexible, and also over the outcome: there
is no binding outcome unless and until each party
is satisfied that it is in their interests to sign a
settlement agreement.
THIS was the thrust of the Lord Chancellor’s announcement in March this year that, in future,
Government Departments will only go to court as a last resort. Disputes involving
government departments will be dealt with by mediation and other alternatives to litigation wherever
possible. Does this reflect a change in culture which will have significance in Scotland?
Journal
Mediation
● Mediation saves management time and
reduces opportunity cost: the speed of
resolution can relieve managers and other
employees of the retrospective, tiresome
and often stressful process of reviewing
what happened in the past and preparing to
fight a potentially long court case, leaving
them free to attend to current and future
business.
● It is “without prejudice”: the process, like any
other negotiation, is “without prejudice”;
being voluntary, either party can leave at any
time and maintain their legal rights.
● It is confidential and avoids the publicity of a
court hearing: the whole process, as well as
the outcome, is conducted in privacy, unless
parties agree to disclosure.
● Mediation provides a reality check for the
parties: where a court case has been raised
or is in contemplation, often the enthusiasm
to make a point can cause the parties to
overlook reality, such as the validity of a
contract or the reliability of a witness –
which will be crucial in a proof. A mediator
is likely, in private, to give the parties the
opportunity to review their true strengths
and weaknesses.
● It creates the possibility of creative and
forward-looking solutions rather than
outcomes based on the past: the parties are
free to look at practical solutions which are
wider than the scope of a court case, which
tends to focus primarily on the past and on
legal remedies or rights.
● Mediation enables the parties to have a
continuing business relationship: rarely do
parties do business after a court case is
won or lost.The experience following
mediations is different – often, a future
working relationship can be encouraged.
● The mediator is independent: of the parties
and their legal representatives, thus
providing a basis for confidence in his or
her impartiality (and lack of baggage) and
ability to assist both sides to find a mutually
acceptable outcome.
One of the parties in a mediation conducted in
Scotland this year had this to say:
“The end came sooner than it would have in
litigation; there was no adverse publicity; a measure
of reconciliation was achieved; staff could be spared
the stress and time involved in appearing as
witnesses, and preparing for the case; and the
potential expense of lengthy and fractious litigation
was avoided.”
What are some of the arguments used
against mediation?
● If the clients’ legal case is strong, mediation
may produce a worse result than going to
court.This tends to ignore the fact that the
strength of the case will be a crucial factor
in the mediation, just as in any negotiation.
But most cases settle, because parties
recognise the risks of going to court.
● There is a need to disclose one’s hand.
There is no need to disclose any
information to the mediator or to the other
side which you do not wish to disclose. In a
court action, most of the relevant information
is likely to be recovered at some stage.
All information disclosed to the mediator in
the course of the mediation is confidential
unless disclosure is specifically agreed.
● Pressure to settle is created by the
mediation. Like any opportunity to settle
and avoid the costs and risks of proceeding
to court, this may be a valuable aspect of
the mediation process. But either party may
walk away at any time if they wish.
● Going to mediation displays weakness or
may be seen as an admission of liability.
Being prepared to explain one’s case at
mediation is seen by many as an indication
of strength. A party speaking from strength
has the opportunity to put its case to the
other side.
● It is just another delaying tactic. It takes a
relatively short time to organise and
conduct a mediation. Often, it can be held
while parties await the next stage of court
procedure.
● Recovery of evidence is not available.As in
any negotiation, parties are not able to force
others to disclose material in a mediation
but they know that, if the mediation is not
successful and the matter proceeds to
court, the court may require disclosure.
When is mediation not appropriate?
Most cases settle without a final court order.
Mediation is a way to bring about that settlement
more quickly and less expensively. Thus, most
cases are suitable for mediation. Nonetheless, it
should be recognised that mediation may not be
appropriate where:
● there is a desire to establish a legal
precedent;
● a party needs a summary decree or rapid
interdict;
● a party wishes to enforce an award;
● there is a need to compel and examine
witnesses;
● a party wishes to make a public statement
on some matter; or
● there is no genuine interest in settlement.
Even in these cases, mediation may have a role at
some stage.
The lawyer’s role in mediation
Mediation does not leave legal rights and lawyers
standing at the door. In most mediations, it is
sensible (if not essential) for lawyers (solicitors
and / or counsel) to be directly involved in the
entire process.
Before there is any hint of conflict:
Lawyers have an early role in advising clients of
the various dispute resolution clauses which may
be included in commercial contracts. These
commonly include reference to arbitration or an
expert and now, increasingly, reference to
mediation. Indeed, there may be a professional
obligation to advise on the inclusion of a mediation
clause if the benefits are likely to include
those mentioned above.
On the emergence of a conflict:
Mediation provides another option for the lawyer
to suggest to his clients. Awareness of the three
pillars of dispute resolution - “Negotiation,
Mediation and Adjudication (including litigation
and arbitration)” and informed commitment to
mediation can send a powerful message to
clients. In practice, it may be easier for the
solicitor to advise clients to continue with litigation
where the clients are satisfied that mediation
as an option has been tried or, at least, canvassed
and validly rejected.Where clients are intimidated
by the possible cost, delay and uncertainty of
court, they may well wish to go to mediation.
In the course of a conflict:
Disputes can be referred to mediation at any
stage - including during litigation. This is an additional
weapon in the dispute resolver’s armoury if
negotiation has failed to produce a satisfactory
result or where there is a need for parties to
have their expectations tested. Mediation may at
least focus and narrow the issues.
In the arrangement and conduct of the
mediation:
There is a real role for the legal adviser in
ensuring that the arrangements for and conduct
of the mediation are handled in such a way that
no unnecessary prejudice is caused to the clients’
position. Representing a client in a mediation is a
challenging task, requiring a rigorous approach to
the issues while looking for ways to resolve the
dispute and create a climate for settlement.
Deciding what to disclose and when, considering
the options and advising on the alternatives all
require sound negotiating and tactical skills.
In the preparation or approval of the Agreement
The successful outcome produced a ‘win-win’
result, leaving everyone with a real
sense of achievement
to Mediate, other pre-mediation
documents and submissions:
It is as important to ensure that all
the relevant information and points
are properly organised prior to a
mediation as in a court hearing. It is
well accepted that an essential prerequisite
of a satisfactory mediation
is the availability of sufficient legal
and factual information to each
party to enable it to make a realistic
analysis and assessment of its case.
The legal adviser’s role in assembling
and advising on this material is
invaluable.
In drafting or approving the
Settlement Agreement:
The terms of any agreement are
normally reduced to writing. This
can be complicated and may involve
detailed drafting by the lawyers.
And finally: broader opportunities
for the legal profession
Mediation gives members of both
branches of the profession in
Scotland the opportunity:
● to consider new and practical
ways of safeguarding and
pursuing clients’ priorities, aims
and interests (and to market
these as part of its repertoire);
● to review the options it makes
available to clients for resolving
disputes and to become
engaged in a process which
widens (and markets) these
options;
● to develop (and market) new
skills in new areas of work;
● to embrace a relatively new
culture which, expanding on
existing processes, can put
Scotland amongst the world
leaders in providing a creative,
efficient and cost-effective
dispute resolution service to its
citizens and to those who do
business here.
Perhaps the last word should be
given to a party who recently experienced
mediation in Scotland:
“Having been unfamiliar with the
process of mediation prior to last
week, we are now fully aware of the
huge benefits to be gained by using
mediation in this type of dispute.
“Whilst we accept that mediation is
not appropriate in all cases of
dispute... we believe that in cases
such as ours, where issues such as a
breakdown in communication and a
general sense of antagonism exists
between both parties, whilst it is
mutually acknowledged that an area
of common ground remains, this
type of arrangement can work very
positively for both parties involved.
“The benefits and advantages of
mediation are numerous, but
personally we identified a few as
being:
● the fact that individual
reputations and dignities are
preserved and maintained
throughout and following the
process,
● a greater understanding of the
specific difficulties faced by
both parties can be achieved in
a very positive, constructive
and respectful manner,
● mediation works effectively by
encouraging the use of
positive, constructive language
and attitudes,
● particular roles and responsibilities
of individuals could be fully
appreciated and respected,
● the successful outcome derived
from mediation produced a
‘win - win’ result, leaving
everyone with a real sense of
achievement and success.“
* Note:There are a number of mediation
organisations which will assist with
setting up a mediation and providing
information about it. In Scotland, David
Semple and John Sturrock are Directors
of Core Mediation Ltd which provides a
full mediation service for disputes in
commercial, public sector and
professional matters (including advice
on whether a dispute is appropriate
for mediation).
E-mail: johnsturrock@core-mediation.com,
davidsemple@core-mediation.com
Journal
Mediation
People do turn to family law because they have
problems to sort out.They will usually be trying to cope
with significant change. In many cases this will not be of
their choosing. If so, a legal adviser is likely to be seem as
part of a very unwelcome new dimension.The information
and advice provided may well be constructive and
appropriate within the context of the changes but still
tainted by association.
Even if the client is bringing about the changes by
initiating the separation or divorce he or she may not
have foreseen that part of the package was to expose
his or her aspirations to the light of family law.Very few
people find it easy to yield up privacy and control over
decision-making to a stranger.
A very helpful book “The Trusted Advisor” (Maister,
Green & Gailford, Simon & Schuster ISBN 074320963X)
makes the point that it is not enough for a professional
to be right: an adviser’s job is to be helpful. Giving correct
information is essential but not sufficient.
Mediation can help foster a relationship between client
and legal adviser, which the client will perceive as helpful.
In the first place, suggesting the option of mediation
provides a client with the opportunity of as much selfdetermination
as is possible. A mediator is a catalyst, not
a referee or adjudicator. Clients using mediation are
provided with a structure for discussion and exchange
of information.They are helped to use the opportunity
to look at possibilities rather than engage in
unhelpful dialogue.They are not told what to do.
If the client elects not to pursue mediation then
the involvement of an advising lawyer to negotiate
or litigate is a matter of choice rather
than imposition.
There are obviously circumstances which
would preclude using mediation. It
would not be an appropriate step if
there were a history of violence or
intimidation in the relationship sufficient
to prevent a client being or
feeling safe enough to explore possibilities
in the presence of their
partner. In that case, the legal
framework should offer a welcome
and reassuring buffer.
In very many cases, however, mediation
is a possibility which should be
considered. Clients can be told that for
LET MEDIATION
take the strain
CONSUMERS see law as a “distress purchase”. It would be unrealistic
to expect clients to regard family law as fun but there
is a way of allowing it to be seen as part of the solution rather than part of the problem.
Anne H Dick and Ewan A Malcolm recommend using mediation to resolve family law disputes
and outline how solicitors can go about referring clients to mediation
part of the process of negotiation a
couple can use a mediator to
assemble information, explore
common ground and look for
mutually acceptable solutions. Some
clients will respond positively and
be relieved to learn decisions can
be tackled in this way. Some clients
may be wary and wish to be reassured
that mediators are complementary
rather than alternatives to
advising solicitors. Some clients will
know immediately that mediation is
not for them.
Those clients who decide to use
mediation will still need important
input from advising solicitors.
Mediation is complementary to, not
instead of, legal advice.Those clients
who decide not to use mediation
will be reassured that their legal
adviser offered impartial information
rather than pursuing his or her
own agenda.
The second way mediation can
provide a helpful input is for advising
solicitors to combine mediation
skills with legal knowledge to allow
valuable advice and information to
be absorbed and used as part of a
problem-solving process. Mediation
skills make it possible to build a
relationship of trust with the client,
to have a structured approach to
the steps which have to be taken
and to create a climate which
encourages solutions to emerge.
Information is an essential building
block in negotiation but by itself will
never deliver the answer. How
people feel about a situation is a
crucial factor and if ignored, can
block or distort negotiations. How
and when information is made
available can also be pivotal.
Mediation training can give an
insight into the power and importance
of paying attention to clients,
of listening as well as speaking and
of asking the right questions as well
as providing the right answers. It
underlines the significance of the
appropriate use of language. It
emphasises the need to clarify and
summarise. It fosters the use of
planning and time keeping. While
mediation is rooted in co-operation
and a search for consensus, this is to
be achieved with professionalism
and accuracy. Mediation training is a
rigorous process but rewarding for
parties and practitioners.
So what is involved if your client
chooses to use mediation or if you
chose to do mediation training?
Referring to mediation
There are two organisations in
Scotland offering family mediation.
Family Mediation Scotland has affiliated
services in regions cross the
country. Most FM mediators, who
are trained and subject to careful
supervision, take on cases after a
separate intake meeting with each
party. Sessions are usually free
Mediation training can give an insight into
the power and importance of paying
attention to clients
continued on next page
Journal
Mediation
The mediator makes full use of collaborative skills to encourage
parties away from positional bargaining
except for All Issues Mediation, where sessional fees
apply. They will only deal with cases where the parties
have children under the age of 16 years. Some services
also offer mediation on financial as well as child related
issues. In addition, FM services do important work in
the provision of contact centres and other initiatives to
support children through the difficult period of family
breakdown. To contact the local service call FMS on
0131 220 1610.
CALM is the organisation set up and run by
solicitors who are accredited by the Law
Society of Scotland as Family Law
Mediators. All CALM members are experienced
family lawyers who have and
continue to undergo extensive mediation
training. To refer a case to a CALM
mediator, simply call or write to one of
the mediators in your area (there are
over 55 practising members
around Scotland). If a recommendation
would be helpful,
contact CALM’s regional
convenor listed on the
freephone number 0800
9150080
It is important that both
parties are willing to attend
mediation and that funding
has been clarified at the
time of making the referral.
CALM mediators usually
charge around about the
recommended Law
Society General Table
hourly rate. If your
client is on Advice and
Assistance or Legal
Aid it is important
to get authority in
advance as
payment for this
expenditure can
only be made as
an outlay on the
advising solicitors
account.
The Scottish
Legal Aid Board
will usually grant
sanction for cover
for the cost of half of four
sessions each of two
hours long.
The CALM mediator will
send out an initial referral form
for each party to complete
before the first meeting
along with a letter (which
parties will be asked to
sign) explaining the guidelines and process of mediation.
Each session will usually last no more than two hours –
any longer can become counter productive as even the
most amicable separating couple can find these conversations
hard going.
At the first meeting the parties work with the mediator
to set the agenda for their assisted negotiations, prioritising
their various issues.Then they start gathering the
necessary information. As both undertake to make full
financial disclosure, the mediator can help, using lists and
additional questionnaires to collect together all the
details of matrimonial assets and liabilities required along
with appropriate vouching. Sometimes parties ask their
lawyers to help with this process.
Usually at the second or third meeting it helps to
tabulate information, by pulling together the numbers
and issues on a flipchart. Then, and only then, the
process can move to the generation of options. The
mediator makes full use of collaborative skills to encourage
parties away from positional bargaining. Legal
advisers can help by discussing a range of possible desirable
outcomes so that the clients’ expectations are realistic
and manageable.
Options are explored without fear of commitment,
developed and then reality tested. If they are mutually
acceptable they can become proposals. Often, the
CALM mediator is asked to produce a Mediation
Summary detailing these proposals and outline the
background discussions leading up to the formulation of
the proposals.Also, often an Open Summary of Financial
Information is produced so both parties and their
advisers can use this disclosed information in whatever
further process they require.
Mediation Training
All CALM members have undergone a foundation
six day training course lead by the internationally
renowned Family Mediation Trainer Lisa Parkinson, who
is CALM’s Director of Mediation Training. CALM would
like to hear from appropriately experienced candidates
interested in such a course as soon as possible. Anyone
who would like to know more about family mediation
foundation training should contact Rhona Cameron at
Robson McLean, 28 Abercromby Place, Edinburgh
(0131 556 0556).
CALM members require to continue to do eight hours
mediation and nine hours family law training along with
one co-mediation and an observed session on which a
trained assessor reports to the Law Society accreditation
panel, annually.The benefits of CALM membership
are that there is a tremendous network of similarly
committed and trained colleagues throughout Scotland
all focused on developing practice in this wonderfully
demanding area of work
Anne H Dick is a partner with Anne Hall Dick & Co in Glasgow
and Ewan A Malcolm is a partner with Drummond Miller WS in
Edinburgh. Both work together as skills trainers for lawyers.
Journal
Adjudication
CONSTRUCTING AN
adjudicated settlement
While mediation is perhaps the most fashionable form of alternative dispute resolution, adjudication is
now increasingly the option of first resort to resolve construction disputes, writes Murray Shaw
IN July 1994 Sir Michael Latham published his report entitled “Constructing the Team”.
This was the final report of the snappily entitled “Government/Industry Review of Procurement
and Contractual Arrangements in the UK Construction Industry”.This report followed on from
a Government/industry review of the construction process.
.In the report Sir Michael and his committee came
forward with numerous recommendations. In the
foreword there was a specific warning against “cherry
picking” parts of the package. Despite this clear warning
the government chose to ignore large sections of Sir
Michael’s report when framing the Housing Grants,
Construction and Regeneration Act 1996.This Act dealt
with a number of disparate matters but Part II of the Act
dealt with construction contracts. This part of the Act
incorporated provisions to define what constitutes a
construction contract and provides for such contracts to
include a right to stage payments and a final date for
payment, prohibits conditional payment arrangements,
makes a provision for a right to suspend performance in
the event of non payment and most significantly creates
a mandatory right to refer disputes to adjudication.
Adjudication is in effect intended to be an interim resolution
of the position pending final determination (unless
otherwise settled) by the courts or in arbitration. For a
while there was considerable uncertainty about
whether Part II of the Act would ever be implemented,
though that finally happened on 1 May 1998.
Prior to Part II coming into effect it was generally
thought the provisions in relation to adjudication would
have the most significant effect. By way of example the
then named Official Referees Court in England (which
principally deals with construction disputes) set up
procedures to deal with disputes arising from the adjudication
process in anticipation that a significant number
of referrals to adjudication would be made and that
these referrals would result in early and numerous legal
disputes. In fact adjudication was very slow to get going.
The Adjudication Reporting Centre at Glasgow
Caledonian University published a report in August of
last year which inter alia commented upon the trends in
respect of adjudication.While the report acknowledged
that some care had to be used in respect of the data
available the 21 Adjudicator nominating bodies (see
below) had appointed 187 Adjudicators in the twelve
months from May 1998, 259 in the next four months
and 743 in the next six months.This raw data is consistent
with practical experience which suggests that after
a slow start in the course of the latter part of 1999 and
throughout 2000 there was a greater willingness to
pursue disputes by way of adjudication.The report from
Glasgow Caledonian University suggests that the
majority of Adjudication Notices are served by subcontractors
and again this is consistent with experience.
In the 1980s and 1990s the phenomenon of “subbiebashing”
was well known. It appears that sub-contractors
have adopted the Act enthusiastically with a view to
re-asserting their rights.
The willingness to serve Adjudication Notices has
resulted from the robust attitude of the Courts both in
England and Scotland to support the adjudication
process. In the first significant reported decision Macob
Civil Engineering v Morrison Construction [1999] BLR
93 the Court decided that a decision which was
properly made by an adjudicator, even if challenged, was
a decision for the purposes of the Act and therefore fell
to be enforced.This early approach has been echoed in
subsequent decisions. The Courts have indicated that
they are willing to uphold an Adjudicator’s decision
despite the fact that mistakes may have been made.The
Court of Appeal in England in the case of Bouygues
(UK) Limited v Dahl Jensen (UK) Limited [2000] BLR
522 upheld the decision of an Adjudicator in principle
even although the Adjudicator had failed to take into
account the position in respect of retention. Had he
done so rather than there being a significant award in
respect of the party referring the dispute to adjudication
there would have been a significant sum due to the
responding party.The Court’s view was that the award
still fell to be enforced because to do otherwise would
in effect be contrary to the intention of the Act.
Recent challenges to the decisions of Adjudicators have
concentrated on the issue of (a) jurisdiction and (b)
whether the rules of natural justice have been breached
- in other words does the Adjudicator have the requisite
jurisdiction to make a decision and has he in any
Journal
Adjudication
way mis-used that jurisdiction. Inevitably the Human
Rights Act has been relied upon to challenge the
adjudication process – so far without any significant
effect. In at least two decisions – Elaney Contracts v
The Vestry and Austin Hall Building Limited v Buckland
Securities the High Court in England has ruled that
Article 6 is not applicable to the adjudication process.
It appears that reference to issues such as jurisdiction
are made in an attempt to avoid the robust approach
the Court has taken to the enforcement of awards
made by adjudications.
A construction contract requires to include adjudication
provisions which comply with the Act, failing which The
Scheme for Construction Contracts set out in a
Statutory Instrument applies. There are separate
schemes for England and Scotland.The Act provides that
the Adjudicator must reach a decision within 28 days or
such longer period as may be permitted by the parties.
The referring party has unilateral discretion to extend
this period by 14 days. Any further extension requires
the consent of both parties.While the Adjudicator is only
making an interim decision that decision is to bind
both parties until the outcome of any further
arbitration or court proceedings and may be of
considerable practical effect.The parties may resolve
the dispute in the meantime. The Adjudicator’s
decision therefore may be of considerable significance
and may indeed provide the basis for resolution
of disputes which previously would have ended
up in litigation or arbitration.There is no financial limit
to the level of claims referred to adjudication and
adjudications commonly relate to six figure
sums. Despite the short timetable for
reaching a decision the disputes
which may be referred to an
Adjudicator are not restricted to
only disputes about payment. Any
dispute may be referred to an
Adjudicator to the extent that it arises
out of a Construction Contract.
The report from Glasgow
Caledonian University referred
to above highlights the fact
the majority of the
disputes referred to
Adjudicators do
simply concern
payment. Commonly disputes are also referred which
relate to “loss and expense claims”, defective work,
claims for extension of time and claims about the alleged
wrongful determination of employment in terms of a
Building Contract.All of these disputes may raise complicated
issues of law and fact and challenge the ability of
any Adjudicator to make a decision within 28 days.
Experience to date suggests that surveyors are leading
the way in dealing with adjudications closely followed by
engineers.As many of the disputes referred to adjudication
can raise complicated issues of law it is not
uncommon for Adjudicators to seek independent legal
advice. The process is not as formalised as that which
often applies in arbitrations in Scotland where a legal
clerk is appointed who in addition to providing the
Arbiter with legal advice deals with procedure. In adjudication
the normal practice is for the Adjudicator to
continue to deal with the administration of the dispute
with the role of the independent lawyer being to
express a view in respect of the legal issues.
There is no financial limit to the level of claims
referred to adjudication
In the event that a dispute is to be
referred to adjudication and if the
identity of the Adjudicator cannot
be agreed between the parties
then an application requires to be
made for the appointment of an
Adjudicator.The Adjudicator has to
be appointed within a seven day
period. It is still relatively rare for a
contract to specifically name an
Adjudicator. Many contracts do
however provide that an application
for the appointment of an
Adjudicator shall be made to a
specific body identified in the
relevant provision within the
contract. In the event that no such
provision is made then application
requires to be made to “an adjudicator
nominating body” to select a
person to act as an adjudicator. An
adjudicator nominating body is
defined to mean “a body (not
being an actual person and not
being a party to the dispute) which
holds itself out publicly as a body
which will select an adjudicator
when requested to do so by a
referring party”.
The Law Society of Scotland is an
adjudicator nominating body. To
the best of the writer’s knowledge
the Law Society of Scotland is not
identified in any form of contract
as the body who must nominate
an adjudicator. The Society therefore
is in a position to appoint
either where the contract is silent
on who is to appoint the
Adjudicator or the contract does
not comply with the Act, the
consequence then being that the
Scheme applies.
The Society maintains a list of solicitors
who are prepared to act as
Adjudicators – all of whom (including
the writer) are accredited as
specialists in Construction Law.This
year the Society has appointed
adjudicators in five disputes. The
fact the Society has been called
upon in this way may reflect the
fact that parties involved in
adjudications are now raising what
are essentially “legal issues” (such as
whether the arbiter has jurisdiction
to deal with a dispute by, for
example, contending the contract
does not relate to “construction
operations within the ambit of the
Act) with a view to avoiding the
consequences of the process.There
is no reason why the use of solicitors
as adjudicators should be
limited to situations where only
legal issues are involved. Many
technically qualified adjudicators
take legal advice. It would equally
be open to legally qualified adjudicators
to take technical advice
should that be necessary. Members
of the profession should therefore
consider whether to seek the
appointment of members of the
Society’s panel as adjudicators or
indeed where appropriate to
identify in a contract the Society as
the body who shall appoint the
adjudicator.
While adjudication was slow to take
off it is commonly resorted to now.
There is an ongoing review by the
Government into the operation of
the Act. The initial report suggests
that slight amendments to the Act
may be necessary. There is clearly
no lack of commitment to the
adjudication process however.
Before the Act was implemented it
was suggested that the right to adjudicate
would reduce the number of
disputes proceeding to arbitration
or litigation. It is too early to come
to a view about that. If that is the
position then despite the fact Sir
Michael’s report was not implemented
in full his objective of
reducing adversarial attitudes in the
construction industry will have been
achieved.
Murray Shaw has been a partner with
Biggart Baillie since1987. He is head of
their construction and development unit,
specialising in planning and construction
and is accredited by the Law Society of
Scotland in both areas.
There is no reason why the use of
solicitors as adjudicators should be limited
Journal This month,Advocate Derek O’Carroll focuses on websites concerned
with ADR and mediation, while below we signpost where to find
out more about mediation ADR Websites
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site of the month:
Websites
Two of the leading UK/ European mediation
and accreditation bodies:
ADR Group: www.adrgroup.co.uk
Centre for Dispute Resolution:
www.cedr.co.uk
An imaginative and informative US site which
provides in-depth articles and research on
mediation: www.mediate.com
An enjoyable UK site which also points to
many areas to explore further:
www.consensus.uk.com
Books
The Third Side
by Wm Ury (of “Getting to Yes”).
Penguin ISBN 0-14-029634-4
How to avoid destructive conflict - at home,
in schools, at work and in the world by involving
a third party.
The Magic of Conflict
by Thomas Crum Simon and Schuster
ISBN 0-671-6836-6
Conflict is not good or bad. It just is.
This is a strategy, based on Aikido, to resolve
conflicts by turning conflict from a damaging
activity to a creative one.
ADR: Principles and Practice
by Brown and Marriott. Sweet & Maxwell.
A comprehensive treatment of all forms of ADR
focusing on mediation, negotiation, med-arb and
mini trial, showing that as means of dispute
resolution, they can stand alone as alternatives
to adjudication. Every law firm engaged in
contentious matters in jurisdictions where ADR is
used will find this text useful. Provides clear
guidance on the practical aspects of using ADR.
Disputes without Tears;Alternative methods of
dispute resolution in the construction sector
John Burkett/ RIBA Publications
ISBN 1 85946 076 3
A straightforward overview of the architect's active
role in selecting the most appropriate from of
agreement and method of dispute resolution.
A working reference for all professionals practising
in the construction sector.
A Handbook of Dispute Resolution
– ADR in Action
Karl Mackie: Routledge
Just what it says from the Chief Executive of
CEDR and one of the most experienced
mediators in the UK.
The ADR Practice Guide,
Commercial Dispute Resolution
by Mackie, Mills, Marsh and Allen
Butterworths ISBN 0-406-91057 X
The Trusted Advisor
Maister, Green & Gailford, Simon & Schuster
ISBN 074320963X
Contact
Core Mediation,
22 Fountainhall Rd, Edinburgh EH9 2LW
Tel 0131 667 8833
Core can be contacted through its
administrator, Rachel Vellacott, at
rachel.vellacott@core-mediation.com
Family Mediation Scotland
Tel: 0131 220 1610
CALM
0800 9150080
For details about foundation training
contact Rhona Cameron at Robson McLean
Tel: 0131 556 0556
Mediation Bureau, Mediators and Trainers
Tel: 0131 535 1045
The Association of Mediators
Tel: 01506 842 736
Centre for Dispute Resolution
Princes House, 95 Gresham St,
London EC2V 7NA
Tel: 0207 600 5000
ADR Group
Grove House, Grove Road, Redland,
Bristol BS6 6UN
Tel: 0117 946 7180
www.consensus.uk.com
A lot of thought has gone into this site hosted
by this organisation based in Norwich. Its site
map reveals a well thought-out and comprehensible
site which is easy to navigate. It has
loads of good quality information on mediation
and mediators. It, like many other sites, has a list
of mediators (mostly in England) complete with
their CVs. The mediators are all certified at a
particular level. In addition to the usual
information about mediation, there is a glossary,
case studies, extracts from the English legislation
relating to ADR. Consensus also offers a
mediation service including information about
fees and how the service operates. All very
clear and easy to comprehend. The user can
start the ball rolling online. Unlike many other
sites, it is happy to provide a list of links to other
organisations providing ADR and mediation
services and so is a useful starting point for a
wider search for ADR resources on the web.
There’s lots more including a section on
mediator jokes (no, really: How many mediators
does it take to change a light bulb...) some of
which are even funny. A well-designed and easy
to use site. Great.
Subjective Rating (where 5* is excellent and 1*
is poor and no stars indicate that that
category has not been assessed)
useful contacts:
Journal
www.adrgroup.co.uk
The Adrgroup, based in Bristol, is
one of the larger organisations
concerned with ADR and mediation.This
well-designed site provides
a wealth of information and
resources in this area. The home
page allows the user to go to the
family mediation part of the site or
to the ADR part. Within the ADR
part, there are extensive sections
on the theory, history and practice
of ADR with worked examples.
There is a facility whereby the user
can refer his/her own case to ADR
by email. Alternatively, contact can
be made with the group in the
traditional way. The Adrgroup is
very strong on training and offers
lots of courses and seminars which
appear to take place largely in
England. However, there appears to
be an Adrgroup presence in
Aberdeen and Edinburgh. Several
pages deal with non-family mediation,
theory and practice. Again,
training is offered, at a price, either
in groups or by distance. There is
also a news section and a members
only section with the usual mixture
of bulletin boards and information
for members. The family mediation
part of the site is less well developed
but useful and informative
nonetheless. It contains a detailed
list of family mediators, all based in
England and Wales, with contact
details and a little about the
mediator’s background. A useful site
to get a grip on the issues or if you
need to find ADR people or mediators
in England or abroad.
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www.cedr.co.uk
The Centre for Effective Dispute
Resolution is an independent
non-profit making organisation
supported by multinational business
and various professional bodies. Its
website provides some useful
resources. Chief among these is a
range of useful looking style agreements
in pdf and Word format
which can be adapted for use if the
user has the appropriate software.
The library also contains a few
dozen articles about the use of
mediation in a variety of business
contexts as well as some useful
information on the use of mediation
and ADR in England. The site also
hosts pages concerned with CEDR’s
own dispute resolution service:
CEDR Solve which is claimed to be
the UK’s leading commercial mediation
provider. Unfortunately, the
information provided about CEDR
Solve is fairly brief and the
resources provided on site are very
limited. CEDR does offer training as
well although not as much as some
other providers. Booking online is
possible. There is a section of the
site for members only.
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www.mediate.com
This site claims to be the most
visited dispute resolution site on the
Web. It is heavily American based.
The site is large and is designed by
one of the Mediate team whose
philosophy of web design is stated
as “Content is king. People are
looking for information. Give to
them. Make it simple and intuitive”.
An admirable viewpoint and one
that this reviewer wishes was more
widely shared. So how well does
this site do? Locating mediators is
straightforward: the search engine
allows search under discipline,
country or name. You can then
email or phone (although the user
will have to decide for him/herself
whether the mediator is appropriately
qualified).The site offers a web
design facility orientated to ADR
practitioners ($600 p.a.) and other
associated website services. There
are over 800 articles on every
aspect of mediation which can be
searched by topic or through free
text search.The practitioner section
contains loads of news and information
about ADR in specific sectors.
Practitioners can engage in discussion
areas free and also get emails
to alert you to a new contribution.
If you fancy getting trained US style:
there are lots of courses to go to.
All in all, while the site is not exactly
pretty, it is true to its philosophy
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ADR Websites
Journal
Mediation
“The adversarial nature of proceedings in court means
parties often become entrenched, giving rise to bitterness.
After all is said and done those involved must get
on with the situation they are left with following divorce.
Mediation can assist in reducing aggression between
parties, and this is particularly important where children
are involved.”
Mediation can allow them to reach a compromise in the
best interests of children, who are otherwise all too
often dragged in to an adversarial case, with the risk that
each parent may ask them to take sides.
“The interests of children are paramount, and it can be
difficult for a sheriff to know where these interests lie
within the parameters of what he or she can assess
within the framework of formalised court procedures.
“Parties are often bitter about each other, the case may
give rise to strong feelings and parties may resort to
saying things to strengthen their own case. Sheriffs must
make a decision in what are often acrimonious cases and
will usually try to retain some form of contact between
the children and both parents, and so it’s better to ask
them to go away and co-operate as much as they can.”
In practice, Sheriff Sheehan will ask at an early stage of
the case, if not in chambers then at a Child Welfare
Hearing or Options hearing, if there is any possibility of
mediation.
It’s an approach that seems to go down well among
practitioners operating in Falkirk Sheriff Court. “Most
solicitors in Falkirk have similar views, and prefer to see
mediators try to assist in resolving cases.”
Gordon Addison, Secretary of the local Faculty, says there
is a saying at Falkirk “has this case been Calmed yet”.
“ The Court refers as many family cases to mediation as
possible not because of some sort of altruistic approach,
but because it has a high success rate of resolving matrimonial
disputes at an early stage, which must be better
for clients.”
So why is Falkirk the mediation centre of Scotland?
“It’s a combination of the type of solicitor we have, in
particular good quality family lawyers and an enlightened
bench who have been keen to give it a try and make it
work”, said Gordon Addison.
Anecdotally, 75-80% of cases are settled without
recourse to proof, or at least some of the contentious
issues are resolved and don’t come before the sheriff.
The advantages are obvious for all concerned.
“If it goes through as undefended, the divorce will generally
be quicker, less unpleasant and aggressive, and might
be cheaper”, said Sheriff Sheehan.
Mediation can’t be imposed and isn’t appropriate in
every situation, where for example, there is an allegation
of violence.
“If a case is mediated through CALM or FMS, the advantage
is that parties can take as long as they need and are
not restrained by formalities of court procedure and
language.”
Before referring parties to mediation the sheriff will
explain the procedure involved, whereby after the
mediator is appointed, they will be interviewed to
explore the issues in dispute. Each party will retain his or
her own legal adviser and needn’t agree to anything
without consulting them. If they do reach agreement, a
joint minute can be submitted. He stresses throughout
that it is an optional process; parties are not bound to
accept anything during mediation and that if nothing can
be agreed the case will proceed in court in the normal
manner.
Sheriff Sheehan would also like to see mediation introduced
in other types of civil litigation such as small claim
or summary cause actions and even in some ordinary
actions where, for example, the sum in dispute is only
marginally above the £1,500 limit.
“It seems absurd to litigate in court where the legal
expenses can quickly and easily escalate to a level far in
excess of the sum sued for.”
But isn’t it in the profession’s interests to stimulate
litigation and bolster their fee income?
“I don’t think solicitors are influenced by fear of reduced
fees. In my experience they are dedicated to seeking the
best solution for their client.”
Gordon Addison also rejects the notion of solicitors
having an incentive to keep on litigating.
“ It’s wrong to criticise a successful process because it
might reduce the fee.The profession had a fear of ADR
but people still have to see their solicitor for legal advice
and if you look at it from the profession’s perspective,
mediation in fact involves three solicitors, not just two.”
While Falkirk Sheriff Court is the hub of fam
of working proved a learning experience for
Roger Mackenzie reports.
The Falkirk experience
At Falkirk, Sheriff Sheehan and
his colleagues preside over
a court where mediation
is encouraged as a route to
resolving family disputes.
Her desire to learn more about what makes a
good mediator led her recently to Allentown in
Pennsylvania where she met with Judge Edward
Cahn, former Chief Judge of Pennsylvania and a
man of such local renown that the town’s new
courthouse is set to be named in his honour.
“I made contact with Judge Cahn by e-mail in my
bid to seek out a real, live American mediator
from whom I could learn a little of American
practice.”
Judge Cahn’s own mediation practice came about
when as a judge he had always been conscious of
the unmitigated expense litigation creates for all
parties, preferring to adopt a pro-active role with
parties to litigation, often assisting in the resolution
of disputes in chambers rather than from the
bench.
“The process of mediation described by Edward
Cahn is quite different from that which I have
experienced under the auspices of CALM”, said
Susie Clark.
“Under the CALM umbrella, parties are brought
into the mediation process fully aware of the
confidentiality of the procedure and reassured
that the role of the mediator is entirely independent.
Both parties are advised not to communicate
privately with the mediator and the mediation
process itself takes place in plenary sessions.
Edward Cahn described similar confidentiality but
designed his role as something more akin to that
of facilitator than mediator.
“He always ensured that he was well briefed on
the details of the dispute and brought parties to a
common meetinghouse in the first instance but
not housed within the same meeting rooms.
Breakfast, coffee and other facilities are provided
with a view to encouraging a relaxed atmosphere
and, when the mood is right, Edward Cahn begins
to shuffle between the meeting rooms clarifying
the positions of both parties. He enjoys a full
understanding from each party and takes on
board any editing each party wishes to impose
when presenting their position to the other.”
Susie Clark diverges from Cahn when describing
his view that “the art of mediation was essentially
a gift”.
“In my experience mediators are trained rather
than just utilising a natural gift.Training allows for
performance to be assessed rationally. Multiple
layers of skills are required to mediate successfully.
The training I have received from CALM provides
an excellent training base, the sessions keeping
you focused on your strengths and weaknesses.
There may be some element of a natural predisposition
to mediation. Certainly I’ve always found
it more rewarding to achieve a settlement by
mediating rather than litigating.”
She rejects any notion that mediation is somehow
alien to the solicitor’s traditional role.
“The old-fashioned notion that a solicitor would
be more of a general agent acting in the best
interests of the client would, I think, have seen
them acting naturally as mediators.
“There are situations where it is inappropriate,
but it’s important not to see the client’s problem
in a vacuum and not just offer cold black letter law
advice.”
While America is often regarded as a highly litigious
society, Susie Clark’s impression is of a
system which is more “future focused”.
“The issue there is not who is right and who is
wrong but rather ‘how can I move forward from
here, maximising circumstances for me’.
“ Falkirk seems progressive in adopting pro-mediation
policies but other sheriff courts and solicitors
are not pro-active in fostering mediation as a
solution.
“Mediation can be used either as a first or last
port of call where there is no other means of
overcoming an impasse. Just getting clients to talk
precipitates some change in their position.
Mediation is an environment where people learn
how to communicate and look at the other point
of view.
“Where a couple are separating or divorcing,
whatever the substantive reasons, it will also be as
a result of a breakdown in communication, and
there is a need to re-establish a means of communication.
“Some use mediation as a stepping stone whereas
for others it will resolve issues and they can then
go back to not speaking!”
Her experience is that some solicitors in this
country still don’t really know what mediation is.
She would reassure the profession that mediation
won’t threaten profits.
“Solicitors are subconsciously mediators. The
introduction of strict conflict of interest rules has
probably inhibited lawyers’ natural inclination to
act as a mediator.
“In many ways it’s easier for solicitors to opt for
an aggressive court room battle but we only ever
have a 50% chance of success and a defeated
client is unlikely to come back. In my experience,
both parties feel positive after successful
mediation.These clients are more likely to have a
favourable impression of the service their solicitor
can offer and come back with more business.
The best marketing is success together with
word of mouth.
“Edward Cahn was a huge inspiration. He
suggested that mediation will become a more
readily recognised service with the general public.
I hope that will be true and that the service will
be seen as one that solicitors do well.”
ily mediation in Scotland, the “future focused” American way
solicitor mediator Susie Clark.
Learning from across the Atlantic
Angus solicitor Susie Clark
has developed a practice
which places mediation
at its core.
While America is often regarded as a highly litigious society,
impression is of a system which is more “future focused”
Journal
Regulatory Timetable
The Financial Services Authority (FSA) will assume its full
powers as the single regulator for regulated activities
(mainstream investment business) in the United
Kingdom on 1st December 2001.The FSA’s powers are
set out in the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.
The Act provides that no person may carry on a
regulated activity unless that person is an authorised
person or an exempt person.Authorisation to carry out
regulated activities will principally come from the FSA.
The main exemption arises when a person is an
appointed representative of another authorised person.
The net effect of these provisions within the Act is that
if a firm of solicitors wishes to conduct regulated
activities it will have to be authorised by the FSA.
At midnight on 30th November 2001 the Society will
cease to be a Recognised Professional Body and will no
longer have the power to authorise its firms for
regulated activities.
The Society will have residual powers to licence firms to
conduct what will be referred to as incidental investment
business, but there are strict statutory provisions which
will govern the manner by which such incidental work
must be carried out.
The activities which constitute regulated activities are
listed not in the Act but in the Financial Services and
Markets Act 2000 (Regulated Activities) Order 2001
(SI 2001 No.544) (“The Regulated Activities Order”).
A firm which conducts regulated activities without FSA
authorisation will be committing a criminal offence
under Section 23 of the Act.
The Regulated Activities Order also sets out a number
of exclusions which will not be regulated activities nor
will these exclusions be considered to be incidental
investment business. A significant exclusion is contained
within Article 33 of the Order which allows introductions
to be made by a professional firm to an independent
financial adviser. Detailed conditions often apply to
the exclusions and the legislation should be carefully
considered. Firms are therefore faced with four options
under the new regime (not all of which are exclusive)
and these are as follows:
● Direct authorisation by the FSA.
● Licensed to undertake Incidental Investment
Business by the Society.
● Acting as an introducer to an IFA (this option
can also be undertaken in conjunction with options
1 or 2).
● None of the above.
Each of the three main options is now considered in
more detail.
Direct Authorisation by the FSA
In late August/early September currently authorised
firms will receive from the FSA an opt-in notice and
information pack.The opt-in notice must be completed
and returned to the FSA by 31st October 2001 if a firm
is to be authorised by the FSA for regulated activities at
the start date of the new system. It is anticipated that the
FSA will be charging firms a periodic fee which will be
based on the scope of the firm’s regulated activities and
a measure of the size or extent of its regulated activities,
for example, the number of approved persons.
A firm which is authorised by the FSA should also, under
the FSA’s regulatory regime authorisation, be able to
undertake most types of incidental investment business
work.
The principal activities which are classified under the
Regulated Activities Order and for which FSA authorisation
may be required are as follows:
● Effecting and carrying out contracts of insurance.
● Dealing in investments as principals.
● Dealing in investments as agents.
● Arranging deals in investments.
● Managing investments.
● Safeguarding and administering investments.
● Sending dematerialised instructions.
● Establishing etc. a collective investment scheme.
● Establishing etc. a stakeholder pension scheme.
● Advising on investments.
● Advising on syndicate participation at Lloyd’s,
managing the underwriting capacity of a Lloyd’s
syndicate and arranging deals in contracts of
insurance written at Lloyd’s.
● Entering as a provider into a funeral plan contract.
● Administering and entering into a regulated
mortgage contract as a lender.
Countdown TO N2
David Cullen, Director of Financial Services at The Law Society of Scotland, provides an
overview of the new investment business regime under the Financial Services Authority
Financial
Services
Journal
Financial
Services
The Regulated Activities Order then
proceeds to define investments to
include:
A deposit, rights under a contract of
insurance, shares, instruments
creating or acknowledging indebtedness,
government and public securities,
instruments giving entitlement
to investments, certificates representing
certain securities, units in a
collective investment scheme, rights
under a stakeholder pension
scheme, options, futures, contracts
for differences etc., Lloyd’s syndicate
capacity and syndicate membership,
funeral plan contracts, regulated
mortgage contracts and rights to or
interests in investments.
For each of the activities which are
defined as regulated activities under
the Regulated Activities Order there
are a number of exclusions and one
of the exclusions is, as previously
mentioned, where an introduction is
made with a view to the provision of
independent advice.
A firm which is already authorised
by the Society under the existing
regime will only be “grandfathered”
into the new FSA regime if it notifies
the FSA by 31st October 2001 that
it wishes to opt-in to direct FSA
authorisation using the FSA opt-in
notice. Once this process is
complete the FSA will, sometime
later, advise a firm of the scope of
business it will be permitted to
conduct.This will mirror the business
conducted under the Society’s
existing regime, although firms may
also be offered one or more
restricted alternatives, so as to
reflect the particular business they
have been carrying on or intend to
carry on. The FSA will also seek
identification and confirmation from
a firm of the individuals who will
actually conduct regulated activities.
Such individuals will be referred to
as approved persons, and the FSA
must be notified if they carry out
specified functions known as
controlled functions. The FSA has
identified twenty seven functions as
controlled functions but these can
be broadly divided into three
categories which are:
● Functions where individuals
have a significant influence on
the conduct of the authorised
person’s affairs, so far as relating
to the regulated activity.
● Dealing with customers of the
authorised person in a manner
substantially connected with the
carrying on of the regulated
activity.
● Dealing with the property of
customers of the authorised
person in a manner substantially
connected with the
carrying on of the regulated
activity.
Any individual who is currently
licensed by the Society to conduct
investment business and who will
carry out a controlled function in
the new regime will not need to
apply for approval but will be grandfathered
into the new regime. A
firm must, once it has decided to
opt-in to the FSA regime, complete
a list for the FSA of those individuals
who will be undertaking controlled
functions, to allow the grandfathering
of all such individuals.
Incidental Investment Business
Regime
The second option which is open to
a firm is that of a licence from the
Society to undertake incidental
investment business. A firm which
chooses this option cannot also be
directly authorised by the FSA. It is,
however, possible for a firm to have
an Incidental Investment Business
Licence and also act as an
introducer.
The Society will send out its application
forms together with information
packs on incidental investment
business at the end of August. The
application form for incidental
investment business must be
returned to the Society by 28th
September 2001 if a firm is to be
licensed for such work from the
start date of the new regime on 1st
December 2001. The charge which
the Society will make for such a
licence will be based on a flat fee per
firm and the number of individuals
within a firm who seek to undertake
incidental investment business work.
The incidental investment business
application form will ask firms to
identify all those solicitors and nonsolicitors
which the firm wishes to
be licensed for such work.
The Act, under Section 327, provides
the conditions which must be met if
a firm is to undertake incidental
investment business work (or
exempt regulated activities as
defined in the Act). The first
condition is that the work must be
incidental to the provision of another
professional service.This means that
a firm cannot have stand-alone incidental
investment business work.
Furthermore, a firm carrying on incidental
investment business work
must not hold itself out as carrying
on regulated activities. The Act also
provides that a firm undertaking incidental
investment business work
must not receive from a person
other than his/her client any
pecuniary award or other advantage,
for which the firm does not account
to its client. This means that any
commission arising from incidental
investment business work must
either be given to the client or,
where a fee is charged for the incidental
investment business work or
the professional services to which it
is attached, the fee must be reduced
by the amount of commission.There
is no prohibition under the Act
against firms charging fees for incidental
investment business work.
One of the difficulties which has not
been resolved is what activities
constitute incidental investment
business work as no definitions are
provided in either the Act or the
Regulated Activities Order. It is
easier, by considering the list of
activities previously stated under
Section 2 which will be regulated
activities, to be clear on what cannot
be conducted as incidental investment
business.
The following activities are, however,
some examples of what may constitute
incidental investment business:
● Arranging for the sale of shares
on the instructions of the
executors in an executry
without providing investment
advice.
● Arranging for the purchase of
shares for a trust on the
instructions of the trustees
without providing investment
advice.
● Discussing with a client advice
which has been provided by
Financial
Services
Journal
Incidental investment business work is restrictive in scope
and also by the manner in which it must be conducted
Summary of Options
● Direct Authorisation by the FSA – Complete and return the FSA’s opt-in notice to the FSA by 31st October 2001.
● Incidental Investment Business – Complete and return the Society’s application form to the Society by 28th September 2001.
● Act as an Introducer Only – No application form to be completed or returned.
● None of the Above.
another authorised person
(who takes full compliance
responsibility for that advice).
A firm may comment upon
such advice and, acting on the
client’s instructions, arrange
deals consequent upon it,
provided the firm does not
give an alternative product
recommendation to the client.
● A solicitor undertaking matrimonial
work can obtain the
advice of an IFA regarding the
matrimonial investment assets.
The solicitor may also seek the
IFA’s valuation of the assets
and the IFA’s advice on the
best ways of dealing with those
assets and the solicitors can
comment on such advice in
negotiating a financial
settlement in the matrimonial
dispute on the client’s
instructions.
● A solicitor who acts for an
estate or trust can hold investments
for the estate and trust
and also collect dividends.
which it must be conducted. The
restrictive nature of this type of
work is clearer when consideration
is given to the following list of
activities which are considered not
to be incidental investment business:
● Making markets in investments.
● Recommendation or arrangements
for a client to buy a
packaged product except
where the recommendation or
arrangement for such a
purchase is by means of an
assignment or the arrangement
is made as a result of a firm
managing assets due to it, or
one of its officers’ appointment
as a trustee, personal representative
or donee of a power of
attorney, or where the arrangement
is made on the basis that
the client is not relying on the
firm as to the merits or suitability
of the transaction.
● A firm must not recommend a
client to buy or dispose of any
rights or interests in a personal
pension scheme except where
Furthermore, firms relying on
conducting incidental investment
business or not carrying on
regulated activities at all will be
subject to the restriction on financial
promotion in Section 21 of the Act.
The FSA will provide guidance to
firms on this subject in order to
assist firms with their opt-in
decision.
Introductions
The Regulated Activities Order
provides a number of exclusions
which will not count as investment
business, whether mainstream or
incidental. One of the main exclusions
is contained within Article 33
of the Order which provides that a
firm may introduce a client to an IFA
and the firm may retain any
payment received from the organisation
to whom the introduction
was made. The firm making the
introduction must do no more than
bring together the investor and the
IFA firm to whom the introduction
is made. Furthermore, this
“introductory” option does not
necessarily allow a firm to market
the services of an IFA or other
authorised person.
There are several other exclusions
within the Regulated Activities
Order which do not amount to
either mainstream or incidental
investment business and these
include:
● The taking of a deposit if it is
received by a practising
solicitor acting in the course
of his/her profession.
● The provision of advice or the
making of arrangements in
relation to breakdown
insurance for cars.
● Making arrangements whose
sole purpose is the provision
of finance to enable a person
to buy, sell, subscribe for or
underwrite investments.
● Managing investments under a
power of attorney where all
routine day to day investment
decisions are taken by an
authorised person.
● Arrangements made by a
person acting as a trustee or
personal representative.
● Where another authorised
person advises a firm’s clients
on the disposal of their investments,
the firm may administer
the collection of the dividend
on the investments and
arrange for the sale of the
investments.
● A solicitor, at his/her own initiative,
can advise a client that the
investment advice or investment
arrangements provided
by another party do not
appear to be in the client’s
best interests and his/her client
should then seek mainstream
investment advice elsewhere.
● A solicitor acting for an estate
advises the sale of all investment
assets to pay for funeral
expenses and debts.
It can be seen from the types of
activities that may constitute
incidental investment business work
that this work is restrictive in its
scope and also in the manner in
the firm assumes on reasonable
grounds that the client is
not relying on the firm as to
the merits or suitability of the
transaction.
● The firm must not provide
advice or make arrangements
in relation to a pension transfer
or pension opt-out.
● Entering into a broker fund
arrangement.
● Act as a sponsor to an issue in
respect of securities to be
admitted for dealing on the
London Stock Exchange.
● Act as a nominated adviser to
an issue in respect of securities
to be admitted for dealing on
the Alternative Investment
Market.
● Act as a corporate adviser to
an application on behalf of a
company to join OFEX.
● Approving the financial
promotions (for example,
advertisements) of others.
Journal
IT
INTERNET DEFAMATION
– Motley fools rush in
Paul Motion considers Totalise Plc v Motley Fool Limited, which seems to set down a strict
requirement of disclosure if the interests of justice are served
A SMALL businessman who breeds and sells specialised animals quite legally, consulted us recently.
He was a sole trader, and in addition he had a holiday business linked to the animal operation.
Three years ago, not long after getting started, he’d had a run-in with one of his customers.The animal
had died soon after the sale. It was not clear whether this was due to poor handling by the purchaser or
a latent illness, but they both fell out over it at the time. Because the animals concerned are specialised,
only a small community of people in the United Kingdom is likely to be interested in them (or related
holidays) at any one time. Our client forgot about the incident and got on with establishing his business.
In June 2001 our client was horrified to discover that
three Internet chat groups - probably the only three in
the United Kingdom concerned with this type of animal
- had begun receiving defamatory e-mail postings,
harking back to the 1999 incident and effectively
accusing our client of sharp practice or fraud. The
posted e-mails made it clear that our client ought not to
be trusted and that no one should contemplate buying
animals from him. The consequences for our client’s
reputation and his business could hardly have been
more grave.
We were able fairly quickly to persuade the ISPs who
hosted the three chat groups to remove the defamatory
postings. This was done promptly as one might have
expected standing the outcome of Godfrey v Demon
Internet [1999] 4 All ER 342. There was, it seemed, no
doubt as to who was to blame for the e-mails, but here
we encountered a twist to the tale. As part of our
response we had also written to the English based email
provider. Their London solicitors informed us that
the e-mail account which had been used to spread the
defamatory statements to all the chat groups was not
registered in the name of the suspected defamer. This
was a surprise. There might be a second, unknown,
defender to consider. How was our client to
find out the identity of the person who
had been allowing the culprit
access to his (or her,
as it turned
out) e-mail account? Prior to February 2001, this task
might have proved insurmountable, or at least only
capable of being overcome after the expenditure of
large sums of money and court appearances. However,
the decision in Totalise plc v Motley Fool Ltd [TLR
15/3/2001 19th February 2001] now came to our aid.
The Totalise Case
Motley Fool Ltd is one of the best known websites in
the UK in relation to investment and share dealing
advice. In common with many other websites, the
Motley Fool Ltd site had a ‘discussion board’ where
investors could exchange chat, provide tips, and generally
talk about anything of relevance to online investment.
However, on one discussion board a large number
of defamatory remarks were posted about an ISP called
Totalise plc. Someone hiding behind the User Name
“Zeddust” had posted the comments. Motley Fool Ltd
agreed to remove the allegedly defamatory postings.
They went further and banned “Zeddust” from using its
site. However “Zeddust” moved to another site and
posted 90 more defamatory messages.
Totalise now needed to know urgently who “Zeddust”
was. Motley Fool Ltd refused to identify him. They
pointed to the Data Protection Act, and to their own
terms and conditions, which undertook to preserve the
confidentiality of their users.The exceptions to this being
as per a user “Privacy Policy” or if ordered to disclose by
an order of court. There was as yet no ongoing court
action between Totalise plc or the alleged defamer, and
there might never be. This potential difficulty was
overcome under reference to X Limited v
Morgan Grampian [1991] 1
AC (HL) 3
on the basis that Totalise required
the information to obtain proper
legal advice as to its rights. Totalise
applied to the court for an order
requiring Motley Fool to disclose
“Zeddust’s” identity. It relied upon
the court’s discretionary power
established in Norwich Pharmacal
[1974] AC 133 to order disclosure
of a wrongdoer’s identity from
those unwittingly involved in the
wrongdoer’s activities.
Under the Contempt of Court Act
1981, section 10, a court can
require disclosure of information
contained “in a publication for
which a person is responsible” if it is
satisfied that the disclosure is
necessary in the interests of justice,
national security, or for the prevention
of disorder or crime”. Mr
Justice Owen was prepared to hold
(a) that the section was primarily
concerned with balancing journalistic
freedom against protection of
individual rights and there was no
such balancing act in this case; and
(b) even if wrong on the first point,
disclosure here was in the interests
of justice. The court ordered that
Motley Fool Ltd must identify the
user concerned. The court went
further. It stated that such disclosure
was permitted under Section 35 of
the Data Protection Act 1998
(information required for prospective
legal proceedings or to obtain
legal advice). The court also
awarded expenses against Motley
Fool Ltd on the basis that the
information ought to have been
provided voluntarily standing the
circumstances.
Returning to our client and his
animal rearing/holiday business, we
then wrote to the e-mail provider
citing Totalise v Motley Fool. We
requested that they provide us with
the identity of the person(s) in
whose name the e-mail account
was registered. After a pause of
some weeks, we received from the
e-mail provider a copy letter
addressed to the registered user.
This stated that in terms of the email
provider’s terms and conditions
of usage an individual’s identity
could be disclosed if there was a
legal obligation to do so. Apparently
the e-mail company agreed with
our submission that the Motley Fool
case created such an obligation.
Loutchansky v Times
Newspapers Ltd
In another interesting Internet
defamation development (which
was aired at length during the trial
but unfortunately did not make it
into the final judgment), the case of
Loutchansky v Times Newspapers
Ltd [27 April 2001 QBD, Mr Justice
Gray] raised the issue of when the
prescriptive period begins to run
where a newspaper article is still
available on the Internet archive
section of a newspaper long after
the date of first publication in hard
copy form. It should be noted that
the one year limitation period
inserted into Section 4A of the
Limitation Act 1980 by Section 5(1)
of the Defamation Act 1996 does
not apply to Scotland, so to that
extent this discussion is academic,
but the point has wider application
and may crop up if you are
advising
on internet
matters. In
this case, two
articles were available
over a year later
in the Internet section of
The Times. The Times argued that
there had been no alteration or
editing of the article since first publication,
and that the prescriptive
period should run from the date of
original publication in the hardcopy
newspaper. The Times sought to
argue the American “single publication
rule” that publication takes
place on the day the material is first
posted on the website. Somewhat
controversially, Mr Justice Gray felt
that provided it could be shown that
someone had read the article on
the website, a libel action could be
brought within a year of that person
“hitting” the article irrespective of
when the article was first posted on
the website. This view if correct is
bad news for the press! The Court
also ruled that in relation to qualified
privilege defences, the publisher
must be able to establish the existence
of that defence at each time
of publication, not merely that it
existed on the basis of the prevailing
circumstances when the article was
first published.The Loutchansky case
is currently under appeal after Mr
Justice Gray’s decision on other
issues, and hopefully these two
matters will receive passing
comment at that stage.
Paul Motion is a partner with
Ledingham Chalmers, Edinburgh
and Convener of the Society’s
Electronic Commerce Committee
IT
Journal
Journal
Risk
Management
TRANSFERRED FILE
– or hand grenade?
This month Alistair Sim considers the risks that arise when a current file is
transferred from one fee earner to another
THE title ‘transferred file or hand grenade?’ is borrowed from a commentary on risk management
issues from another jurisdiction. Risk management commentaries from other parts
of the world identify the transfer of work in progress from one fee earner to another in the
same firm as a specific area of risk for lawyers.
The transfer of a live file creates the opportunity for a
breakdown in communication, a misunderstanding, an
incorrect assumption on the part of one or other or
both of the fee earners resulting in something going
unchecked or left unattended to, a question not asked,
a document left incomplete or unrecorded.
Transferring files
When taking over responsibility for a piece of work in
progress, particular care needs to be taken to avoid the
temptation to make assumptions about the file which
may prove to be incorrect.
You might assume, for instance, that the information
about the client and the client’s instructions in the file
are correct in every respect; that everything you would
have done at a particular stage of a piece of work will
have been done; that critical dates have been properly
ascertained and diaried. That may not be the case.
The circumstances in which you are taking over responsibility
for the file may be such that it is dangerous to
assume that matters will have been dealt with properly.
The colleague may have left the firm for another job,
may have moved departments or retired.
In all of these circumstances, there could be reasons why
matters have not been attended to as well as they might
prior to your taking over the file. The colleague’s mind
may have been on other matters for some time prior to
leaving/handing over the file. The colleague may have
been under pressure to finalise as much work as
possible prior to leaving and that pressure may not have
been conducive to attention to detail.
Perhaps the colleague has gone off ill, in which case his
work may have been suffering from a lack of concentration
in the days before taking sick leave. The colleague
may have been anxious about a more serious medical
condition.
Perhaps you have been passed the file as someone
experienced in a specialist area of work by a colleague
who recognised that the work was outwith his or her
experience. Depending on the stage at which the file
was passed on, a certain amount of work may have
been done already.
In all of these circumstances more than a cursory file
review is appropriate. The file needs to be read
thoroughly to ensure that everything done to date is
correct; that nothing has been omitted and that none of
the crucial facts has been misunderstood or misrecorded.
If it is practicable, review the file while the colleague who
has been dealing with it is still in the office and available
to discuss and clarify any areas of doubt.
Whatever the circumstances in which someone is
handing over the conduct of a piece of work, that fee
earner should be encouraged, with the reassurance that
there will be no recriminations over honest mistakes, to
identify any problem of which the fee earner is aware.
The same goes for someone leaving the firm. They
should be encouraged to make a disclosure about any
file which they consider could present a potential
problem.That is in everyone’s best interest.
Remember to tell the client whenever there has been a
change of responsible fee earner. If this is a case where
you have been passed the file to deal with a specialist
matter, make sure you agree with your colleague who is
communicating with the client and who is keeping track
of time limits and deadlines.
Example:
A partner was retiring on account of ill health and his
varied workload was transferred to the remaining
partners according to their particular area of expertise.
The litigation partner took over the small number of
files involving contentious matters, one of them being a
personal injuries claim for a client who had been
involved in a road accident. The retiring partner had
produced what appeared to be a comprehensive
handover note and this indicated that the claim would
become time barred on a date which was about a year
and a month hence.
Journal
Risk
Management
The other files called for more immediate action
and they received priority attention. When, a
month or so later, this particular file was actioned
and a letter sent to the relevant insurers, it
emerged that the claim had just recently
prescribed. The information on the file, in the
diary system, in the retiring partner’s briefing note
was all incorrect, out by a year.
Had the client provided incorrect information?
Apparently not. How had the error occurred
then? Impossible to say whether the retiring
partner’s error was the result of the illness which
prompted his early retirement or just one of
those slip ups that can afflict any of us from time
to time. Whatever caused it, the outcome was
precisely the same.
How to avoid a recurrence?
The partner who had taken over the file resolved
that, in future, when taking over a litigation file
from a colleague, he would always undertake a
careful review of the essential elements of the
case to verify, among other things, that the
prescription date had been correctly identified
and diaried with appropriate countdown
reminders. The experience prompted him go
further and to adopt a standard procedure of
having a colleague verify his own assessment of
the prescriptive date in all his litigation cases.
Risk management points
The fee earner taking over responsibility for a file
should read it thoroughly and ensure
● that the terms of engagement agreed with
the client are properly understood, any areas
of doubt being clarified as soon as possible
● that everything undertaken to the date of
transfer is correct and that critical dates
have been verified and diaried properly
● Encourage fee earners who are leaving to
identify problem or ‘skeleton’ files without
fear of recrimination
Consider whether it may be appropriate in
certain circumstances to conduct a thorough
audit of all the departing fee earner’s files to
identify any potential problems and deal with
them, ideally while the fee earner is still in the
office.
Transfers between departments/offices
Problems can also arise as a result of poor
communications between different departments
or different offices.
In larger practices, files may be transferred
between different specialist departments. The
conveyancing department may become involved
in a corporate transaction, the litigation department
may become involved in a conveyancing
transaction etc. There is potential in these situations
for ineffective communication to result in
incorrect assumptions being made and for errors
and omissions to result.
Risk management points
Ideally, the instructions from one department to
another should be as thorough as if the firm were
contracting the work out to another practice. It
is suggested that there ought to be a standard
form of instructions which should include:
● inventory of all documents being transferred
and request for confirmation of receipt
● explanation of the current position and
what requires to be done next
● indication of timescales and time limits and
request for confirmation that critical dates
have been noted, agreed and diaried with
appropriate countdown reminders
● agreement about who will be responsible
for the work on the file and who will be
taking instructions from and reporting to
the client – and who will be advising the
client of all these arrangements
● discussion concerning fresh terms of
engagement or amendment of the terms of
engagement initially agreed with the client
● notification to other interested departments
of the transfer of the file
Again, it is important that the recipient department
verifies the critical dates and other essential
points and does not make assumptions that the
transferring department’s assessment of these
matters will be correct in all respects.
The recipient department should check what has
been said to the client that could have raised the
client’s expectations as regards service or
result/outcome. It may be appropriate to correct
the client’s expectations if they have been raised
unrealistically.
The information in this page is (a) intended to provide
guidance on matters of practical risk management and
not on issues of law and (b) is necessarily of a
generalised nature. It is not specific to any practice or
to any individual and should not be relied on as stating
the correct legal position.
Alistair Sim is Associate Director in the Professional
Liabilities Division at Marsh UK Limited
(e-mail: Alistair.J.Sim@marsh.com)
EUROPEAN OPINION ON MDPs
takes debate forward
ADVOCATE General Léger of the European Court of Justice gave his opinion on 10 July 2001 in the NOVA case
(C-309/99 Wouters).These were long-awaited conclusions in a case which should have
a significant impact for legal professions across Europe.
The case itself stems from a dispute between
Price Waterhouse and Arthur Andersen & Co.,
and the Dutch Bar Association (“NOVA”) and
relates to whether the Dutch Bar Association can
regulate its profession in such a way as to prevent
lawyers and accountants from setting up multidisciplinary
partnerships. The two accountants
firms had claimed that such a prohibition is anticompetitive
and contrary to EC law.
The Amsterdam court making the reference to
the ECJ had ruled that such a ban is a restriction
on the freedom to provide services but that it is,
however, justified in the public interest. An oral
hearing on the case was held in mid-December
2000 and the Advocate General, Philippe Léger,
delivered his Opinion in July this year.
Competition
One of the areas principally under consideration
in this case was the question of whether EC
competition law applies to the Bar Association’s
rules and, if so, whether these rules could be
deemed to be anti-competitive. Mr Léger found
that NOVA is, in competition terms, an association
of undertakings, as it is exclusively composed
of members of the professions who undertake
economic activities, and its decisions do not need
to be taken in the public interest. This corresponds
to the Advocate General’s opinion in
another case presently under consideration by
the ECJ (C-35/99 Arduino) on fixed fees for work
carried out by lawyers in Italy.
It had been argued during submissions to the
Court that NOVA itself does not carry on an
economic activity and is an organisation which is
governed by public law and has a public interest
which is linked to the administration of justice. Mr
Léger dismissed these arguments stating that:
● ECJ case-law has established that competition
rules will apply where the undertakings affiliated
to an association carry on the economic
activity; and
● the association is composed only of private
economic bodies, and the public authorities
had not reserved the right to interfere in their
decision-making process.
The CCBE’s (Council of the Bars and Law
Societies of the European Union) position was
that competition rules should only apply in
circumstances where NOVA is acting solely in the
interests of its members. Mr Léger also dismissed
this argument, on the basis that the majority of
rules adopted by authorities in this field would at
the same time involve both private and public
interests.
Although Mr Léger accepted that the object
of the regulation is not to be anti-competitive,
its effect was nevertheless a restriction on
competition.
Justification
Having determined that the regulation is an
obstacle to competition, Mr Léger had to
consider whether the regulation was justified by
testing whether it met four conditions:
● It must be applied in a non-discriminatory
manner
The national court was satisfied that there
was no discrimination on the grounds of
nationality of lawyers.
● It must be justified in the general interest
The ECJ has previously held that the
application of professional rules to lawyers
is in the public interest and therefore by
safeguarding these, the regulation regulates
the public interest.
● It must be suitable for attaining the
pursued objective
Mr Léger agrees that the prohibition of
MDPs is apt to ensure that the objective
(safeguarding the legal profession’s
obligations of independence and
confidentiality) is attained.
● It must not go beyond what is necessary in
order to attain the objective
Although Mr Léger asks that consideration
of this question should be referred back to
the national court, he is of the opinion that
the regulation does not go beyond what is
necessary.
Conclusions
Although Mr Léger did find that the Dutch Bar
Association regulation was a restriction on
competition, he also concluded that it was lawful
and that the application of competition rules in
this area, would compromise the obligations on
the legal profession (particularly independence,
confidentiality and the avoidance of a conflict of
interest).
In Mr Léger’s view, a professional association of
lawyers is permitted to prohibit lawyers from
setting up MDPs with accountants if “…that
measure is necessary to safeguard lawyers’ independence
and professional secrecy. It is for the
national court to decide that”. He therefore
proposed that the Dutch national court should
find that the regulation is not contrary to Article
59 of the EC Treaty (the freedom to provide
services).
In summing up, Mr Léger acknowledged the need
to find a balance between anti-competitive
conduct and the profession’s power of
self-regulation. As such, he determined that a
Member State could grant a professional body
the power to adopt binding measures, as long as
(1) the power to determine the content of the
essential rules of the profession is retained by
authorities and (2) members of the profession are
entitled to seek redress before the courts. It is for
the national courts to determine whether that is
the case in each instance.
Next Steps
The ECJ is expected to give its ruling in the
coming months, however the Court goes
into judicial vacation until 10 September and no
official date has yet been set for delivering the
judgment.
The full text of the Opinion can be found at
the European Court of Justice website
(www.curia.eu.int) in the section dealing with
recent case-law.
EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EU
Journal
FRANCO-BRITISH LAWYERS SOCIETY COLLOQUIUM
THE annual Colloquium of the FrancoBritish
Lawyers Society is being
organised by the Society’s French section and will
be held in Paris on 14 September 2001. The
theme of the colloquium is “On-Line Justice –
Litigation, Mediation, Arbitration and Information
Technology”. This is an exceptional event as it can
be followed either in person in Paris or via the
internet, in both French and English. The presentations
given by speakers will be accessible
from the colloquium website – www.justice-enligne.org.
The programme involves distinguished
speakers from both sides of the Channel,including
Lord Prosser, Paul Motion of Ledingham Chalmers
from Scotland,and from France,Guy Canivent,the
President of the Court of Cassation.
Further information on the colloquium can be found at
the colloquium website. You can also contact the French
section of the FBLs ad 10, Rue Chardin, 75016 Paris,
tel: + 33 (0) 1 41 91 76 72, fax: + 33 (0) 1 41 91 76 77,
email: colloque@justice-en-ligne.org.
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Commission to launch Consultation on Corporate Social Responsiblity
THE Commission’s forthcoming green paper on
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSP), which
was due to have been adopted on 18 July 2001,
will include employment practices, human rights,
socially responsible investment, reporting,
auditing and environmental issues. The green
paper should be considered with reference to
the European Commission’s Recommendation
of 30 May 2001 on the recognition, measurement
and disclosure of environmental issues in
the annual accounts and annual reports of
companies, which was adopted on 11 June 2001.
The Belgian Presidency of the EU intends to
host a conference entitled “Corporate Social
Responsibility on the European Social Policy
Agenda” on 27-28 November 2001 in Brussels.
The consultation process on the CSP paper is
due to conclude at the end of December 2001.
COMPANY LAW
Belgian Presidency encouraged to ask Commission to submit revised Takeover Directive
FOLLOWING the European
Parliament’s rejection of the
proposed Directive on takeover bids
(technically, the 13th Company Law
Directive), the Belgian Presidency has
been called on to salvage the twelve
years of work invested in this
Directive, by submitting a revised
version.With 273 votes in favour and
273 against but 22 abstentions, the
proposal fell.This is a result of rule 83
of the European Parliament’s rules of
procedure, which states that a simple
majority of MEPs present for the
vote would be required for adoption,
combined with rule 128(3) which
foresees that where there is a tied
vote, the text or proposal shall be
deemed to be rejected. The
Directive would have facilitated a
pan-European framework for
takeovers, setting out fundamental
principles and a limited number of
broad requirements to be implemented
by Member States through
more detailed rules. The fallen
Directive would have harmonised
only the key elements of national
regulations, allowing Member States
to implement the Directive in line
with their individual national system
(the subsidiarity principle). The
European Commission had stated
that the vote “…represents an
important set-back for achieving the
targets agreed by the EU’s Heads of
State and Government in Lisbon of
realising an integrated European
capital market by 2005”. Were the
Directive to be revised and
re-submitted, it would be likely to
face a difficult passage via the
co-decision procedure of the
European Union.
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Discussions continue on the Community Patent
AT their meeting of 26 June 2001,
the Parliamentary Committee on
Legal Affairs and the Internal
Market held an exchange of views
on the Community Patent, which
included an update on the current
position and comment on the decisions
of the Internal Market Council
meeting of 30/31 May 2001.
Following the former Swedish
Presidency’s expression of concern
at the lack of progress which had
been made on the Community
Patent, Ministers managed to reach
agreement on some of the
outstanding issues. In particular,
Member States have agreed on the
role of national patent offices
(NPOs), which will involve responsibility
for evaluating the novelty of
patent applications, processing
applications, giving advice and
disseminating information, and
carrying out searches. The Patent
holder would pay an annual fee to
the European Patent Office and a
proportion of this would be distributed
to the NPOs, but the exact
percentage has not yet been
decided. Progress was also made
regarding the judicial regime, with
the Council announcing that the
legal basis for the Patent will be the
new articles 225(a) and 229(a) of
the EC Treaty as adopted at Nice
(although still to be ratified). The
Commission’s proposal foresees a
central intellectual property court
at first and second instance, set up
by the Nice Treaty, which would be
integrated into the existing
European Court of Justice. As
regards the linguistic regime,
despite the Council’s failure to
agree on the Patent’s official
languages, the Commission is optimistic
that progress continues to be
made. The Parliament’s report,
which will require far reaching
debate, is expected to be ready by
October 2001.
UROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE
information:
If you would like further information or if you would like to subscribe to any of the services provided by
the Brussels Office (Brussels Agenda, EU Documentation or Enquiry Service) or Guidance Notes
which are all free of charge, please contact us at:
The Law Societies’ Joint Brussels Office,
142-144 Avenue de Tervuren, B-1150 Brussels, Belgium, or DX 1065 BDE Belgium
Tel: 00-32-2-743 85 85 Fax: 00-32-2-743 85 86 and by e-mail: brussels@lawsociety.org.uk
Information is also available from the Society in Edinburgh from Sarah Fleming.
Tel: 0131 476 8132 Fax: 0131 225 4243 E-mail: sarahfleming@lawscot.org.uk
The book is
instead divided
into two parts,
reflecting the
specialisms of
the authors. The
first section
explores the
broad theoretical
framework of the
law of damages.
The second
examines qualification
in more
detail, it is slightly
cumbersome: the reader checking
out loss of employability, for
example, must go to p30 to read
about the principles underlying this
head of claim, and then leaf forward
to p158 for detail on quantification.
The first part thus provides a useful
summary of the principles of delictual
damages, but contributes little
more than what is already on offer
from the established textbooks.
(The discussion of institutional
writings on damages, for example,
concludes by observing that they
“provide some food for thought”,
pp1-3)
The book declares its target
audience to be practitioners, and
indeed practitioners will possibly
find the second part of the
book of most immediate
value. In addition
to an analysis of
authority on quantum,
the authors also offer
practical guidance on the
conduct of claims,
concluding with useful
suggestions on the negotiations
process and an
appendix with style
averments. The work takes
into account recent case law
developments up to and including
the important ruling in Wells v
Wells [1999] AC 345 on quantification
of loss of future earnings and
cost of future care, and also the
landmark House of Lords decision
in McFarlane v Tayside Health Board
2000 SC (HL) 1.
Those who buy this short book
(xxiv + 224 pages including
index) will be unlikely to use
it as a substitute for the far
more detailed treatment
contained in works such
as McEwan and Paton on
Damages in Scotland, for
example, but that is
not its purpose. It is
certainly of value as a
guide to be used alongside
longer texts, and
also as a helpful
starting point for the
less experienced.
Elspeth Reid
Delictual damages
THE last year or so has brought a series of new handbooks on damages, with Bennett’s Personal Injury Damages in Scotland, Conway’s
Personal Injury Practice in the Sheriff Court, and now this text written by a partnership of an academic and a sheriff.The authors
declare their framework of analysis to be underpinned by their reading of Atiyah’s Accidents Compensation and the Law, the sixth edition of which,
by Peter Cabe, also appeared in 1999.The categorisation of different types of damages is thus taken from Atiyah. But this is otherwise a work of
rather narrower range than its English role model, and it does not make it its business to reflect on the grander philosophical issues of the best way
to compensate victims of personal injury.
BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIE
Robin M White and
Michael J Fletcher
Butterworths
ISBN 0 406 14469
Price £50
Journal
Review I will be very happy to receive reviews of books which readers have
enjoyed and feel would be of interest to the profession.
I would also welcome suggestions on areas
of the law which we should tackle.
Journal
Alistair Bonnington
The Law School,The Stair Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ
Tel: 0141 338 2352 Fax: 0141 338 2973
E-mail: alistair.bonnington@bbc.co.uk
W BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW
Of course, this both is and is not a second edition.
The amount of new material which has required to
be added has meant that Margaret Ross (with
some assistance from James Chalmers) has in
effect had to write a substantial book. Key developments
since 1964 are too numerous to
mention. They include, however, the possibility of
proof by hearsay evidence as a result of the Civil
Evidence (Scotland) Act 1988, which in turn generated
a number of international problems. (The
significant case of T v T 2000 SLT 1442 appears to
have been decided too late to be included) That
Act, of course abolished the requirement of
corroboration in civil cases and modernised the
law relating to business records.Also of significance
in the civil sphere are the Civil Evidence (Family
Mediation) (Scotland) Act 1995 and the
Requirements of Writing (Scotland) Act 1995 as
well as certain provisions of the Law Reform
(Parent and Child) (Scotland) Act 1986, the
LR(MP)(S) Act 1990 and the Contract (Scotland)
Act 1997. The criminal sphere has also
seen a fair number of statutory
developments since
1964 (all consolidated in the
Criminal Procedure (Scotland)
Act 1995) including major
reform of the admissibility of
hearsay evidence, evidence
relating to the sexual character of
complainers and the means by
which vulnerable persons may
give evidence. There may have
been significant developments in
many areas, including in relation to
the uses of circumstantial evidence,
especially evidence of distress, the
admissibility of confessions and many facets of
corroboration. Key cases have included Leggate v
HMA 1988 JC 127, Townsley v Lees 1996 SLT
1182 and Thompson v Crowe
2000 JC 123. Finally, on top of
this comes the incorporation
of the European Convention
on Human Rights, and particularly
the right to a fair trial
under Article 6, into domestic
law. This has already attracted
a fair amount of case law, and
of course comes with an
enormous background of
jurisprudence.
One result of the many
changes in the law which have
to be taken on board is that a
significant reordering of material has been
required. So there are 29 chapters in the second
edition, as opposed to 36 in the first, although the
work is certainly not less substantial, the footnotes
in particular have expanded significantly.
Naturally, the four chapters on writ, oath and
proof thereby have disappeared, although
there has been inserted a chapter on
proof by restricted mode, it being the
view of the author that the Requirements
of Writing (Scotland) Act might have the
effect of saving the effect of the old law
in respect of documents executed and
things done prior to August 1 1995.
The chapters on stamping of deeds
and international private law appear
to have been discarded, while the
various issues grouped under the
rather unhappy heading, proof of
miscellaneous matters, are now
discussed at more appropriate points in
the other chapters.
Other chapters reappear in slightly disguised
form, so the slightly clumsy title of proof judicial
admissions – res judicata – judicial knowledge
becomes simply proof –
where evidence is excluded,
and proof in family actions
replaces the chapters on
proof in consistorial causes
and proof in actions of affiliation
and aliment. Some attention
has also been paid to the
order in which chapters
appear, so that, for example,
the chapter on sufficiency of
evidence, chapter thirty in the
first edition, is chapter five in
the second. Developments in
the law have necessitated
one wholly new chapter – on
proof on proceedings concerning children –
public law.Yet, despite the mass of new material
covered, and the partial reorganisation of the
work, the result is still very recognisably Walker
and Walker.The fresh material has been very skilfully
woven into the existing structure, and one
can pay the author no higher compliment than to
say that someone unaware of the previous
edition would struggle to identify the passages
which have been added. This edition is as
comprehensive as the first, both in terms of
leaving no aspect of the subject untreated, and in
terms of the depth of analysis. Moreover, while
the work continues to engage with all the theoretical
problems of evidence, it remains first and
foremost a practical book. Its price would naturally
disqualify it from being regarded as a student
text, and I would not in any case recommend it
as an easy survey of the subject. But students will
surely value it as a work of reference, especially
when they require to carry-out serious research
into the subject. More importantly, however, it
must surely find its way on to every practitioner’s
bookshelf as once again the primary authority on
the law of evidence.
Fraser Davidson
Margaret Ross with
James Chalmers
T&T Clark
ISBN 0567 00562 3
Price £90
WALKER AND WALKER:
The Law of Evidence in Scotland
THIS classic work appeared in 1964 and quickly became regarded as the leading authority on the subject by both the academics and the
profession, and indeed by the bench. Even in recent years, many would still turn to it for its penetrating yet practical insights on the
law of evidence, including many points passed over by later works. However, despite its outstanding virtues, the mere passage of time has meant that
one would inevitably refer to it less frequently, and it had become positively dangerous to suggest that those who might use it in an unreflecting
fashion might like to use it even as a work of reference.Thus it is something of an understatement to say that a second edition was long overdue.
Journal
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THE
JOURNAL
OF THE LAW SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND
ADR SPECIAL
EDITION
MEDIATION:
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR LEGAL PROFESSION
FAMILY CASES
LET MEDIATION TAKE
THE STRAIN
VOLUME 46 NO 8 AUGUST 2001
Regulars
THE
JOURNAL
OF THE LAW SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND
AUGUST 2001 VOLUME 46 NO 8
Features
contents
21 Mediation Revolution
John Sturrock and David Semple
argue for a simpler, cheaper, quicker
and less stressful solution
24 Family Cases
Guide to referring clients to mediation
27 Adjudication in
Construction Disputes
Murray Shaw on reducing adversarial attitudes
in the construction industry
32 Judging Mediation
In Falkirk and Pennsylvania judges
are encouraging alternatives to litigation
34 Financial Services
Essential guide to gearing up for N2 Day
From the
editor
ALTERNATIVE forms
of
dispute resolution have long been with us,
but the announcement earlier this year that
Government Departments will only go to
court as a last resort could be viewed
as something of a watershed.
Many of you may well be sceptical about the
merits of mediation, arbitration, adjudication and
other alternatives to court, and might be concerned
about possible loss of fee income.
Yet as mediation, in particular, becomes an
increasing part of the legal landscape in Scotland -
in recent months the FSA have announced a
mediation service as part of their new regulatory
regime and Lord Ross is chairing an independent
group of senior medical, legal and public health
leaders established by The Royal Society of
Edinburgh to explore the use of mediation to help
resolve disputes between patients and health
services in Scotland - we devote much of this
edition to ADR.
John Sturrock and David Semple commence our
coverage by exploring the arguments for mediation
and outlining where it is likely to offer broader
opportunities for the legal profession.
They suggest embracing mediation “can put
Scotland amongst the world leaders in providing a
creative, efficient and cost-effective dispute
resolution service to its citizens and to those who
do business here”.
In two articles, we focus more specifically on the
use of mediation in family cases, and Murray Shaw
examines the increasing use of adjudication on
construction disputes.
Finally, and on a different theme, for all of you who
engage in financial services business, our article on
N2 day and the steps you need to take is required
reading.
5 President’s Report
7 News
16 People
18 Letters
30 Web Reviews
38 Information Technology
40 Risk Management
42 Europe
44 Books
Front cover photography: Brian McDonough
Journal
Viewpoint President’s
REPORT
At first it seemed strange that China, with its huge
population, (the number of people in Beijing alone
is double that in Scotland) could have anything in
common with us, but whilst fundamental
differences were very apparent, there were areas
where information could be shared and experiences
discussed. The Chinese seem to be
intrigued with the fact that Scotland has a different
legal system from the rest of the United
Kingdom and now its own parliament. China has
Self Administered Regions (SARs) in Hong Kong
and Macau and the phrase that we heard often in
connection with these was “one country, two
systems”.The Chinese were interested in comparing
our experiences with theirs.They had specific
interests in discussing certain matters - juvenile
justice, resettlement of offenders, regulation of
lawyers and
the continuing development of the rule of law in
China. In all of those areas we had a great deal to
contribute and welcomed the discussion and the
debate which followed.
When we were in Hong Kong, the decision to
hold the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing was
announced and it is clear that there will be huge
developments in China over the next decade.The
law is set to develop and one of the principal
areas will be in business law. Companies doing
business in the country will need certainty in
commercial activity and that is where the legal
framework and the legal profession are so important.
We visited the office of the All China
Lawyers’ Association, which regulates the
profession and which is under the jurisdiction of
the Ministry of Justice. We also went to East
Associates which was the first legal firm
established in the Peoples Republic of China. It is
only six or seven years old and indeed the
profession, as we would recognise it, has only
existed for twenty years or so.
It will be interesting to watch developments
because what was underlined to me was the
importance of an independent legal profession and
its place in any developed society.The Chinese
have made huge strides but an independent
legal system does not yet exist and
as matters develop there must be
situations where the Government
will need to be challenged.
Sometimes we forget to appreciate
what we have and our Justice
Minister was able to tell the
Chinese about challenges he
has faced in such matters as
temporary sheriffs and prison
conditions.
I think that these issues
would be almost impossible
to raise if the Scottish legal
profession was not independent
and proudly so. Involvement with China is
challenging and there is always the huge issue of
human rights to be considered. Jim Wallace didn’t
shirk from raising the subject and I think it is right
that lawyers throughout the world have dialogue
with each other, especially on controversial issues.
The rule of law should be universal and can only
reach full maturity where lawyers can operate
independently from the state.
The international debate about MDPs continues
and the opinion of the Advocate-General in the
Nova case in the European Court of Justice may
have significant consequences for Scotland.
Although the court’s final decision is awaited,
many hope it will follow the thrust of the
Advocate-General’s conclusions and vindicate the
Dutch Bar’s position of not permitting MDPs -
a view which mirrors the Society’s own policy.
I don’t want to dwell on this but I do wonder if
the debate on MDPs has masked an extremely
important problem for firms in Scotland and that
is their inability to form multi-national
partnerships or MNPs.
Legislative change is required before this is
possible and I hope that the Scottish Executive
will recognise that need as a priority and essential
if Scottish firms are to retain their competitive
edge in international business.
Much of my role involves communication. The
more I meet solicitors, whether Scottish or not,
the more I am reminded of the importance of
sharing information, listening and learning. Many
Scottish solicitors have latched on to the benefits
of good communication and one of the developing
areas of law which involves solicitors assisting
their clients to communicate is mediation.
Mediation is by no means the easy way out, but it
can be the most constructive to tackle a problem
for clients. Increasing numbers of solicitors are
training as mediators or referring disputes to
trained mediators after discovering the benefits it
can bring clients. It is now increasingly popular
with those who are prepared to resolve a dispute
rather than fight it out. I commend the articles on
mediation in this month’s Journal to you and look
forward to watching developments in this exciting
area of practice.
I WAS privileged to accompany Jim Wallace, Scotland’s Justice Minister and Deputy First
Minister, who led the British Council delegation to Beijing and Hong Kong in July.
We were in Beijing as guests of the Chinese Ministry of Justice.The visit was at the invitation of
China following on a visit from the Chinese Ministry of Justice Scotland earlier this year.
Martin McAllister describes his visit to Beijing to share experiences with members
of China’s embryonic legal system
Martin McAllister
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Disclaimers
The views expressed in the Journal of the Law Society of Scotland are those of invited contributors and not necessarily those of the Law Society of Scotland.The Law Society of Scotland does not endorse any goods or services advertised, nor any claims or representations made in any advertisement,
in the Journal and accepts no liability to any person for loss or damage suffered as a consequence of their responding to, or placing reliance upon any claim or representation made in, any advertisement appearing in the Journal. Readers should make appropriate enquiries and satisfy
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Journal
News inside
8 Marketing help for
small firms
8 Conveyancing update
9 Member services
9 South African visit
10 AGM & Conference
diary dates
10 CII AGM
11 Pro bono lawyers
wanted
12 Forthcoming events
12 Poinding and warrant
sale consultation
13 SLAB report
13 Obituaries
14 Terms of business
letters
15 Land Register update
Embracing
Leadership
Challenge
CHIEF Executive of The Law Society of Scotland Douglas Mill has signed up to the
Commission for Racial Equality’s Leadership Challenge, aimed at encouraging those
at the top of institutions to take personal ownership of racial equality issues.
Recognising the role of leaders in influencing change, the
Challenge is designed to promote good practice and
develop organisational effectiveness.
Leaders are asked to demonstrate their commitment to
racial equality by raising the profile of racial equality
issues and supporting events and campaigns where the
issue might not be raised.
The Challenge also asks leaders to ensure they and
their organisations are at the forefront of best practice
and encourage leadership among colleagues and
contemporaries.
Douglas Mill said:“Not only must the Society convey the
importance of equal opportunities to the profession, but
as their representative body, we must lead by example.
“The Society’s own procedures and policies regarding
equal opportunities are rigorous. The Society has also
adopted a policy dealing with sexual and racial
harassment issues that seeks to ensure the working
environment is sympathetic to all employees.
“The Society, both internally and externally, is committed
to ensuring that equal opportunities are a fact of life for
the Scottish solicitors’ profession.”
Implementation of the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000
“…if racism is to be eliminated from our society there must be a co-ordinated effort to prevent its growth”
THIS statement, taken from the
Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report
highlights the importance of
effective implementation of the
Race Relations (Amendment) Act
2000 and the need for all public
authorities to adopt a pro-active
role in the promotion of race
equality and the elimination of
race discrimination.
The Race Relations Act 1976
outlawed discrimination in employment
and training, the provision of
goods, facilities and services, education,
housing and certain other
specified activities. It did not,
however, extend to all functions of
public authorities. The Race
Relations (Amendment) Act 2000
seeks to correct this.
Section 71(1) of the 2000 Act
creates a general duty to “eliminate
unlawful racial discrimination and to
promote equality of opportunity
and good relations between
persons of different racial groups”.
The application of this section is,
however, currently limited to those
public bodies specified in the 2000
Act, principally government departments,
the devolved administrations,
the armed forces, the police, local
government, educational authorities
and the National Health Service.
To ensure wider applicability of this
provision, the Government issued a
consultation document in February
2001, proposing the extension of
this general duty to a number of
other organisations, including the
Law Society of Scotland.
The Society responded to this
document in May 2001, confirming
its belief that this general duty
should be extended if a co-ordinated
approach in addressing diversity
issues is to be developed by
public bodies.
The Society is actively considering
ways in which it can fulfil this
general duty. The Society’s Chief
Executive, Douglas Mill has signed
up to the Commission for Racial
Equality leadership challenge and is
in the process of developing a
framework document to identify
specific objectives and projects
which the Society wishes to
complete within a given timescale.
The Society hopes that by the
development of these projects, and
indeed the acceptance of the
general duty under the 2000 Act,
that it will be in a position not only
to offer guidance to its members
on diversity issues but hopefully to
lead the way for the profession.
Douglas Mill with Dharmendra Kanani, Head of CRE Scotland
Journal
News
IT is a well known fact that many firms find the idea of
marketing themselves rather daunting or may even feel
that it is irrelevant to them. However, we all know that
neither view can be entertained for long, if a firm
wishes to survive in today’s market.
Many firms now have dedicated marketing teams but
many others do not have
such in-house expertise to
guide them along the path
to being more successful
and more profitable. To this
end, a new section has
been launched in the
Society’s website
(www.lawscot.org.uk) to
offer those firms who do
not have a dedicated
marketing resource a “first
aid” guide on marketing -
what it is and what to do
about it.
Linsey Lewin, Secretary to the Marketing Committee at
the Society, said: “The Directory gives primary information
and advice on marketing - both from a strategic and
tactical point of view. Our aim is to provide useful information
to members who may not have other sources
for this sort of expertise. The on-line directory can be
found in the Members’
section of the web site, and
we have produced it in
easily managed “chunks” of
information, which can be
printed off in sections, if
required. We hope it will be
well received and as always,
I would welcome any
further suggestions which
firms may find useful in their
day-to-day business.”
Suggestions and comments
can be forwarded to
linseylewin@lawscot.org.uk
Council of
Mortgage Lenders
Representatives of the
Society’s Conveyancing
Committee are meeting with
members of the Council of
Mortgage Lenders on
September 5th.
If any practitioners are
experiencing difficulties with
the CML handbook or have
matters they would like raised
at the meeting, please contact
Linsey Lewin, Secretary of the
Conveyancing Committee, on
0131 476 8174, e-mail
linseylewin@lawscot.org.uk
Conveyancing essentials
AROUND 30 solicitors attended the third Conveyancers’ Question Time, held in Oban in July. Practitioners joined members of the Oban Faculty
from as far afield as Dunoon to question the line-up of expert speakers.As part of the session, Roddy Paisley, Professor of Commercial Property Law
at Aberdeen University, sparked off a lively debate about the effect of the Abolition of Feudal Tenure etc (Scotland) Act 2000 and the ways in which
people might try to secure conditions previously created in feudal titles.There was a debate between the Deputy Keeper Alistair Rennie and some of
the local practitioners about the creation of servitudes and the way that these are dealt with by the Registers of Scotland. Janette Wilson, Church of
Scotland solicitor, delivered an informative talk about the Title Conditions Bill and urged members to contribute a response to the Scottish Law
Commission during the current consultation period.
“The feedback from Oban was very positive.
There was no shortage of questions and we could
have done justice to a number of other topics. I
am pleased to say that many solicitors said that
they found the question and answer session
helpful. Some said that the amount of new legislation
in contemplation and the effect this is going
to have on their current practice was a little
'scary' but I think that is only natural and the
purpose of the Roadshow is in part to alert solicitors
to the number of changes there will be.
Finally there is no doubt that they found the
speakers both informative and amusing”, said
Committee Secretary, Linsey Lewin.
The Committee now plans to take the roadshow to
Glasgow, Edinburgh and southwest Scotland as part
of a nationwide-tour. Roadshows have already been
successfully held in Inverness and Dundee. In the
next Roadshow the format will be developed using
the experience of the first three sessions and plan
to say more about electronic conveyancing and to
give some more practical examples of the ways that
the new legislation, both that proposed and now
enacted, will affect practitioners
The Committee is also continuing to develop its
web site section ‘Conveyancing Essentials’ on
lawscot.org.uk after receiving encouraging initial
feedback from the members. The most recent
additions being the Committee’s responses to the
Scottish Law Commission Discussion Papers on
Conversion of Long Leases, Law of the Foreshore
and Seabed, and to the Report on Real Burdens.
All of these can be found in the news section of
‘Conveyancing Essentials’ on www.lawscot.org.uk.
Marketing help for small firms on-line at lawscot.org.uk
Coal Authority On-Line Mining Reports Service
AS part of their ongoing drive for
improved customer service and
delivery performance, and in
response to customer demand, the
Coal Authority have developed an
Internet service for the ordering
and delivery of coal mining reports.
This service removes the dependence
on conventional mail delivery,
and combined with alternative
payment methods, will significantly
contribute to reducing the time and
effort needed by you to complete
property searches.
Using the on-line mining reports
service provides the following
benefits:
● immediate on-line confirmation
as to whether a coal
mining report is required or
not, avoiding the purchase of
unnecessary searches;
● optional facility to receive a
Coal Authority certificate
confirming a mining report is
not needed;
● improved turnaround times -
same day receipt & processing
of property searches and same
day or next working day
despatch;
● improved convenience of
requesting reports - no letter,
copy of plan, no need to write
cheques;
● user-friendly front-end and
service functionality (e.g. utilising
post-code data);
● alternative payment methods,
either by secure credit/debit
card facility or, where a formal
credit agreement exists, by
customer account/monthly
invoice;
● extended out-of-hours service
availability.
The on-line service is at www.coalminingreports.co.uk
Please visit the site and
test it out for yourself. Pre-registering as
a regular user will save you even more
time since it avoids the need to input
your name and contact details each
time you visit the site. If you wish to
pre-register, or arrange customer account
facilities, contact the Coal Authority’s
Helpline Team on 0845 762 6848.
Journal
News Fundraising starts for new charity
THE Scottish Huntington’s
Association has been nominated
by the Society’s staff as this year’s
charity.
Staff voted to support the charity in
2001/02 after a number of suggestions
were put forward.
Hugh Docherty, chairman, said: “We
have asked people to come up with
some ideas for fundraising and have
had some really good suggestions.
“Every year, the staff really get
behind the nominated charity and
last year we raised more than
£2,000 for MS Scotland.”
Ian Anderson, special project
manager at the Scottish Huntington’s
Association, said: “We are delighted
that the Society has chosen to
support the Association. Because
Huntington’s Disease is an inherited
condition it tends to be with families
through generations and is a constant
factor in the lives of family members.
“It has been called mankind’s worst
disease, with physical, emotional and
behavioural symptoms which can be
very difficult to live with.
“Our role is to provide support,
specialist knowledge and advice for
families via our specialist Advisory
Services.This can make a huge difference
to the quality of life of those
living with HD. SHA also campaigns
vigorously to raise awareness of HD
and to seek better care for those
affected. Some 500 to 600 people
have the faulty gene in Scotland and
many more in families are affected
by being at risk, or by being carers.
“We would like to say a very big
thanks to all at the Society who are
helping us as their chosen charity.”
For more information about Huntington’s
Disease or the Association, contact
01505 322245.
For the past 15 months I have been
acting as a filter for new ideas for
services to the profession and
although I have come up with a
number of products and services
myself a great number of suggestions
have been received from
other members of Council and
members of the profession but
even still there has not been as
many as one new idea a day. In
reality my committee is not in a
position to process that volume of
ideas anyway and in a magical sort
of way good ideas easily commend
themselves.
You will be aware of the Microsoft
deal which was negotiated last year
and ran until May of this year and a
great number of members of the
profession took advantage of this
and saved literally tens of thousands
of pounds. This deal has been
extended and considerable savings
on Microsoft software are available
to members. Contact Angela at
Global Direct Licensing on 0870
729 2107.
My committee is currently working
on a number of projects which I
hope to bring to fruit in the next
few months and these include
amongst other things a secure email
system for use by members
including the provision of digital
signatures which are will be aware
have recently been recognised
across Europe as having legal
validity. We are also considering a
range of distance learning products
which might reduce the cost of
delivery of certain aspects of CPD
and also be of interest to those
who are “geographically challenged”.
Also under investigation is
the possibility of various telecoms
deals that will save members costs
in that area which is becoming a
more and more significant item of
expenditure in the modern
practice.
In the meantime I would commend
you to visit the society’s website
where the latest deals on computers
from Systemax and NEC can be
seen including in particular a truly
outstanding offer from NEC for a
1GHz PC including Word 2000
Works 2000 and other productivity
software for just £499 plus VAT
(Phone NEC on 0870 333 6320
and quote product code BLSS1).
The discount arrangement with
Hertz also continues to prove to be
valuable and attractive to members.
I would hope to make this item a
regular contribution to the Journal
as a means of keeping you up to
date with new products and
services as they come on line and to
save bombarding you with flyers and
e-mail! I welcome ideas and suggestions
for products and services that
members feel would be useful and
appreciate the support of those
who have used the services to date.
Please contact George Samson at
the Society with your ideas, georgesamson@lawscot.org.uk
James Ness - Convener Business
Development Committee
EACH morning my day is made slightly brighter by my cashier’s “Larson”
cartoon diary.This provides a new cartoon every morning and is a cheery
way to start the day.What astonishes me is how Mr Larson can come up
with a new idea for every morning in life.
MEMBERS’ SERVICES COLUMN
THE Law Society of Scotland welcomed representatives
of the South African solicitors’ profession.
The delegation was seeking to share information
with other law societies to assist their
ongoing review of the South African regulatory
system. Greg Kruger, President of the Law Society
of Natal, David Randles, President of the Board of
Control of the South African Attorneys’ Fund and
John Moorhouse, General Manager of the
Attorneys’ Fund spent three days learning about
the work of the Guarantee Fund monitoring team
and its regulatory work on client accounts.
The delegation met with David Preston, the
Society’s Vice President and Heather Gibbings, the
Convener of the Guarantee Fund Committee as
well as Leslie Cumming, the Chief Accountant and
members of his team. They asked to see the
Society’s monitoring system at first hand after
hearing of a report presented to the International
Bar Association last year and also plan to visit the
New Zealand Law Society.
David Preston welcomed the visitors saying he
was delighted that our system of monitoring and
accountancy regulation was of such interest to
other jurisdictions and that the international
exchange of experiences was interesting and
useful.
Heather Gibbings explained the work of the
Guarantee Fund Committee and discussed the
current review of the Society’s rules and procedures.
She said: “The interest from South Africa
shows the international regard for the Scottish
system as well as recognition that the Society is at
the forefront of this type of work in the world.”
Journal
News
By-Election for Council
Sheriff Court District of Glasgow and Strathkelvin
New Journal
Advertising Agent
appointed by the
Society
THE Law Society of Scotland
has appointed Connect
Communications as the
advertising agent for the Journal
of the Law Society of Scotland
with effect from 1 November
2001.Connect Communications’
appointment is the result of a
full tender for this agency
contract which was conducted
by the Society’s Journal Advisory
Board. Connect
Communications had previously
won the five year contract for
the production of the Journal
from 1 November 1998 when
that contract was put out to
tender in Spring 1998.The
contract for the advertising
agency is for a five year period
from 1 November 2001.
Further details are available
from David Cullen –
davidcullen@lawscot.org.uk
AGM and Conference News
Society hosts mock court procedure at CII AGM
FOR the first time since the 50th Anniversary, the Conference and the Annual General Meeting of the
Law Society of Scotland will be split.This will enable delegates of the Conference to focus on a full
CPD programme as well as the golf and socialising.
NOTICE is hereby given that,
pursuant to the Solicitors
(Scotland) Act 1980 and the
Constitution of the Law Society
of Scotland, a by-election of one
member of Council representing
solicitors having a place of
business in the above named
constituency is about to be held.
Every member of the Society
having a place of business as
defined in Article 2 of the
Constitution of the Society in
the above constituency as at
November 1, 2000, is entitled to
one vote for one candidate to be
elected by that constituency.
The Returning Officer for the
purpose of this election is:
The Secretary, The Law Society
of Scotland, 26 Drumsheugh
Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7YR.
No person may be elected a
member of Council unless he or
she is a member of the Society and
unless a Nomination Paper in
respect of such person is sent or
delivered by hand as to reach the
offices of the Returning Officer at
or before Noon on Friday 28
September 2001.
Forms of Nomination Papers may
be obtained from the Returning
Officer on application.
Every person proposed for election
for a constituency must be nominated
by a separate Nomination
Paper in the appropriate form
contained in Part II of the Second
Schedule to the said Constitution,
and every Nomination Paper must
be subscribed by two Proposers,
being electors in the constituency,
and shall contain a statement
subscribed by the candidate that he
or she consents to be nominated
and that, if elected, he or she accepts
office as a member of the Council.
No person may sign more
Nomination Papers than the
number of members to be elected
by the constituency
Douglas R. Mill (Returning Officer)
The Law Society of Scotland is
hosting a mock court procedure,
under Scots law, at the Annual
Conference of the Chartered
Insurance Institute, which takes
place at the Edinburgh
International Conference Centre
on 19th - 21st September 2001.
The event will be held on
Wednesday 19th September and is
open to all Society members
without charge.
Society members are also being
offered preferential terms for attendance
at the full CII Conference.
They will pay a discounted rate of
£595.00 - a saving of £155.
Details of the CII conference are
included with this edition of the
Journal.
Further information is also available
from www.financialservicesconference.co.uk,
the dedicated website.
The CII conference is the event at
which to meet decision-makers in the
insurance and financial services sector.
Delegates will include senior executives
from leading companies, representatives
from IT systems and
software suppliers, management
consultants, loss adjusters, brokers,
lawyers and other professionals.
You can register for the conference at the
discounted rate by calling 020 8332
7696, or you can book
online at the address above.
The Annual General Meeting of the Law Society of
Scotland for 2002 will be held in the Lecture Theatre of
the National Museums of Scotland, Chambers St,
Edinburgh, on Friday March 22nd. Registration with tea,
coffee and pastries will be in the Bird Hall at 10am. A
finger buffet will be served in the European Art Gallery
at 1pm.
The Council Dinner will be held on the evening of Friday
March 22nd in the Signet Library.
Scotland play France at Murrayfield on Saturday March
23rd, so why not make a weekend of it?
The Annual Conference will be held at the new hotel
development,The St Andrews Bay Golf Resort and Spa,
St Andrews, on May 10th/11th 2002.This luxury hotel’s
facilities are boundless. Over 200 bedrooms equipped
with satellite TV, high speed Internet connections and
with panoramic views.Three restaurants to choose from,
and a spa offering a range of body and beauty treatments;
and not forgetting the Sam Torrance golf course
which will open next month.
Further details on the Conference in next month’s Journal, so
watch this space.
Journal
News
THE Society of Solicitor Advocates has revamped its
organisation and is to be running a training day for
anyone interested in gaining extended civil rights of
audience. Until now there has been no structured
assistance for candidates who have been very much left
to their own devices. The SSA event will be very much
a practical guide, with contributions from experienced
Solicitor Advocates who undertake regular appearance
work. Other speakers will, it is hoped, include members
of the bench.The morning will focus on the practicalities
of applications, exam preparation, topical issues such as
QC status & ‘Mixed Doubles’, and the assessment
course; whereas the afternoon will include practical
sessions in relation to Court of Session’s pleading
requirements and its Rules of Evidence.The date is to be
7th September 2001, hosted by the SSA at the Law
Society of Scotland’s headquarters, 26 Drumsheugh
Gardens, Edinburgh. For further details contact Paul
Motion, Ledingham Chalmers, on 0131 200 1057, or
Frank Maguire,Thompsons, 0141 221 8840; or visit the
Society’s website at www.solicitoradvocates.com
THE Foreign and Commonwealth
Office is looking for volunteers in
setting up a panel of pro bono
lawyers to work on cases involving
British nationals in prison overseas.
They are seeking to set up a
network of qualified lawyers ideally
with criminal or international human
rights experience to help promote
and protect the human rights of
British prisoners overseas by
working with local lawyers and
providing legal advice to the FCO.
Further information is available by
calling Nia James, Human Rights coordinator
in the FCO’s Consular
Division on 020 7008 0242, e-mail
nia.james@fco.gov.uk.
To apply to get on the panel, send your
CV by e-mail to Nia James or post it to
Foreign and Commonwealth Office,
Consular Division (Room G63), Old
Admiralty Building, London, SW1A 2PA.
Criminal Legal Aid Duty Plans 2002
Becoming a Civil Solicitor Advocate – made easy!
Pro bono lawyers wanted
THE Scottish Legal Aid Board is preparing duty plans for
the sheriff/district courts from 1 January 2002 to 31
December 2002. Any solicitor who has not already
received a letter about this and wishes to be included in
the duty plan should contact the Scottish Legal Aid Board.
Copies of the application form for the duty plans 2002
can also be obtained from the Board’s website for the
legal profession at www.slabpro.gov.uk
Please note that all applications for inclusion in next
year’s plans must be received by 31 August 2001.
To be included in the duty plan contact Lindsay Frame or Carol
Moffat, SLAB, 44 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh, EH3 7SW,
tel 0131 226 7061 ext 220 or 419
Journal
News
A Replacement for Poinding
and Warrant Sale: Consultation
THE Scottish Executive has issued for consultation the report of the
Working Group on a Replacement for Poinding and Warrant Sale, Striking
the Balance: a New Approach to Debt Management.
Poinding and warrant sale will be abolished on or before 31 December 2002
as a result of the Abolition of Poindings and Warrant Sales Act 2000 passed
by the Scottish Parliament. The Scottish Parliament deferred the Act’s
coming into effect to enable an alternative means of enforcement to be
created and introduced. The Working Group was set up to look for a
workable and humane alternative to poinding and warrant sale.
Copies of the consultation paper and Working Group report can be
obtained from Julie McKinnon, Scottish Executive Justice Department,Access
to Justice, Diligence and European Co-Ordination Division, Hayweight
House, 23 Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DQ (tel 0131 221 6764; fax
0131 221 6894; e-mail julie.mckinnon@scotland.gsi.gov.uk), or from the
Scottish Executive web site (www.scotland.gov.uk).
Comments are invited and should be sent by 17 October 2001 to Julie McKinnon
at the above address.
SCL Conference
THE Scottish Society for Computers
& Law are holding their AGM on
September 27th 2001 at a venue to
be decided. After the AGM the
speakers will be John Gailey of
Pilgrim Systems who will do a
review of cutting edge legal web
sites and David Gardner of Holt
Marketing who will have a look at
what makes a good web site.
October 18th 2001 sees the first in
a series of events for the 2001/2002
programme looking at cyber crime.
“On-Line Fraud” takes place at the
MacKenzie Building, off High Street,
Edinburgh.
The event is a joint meeting with
Faculty of Advocates IT Group.
Speaker is DS David Reid, Head
of Lothian and Borders Police
Computer Squad.
Further information for both meetings can
be obtained from Brandon Malone on
0131 226 6703.
THE opening meeting for the 2001 – 2002
Session will be on Thursday 4th October 2001
at 6pm for 7 at The Assembly Hall,
Strathclyde Police, Pitt Street, Glasgow.
The debate will be “This house considers that
sentencing is too important a matter to be left
to the judges”. All, whether members of SASD
or not, are welcome.
The Honourable Lord MacLean will be in the
chair, debaters will be Professor Neil Hutton,
Strathclyde University Law School, Sue Moody,
Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Dundee,
Vincent Smith, Solicitor, Glasgow, Sheriff Nigel
Thomson, CBE, QC.
There will be light refreshments, including a glass
of wine, from 6pm till 7.
Admission is free and formal advance notice is
not essential, but it would be much appreciated
if those intending to come would advise the
Secretary, preferably by e-mail or fax, in order to
assist the catering arrangements.
Ms Carol Kelly, Secretary
SASD, Glasgow Branch,
Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, 5th Floor,
Portland House, 17 Renfield Street, Glasgow G2 5AH -
e-mail: ckelly@sccrc.org.uk fax: 0141 270 7040;
tel: 0141 270 7030
THE Chartered Institute of
Management Accountants and the
University of Edinburgh are inviting
Journal readers to the annual
“Edinburgh Exchanges” lecture.
Professor Jan Mouritsen,
Copenhagen Business School, will
speak on Measuring and Reporting
Intellectual Capital. Jan Mouritsen is
the professor of operations management
and an acknowledged expert
in this ever growing and increasingly
relevant area. He has recently
carried out research in this field in
co-operation with many of
Denmark’s leading firms. One of the
key objectives has been to develop a
practical approach to measuring and
evaluating intellectual capital and this
will be the subject of his Edinburgh
Exchanges talk.
If you would like to know more
about how this impacts on you and
your business, you are welcome
along to the Playfair Library,
Edinburgh University, on 12
September 2001. Registration is at
18.00.
The lecture will be followed by a
reception.
To book your free place, contact Jackie
Walker on 01875 320879 or
Jackie.Walker@cimaglobal.com.
Scottish Association for the Study of Delinquency
Measuring and Reporting Intellectual Capital
Journal
News
Obituaries
JOHN MAIR
Wishaw
On 11th June 2001, John Mair,
formerly partner of and
consultant of the firm Morison
& Smith and latterly consultant
of the firm Freelands,Wishaw.
AGE: 69
ADMITTED: 1953
THOMAS ALEXANDER
McGHIE
(retired solicitor), Falkirk
On 11th July 2001,Thomas
Alexander McGhie, formerly
partner of the firm Dan McKay
& Norwell, SSC, Edinburgh, and
latterly Honorary Sherriff,
Airdrie.
AGE: 83
ADMITTED: 1969
THE Law Society of Scotland
welcomed last month’s publication
of the Scottish Legal Aid Board’s
annual report.
President Martin McAllister said:
“The past year has seen progress
in communications between the
organisations involved in legal aid as
well as new initiatives to assist those
who provide and receive assistance.
The Society regularly meet with the
Board and members of the Scottish
Executive in the Tripartite Group to
discuss legal aid issues in general. I
welcome the dialogue and progress
being made.
“The Society is working with the
Board on exciting proposals for a
new e-commerce system. We are
also represented on the Community
Legal Services Working Group,
which is progressing ideas for
co-ordinating advice services in
Scotland.”
The report revealed that for the
third successive year the cost of
criminal legal aid has fallen despite
an increase in the number of grants
to 79,000, a rise of four per cent.
Total spending on civil legal aid also
fell, with a reduction of almost 2,000
in the number of applications. The
Society has raised concerns about
eligibility in civil cases as part of its
evidence to the Scottish Parliament
Justice 1 Committee.
General Insurance Standards Council
The General Insurance Standards Council (GISC) has announced a further postponement to its proposed
registration system for solicitors who conduct general insurance business.The system is now unlikely to be
operational until early 2002. Further details are available from David Cullen - davidcullen@lawscot.org.uk
Criminal code
The unofficial draft criminal code for Scotland has now been revised in the light of the successful
consultation conference held in Edinburgh in November 2000. Comments on the revised draft are invited
by 7 September 2001 after which the draft will be further revised and submitted to the Minister for Justice
and the Scottish Parliament.Anyone who would like a copy of the revised draft can obtain one on request
by sending their e-mail address to eric.clive@ed.ac.uk.
IIP renewed
MANAGING Partner of Brechin
Tindall Oatts,Willie Young, is
pictured with colleagues Douglas
Cowie and Carolyn Flavelle
accepting a quaich on behalf of the
firm from Frank Pignatelli, Chief
Executive Officer of Scottish
University for Industry, in
recognition of their re-accreditation
as Investors in People.
Society welcomes SLAB report
Authors Wanted
The Society has a joint books
agreement with the publishers
Butterworths, the express purpose
of which is “to ensure that there
continues to be made available to
the Society’s members and the
legal profession in Scotland a range
of books and publications on
Scots law and legal practice and
related subjects.”
The Society and Butterworths
would welcome suggested book
topics and authors willing to write
under the joint books programme.
All suggestions should be sent to:
Carole Dalgleish, Commissioning
Editor (Scotland), Butterworths,
4 Hill Street, Edinburgh
EH2 3JZ or DX ED 211
or
e-mail Carole at
caroledalgleish@butterworths.co.uk
Multiple claim
deep vein
thrombosis
Solicitor Alistair Mackie has been
consulted by a client who suffered a
deep vein thrombosis which has
resulted in her hospitalisation.
Any other solicitors who might
consider pooling resources in
submission of claims for compensation
to airline companies should
contact him at Brooke & Brown
Solicitors, 42 High Street, Dunbar,
East Lothian, EH42 1JH, tel 01368
862746, fax 01368 864150, e-mail
brookeandbrown@talk21.com
The new regime for the training of Scottish
solicitors is now underway. Trainees who gained
the Diploma in Legal Practice this year are required, as
part of the new regime, to complete training logbooks.
Logbooks are available in a wide range of practice areas.
The full range of logbooks, the Quarterly Performance
Review sheet and the accompanying guidelines for
trainees and trainers are now available on the Society’s
website, from where they can be downloaded. Go to
www.lawscot.org.uk and look under Training and
Education.
Any trainee or firm or training organisation without
Internet access should contact the Legal Education
Department on 0131 226 7411,
e-mail legaleduc@lawscot.org.uk to request paper copies.
Training Logbooks
Terms of Business Letters
THE Society’s Professional Practice Committee and
Pensions Law Committee recently considered the
implications of the Pensions Act 1995 and the
requirements it imposes on the legal profession.
Section 47 of the Pensions Act 1995 together with the
relevant regulations, requires trustees of occupational
pension schemes to have a written agreement in place
with their advisers. If there is no such agreement,
trustees cannot rely on the terms of the Pensions Act
1995 for protection.
Following a recommendation by the Pensions Law
Working Party and the Professional Practice Committee,
the Council of the Law Society of Scotland agreed that
solicitors should enter into a written agreement with
trustees as required by the Act. Consequently, there is a
duty on solicitors to advise pensions trustee clients of
the terms of the Pensions Act 1995, including the
requirement to enter into a written agreement with
their legal advisers.
Those solicitors carrying out work in terms of the
Pensions Act 1995 are reminded of this obligation and
advised to incorporate reference to this professional
obligation in terms of business letters.
Journal
News
Social Security Appeals
A Practice Memorandum on the Human Rights Act
1998 has been issued by the Chief Social Security and
Child Support Commissioner for guidance in appeals to
the Commissioner in Scotland. In addition, the Senior
Commissioner (Scotland) has issued a Practice
Memorandum dealing with Written Observations on
Appeals in Social Security and Tax Credit Cases in
Scotland. A copy of both memoranda can be found on
lawscot.org.uk or copies obtained from The Secretary,
Office of the Social Security Commissioners, 23 Melville
Street, Edinburgh EH3 7PW
THE next Diet of Examinations for
Solicitors seeking Rights of
Audience in the Supreme Courts
will take place on Monday 19
November for applicants in the
Court of Session and Tuesday 20
November 2001 for applicants in
the High Court of Justiciary.
If you wish to sit these exams but
have not already applied for Rights
of Audience, please contact Lisa
Anderson on 0131 476 8164 as
soon as possible for an application
form.
Rights of Audience in the Supreme Courts
turnaround times
The current average turnaround
times in working days from the
Registers of Scotland are
as follows:
Sasine Writs
27 working days
with a maximum of 57 days
for the latest County
Unattached Dealings with Whole*
27 working days
with a maximum of 39 days
for the latest County
* An unattached Dealing with whole
is a Dealing which is not dependent
on the processing of a prior
First Registration,Transfer of Part or
Dealing with Whole for its
completion.
Information from
the Registers
Journal
News
Land Register Update
– certified plans
PARAGRAPH 4.16 of the Registration of Title Practice Book (2nd edition)
refers to the situation where the title deeds do not contain
sufficient information to enable the Keeper to confirm the location or extent of a property which is the
subject of an application for first registration in the Land Register. In that situation, the applicant’s solicitors
may elect to submit an appropriate scale plan, bearing a docquet signed by the solicitors, in which they
certify that the plan shows the extent of the property for which registration is sought.
In recent years, the Keeper has
found it necessary to request certified
plans on an increasing number
of occasions. As a result of operational
difficulties and – unfortunately
– as a consequence of a variety of
claims on the Keeper’s indemnity
resulting from circumstances in
which a certified plan has been
accepted, the Keeper has now found
it necessary to reconsider this policy.
The Keeper is required under
section 4(2)(a) of the Land
Registration (Scotland) Act 1979 to
reject an application for registration
if it does not contain sufficient to
enable him to identify the property
by reference to the Ordnance Map.
Where the extent to be registered
cannot be established by any other
means, the applicant’s solicitors may
continue to supply a separate certified
plan, and the Keeper will
continue to requisition such plans
where he considers that they may
assist the identification process.
However, the following guidelines
now apply to the submission of such
plans:
● The plan should be drawn in
conformity with the criteria in
appendix 1 to chapter 4 of the
Practice Book. Subject to the
relevant copyright restrictions,
solicitors may if they wish base
the plan on an extract from the
current edition of the
Ordnance Map, at the appropriate
scale referred to in the
Practice Book.
● The solicitor submitting the
plan is responsible for
ensuring that the extent
depicted on the plan accurately
reflects the current
occupied extent, and also for
ensuring that this coincides
both with the extent which
the prior titles are believed to
support and with the extent
which has been possessed for
the prescriptive period on the
strength of those titles.The
Keeper will read the answers
to the relevant questions on
Form 1 in the light of this
responsibility.
● The plan should bear a
docquet certifying that it
depicts the subjects to which
the application for registration
relates. This docquet should
be signed by the granter(s) and
the grantee(s) of the deed
inducing registration.
(Solicitors should particularly
note this change of practice:
the docquet should no longer
be signed by the applicant’s
agents, but must instead be
signed personally by both
parties to the transaction).
● The Keeper reserves the right
to request further supportive
evidence in the course of his
examination of title, and – if
necessary – to exclude indemnity
and/or to restrict the
extent of the subjects included
in the title sheet.
These guidelines will be adopted by
the Keeper’s staff with immediate
effect. However, the Keeper wishes
to reassure solicitors that he will
continue to look sympathetically at
cases on their individual merits. He
will also of course honour any
commitment he may already have
made in a particular case,as the result
of a written pre-registration enquiry.
If it is obvious before the application
for registration is made that the
description in the titles is not going
to be sufficient to enable the Keeper
to confirm the location and or
extent of the subjects it is permissible
to prepare and attach a plan to
the deed inducing registration. Any
such plan should be drawn in
conformity with the criteria noted
above, but will not require to be
signed by the purchaser. The
subjects should be described in such
a way as to make it clear that the
plan defines the extent of the
subjects possessed on the basis of
the description which is believed to
be habile to comprehend that
extent. Some such formula as the
following is suggested:
“All and Whole the subjects
delineated/coloured …………….
on the plan annexed and subscribed
by me/us as relative hereto, which is
hereby declared to be taxative and
which defines the extent of the
subjects possessed by me/us and
my/our predecessors in title as [here
insert the description from earlier
titles noting any exceptions that are
necessary]”.
Naturally, if this approach is used the
same caveats noted at the fourth
bullet point above apply. In particular
any exception from warrandice
will almost certainly result in an
exclusion of indemnity.
Solicitors who have questions about the
new guidelines are invited to contact the
Pre-Registration Enquiries Section at the
Keeper’s office at Meadowbank House,
153 London Road, Edinburgh, EH8 7AU
(direct telephone line 0845 6070163).
ABERDEIN CONSIDINE &
COMPANY, 8 & 9 Bon Accord
Crescent, Aberdeen, also at
Aboyne, Ballater, Banchory, Culter,
Dyce, Ellon, Inverurie, Kingswells,
Peterhead, Stonehaven,Torry and
Westhill, are delighted to announce
that with effect from 24th August
2001 their associates Mark McCall,
Rhona MacLean and Lynne Mulcahy
have been assumed as partners of
the firm and Lynn Bentley has
joined the firm as an associate.
Stuart Beveridge resigned as a
partner of the firm with effect from
2nd August 2001.
ADAMS WHYTE, Edinburgh and
Livingston, are pleased to intimate
that as of 3rd June 2001 they have
moved to new Edinburgh premises
at 14/16 Frederick Street,
Edinburgh, EH2 2HB, telephone
0131 225 8813, fax 0131 226 0949
and DX ED212. The e-mail and
web address remain unchanged as
do the Livingston office details.
ANDERSON STRATHERN,WS,
Edinburgh, are pleased to intimate
that Michael Joseph Ferrie was
appointed an associate of the firm
with effect from 1st March 2001.
BOYDS, Glasgow and Edinburgh,
are pleased to announce that with
effect from 1st July 2001, Robert
Weir has been assumed as a
partner in the firm.
CAESAR & HOWIE, Bathgate and
elsewhere, are pleased to announce
the assumption as partners of their
associates Hamish Alexander
Davidson and Sarah Helen Patrick
with effect from 1st July 2001.
CAMERONS, 160A High Street,
Irvine, KA12 8AN, intimate the
retiral of their senior partner, Colin
Cameron from the partnership
with effect from 31st May 2001.
Mr Cameron continues to be associated
with the practice as a
consultant.
Michael Joseph Ferrie intimates that
he resigned as a partner of
BOYDS, Glasgow with effect from
28th February 2001.
Robert Howat, formerly Company
solicitor of SCOTIA HOLDINGS
PLC is pleased to announce his
appointment as Company
Secretary and In-House Legal
Adviser to CELTIC PLC, with effect
from 18th June 2001.
KEEGAN WALKER & CO, SSC,
Livingston & Bathgate, have transferred
their head office in
Livingston. With effect from 4th
June 2001 the new address is
Torridon House, Civic Square,
Almondvale Boulevard, Livingston,
EH54 6QJ. Telephone 01506
415333, fax 01506 416116, e-mail:
livingston@keeganwalker.co.uk,
Legal Post: LP1 Livingston.
Journal
People
PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE
Intimations for the people section should be sent to:
Denise Robertson, Records Department, Law Society of Scotland,
26 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7YR
e-mail: deniserobertson@lawscot.org.uk
LEDINGHAM CHALMERS,
Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Inverness,
Baku, Istanbul and Falkland Islands,
intimates that on 1st July 2001,
Claire MacLeod, Melanie Sara
Reynolds and John Douglas Smart
(Aberdeen) were appointed as
associates in the firm.
LOW BEATON RICHMOND,
Glasgow, intimate the retiral of
Ronald B. Low as a consultant with
the firm with effect from 31st July
2001.
Ann McKechin, Glasgow, intimates
that following her election as the
Member of Parliament for Glasgow
Maryhill she has retired from
private practice with effect from
8th June 2001. Telephone 0207
219 8239
MACLAY MURRAY & SPENS,
Glasgow, Edinburgh, London and
Brussels, intimate that with effect
from 1st June 2001 Kirsti Olson
and Gregor Mitchell were assumed
as partners of the firm. Kirsti, as
part of the Construction &
Engineering Department, is a
construction litigator with considerable
experience of advising and
representing clients in relation to all
types of dispute resolution. Gregor,
as a member of the Tax & Private
Capital Department, is head of the
firm’s Rural Property unit, as well as
advising clients on partnership
disputes and succession planning. In
addition, the following assistants
were assumed as associates on the
same date: Craig Darling – IP &
Technology, Douglas Milne –
Commercial Litigation & Advocacy,
George Pennel – Employment,
Pensions & Benefits and Iain
Sutherland - Corporate
The partners of McFADYEN &
SEMPLE, Paisley, are pleased to
announce that their principal court
assistant, Frances Marie McCartney,
has been assumed as a partner in
the firm with effect from 1st August
2001.
On 31st July 2001 Adam More
retired from MURRAY BEITH
MURRAY,WS, Edinburgh. Adam
spent twenty three years as a
partner of the firm, of which seven
were spent as Managing Partner.
He leaves us to take up a course in
e-commerce at Strathclyde
University and we wish him well.
The firm would also like to
announce the appointment of Neil
Addis, who joined the firm on 1st
August 2001 as an associate in the
Commercial Property department.
HELEN M NICOLSON, 6 Bridge
Street Wynd, Kirkwall, is pleased to
announce that with effect from 1st
August 2001 she has retired from
the firm, and that as from that date
the business has been taken over
by her assistant, Edward T C
Nicolson, who will be trading under
the existing firm name of HELEN M
NICOLSON. The address,
telephone and fax number
remain unchanged.
NICOLSON O’BRIEN, Airdrie are
pleased to announce that with
effect from 1st July 2001 John S.
Hunter has been assumed as a
partner in the firm.
PATTISON & SIM, Paisley, are
pleased to intimate that George
Jamieson, formerly of WALKER
LAIRD, Paisley, joined the firm as a
consultant with effect from 8th May
2001.
The PRG PARTNERSHIP, Glasgow,
Clydebank, Kirkintilloch and
Lennoxtown, are pleased to
intimate the appointment of their
assistant, Sheila Munro, as an
associate of the firm. Mrs Munro is
based at the firm’s offices at 12
Royal Crescent, Glasgow.
SCOTTISH ENTERPRISE, Legal
Team, Glasgow, intimate that with
effect from 25th September 2001
they will move to new premises at
150 Broomielaw, Atlantic Quay,
Glasgow, G2 8LU. Telephone
numbers and e-mail addresses will
remain unchanged.
SHAUN PRINGLE & CO,WS, 15
Ainslie Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6AS,
are pleased to announce that with
effect from 1st July 2001 their
associate John Welsh Stewart
Macfie has been assumed as a
partner in the firm.
SIMPSON & MARWICK, WS,
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and
Dundee, are pleased to announce
that Henry T D Boyle joined the
firm on 28th May 2001 as an
associate in their Dundee office, and
with effect from 1st May 2001 have
appointed Mark Donaldson as an
associate in their Aberdeen office.
WM. SKELTON & CO, Rothesay,
Isle of Bute, are pleased to
announce the appointment of their
qualified assistant, Marianne
Deighan, as an associate of the firm
with effect from 1st June 2001.
TURNBULL, SIMSON &
STURROCK,WS, Jedburgh,
intimate the retiral of their partner,
Martin George Ritchie Edington,
WS, as a partner with effect from
12th July 2001, following upon his
appointment to the Shrieval bench.
A C WHITE, Ayr, are pleased to
announce that with effect from 2nd
July 2001 Morven Cumming, assistant
in their Conveyancing and
Trusts and Executries Department,
and Gregor Forbes, until recently
Court Partner in R & J A
MacCallum, Ayr, have been
appointed as associates of the firm.
 PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE
Journal
Photographs of people featured can be sent to:
The Journal, Studio 62, Sir James Clark Building,Abbeymill Business Centre, Paisley PA1 1TJ
Correction
In the People section last month
at page 14, Alexander Neil
Wilson, accredited as a specialist
in Commercial Leasing Law,
was wrongly designated as
Andrew Neil Wilson.
Write to:
The Editor,The Journal,
Studio 62, Sir James Clark Building,
Abbeymill Business Centre, Paisley PA1 1TJ
Journal
Letters
LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS
Alistair Rennie acknowledges in his
article that the pilot scheme
requires the solicitor to prepare
two parallel applications, the paper
one which will effect registration
and that carried out online. I can
reassure colleagues that the online
transaction, even in pilot form, takes
very little time. One can view the
duplicate copy of the Title
Certificate entry on screen and
when necessary, completion of the
Form 2 in its modified electronic
form takes only a few seconds. I can
assure Austin Lafferty that, provided
one is reasonably adept with a
mouse, the online Form 2 used in
connection with ARTL transactions
can be completed far more quickly
than a handwritten Form 2, as the
layout has been simplified and many
of the questions have a default
answer, for example when not applicable.
There is no form 4 as no
documents would be lodged in the
event of an on line registration.
Purchasers’ details, standard security
and discharge details must be
inserted by the purchasing or selling
agent as required but some of these
are simply a matter of using drop
down boxes and highlighting the
appropriate entry. My firm is at
present looking at whether our case
management software could
complete some of the entries in the
ARTL forms with information
already held on our electronic file,
which again would save time.
I think some of the doubts
expressed in connection with the
use of ARTL have arisen from
misunderstanding as to the process.
One must remember that ARTL is
only applicable at present for transfers
of whole. Transfers of part
would provide various difficulties.
Further, in its pilot form, the
Embrace e-conveyancing
I READ with interest that section of The Journal of June 2001 devoted to conveyancing and in particular
Alistair Rennie’s article on ARTL. I thought it appropriate that, as an enthusiastic participant
in the pilot scheme, I should provide some further information to fellow practitioners.
Fax on: 0141 561 0400
E-mail: roger@connectcommunications.co.uk
Conveyancing Committee
 LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS LETTERS
Journal
conveyancing process in its present
form is unchanged. One simply
completes an online application in
parallel with the paper one.
However, if one takes the concept
to its logical conclusion, one would
have to consider whether, for
example, any form of Disposition
would be required as there would
be no need to record a hard copy
deed. Similarly, missives should be
much simplified, and may be in an
electronic form. Changes to legislation,
however, would obviously be
required to allow a fully electronic
transaction.
The benefits of ARTL would be
many, principally in saving of time.
Purchasers would have a registered
title instantly, and lenders would
similarly be secured at point of
registration.
Also, as many of the documents
involved could be completed with
default answers or information from
files held electronically elsewhere,
the opportunity for error should
hopefully be reduced. One should
not overlook the ecological aspects.
I am constantly amazed at how
much paper is wasted in any legal
office. Storage of paper files (and
the cost of same) would be
reduced and lenders would only
require electronic copies of the
charge entry as a hard copy Charge
Certificate could be downloaded at
any time.
With regard to David Adie’s
concerns regarding the virtual
office, I would agree that many
clients will still expect to come to a
functioning office. However, in a
standard transaction through ARTL
as envisaged, it is unlikely that one
would ever need to meet the client
other than for the purpose of
money laundering checks and this
may be negated where a client has
a biometric or other verifiable
electronic signature. If lenders
become involved, the funding may
be controlled by the solicitors in
the transaction and transferred
electronically, automatically paying
the purchase price and also automatically
supplying the redemption
monies to the discharging lender.
It may all seem pie in the sky but
one only has to look at the huge
increase in interest in Internetbased
transactions for any
commodity, be it CDs, the weekly
shop or even the family holiday or
motor car.
All in all I think that E-conveyancing
is something which the profession
should welcome and I would
encourage colleagues to sign up for
the pilot scheme. Using the system
in pilot form will help to ensure that
the finished product reflects the
practice of its users.
John Leyden
Morton Fraser
No member of the Conveyancing
Committee has ever said that the
Society has given up the fight to
preserve the position of solicitors in
the conveyancing process in
Scotland. Such comments are
without foundation and lead to
unnecessary anxiety in the
profession. Indeed, the Committee's
commitment to assisting the profession
is clear from current developments.
These include the new
conveyancing section on the
Society's website, the current series
of conveyancing roadshows across
the country, the many responses
to consultation papers which may
lead to changes affecting all
conveyancers such as the Feudal
Reform package. In addition the
committee are in dialogue with
agencies, including the Council for
Mortgage Lenders (CML), Stamp
Office, Scottish Executive, Scottish
Consumer Council and individual
lenders.The Society's Council has
approved and supports these initiatives
and receives reports of
progress at the monthly Council
meeting.
Conveyancing Essentials, the
Committee’s section of
www.lawscot.org.uk, now gives
members news and information
which will be of practical use and
assist busy practitioners to keep
abreast of developments in the law.
It also provides a forum for practitioners
to tell the Committee about
difficulties encountered and request
matters to be raised with agencies
such as the CML or Registers of
Scotland.The Committee communicates
regularly with many practitioners
and and addresses concerns
they raise with the various
agencies.The Committee's representations
have ensured that
conveyancing practitioners’ interests
as well as those of their clients are
strongly represented.
In this regard, I am pleased to be
able to confirm that the Keeper and
the Conveyancing Committee have
agreed to create a Fast Response
Focus Group to represent the interests
of conveyancers in relation to
the Registers and to canvas their
opinions with regard to proposed
changes in practice. If you would like
to be a member of this Focus
Group I would urge you to contact
me at linseylewin@lawscot.org.uk
(0131 476 8174).
Mr McCormick's reference to the
fee order is a little misleading in
suggesting that change is imminent.
The Deputy Keeper has advised me
that he undertook to raise the
question of a fixed fee for remortgages
when the next fee review
commences. He will report the
views of the profession as
expressed by Mr McCormick to the
Justice Department at the outset
and, as with all fee orders, there will
be consultation before the order is
finally made.
If Mr McCormick or any conveyancing
practitioner would like to clarify
any of the issues raised in this correspondence
or would like to discuss
a particular issue with members of
the Committee, then the ideal
opportunity to do so is at the
Conveyancing Roadshows.The next
event will be in Edinburgh on
Wednesday, 7th November, at the
Society. Details will be posted on
lawscot.org.uk in due course.
Linsey J. Lewin
GRAEME MCCORMICK'S letters have given me the opportunity,
as Secretary of the Conveyancing Committee, to correct his
understanding of some matters and to inform Journal readers of the
work of the Conveyancing Committee.
MEDIATING
a cultural revolution
Introducing our coverage of alternative forms of dispute resolution, John Sturrock QC and David Semple
examine the merits of mediation and the lawyer’s role in facilitating its success
Setting the Scene
“Very often, there will be alternative ways of settling the issues at stake which
are simpler, cheaper, quicker and less stressful to all concerned
than an adversarial court case.”
Of course, alternatives to litigation have been available
for a long time: many lawyers pride themselves on being
able to negotiate settlements without a court hearing.
Arbitration and expert determination are well established
and tribunals of all kinds have popped up.
Ombudsmen have appeared. Adjudication has arrived
on the construction scene.“Dispute Resolution” departments
are replacing Court departments. Litigation is
seen by many lawyers and, perhaps more importantly, by
their clients, as only one of the many ways by which
disputes may be resolved.
Mediation represents a further means for resolving
disputes where traditional negotiation is not working
effectively. In England, in commercial and public sector
disputes, professional negligence claims and even in
personal injury cases, mediation is now part of the landscape,
following trends in the United States, Australia
and elsewhere. In some States in the US, in Hong Kong,
Canada,Australia and England, courts have the power to
refer cases to mediation. In England, the arrival of the
new Civil Procedure Rules, following the enquiry by
Lord Woolf, resulted in a large increase in referrals to
mediation. In the year after their introduction (1999)
the number of mediations handled by the Centre for
Dispute Resolution (CEDR) increased by 140%. CEDR’s
statistics reveal an overall successful settlement rate for
cases referred to mediation in excess of 80%.
In Scotland, for the first time in non-family cases, alternative
dispute resolution (of which mediation is the
most commonly used method) is now referred to in
court rules. The Act of Sederunt (Ordinary Cause
Rules) Amendment (No 3) (Commercial Actions) 2000
provides at Rule 40.12(3)(m) that the Sheriff has the
power to make any order which he thinks will result in
the speedy resolution of the action, including the use of
alternative dispute resolution.
There is already increasing use of mediation in Scotland
in non-family cases. Recently, disputes involving web site
design, building contracts, local authority services and
employment have been resolved successfully by mediators.There
is currently a review of the use of mediation
in disputes involving patients and the health services in
Scotland. It seems likely that mediation will become a
fact of professional life for Scots lawyers. How is that
going to affect the profession? Will it result in a loss of
lucrative work or is it an opportunity for lawyers to
embrace a further line of business and provide a
valuable additional service for their clients?
What is mediation?
Mediation is a flexible, voluntary and private process, in
which an impartial third party (the mediator) seeks to
help the parties to negotiate a satisfactory outcome to
their dispute. Unlike litigation and many other adjudicative
processes in which a decision is given by a third
party, the mediator assists the parties to communicate
and negotiate but does not issue a decision or make a
ruling. The parties themselves are usually involved and
can identify and explore the real issues with the
mediator, in total confidence, and address any problem
areas in the case. They can also gain a greater understanding
of each other’s situation. If the mediation is
successful, the parties will sign an agreement which is
binding like any other legal agreement.
What are the advantages of mediation?
● Mediation provides speedy resolution of conflicts:
most mediations are completed within one day.
Preparation beforehand is important but will tend
to be far quicker than for a court case.
● The costs of mediation are relatively low
compared to litigation: in a recent mediation, one
party identified cost savings of between £10,000
and £50,000 compared to litigation.The costs of
organising a mediation and providing a mediator
are readily ascertainable from mediation providers.
● The parties retain control over the procedure,
which is flexible, and also over the outcome: there
is no binding outcome unless and until each party
is satisfied that it is in their interests to sign a
settlement agreement.
THIS was the thrust of the Lord Chancellor’s announcement in March this year that, in future,
Government Departments will only go to court as a last resort. Disputes involving
government departments will be dealt with by mediation and other alternatives to litigation wherever
possible. Does this reflect a change in culture which will have significance in Scotland?
Journal
Mediation
● Mediation saves management time and
reduces opportunity cost: the speed of
resolution can relieve managers and other
employees of the retrospective, tiresome
and often stressful process of reviewing
what happened in the past and preparing to
fight a potentially long court case, leaving
them free to attend to current and future
business.
● It is “without prejudice”: the process, like any
other negotiation, is “without prejudice”;
being voluntary, either party can leave at any
time and maintain their legal rights.
● It is confidential and avoids the publicity of a
court hearing: the whole process, as well as
the outcome, is conducted in privacy, unless
parties agree to disclosure.
● Mediation provides a reality check for the
parties: where a court case has been raised
or is in contemplation, often the enthusiasm
to make a point can cause the parties to
overlook reality, such as the validity of a
contract or the reliability of a witness –
which will be crucial in a proof. A mediator
is likely, in private, to give the parties the
opportunity to review their true strengths
and weaknesses.
● It creates the possibility of creative and
forward-looking solutions rather than
outcomes based on the past: the parties are
free to look at practical solutions which are
wider than the scope of a court case, which
tends to focus primarily on the past and on
legal remedies or rights.
● Mediation enables the parties to have a
continuing business relationship: rarely do
parties do business after a court case is
won or lost.The experience following
mediations is different – often, a future
working relationship can be encouraged.
● The mediator is independent: of the parties
and their legal representatives, thus
providing a basis for confidence in his or
her impartiality (and lack of baggage) and
ability to assist both sides to find a mutually
acceptable outcome.
One of the parties in a mediation conducted in
Scotland this year had this to say:
“The end came sooner than it would have in
litigation; there was no adverse publicity; a measure
of reconciliation was achieved; staff could be spared
the stress and time involved in appearing as
witnesses, and preparing for the case; and the
potential expense of lengthy and fractious litigation
was avoided.”
What are some of the arguments used
against mediation?
● If the clients’ legal case is strong, mediation
may produce a worse result than going to
court.This tends to ignore the fact that the
strength of the case will be a crucial factor
in the mediation, just as in any negotiation.
But most cases settle, because parties
recognise the risks of going to court.
● There is a need to disclose one’s hand.
There is no need to disclose any
information to the mediator or to the other
side which you do not wish to disclose. In a
court action, most of the relevant information
is likely to be recovered at some stage.
All information disclosed to the mediator in
the course of the mediation is confidential
unless disclosure is specifically agreed.
● Pressure to settle is created by the
mediation. Like any opportunity to settle
and avoid the costs and risks of proceeding
to court, this may be a valuable aspect of
the mediation process. But either party may
walk away at any time if they wish.
● Going to mediation displays weakness or
may be seen as an admission of liability.
Being prepared to explain one’s case at
mediation is seen by many as an indication
of strength. A party speaking from strength
has the opportunity to put its case to the
other side.
● It is just another delaying tactic. It takes a
relatively short time to organise and
conduct a mediation. Often, it can be held
while parties await the next stage of court
procedure.
● Recovery of evidence is not available.As in
any negotiation, parties are not able to force
others to disclose material in a mediation
but they know that, if the mediation is not
successful and the matter proceeds to
court, the court may require disclosure.
When is mediation not appropriate?
Most cases settle without a final court order.
Mediation is a way to bring about that settlement
more quickly and less expensively. Thus, most
cases are suitable for mediation. Nonetheless, it
should be recognised that mediation may not be
appropriate where:
● there is a desire to establish a legal
precedent;
● a party needs a summary decree or rapid
interdict;
● a party wishes to enforce an award;
● there is a need to compel and examine
witnesses;
● a party wishes to make a public statement
on some matter; or
● there is no genuine interest in settlement.
Even in these cases, mediation may have a role at
some stage.
The lawyer’s role in mediation
Mediation does not leave legal rights and lawyers
standing at the door. In most mediations, it is
sensible (if not essential) for lawyers (solicitors
and / or counsel) to be directly involved in the
entire process.
Before there is any hint of conflict:
Lawyers have an early role in advising clients of
the various dispute resolution clauses which may
be included in commercial contracts. These
commonly include reference to arbitration or an
expert and now, increasingly, reference to
mediation. Indeed, there may be a professional
obligation to advise on the inclusion of a mediation
clause if the benefits are likely to include
those mentioned above.
On the emergence of a conflict:
Mediation provides another option for the lawyer
to suggest to his clients. Awareness of the three
pillars of dispute resolution - “Negotiation,
Mediation and Adjudication (including litigation
and arbitration)” and informed commitment to
mediation can send a powerful message to
clients. In practice, it may be easier for the
solicitor to advise clients to continue with litigation
where the clients are satisfied that mediation
as an option has been tried or, at least, canvassed
and validly rejected.Where clients are intimidated
by the possible cost, delay and uncertainty of
court, they may well wish to go to mediation.
In the course of a conflict:
Disputes can be referred to mediation at any
stage - including during litigation. This is an additional
weapon in the dispute resolver’s armoury if
negotiation has failed to produce a satisfactory
result or where there is a need for parties to
have their expectations tested. Mediation may at
least focus and narrow the issues.
In the arrangement and conduct of the
mediation:
There is a real role for the legal adviser in
ensuring that the arrangements for and conduct
of the mediation are handled in such a way that
no unnecessary prejudice is caused to the clients’
position. Representing a client in a mediation is a
challenging task, requiring a rigorous approach to
the issues while looking for ways to resolve the
dispute and create a climate for settlement.
Deciding what to disclose and when, considering
the options and advising on the alternatives all
require sound negotiating and tactical skills.
In the preparation or approval of the Agreement
The successful outcome produced a ‘win-win’
result, leaving everyone with a real
sense of achievement
to Mediate, other pre-mediation
documents and submissions:
It is as important to ensure that all
the relevant information and points
are properly organised prior to a
mediation as in a court hearing. It is
well accepted that an essential prerequisite
of a satisfactory mediation
is the availability of sufficient legal
and factual information to each
party to enable it to make a realistic
analysis and assessment of its case.
The legal adviser’s role in assembling
and advising on this material is
invaluable.
In drafting or approving the
Settlement Agreement:
The terms of any agreement are
normally reduced to writing. This
can be complicated and may involve
detailed drafting by the lawyers.
And finally: broader opportunities
for the legal profession
Mediation gives members of both
branches of the profession in
Scotland the opportunity:
● to consider new and practical
ways of safeguarding and
pursuing clients’ priorities, aims
and interests (and to market
these as part of its repertoire);
● to review the options it makes
available to clients for resolving
disputes and to become
engaged in a process which
widens (and markets) these
options;
● to develop (and market) new
skills in new areas of work;
● to embrace a relatively new
culture which, expanding on
existing processes, can put
Scotland amongst the world
leaders in providing a creative,
efficient and cost-effective
dispute resolution service to its
citizens and to those who do
business here.
Perhaps the last word should be
given to a party who recently experienced
mediation in Scotland:
“Having been unfamiliar with the
process of mediation prior to last
week, we are now fully aware of the
huge benefits to be gained by using
mediation in this type of dispute.
“Whilst we accept that mediation is
not appropriate in all cases of
dispute... we believe that in cases
such as ours, where issues such as a
breakdown in communication and a
general sense of antagonism exists
between both parties, whilst it is
mutually acknowledged that an area
of common ground remains, this
type of arrangement can work very
positively for both parties involved.
“The benefits and advantages of
mediation are numerous, but
personally we identified a few as
being:
● the fact that individual
reputations and dignities are
preserved and maintained
throughout and following the
process,
● a greater understanding of the
specific difficulties faced by
both parties can be achieved in
a very positive, constructive
and respectful manner,
● mediation works effectively by
encouraging the use of
positive, constructive language
and attitudes,
● particular roles and responsibilities
of individuals could be fully
appreciated and respected,
● the successful outcome derived
from mediation produced a
‘win - win’ result, leaving
everyone with a real sense of
achievement and success.“
* Note:There are a number of mediation
organisations which will assist with
setting up a mediation and providing
information about it. In Scotland, David
Semple and John Sturrock are Directors
of Core Mediation Ltd which provides a
full mediation service for disputes in
commercial, public sector and
professional matters (including advice
on whether a dispute is appropriate
for mediation).
E-mail: johnsturrock@core-mediation.com,
davidsemple@core-mediation.com
Journal
Mediation
People do turn to family law because they have
problems to sort out.They will usually be trying to cope
with significant change. In many cases this will not be of
their choosing. If so, a legal adviser is likely to be seem as
part of a very unwelcome new dimension.The information
and advice provided may well be constructive and
appropriate within the context of the changes but still
tainted by association.
Even if the client is bringing about the changes by
initiating the separation or divorce he or she may not
have foreseen that part of the package was to expose
his or her aspirations to the light of family law.Very few
people find it easy to yield up privacy and control over
decision-making to a stranger.
A very helpful book “The Trusted Advisor” (Maister,
Green & Gailford, Simon & Schuster ISBN 074320963X)
makes the point that it is not enough for a professional
to be right: an adviser’s job is to be helpful. Giving correct
information is essential but not sufficient.
Mediation can help foster a relationship between client
and legal adviser, which the client will perceive as helpful.
In the first place, suggesting the option of mediation
provides a client with the opportunity of as much selfdetermination
as is possible. A mediator is a catalyst, not
a referee or adjudicator. Clients using mediation are
provided with a structure for discussion and exchange
of information.They are helped to use the opportunity
to look at possibilities rather than engage in
unhelpful dialogue.They are not told what to do.
If the client elects not to pursue mediation then
the involvement of an advising lawyer to negotiate
or litigate is a matter of choice rather
than imposition.
There are obviously circumstances which
would preclude using mediation. It
would not be an appropriate step if
there were a history of violence or
intimidation in the relationship sufficient
to prevent a client being or
feeling safe enough to explore possibilities
in the presence of their
partner. In that case, the legal
framework should offer a welcome
and reassuring buffer.
In very many cases, however, mediation
is a possibility which should be
considered. Clients can be told that for
LET MEDIATION
take the strain
CONSUMERS see law as a “distress purchase”. It would be unrealistic
to expect clients to regard family law as fun but there
is a way of allowing it to be seen as part of the solution rather than part of the problem.
Anne H Dick and Ewan A Malcolm recommend using mediation to resolve family law disputes
and outline how solicitors can go about referring clients to mediation
part of the process of negotiation a
couple can use a mediator to
assemble information, explore
common ground and look for
mutually acceptable solutions. Some
clients will respond positively and
be relieved to learn decisions can
be tackled in this way. Some clients
may be wary and wish to be reassured
that mediators are complementary
rather than alternatives to
advising solicitors. Some clients will
know immediately that mediation is
not for them.
Those clients who decide to use
mediation will still need important
input from advising solicitors.
Mediation is complementary to, not
instead of, legal advice.Those clients
who decide not to use mediation
will be reassured that their legal
adviser offered impartial information
rather than pursuing his or her
own agenda.
The second way mediation can
provide a helpful input is for advising
solicitors to combine mediation
skills with legal knowledge to allow
valuable advice and information to
be absorbed and used as part of a
problem-solving process. Mediation
skills make it possible to build a
relationship of trust with the client,
to have a structured approach to
the steps which have to be taken
and to create a climate which
encourages solutions to emerge.
Information is an essential building
block in negotiation but by itself will
never deliver the answer. How
people feel about a situation is a
crucial factor and if ignored, can
block or distort negotiations. How
and when information is made
available can also be pivotal.
Mediation training can give an
insight into the power and importance
of paying attention to clients,
of listening as well as speaking and
of asking the right questions as well
as providing the right answers. It
underlines the significance of the
appropriate use of language. It
emphasises the need to clarify and
summarise. It fosters the use of
planning and time keeping. While
mediation is rooted in co-operation
and a search for consensus, this is to
be achieved with professionalism
and accuracy. Mediation training is a
rigorous process but rewarding for
parties and practitioners.
So what is involved if your client
chooses to use mediation or if you
chose to do mediation training?
Referring to mediation
There are two organisations in
Scotland offering family mediation.
Family Mediation Scotland has affiliated
services in regions cross the
country. Most FM mediators, who
are trained and subject to careful
supervision, take on cases after a
separate intake meeting with each
party. Sessions are usually free
Mediation training can give an insight into
the power and importance of paying
attention to clients
continued on next page
Journal
Mediation
The mediator makes full use of collaborative skills to encourage
parties away from positional bargaining
except for All Issues Mediation, where sessional fees
apply. They will only deal with cases where the parties
have children under the age of 16 years. Some services
also offer mediation on financial as well as child related
issues. In addition, FM services do important work in
the provision of contact centres and other initiatives to
support children through the difficult period of family
breakdown. To contact the local service call FMS on
0131 220 1610.
CALM is the organisation set up and run by
solicitors who are accredited by the Law
Society of Scotland as Family Law
Mediators. All CALM members are experienced
family lawyers who have and
continue to undergo extensive mediation
training. To refer a case to a CALM
mediator, simply call or write to one of
the mediators in your area (there are
over 55 practising members
around Scotland). If a recommendation
would be helpful,
contact CALM’s regional
convenor listed on the
freephone number 0800
9150080
It is important that both
parties are willing to attend
mediation and that funding
has been clarified at the
time of making the referral.
CALM mediators usually
charge around about the
recommended Law
Society General Table
hourly rate. If your
client is on Advice and
Assistance or Legal
Aid it is important
to get authority in
advance as
payment for this
expenditure can
only be made as
an outlay on the
advising solicitors
account.
The Scottish
Legal Aid Board
will usually grant
sanction for cover
for the cost of half of four
sessions each of two
hours long.
The CALM mediator will
send out an initial referral form
for each party to complete
before the first meeting
along with a letter (which
parties will be asked to
sign) explaining the guidelines and process of mediation.
Each session will usually last no more than two hours –
any longer can become counter productive as even the
most amicable separating couple can find these conversations
hard going.
At the first meeting the parties work with the mediator
to set the agenda for their assisted negotiations, prioritising
their various issues.Then they start gathering the
necessary information. As both undertake to make full
financial disclosure, the mediator can help, using lists and
additional questionnaires to collect together all the
details of matrimonial assets and liabilities required along
with appropriate vouching. Sometimes parties ask their
lawyers to help with this process.
Usually at the second or third meeting it helps to
tabulate information, by pulling together the numbers
and issues on a flipchart. Then, and only then, the
process can move to the generation of options. The
mediator makes full use of collaborative skills to encourage
parties away from positional bargaining. Legal
advisers can help by discussing a range of possible desirable
outcomes so that the clients’ expectations are realistic
and manageable.
Options are explored without fear of commitment,
developed and then reality tested. If they are mutually
acceptable they can become proposals. Often, the
CALM mediator is asked to produce a Mediation
Summary detailing these proposals and outline the
background discussions leading up to the formulation of
the proposals.Also, often an Open Summary of Financial
Information is produced so both parties and their
advisers can use this disclosed information in whatever
further process they require.
Mediation Training
All CALM members have undergone a foundation
six day training course lead by the internationally
renowned Family Mediation Trainer Lisa Parkinson, who
is CALM’s Director of Mediation Training. CALM would
like to hear from appropriately experienced candidates
interested in such a course as soon as possible. Anyone
who would like to know more about family mediation
foundation training should contact Rhona Cameron at
Robson McLean, 28 Abercromby Place, Edinburgh
(0131 556 0556).
CALM members require to continue to do eight hours
mediation and nine hours family law training along with
one co-mediation and an observed session on which a
trained assessor reports to the Law Society accreditation
panel, annually.The benefits of CALM membership
are that there is a tremendous network of similarly
committed and trained colleagues throughout Scotland
all focused on developing practice in this wonderfully
demanding area of work
Anne H Dick is a partner with Anne Hall Dick & Co in Glasgow
and Ewan A Malcolm is a partner with Drummond Miller WS in
Edinburgh. Both work together as skills trainers for lawyers.
Journal
Adjudication
CONSTRUCTING AN
adjudicated settlement
While mediation is perhaps the most fashionable form of alternative dispute resolution, adjudication is
now increasingly the option of first resort to resolve construction disputes, writes Murray Shaw
IN July 1994 Sir Michael Latham published his report entitled “Constructing the Team”.
This was the final report of the snappily entitled “Government/Industry Review of Procurement
and Contractual Arrangements in the UK Construction Industry”.This report followed on from
a Government/industry review of the construction process.
.In the report Sir Michael and his committee came
forward with numerous recommendations. In the
foreword there was a specific warning against “cherry
picking” parts of the package. Despite this clear warning
the government chose to ignore large sections of Sir
Michael’s report when framing the Housing Grants,
Construction and Regeneration Act 1996.This Act dealt
with a number of disparate matters but Part II of the Act
dealt with construction contracts. This part of the Act
incorporated provisions to define what constitutes a
construction contract and provides for such contracts to
include a right to stage payments and a final date for
payment, prohibits conditional payment arrangements,
makes a provision for a right to suspend performance in
the event of non payment and most significantly creates
a mandatory right to refer disputes to adjudication.
Adjudication is in effect intended to be an interim resolution
of the position pending final determination (unless
otherwise settled) by the courts or in arbitration. For a
while there was considerable uncertainty about
whether Part II of the Act would ever be implemented,
though that finally happened on 1 May 1998.
Prior to Part II coming into effect it was generally
thought the provisions in relation to adjudication would
have the most significant effect. By way of example the
then named Official Referees Court in England (which
principally deals with construction disputes) set up
procedures to deal with disputes arising from the adjudication
process in anticipation that a significant number
of referrals to adjudication would be made and that
these referrals would result in early and numerous legal
disputes. In fact adjudication was very slow to get going.
The Adjudication Reporting Centre at Glasgow
Caledonian University published a report in August of
last year which inter alia commented upon the trends in
respect of adjudication.While the report acknowledged
that some care had to be used in respect of the data
available the 21 Adjudicator nominating bodies (see
below) had appointed 187 Adjudicators in the twelve
months from May 1998, 259 in the next four months
and 743 in the next six months.This raw data is consistent
with practical experience which suggests that after
a slow start in the course of the latter part of 1999 and
throughout 2000 there was a greater willingness to
pursue disputes by way of adjudication.The report from
Glasgow Caledonian University suggests that the
majority of Adjudication Notices are served by subcontractors
and again this is consistent with experience.
In the 1980s and 1990s the phenomenon of “subbiebashing”
was well known. It appears that sub-contractors
have adopted the Act enthusiastically with a view to
re-asserting their rights.
The willingness to serve Adjudication Notices has
resulted from the robust attitude of the Courts both in
England and Scotland to support the adjudication
process. In the first significant reported decision Macob
Civil Engineering v Morrison Construction [1999] BLR
93 the Court decided that a decision which was
properly made by an adjudicator, even if challenged, was
a decision for the purposes of the Act and therefore fell
to be enforced.This early approach has been echoed in
subsequent decisions. The Courts have indicated that
they are willing to uphold an Adjudicator’s decision
despite the fact that mistakes may have been made.The
Court of Appeal in England in the case of Bouygues
(UK) Limited v Dahl Jensen (UK) Limited [2000] BLR
522 upheld the decision of an Adjudicator in principle
even although the Adjudicator had failed to take into
account the position in respect of retention. Had he
done so rather than there being a significant award in
respect of the party referring the dispute to adjudication
there would have been a significant sum due to the
responding party.The Court’s view was that the award
still fell to be enforced because to do otherwise would
in effect be contrary to the intention of the Act.
Recent challenges to the decisions of Adjudicators have
concentrated on the issue of (a) jurisdiction and (b)
whether the rules of natural justice have been breached
- in other words does the Adjudicator have the requisite
jurisdiction to make a decision and has he in any
Journal
Adjudication
way mis-used that jurisdiction. Inevitably the Human
Rights Act has been relied upon to challenge the
adjudication process – so far without any significant
effect. In at least two decisions – Elaney Contracts v
The Vestry and Austin Hall Building Limited v Buckland
Securities the High Court in England has ruled that
Article 6 is not applicable to the adjudication process.
It appears that reference to issues such as jurisdiction
are made in an attempt to avoid the robust approach
the Court has taken to the enforcement of awards
made by adjudications.
A construction contract requires to include adjudication
provisions which comply with the Act, failing which The
Scheme for Construction Contracts set out in a
Statutory Instrument applies. There are separate
schemes for England and Scotland.The Act provides that
the Adjudicator must reach a decision within 28 days or
such longer period as may be permitted by the parties.
The referring party has unilateral discretion to extend
this period by 14 days. Any further extension requires
the consent of both parties.While the Adjudicator is only
making an interim decision that decision is to bind
both parties until the outcome of any further
arbitration or court proceedings and may be of
considerable practical effect.The parties may resolve
the dispute in the meantime. The Adjudicator’s
decision therefore may be of considerable significance
and may indeed provide the basis for resolution
of disputes which previously would have ended
up in litigation or arbitration.There is no financial limit
to the level of claims referred to adjudication and
adjudications commonly relate to six figure
sums. Despite the short timetable for
reaching a decision the disputes
which may be referred to an
Adjudicator are not restricted to
only disputes about payment. Any
dispute may be referred to an
Adjudicator to the extent that it arises
out of a Construction Contract.
The report from Glasgow
Caledonian University referred
to above highlights the fact
the majority of the
disputes referred to
Adjudicators do
simply concern
payment. Commonly disputes are also referred which
relate to “loss and expense claims”, defective work,
claims for extension of time and claims about the alleged
wrongful determination of employment in terms of a
Building Contract.All of these disputes may raise complicated
issues of law and fact and challenge the ability of
any Adjudicator to make a decision within 28 days.
Experience to date suggests that surveyors are leading
the way in dealing with adjudications closely followed by
engineers.As many of the disputes referred to adjudication
can raise complicated issues of law it is not
uncommon for Adjudicators to seek independent legal
advice. The process is not as formalised as that which
often applies in arbitrations in Scotland where a legal
clerk is appointed who in addition to providing the
Arbiter with legal advice deals with procedure. In adjudication
the normal practice is for the Adjudicator to
continue to deal with the administration of the dispute
with the role of the independent lawyer being to
express a view in respect of the legal issues.
There is no financial limit to the level of claims
referred to adjudication
In the event that a dispute is to be
referred to adjudication and if the
identity of the Adjudicator cannot
be agreed between the parties
then an application requires to be
made for the appointment of an
Adjudicator.The Adjudicator has to
be appointed within a seven day
period. It is still relatively rare for a
contract to specifically name an
Adjudicator. Many contracts do
however provide that an application
for the appointment of an
Adjudicator shall be made to a
specific body identified in the
relevant provision within the
contract. In the event that no such
provision is made then application
requires to be made to “an adjudicator
nominating body” to select a
person to act as an adjudicator. An
adjudicator nominating body is
defined to mean “a body (not
being an actual person and not
being a party to the dispute) which
holds itself out publicly as a body
which will select an adjudicator
when requested to do so by a
referring party”.
The Law Society of Scotland is an
adjudicator nominating body. To
the best of the writer’s knowledge
the Law Society of Scotland is not
identified in any form of contract
as the body who must nominate
an adjudicator. The Society therefore
is in a position to appoint
either where the contract is silent
on who is to appoint the
Adjudicator or the contract does
not comply with the Act, the
consequence then being that the
Scheme applies.
The Society maintains a list of solicitors
who are prepared to act as
Adjudicators – all of whom (including
the writer) are accredited as
specialists in Construction Law.This
year the Society has appointed
adjudicators in five disputes. The
fact the Society has been called
upon in this way may reflect the
fact that parties involved in
adjudications are now raising what
are essentially “legal issues” (such as
whether the arbiter has jurisdiction
to deal with a dispute by, for
example, contending the contract
does not relate to “construction
operations within the ambit of the
Act) with a view to avoiding the
consequences of the process.There
is no reason why the use of solicitors
as adjudicators should be
limited to situations where only
legal issues are involved. Many
technically qualified adjudicators
take legal advice. It would equally
be open to legally qualified adjudicators
to take technical advice
should that be necessary. Members
of the profession should therefore
consider whether to seek the
appointment of members of the
Society’s panel as adjudicators or
indeed where appropriate to
identify in a contract the Society as
the body who shall appoint the
adjudicator.
While adjudication was slow to take
off it is commonly resorted to now.
There is an ongoing review by the
Government into the operation of
the Act. The initial report suggests
that slight amendments to the Act
may be necessary. There is clearly
no lack of commitment to the
adjudication process however.
Before the Act was implemented it
was suggested that the right to adjudicate
would reduce the number of
disputes proceeding to arbitration
or litigation. It is too early to come
to a view about that. If that is the
position then despite the fact Sir
Michael’s report was not implemented
in full his objective of
reducing adversarial attitudes in the
construction industry will have been
achieved.
Murray Shaw has been a partner with
Biggart Baillie since1987. He is head of
their construction and development unit,
specialising in planning and construction
and is accredited by the Law Society of
Scotland in both areas.
There is no reason why the use of
solicitors as adjudicators should be limited
Journal This month,Advocate Derek O’Carroll focuses on websites concerned
with ADR and mediation, while below we signpost where to find
out more about mediation ADR Websites
Speed ◆◆◆◆
Usefulness to practitioners ◆◆◆◆.
Usefulness to non-practitioners ◆◆◆◆
Site design ◆◆◆◆◆
Ease of use ◆◆◆◆◆
Updating frequency ◆◆◆
site of the month:
Websites
Two of the leading UK/ European mediation
and accreditation bodies:
ADR Group: www.adrgroup.co.uk
Centre for Dispute Resolution:
www.cedr.co.uk
An imaginative and informative US site which
provides in-depth articles and research on
mediation: www.mediate.com
An enjoyable UK site which also points to
many areas to explore further:
www.consensus.uk.com
Books
The Third Side
by Wm Ury (of “Getting to Yes”).
Penguin ISBN 0-14-029634-4
How to avoid destructive conflict - at home,
in schools, at work and in the world by involving
a third party.
The Magic of Conflict
by Thomas Crum Simon and Schuster
ISBN 0-671-6836-6
Conflict is not good or bad. It just is.
This is a strategy, based on Aikido, to resolve
conflicts by turning conflict from a damaging
activity to a creative one.
ADR: Principles and Practice
by Brown and Marriott. Sweet & Maxwell.
A comprehensive treatment of all forms of ADR
focusing on mediation, negotiation, med-arb and
mini trial, showing that as means of dispute
resolution, they can stand alone as alternatives
to adjudication. Every law firm engaged in
contentious matters in jurisdictions where ADR is
used will find this text useful. Provides clear
guidance on the practical aspects of using ADR.
Disputes without Tears;Alternative methods of
dispute resolution in the construction sector
John Burkett/ RIBA Publications
ISBN 1 85946 076 3
A straightforward overview of the architect's active
role in selecting the most appropriate from of
agreement and method of dispute resolution.
A working reference for all professionals practising
in the construction sector.
A Handbook of Dispute Resolution
– ADR in Action
Karl Mackie: Routledge
Just what it says from the Chief Executive of
CEDR and one of the most experienced
mediators in the UK.
The ADR Practice Guide,
Commercial Dispute Resolution
by Mackie, Mills, Marsh and Allen
Butterworths ISBN 0-406-91057 X
The Trusted Advisor
Maister, Green & Gailford, Simon & Schuster
ISBN 074320963X
Contact
Core Mediation,
22 Fountainhall Rd, Edinburgh EH9 2LW
Tel 0131 667 8833
Core can be contacted through its
administrator, Rachel Vellacott, at
rachel.vellacott@core-mediation.com
Family Mediation Scotland
Tel: 0131 220 1610
CALM
0800 9150080
For details about foundation training
contact Rhona Cameron at Robson McLean
Tel: 0131 556 0556
Mediation Bureau, Mediators and Trainers
Tel: 0131 535 1045
The Association of Mediators
Tel: 01506 842 736
Centre for Dispute Resolution
Princes House, 95 Gresham St,
London EC2V 7NA
Tel: 0207 600 5000
ADR Group
Grove House, Grove Road, Redland,
Bristol BS6 6UN
Tel: 0117 946 7180
www.consensus.uk.com
A lot of thought has gone into this site hosted
by this organisation based in Norwich. Its site
map reveals a well thought-out and comprehensible
site which is easy to navigate. It has
loads of good quality information on mediation
and mediators. It, like many other sites, has a list
of mediators (mostly in England) complete with
their CVs. The mediators are all certified at a
particular level. In addition to the usual
information about mediation, there is a glossary,
case studies, extracts from the English legislation
relating to ADR. Consensus also offers a
mediation service including information about
fees and how the service operates. All very
clear and easy to comprehend. The user can
start the ball rolling online. Unlike many other
sites, it is happy to provide a list of links to other
organisations providing ADR and mediation
services and so is a useful starting point for a
wider search for ADR resources on the web.
There’s lots more including a section on
mediator jokes (no, really: How many mediators
does it take to change a light bulb...) some of
which are even funny. A well-designed and easy
to use site. Great.
Subjective Rating (where 5* is excellent and 1*
is poor and no stars indicate that that
category has not been assessed)
useful contacts:
Journal
www.adrgroup.co.uk
The Adrgroup, based in Bristol, is
one of the larger organisations
concerned with ADR and mediation.This
well-designed site provides
a wealth of information and
resources in this area. The home
page allows the user to go to the
family mediation part of the site or
to the ADR part. Within the ADR
part, there are extensive sections
on the theory, history and practice
of ADR with worked examples.
There is a facility whereby the user
can refer his/her own case to ADR
by email. Alternatively, contact can
be made with the group in the
traditional way. The Adrgroup is
very strong on training and offers
lots of courses and seminars which
appear to take place largely in
England. However, there appears to
be an Adrgroup presence in
Aberdeen and Edinburgh. Several
pages deal with non-family mediation,
theory and practice. Again,
training is offered, at a price, either
in groups or by distance. There is
also a news section and a members
only section with the usual mixture
of bulletin boards and information
for members. The family mediation
part of the site is less well developed
but useful and informative
nonetheless. It contains a detailed
list of family mediators, all based in
England and Wales, with contact
details and a little about the
mediator’s background. A useful site
to get a grip on the issues or if you
need to find ADR people or mediators
in England or abroad.
Subjective Rating
Speed ◆◆◆◆
Usefulness to practitioners ◆◆◆◆
Usefulness to non-practitioners ◆◆◆◆
Site design ◆◆◆◆
Ease of use ◆◆◆◆
Updating frequency ◆◆
www.cedr.co.uk
The Centre for Effective Dispute
Resolution is an independent
non-profit making organisation
supported by multinational business
and various professional bodies. Its
website provides some useful
resources. Chief among these is a
range of useful looking style agreements
in pdf and Word format
which can be adapted for use if the
user has the appropriate software.
The library also contains a few
dozen articles about the use of
mediation in a variety of business
contexts as well as some useful
information on the use of mediation
and ADR in England. The site also
hosts pages concerned with CEDR’s
own dispute resolution service:
CEDR Solve which is claimed to be
the UK’s leading commercial mediation
provider. Unfortunately, the
information provided about CEDR
Solve is fairly brief and the
resources provided on site are very
limited. CEDR does offer training as
well although not as much as some
other providers. Booking online is
possible. There is a section of the
site for members only.
Subjective Rating
Speed ◆◆◆
Usefulness to practitioners ◆◆◆
Usefulness to non-practitioners ◆◆◆
Site design ◆◆◆
Ease of use ◆◆◆◆
Updating frequency ◆◆
www.mediate.com
This site claims to be the most
visited dispute resolution site on the
Web. It is heavily American based.
The site is large and is designed by
one of the Mediate team whose
philosophy of web design is stated
as “Content is king. People are
looking for information. Give to
them. Make it simple and intuitive”.
An admirable viewpoint and one
that this reviewer wishes was more
widely shared. So how well does
this site do? Locating mediators is
straightforward: the search engine
allows search under discipline,
country or name. You can then
email or phone (although the user
will have to decide for him/herself
whether the mediator is appropriately
qualified).The site offers a web
design facility orientated to ADR
practitioners ($600 p.a.) and other
associated website services. There
are over 800 articles on every
aspect of mediation which can be
searched by topic or through free
text search.The practitioner section
contains loads of news and information
about ADR in specific sectors.
Practitioners can engage in discussion
areas free and also get emails
to alert you to a new contribution.
If you fancy getting trained US style:
there are lots of courses to go to.
All in all, while the site is not exactly
pretty, it is true to its philosophy
Subjective Rating
Speed ◆◆
Usefulness to practitioners ◆◆◆◆
Usefulness to non-practitioners ◆◆◆◆
Site design ◆◆◆◆
Ease of use ◆◆◆◆
Updating frequency ◆◆◆
ADR Websites
Journal
Mediation
“The adversarial nature of proceedings in court means
parties often become entrenched, giving rise to bitterness.
After all is said and done those involved must get
on with the situation they are left with following divorce.
Mediation can assist in reducing aggression between
parties, and this is particularly important where children
are involved.”
Mediation can allow them to reach a compromise in the
best interests of children, who are otherwise all too
often dragged in to an adversarial case, with the risk that
each parent may ask them to take sides.
“The interests of children are paramount, and it can be
difficult for a sheriff to know where these interests lie
within the parameters of what he or she can assess
within the framework of formalised court procedures.
“Parties are often bitter about each other, the case may
give rise to strong feelings and parties may resort to
saying things to strengthen their own case. Sheriffs must
make a decision in what are often acrimonious cases and
will usually try to retain some form of contact between
the children and both parents, and so it’s better to ask
them to go away and co-operate as much as they can.”
In practice, Sheriff Sheehan will ask at an early stage of
the case, if not in chambers then at a Child Welfare
Hearing or Options hearing, if there is any possibility of
mediation.
It’s an approach that seems to go down well among
practitioners operating in Falkirk Sheriff Court. “Most
solicitors in Falkirk have similar views, and prefer to see
mediators try to assist in resolving cases.”
Gordon Addison, Secretary of the local Faculty, says there
is a saying at Falkirk “has this case been Calmed yet”.
“ The Court refers as many family cases to mediation as
possible not because of some sort of altruistic approach,
but because it has a high success rate of resolving matrimonial
disputes at an early stage, which must be better
for clients.”
So why is Falkirk the mediation centre of Scotland?
“It’s a combination of the type of solicitor we have, in
particular good quality family lawyers and an enlightened
bench who have been keen to give it a try and make it
work”, said Gordon Addison.
Anecdotally, 75-80% of cases are settled without
recourse to proof, or at least some of the contentious
issues are resolved and don’t come before the sheriff.
The advantages are obvious for all concerned.
“If it goes through as undefended, the divorce will generally
be quicker, less unpleasant and aggressive, and might
be cheaper”, said Sheriff Sheehan.
Mediation can’t be imposed and isn’t appropriate in
every situation, where for example, there is an allegation
of violence.
“If a case is mediated through CALM or FMS, the advantage
is that parties can take as long as they need and are
not restrained by formalities of court procedure and
language.”
Before referring parties to mediation the sheriff will
explain the procedure involved, whereby after the
mediator is appointed, they will be interviewed to
explore the issues in dispute. Each party will retain his or
her own legal adviser and needn’t agree to anything
without consulting them. If they do reach agreement, a
joint minute can be submitted. He stresses throughout
that it is an optional process; parties are not bound to
accept anything during mediation and that if nothing can
be agreed the case will proceed in court in the normal
manner.
Sheriff Sheehan would also like to see mediation introduced
in other types of civil litigation such as small claim
or summary cause actions and even in some ordinary
actions where, for example, the sum in dispute is only
marginally above the £1,500 limit.
“It seems absurd to litigate in court where the legal
expenses can quickly and easily escalate to a level far in
excess of the sum sued for.”
But isn’t it in the profession’s interests to stimulate
litigation and bolster their fee income?
“I don’t think solicitors are influenced by fear of reduced
fees. In my experience they are dedicated to seeking the
best solution for their client.”
Gordon Addison also rejects the notion of solicitors
having an incentive to keep on litigating.
“ It’s wrong to criticise a successful process because it
might reduce the fee.The profession had a fear of ADR
but people still have to see their solicitor for legal advice
and if you look at it from the profession’s perspective,
mediation in fact involves three solicitors, not just two.”
While Falkirk Sheriff Court is the hub of fam
of working proved a learning experience for
Roger Mackenzie reports.
The Falkirk experience
At Falkirk, Sheriff Sheehan and
his colleagues preside over
a court where mediation
is encouraged as a route to
resolving family disputes.
Her desire to learn more about what makes a
good mediator led her recently to Allentown in
Pennsylvania where she met with Judge Edward
Cahn, former Chief Judge of Pennsylvania and a
man of such local renown that the town’s new
courthouse is set to be named in his honour.
“I made contact with Judge Cahn by e-mail in my
bid to seek out a real, live American mediator
from whom I could learn a little of American
practice.”
Judge Cahn’s own mediation practice came about
when as a judge he had always been conscious of
the unmitigated expense litigation creates for all
parties, preferring to adopt a pro-active role with
parties to litigation, often assisting in the resolution
of disputes in chambers rather than from the
bench.
“The process of mediation described by Edward
Cahn is quite different from that which I have
experienced under the auspices of CALM”, said
Susie Clark.
“Under the CALM umbrella, parties are brought
into the mediation process fully aware of the
confidentiality of the procedure and reassured
that the role of the mediator is entirely independent.
Both parties are advised not to communicate
privately with the mediator and the mediation
process itself takes place in plenary sessions.
Edward Cahn described similar confidentiality but
designed his role as something more akin to that
of facilitator than mediator.
“He always ensured that he was well briefed on
the details of the dispute and brought parties to a
common meetinghouse in the first instance but
not housed within the same meeting rooms.
Breakfast, coffee and other facilities are provided
with a view to encouraging a relaxed atmosphere
and, when the mood is right, Edward Cahn begins
to shuffle between the meeting rooms clarifying
the positions of both parties. He enjoys a full
understanding from each party and takes on
board any editing each party wishes to impose
when presenting their position to the other.”
Susie Clark diverges from Cahn when describing
his view that “the art of mediation was essentially
a gift”.
“In my experience mediators are trained rather
than just utilising a natural gift.Training allows for
performance to be assessed rationally. Multiple
layers of skills are required to mediate successfully.
The training I have received from CALM provides
an excellent training base, the sessions keeping
you focused on your strengths and weaknesses.
There may be some element of a natural predisposition
to mediation. Certainly I’ve always found
it more rewarding to achieve a settlement by
mediating rather than litigating.”
She rejects any notion that mediation is somehow
alien to the solicitor’s traditional role.
“The old-fashioned notion that a solicitor would
be more of a general agent acting in the best
interests of the client would, I think, have seen
them acting naturally as mediators.
“There are situations where it is inappropriate,
but it’s important not to see the client’s problem
in a vacuum and not just offer cold black letter law
advice.”
While America is often regarded as a highly litigious
society, Susie Clark’s impression is of a
system which is more “future focused”.
“The issue there is not who is right and who is
wrong but rather ‘how can I move forward from
here, maximising circumstances for me’.
“ Falkirk seems progressive in adopting pro-mediation
policies but other sheriff courts and solicitors
are not pro-active in fostering mediation as a
solution.
“Mediation can be used either as a first or last
port of call where there is no other means of
overcoming an impasse. Just getting clients to talk
precipitates some change in their position.
Mediation is an environment where people learn
how to communicate and look at the other point
of view.
“Where a couple are separating or divorcing,
whatever the substantive reasons, it will also be as
a result of a breakdown in communication, and
there is a need to re-establish a means of communication.
“Some use mediation as a stepping stone whereas
for others it will resolve issues and they can then
go back to not speaking!”
Her experience is that some solicitors in this
country still don’t really know what mediation is.
She would reassure the profession that mediation
won’t threaten profits.
“Solicitors are subconsciously mediators. The
introduction of strict conflict of interest rules has
probably inhibited lawyers’ natural inclination to
act as a mediator.
“In many ways it’s easier for solicitors to opt for
an aggressive court room battle but we only ever
have a 50% chance of success and a defeated
client is unlikely to come back. In my experience,
both parties feel positive after successful
mediation.These clients are more likely to have a
favourable impression of the service their solicitor
can offer and come back with more business.
The best marketing is success together with
word of mouth.
“Edward Cahn was a huge inspiration. He
suggested that mediation will become a more
readily recognised service with the general public.
I hope that will be true and that the service will
be seen as one that solicitors do well.”
ily mediation in Scotland, the “future focused” American way
solicitor mediator Susie Clark.
Learning from across the Atlantic
Angus solicitor Susie Clark
has developed a practice
which places mediation
at its core.
While America is often regarded as a highly litigious society,
impression is of a system which is more “future focused”
Journal
Regulatory Timetable
The Financial Services Authority (FSA) will assume its full
powers as the single regulator for regulated activities
(mainstream investment business) in the United
Kingdom on 1st December 2001.The FSA’s powers are
set out in the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.
The Act provides that no person may carry on a
regulated activity unless that person is an authorised
person or an exempt person.Authorisation to carry out
regulated activities will principally come from the FSA.
The main exemption arises when a person is an
appointed representative of another authorised person.
The net effect of these provisions within the Act is that
if a firm of solicitors wishes to conduct regulated
activities it will have to be authorised by the FSA.
At midnight on 30th November 2001 the Society will
cease to be a Recognised Professional Body and will no
longer have the power to authorise its firms for
regulated activities.
The Society will have residual powers to licence firms to
conduct what will be referred to as incidental investment
business, but there are strict statutory provisions which
will govern the manner by which such incidental work
must be carried out.
The activities which constitute regulated activities are
listed not in the Act but in the Financial Services and
Markets Act 2000 (Regulated Activities) Order 2001
(SI 2001 No.544) (“The Regulated Activities Order”).
A firm which conducts regulated activities without FSA
authorisation will be committing a criminal offence
under Section 23 of the Act.
The Regulated Activities Order also sets out a number
of exclusions which will not be regulated activities nor
will these exclusions be considered to be incidental
investment business. A significant exclusion is contained
within Article 33 of the Order which allows introductions
to be made by a professional firm to an independent
financial adviser. Detailed conditions often apply to
the exclusions and the legislation should be carefully
considered. Firms are therefore faced with four options
under the new regime (not all of which are exclusive)
and these are as follows:
● Direct authorisation by the FSA.
● Licensed to undertake Incidental Investment
Business by the Society.
● Acting as an introducer to an IFA (this option
can also be undertaken in conjunction with options
1 or 2).
● None of the above.
Each of the three main options is now considered in
more detail.
Direct Authorisation by the FSA
In late August/early September currently authorised
firms will receive from the FSA an opt-in notice and
information pack.The opt-in notice must be completed
and returned to the FSA by 31st October 2001 if a firm
is to be authorised by the FSA for regulated activities at
the start date of the new system. It is anticipated that the
FSA will be charging firms a periodic fee which will be
based on the scope of the firm’s regulated activities and
a measure of the size or extent of its regulated activities,
for example, the number of approved persons.
A firm which is authorised by the FSA should also, under
the FSA’s regulatory regime authorisation, be able to
undertake most types of incidental investment business
work.
The principal activities which are classified under the
Regulated Activities Order and for which FSA authorisation
may be required are as follows:
● Effecting and carrying out contracts of insurance.
● Dealing in investments as principals.
● Dealing in investments as agents.
● Arranging deals in investments.
● Managing investments.
● Safeguarding and administering investments.
● Sending dematerialised instructions.
● Establishing etc. a collective investment scheme.
● Establishing etc. a stakeholder pension scheme.
● Advising on investments.
● Advising on syndicate participation at Lloyd’s,
managing the underwriting capacity of a Lloyd’s
syndicate and arranging deals in contracts of
insurance written at Lloyd’s.
● Entering as a provider into a funeral plan contract.
● Administering and entering into a regulated
mortgage contract as a lender.
Countdown TO N2
David Cullen, Director of Financial Services at The Law Society of Scotland, provides an
overview of the new investment business regime under the Financial Services Authority
Financial
Services
Journal
Financial
Services
The Regulated Activities Order then
proceeds to define investments to
include:
A deposit, rights under a contract of
insurance, shares, instruments
creating or acknowledging indebtedness,
government and public securities,
instruments giving entitlement
to investments, certificates representing
certain securities, units in a
collective investment scheme, rights
under a stakeholder pension
scheme, options, futures, contracts
for differences etc., Lloyd’s syndicate
capacity and syndicate membership,
funeral plan contracts, regulated
mortgage contracts and rights to or
interests in investments.
For each of the activities which are
defined as regulated activities under
the Regulated Activities Order there
are a number of exclusions and one
of the exclusions is, as previously
mentioned, where an introduction is
made with a view to the provision of
independent advice.
A firm which is already authorised
by the Society under the existing
regime will only be “grandfathered”
into the new FSA regime if it notifies
the FSA by 31st October 2001 that
it wishes to opt-in to direct FSA
authorisation using the FSA opt-in
notice. Once this process is
complete the FSA will, sometime
later, advise a firm of the scope of
business it will be permitted to
conduct.This will mirror the business
conducted under the Society’s
existing regime, although firms may
also be offered one or more
restricted alternatives, so as to
reflect the particular business they
have been carrying on or intend to
carry on. The FSA will also seek
identification and confirmation from
a firm of the individuals who will
actually conduct regulated activities.
Such individuals will be referred to
as approved persons, and the FSA
must be notified if they carry out
specified functions known as
controlled functions. The FSA has
identified twenty seven functions as
controlled functions but these can
be broadly divided into three
categories which are:
● Functions where individuals
have a significant influence on
the conduct of the authorised
person’s affairs, so far as relating
to the regulated activity.
● Dealing with customers of the
authorised person in a manner
substantially connected with the
carrying on of the regulated
activity.
● Dealing with the property of
customers of the authorised
person in a manner substantially
connected with the
carrying on of the regulated
activity.
Any individual who is currently
licensed by the Society to conduct
investment business and who will
carry out a controlled function in
the new regime will not need to
apply for approval but will be grandfathered
into the new regime. A
firm must, once it has decided to
opt-in to the FSA regime, complete
a list for the FSA of those individuals
who will be undertaking controlled
functions, to allow the grandfathering
of all such individuals.
Incidental Investment Business
Regime
The second option which is open to
a firm is that of a licence from the
Society to undertake incidental
investment business. A firm which
chooses this option cannot also be
directly authorised by the FSA. It is,
however, possible for a firm to have
an Incidental Investment Business
Licence and also act as an
introducer.
The Society will send out its application
forms together with information
packs on incidental investment
business at the end of August. The
application form for incidental
investment business must be
returned to the Society by 28th
September 2001 if a firm is to be
licensed for such work from the
start date of the new regime on 1st
December 2001. The charge which
the Society will make for such a
licence will be based on a flat fee per
firm and the number of individuals
within a firm who seek to undertake
incidental investment business work.
The incidental investment business
application form will ask firms to
identify all those solicitors and nonsolicitors
which the firm wishes to
be licensed for such work.
The Act, under Section 327, provides
the conditions which must be met if
a firm is to undertake incidental
investment business work (or
exempt regulated activities as
defined in the Act). The first
condition is that the work must be
incidental to the provision of another
professional service.This means that
a firm cannot have stand-alone incidental
investment business work.
Furthermore, a firm carrying on incidental
investment business work
must not hold itself out as carrying
on regulated activities. The Act also
provides that a firm undertaking incidental
investment business work
must not receive from a person
other than his/her client any
pecuniary award or other advantage,
for which the firm does not account
to its client. This means that any
commission arising from incidental
investment business work must
either be given to the client or,
where a fee is charged for the incidental
investment business work or
the professional services to which it
is attached, the fee must be reduced
by the amount of commission.There
is no prohibition under the Act
against firms charging fees for incidental
investment business work.
One of the difficulties which has not
been resolved is what activities
constitute incidental investment
business work as no definitions are
provided in either the Act or the
Regulated Activities Order. It is
easier, by considering the list of
activities previously stated under
Section 2 which will be regulated
activities, to be clear on what cannot
be conducted as incidental investment
business.
The following activities are, however,
some examples of what may constitute
incidental investment business:
● Arranging for the sale of shares
on the instructions of the
executors in an executry
without providing investment
advice.
● Arranging for the purchase of
shares for a trust on the
instructions of the trustees
without providing investment
advice.
● Discussing with a client advice
which has been provided by
Financial
Services
Journal
Incidental investment business work is restrictive in scope
and also by the manner in which it must be conducted
Summary of Options
● Direct Authorisation by the FSA – Complete and return the FSA’s opt-in notice to the FSA by 31st October 2001.
● Incidental Investment Business – Complete and return the Society’s application form to the Society by 28th September 2001.
● Act as an Introducer Only – No application form to be completed or returned.
● None of the Above.
another authorised person
(who takes full compliance
responsibility for that advice).
A firm may comment upon
such advice and, acting on the
client’s instructions, arrange
deals consequent upon it,
provided the firm does not
give an alternative product
recommendation to the client.
● A solicitor undertaking matrimonial
work can obtain the
advice of an IFA regarding the
matrimonial investment assets.
The solicitor may also seek the
IFA’s valuation of the assets
and the IFA’s advice on the
best ways of dealing with those
assets and the solicitors can
comment on such advice in
negotiating a financial
settlement in the matrimonial
dispute on the client’s
instructions.
● A solicitor who acts for an
estate or trust can hold investments
for the estate and trust
and also collect dividends.
which it must be conducted. The
restrictive nature of this type of
work is clearer when consideration
is given to the following list of
activities which are considered not
to be incidental investment business:
● Making markets in investments.
● Recommendation or arrangements
for a client to buy a
packaged product except
where the recommendation or
arrangement for such a
purchase is by means of an
assignment or the arrangement
is made as a result of a firm
managing assets due to it, or
one of its officers’ appointment
as a trustee, personal representative
or donee of a power of
attorney, or where the arrangement
is made on the basis that
the client is not relying on the
firm as to the merits or suitability
of the transaction.
● A firm must not recommend a
client to buy or dispose of any
rights or interests in a personal
pension scheme except where
Furthermore, firms relying on
conducting incidental investment
business or not carrying on
regulated activities at all will be
subject to the restriction on financial
promotion in Section 21 of the Act.
The FSA will provide guidance to
firms on this subject in order to
assist firms with their opt-in
decision.
Introductions
The Regulated Activities Order
provides a number of exclusions
which will not count as investment
business, whether mainstream or
incidental. One of the main exclusions
is contained within Article 33
of the Order which provides that a
firm may introduce a client to an IFA
and the firm may retain any
payment received from the organisation
to whom the introduction
was made. The firm making the
introduction must do no more than
bring together the investor and the
IFA firm to whom the introduction
is made. Furthermore, this
“introductory” option does not
necessarily allow a firm to market
the services of an IFA or other
authorised person.
There are several other exclusions
within the Regulated Activities
Order which do not amount to
either mainstream or incidental
investment business and these
include:
● The taking of a deposit if it is
received by a practising
solicitor acting in the course
of his/her profession.
● The provision of advice or the
making of arrangements in
relation to breakdown
insurance for cars.
● Making arrangements whose
sole purpose is the provision
of finance to enable a person
to buy, sell, subscribe for or
underwrite investments.
● Managing investments under a
power of attorney where all
routine day to day investment
decisions are taken by an
authorised person.
● Arrangements made by a
person acting as a trustee or
personal representative.
● Where another authorised
person advises a firm’s clients
on the disposal of their investments,
the firm may administer
the collection of the dividend
on the investments and
arrange for the sale of the
investments.
● A solicitor, at his/her own initiative,
can advise a client that the
investment advice or investment
arrangements provided
by another party do not
appear to be in the client’s
best interests and his/her client
should then seek mainstream
investment advice elsewhere.
● A solicitor acting for an estate
advises the sale of all investment
assets to pay for funeral
expenses and debts.
It can be seen from the types of
activities that may constitute
incidental investment business work
that this work is restrictive in its
scope and also in the manner in
the firm assumes on reasonable
grounds that the client is
not relying on the firm as to
the merits or suitability of the
transaction.
● The firm must not provide
advice or make arrangements
in relation to a pension transfer
or pension opt-out.
● Entering into a broker fund
arrangement.
● Act as a sponsor to an issue in
respect of securities to be
admitted for dealing on the
London Stock Exchange.
● Act as a nominated adviser to
an issue in respect of securities
to be admitted for dealing on
the Alternative Investment
Market.
● Act as a corporate adviser to
an application on behalf of a
company to join OFEX.
● Approving the financial
promotions (for example,
advertisements) of others.
Journal
IT
INTERNET DEFAMATION
– Motley fools rush in
Paul Motion considers Totalise Plc v Motley Fool Limited, which seems to set down a strict
requirement of disclosure if the interests of justice are served
A SMALL businessman who breeds and sells specialised animals quite legally, consulted us recently.
He was a sole trader, and in addition he had a holiday business linked to the animal operation.
Three years ago, not long after getting started, he’d had a run-in with one of his customers.The animal
had died soon after the sale. It was not clear whether this was due to poor handling by the purchaser or
a latent illness, but they both fell out over it at the time. Because the animals concerned are specialised,
only a small community of people in the United Kingdom is likely to be interested in them (or related
holidays) at any one time. Our client forgot about the incident and got on with establishing his business.
In June 2001 our client was horrified to discover that
three Internet chat groups - probably the only three in
the United Kingdom concerned with this type of animal
- had begun receiving defamatory e-mail postings,
harking back to the 1999 incident and effectively
accusing our client of sharp practice or fraud. The
posted e-mails made it clear that our client ought not to
be trusted and that no one should contemplate buying
animals from him. The consequences for our client’s
reputation and his business could hardly have been
more grave.
We were able fairly quickly to persuade the ISPs who
hosted the three chat groups to remove the defamatory
postings. This was done promptly as one might have
expected standing the outcome of Godfrey v Demon
Internet [1999] 4 All ER 342. There was, it seemed, no
doubt as to who was to blame for the e-mails, but here
we encountered a twist to the tale. As part of our
response we had also written to the English based email
provider. Their London solicitors informed us that
the e-mail account which had been used to spread the
defamatory statements to all the chat groups was not
registered in the name of the suspected defamer. This
was a surprise. There might be a second, unknown,
defender to consider. How was our client to
find out the identity of the person who
had been allowing the culprit
access to his (or her,
as it turned
out) e-mail account? Prior to February 2001, this task
might have proved insurmountable, or at least only
capable of being overcome after the expenditure of
large sums of money and court appearances. However,
the decision in Totalise plc v Motley Fool Ltd [TLR
15/3/2001 19th February 2001] now came to our aid.
The Totalise Case
Motley Fool Ltd is one of the best known websites in
the UK in relation to investment and share dealing
advice. In common with many other websites, the
Motley Fool Ltd site had a ‘discussion board’ where
investors could exchange chat, provide tips, and generally
talk about anything of relevance to online investment.
However, on one discussion board a large number
of defamatory remarks were posted about an ISP called
Totalise plc. Someone hiding behind the User Name
“Zeddust” had posted the comments. Motley Fool Ltd
agreed to remove the allegedly defamatory postings.
They went further and banned “Zeddust” from using its
site. However “Zeddust” moved to another site and
posted 90 more defamatory messages.
Totalise now needed to know urgently who “Zeddust”
was. Motley Fool Ltd refused to identify him. They
pointed to the Data Protection Act, and to their own
terms and conditions, which undertook to preserve the
confidentiality of their users.The exceptions to this being
as per a user “Privacy Policy” or if ordered to disclose by
an order of court. There was as yet no ongoing court
action between Totalise plc or the alleged defamer, and
there might never be. This potential difficulty was
overcome under reference to X Limited v
Morgan Grampian [1991] 1
AC (HL) 3
on the basis that Totalise required
the information to obtain proper
legal advice as to its rights. Totalise
applied to the court for an order
requiring Motley Fool to disclose
“Zeddust’s” identity. It relied upon
the court’s discretionary power
established in Norwich Pharmacal
[1974] AC 133 to order disclosure
of a wrongdoer’s identity from
those unwittingly involved in the
wrongdoer’s activities.
Under the Contempt of Court Act
1981, section 10, a court can
require disclosure of information
contained “in a publication for
which a person is responsible” if it is
satisfied that the disclosure is
necessary in the interests of justice,
national security, or for the prevention
of disorder or crime”. Mr
Justice Owen was prepared to hold
(a) that the section was primarily
concerned with balancing journalistic
freedom against protection of
individual rights and there was no
such balancing act in this case; and
(b) even if wrong on the first point,
disclosure here was in the interests
of justice. The court ordered that
Motley Fool Ltd must identify the
user concerned. The court went
further. It stated that such disclosure
was permitted under Section 35 of
the Data Protection Act 1998
(information required for prospective
legal proceedings or to obtain
legal advice). The court also
awarded expenses against Motley
Fool Ltd on the basis that the
information ought to have been
provided voluntarily standing the
circumstances.
Returning to our client and his
animal rearing/holiday business, we
then wrote to the e-mail provider
citing Totalise v Motley Fool. We
requested that they provide us with
the identity of the person(s) in
whose name the e-mail account
was registered. After a pause of
some weeks, we received from the
e-mail provider a copy letter
addressed to the registered user.
This stated that in terms of the email
provider’s terms and conditions
of usage an individual’s identity
could be disclosed if there was a
legal obligation to do so. Apparently
the e-mail company agreed with
our submission that the Motley Fool
case created such an obligation.
Loutchansky v Times
Newspapers Ltd
In another interesting Internet
defamation development (which
was aired at length during the trial
but unfortunately did not make it
into the final judgment), the case of
Loutchansky v Times Newspapers
Ltd [27 April 2001 QBD, Mr Justice
Gray] raised the issue of when the
prescriptive period begins to run
where a newspaper article is still
available on the Internet archive
section of a newspaper long after
the date of first publication in hard
copy form. It should be noted that
the one year limitation period
inserted into Section 4A of the
Limitation Act 1980 by Section 5(1)
of the Defamation Act 1996 does
not apply to Scotland, so to that
extent this discussion is academic,
but the point has wider application
and may crop up if you are
advising
on internet
matters. In
this case, two
articles were available
over a year later
in the Internet section of
The Times. The Times argued that
there had been no alteration or
editing of the article since first publication,
and that the prescriptive
period should run from the date of
original publication in the hardcopy
newspaper. The Times sought to
argue the American “single publication
rule” that publication takes
place on the day the material is first
posted on the website. Somewhat
controversially, Mr Justice Gray felt
that provided it could be shown that
someone had read the article on
the website, a libel action could be
brought within a year of that person
“hitting” the article irrespective of
when the article was first posted on
the website. This view if correct is
bad news for the press! The Court
also ruled that in relation to qualified
privilege defences, the publisher
must be able to establish the existence
of that defence at each time
of publication, not merely that it
existed on the basis of the prevailing
circumstances when the article was
first published.The Loutchansky case
is currently under appeal after Mr
Justice Gray’s decision on other
issues, and hopefully these two
matters will receive passing
comment at that stage.
Paul Motion is a partner with
Ledingham Chalmers, Edinburgh
and Convener of the Society’s
Electronic Commerce Committee
IT
Journal
Journal
Risk
Management
TRANSFERRED FILE
– or hand grenade?
This month Alistair Sim considers the risks that arise when a current file is
transferred from one fee earner to another
THE title ‘transferred file or hand grenade?’ is borrowed from a commentary on risk management
issues from another jurisdiction. Risk management commentaries from other parts
of the world identify the transfer of work in progress from one fee earner to another in the
same firm as a specific area of risk for lawyers.
The transfer of a live file creates the opportunity for a
breakdown in communication, a misunderstanding, an
incorrect assumption on the part of one or other or
both of the fee earners resulting in something going
unchecked or left unattended to, a question not asked,
a document left incomplete or unrecorded.
Transferring files
When taking over responsibility for a piece of work in
progress, particular care needs to be taken to avoid the
temptation to make assumptions about the file which
may prove to be incorrect.
You might assume, for instance, that the information
about the client and the client’s instructions in the file
are correct in every respect; that everything you would
have done at a particular stage of a piece of work will
have been done; that critical dates have been properly
ascertained and diaried. That may not be the case.
The circumstances in which you are taking over responsibility
for the file may be such that it is dangerous to
assume that matters will have been dealt with properly.
The colleague may have left the firm for another job,
may have moved departments or retired.
In all of these circumstances, there could be reasons why
matters have not been attended to as well as they might
prior to your taking over the file. The colleague’s mind
may have been on other matters for some time prior to
leaving/handing over the file. The colleague may have
been under pressure to finalise as much work as
possible prior to leaving and that pressure may not have
been conducive to attention to detail.
Perhaps the colleague has gone off ill, in which case his
work may have been suffering from a lack of concentration
in the days before taking sick leave. The colleague
may have been anxious about a more serious medical
condition.
Perhaps you have been passed the file as someone
experienced in a specialist area of work by a colleague
who recognised that the work was outwith his or her
experience. Depending on the stage at which the file
was passed on, a certain amount of work may have
been done already.
In all of these circumstances more than a cursory file
review is appropriate. The file needs to be read
thoroughly to ensure that everything done to date is
correct; that nothing has been omitted and that none of
the crucial facts has been misunderstood or misrecorded.
If it is practicable, review the file while the colleague who
has been dealing with it is still in the office and available
to discuss and clarify any areas of doubt.
Whatever the circumstances in which someone is
handing over the conduct of a piece of work, that fee
earner should be encouraged, with the reassurance that
there will be no recriminations over honest mistakes, to
identify any problem of which the fee earner is aware.
The same goes for someone leaving the firm. They
should be encouraged to make a disclosure about any
file which they consider could present a potential
problem.That is in everyone’s best interest.
Remember to tell the client whenever there has been a
change of responsible fee earner. If this is a case where
you have been passed the file to deal with a specialist
matter, make sure you agree with your colleague who is
communicating with the client and who is keeping track
of time limits and deadlines.
Example:
A partner was retiring on account of ill health and his
varied workload was transferred to the remaining
partners according to their particular area of expertise.
The litigation partner took over the small number of
files involving contentious matters, one of them being a
personal injuries claim for a client who had been
involved in a road accident. The retiring partner had
produced what appeared to be a comprehensive
handover note and this indicated that the claim would
become time barred on a date which was about a year
and a month hence.
Journal
Risk
Management
The other files called for more immediate action
and they received priority attention. When, a
month or so later, this particular file was actioned
and a letter sent to the relevant insurers, it
emerged that the claim had just recently
prescribed. The information on the file, in the
diary system, in the retiring partner’s briefing note
was all incorrect, out by a year.
Had the client provided incorrect information?
Apparently not. How had the error occurred
then? Impossible to say whether the retiring
partner’s error was the result of the illness which
prompted his early retirement or just one of
those slip ups that can afflict any of us from time
to time. Whatever caused it, the outcome was
precisely the same.
How to avoid a recurrence?
The partner who had taken over the file resolved
that, in future, when taking over a litigation file
from a colleague, he would always undertake a
careful review of the essential elements of the
case to verify, among other things, that the
prescription date had been correctly identified
and diaried with appropriate countdown
reminders. The experience prompted him go
further and to adopt a standard procedure of
having a colleague verify his own assessment of
the prescriptive date in all his litigation cases.
Risk management points
The fee earner taking over responsibility for a file
should read it thoroughly and ensure
● that the terms of engagement agreed with
the client are properly understood, any areas
of doubt being clarified as soon as possible
● that everything undertaken to the date of
transfer is correct and that critical dates
have been verified and diaried properly
● Encourage fee earners who are leaving to
identify problem or ‘skeleton’ files without
fear of recrimination
Consider whether it may be appropriate in
certain circumstances to conduct a thorough
audit of all the departing fee earner’s files to
identify any potential problems and deal with
them, ideally while the fee earner is still in the
office.
Transfers between departments/offices
Problems can also arise as a result of poor
communications between different departments
or different offices.
In larger practices, files may be transferred
between different specialist departments. The
conveyancing department may become involved
in a corporate transaction, the litigation department
may become involved in a conveyancing
transaction etc. There is potential in these situations
for ineffective communication to result in
incorrect assumptions being made and for errors
and omissions to result.
Risk management points
Ideally, the instructions from one department to
another should be as thorough as if the firm were
contracting the work out to another practice. It
is suggested that there ought to be a standard
form of instructions which should include:
● inventory of all documents being transferred
and request for confirmation of receipt
● explanation of the current position and
what requires to be done next
● indication of timescales and time limits and
request for confirmation that critical dates
have been noted, agreed and diaried with
appropriate countdown reminders
● agreement about who will be responsible
for the work on the file and who will be
taking instructions from and reporting to
the client – and who will be advising the
client of all these arrangements
● discussion concerning fresh terms of
engagement or amendment of the terms of
engagement initially agreed with the client
● notification to other interested departments
of the transfer of the file
Again, it is important that the recipient department
verifies the critical dates and other essential
points and does not make assumptions that the
transferring department’s assessment of these
matters will be correct in all respects.
The recipient department should check what has
been said to the client that could have raised the
client’s expectations as regards service or
result/outcome. It may be appropriate to correct
the client’s expectations if they have been raised
unrealistically.
The information in this page is (a) intended to provide
guidance on matters of practical risk management and
not on issues of law and (b) is necessarily of a
generalised nature. It is not specific to any practice or
to any individual and should not be relied on as stating
the correct legal position.
Alistair Sim is Associate Director in the Professional
Liabilities Division at Marsh UK Limited
(e-mail: Alistair.J.Sim@marsh.com)
EUROPEAN OPINION ON MDPs
takes debate forward
ADVOCATE General Léger of the European Court of Justice gave his opinion on 10 July 2001 in the NOVA case
(C-309/99 Wouters).These were long-awaited conclusions in a case which should have
a significant impact for legal professions across Europe.
The case itself stems from a dispute between
Price Waterhouse and Arthur Andersen & Co.,
and the Dutch Bar Association (“NOVA”) and
relates to whether the Dutch Bar Association can
regulate its profession in such a way as to prevent
lawyers and accountants from setting up multidisciplinary
partnerships. The two accountants
firms had claimed that such a prohibition is anticompetitive
and contrary to EC law.
The Amsterdam court making the reference to
the ECJ had ruled that such a ban is a restriction
on the freedom to provide services but that it is,
however, justified in the public interest. An oral
hearing on the case was held in mid-December
2000 and the Advocate General, Philippe Léger,
delivered his Opinion in July this year.
Competition
One of the areas principally under consideration
in this case was the question of whether EC
competition law applies to the Bar Association’s
rules and, if so, whether these rules could be
deemed to be anti-competitive. Mr Léger found
that NOVA is, in competition terms, an association
of undertakings, as it is exclusively composed
of members of the professions who undertake
economic activities, and its decisions do not need
to be taken in the public interest. This corresponds
to the Advocate General’s opinion in
another case presently under consideration by
the ECJ (C-35/99 Arduino) on fixed fees for work
carried out by lawyers in Italy.
It had been argued during submissions to the
Court that NOVA itself does not carry on an
economic activity and is an organisation which is
governed by public law and has a public interest
which is linked to the administration of justice. Mr
Léger dismissed these arguments stating that:
● ECJ case-law has established that competition
rules will apply where the undertakings affiliated
to an association carry on the economic
activity; and
● the association is composed only of private
economic bodies, and the public authorities
had not reserved the right to interfere in their
decision-making process.
The CCBE’s (Council of the Bars and Law
Societies of the European Union) position was
that competition rules should only apply in
circumstances where NOVA is acting solely in the
interests of its members. Mr Léger also dismissed
this argument, on the basis that the majority of
rules adopted by authorities in this field would at
the same time involve both private and public
interests.
Although Mr Léger accepted that the object
of the regulation is not to be anti-competitive,
its effect was nevertheless a restriction on
competition.
Justification
Having determined that the regulation is an
obstacle to competition, Mr Léger had to
consider whether the regulation was justified by
testing whether it met four conditions:
● It must be applied in a non-discriminatory
manner
The national court was satisfied that there
was no discrimination on the grounds of
nationality of lawyers.
● It must be justified in the general interest
The ECJ has previously held that the
application of professional rules to lawyers
is in the public interest and therefore by
safeguarding these, the regulation regulates
the public interest.
● It must be suitable for attaining the
pursued objective
Mr Léger agrees that the prohibition of
MDPs is apt to ensure that the objective
(safeguarding the legal profession’s
obligations of independence and
confidentiality) is attained.
● It must not go beyond what is necessary in
order to attain the objective
Although Mr Léger asks that consideration
of this question should be referred back to
the national court, he is of the opinion that
the regulation does not go beyond what is
necessary.
Conclusions
Although Mr Léger did find that the Dutch Bar
Association regulation was a restriction on
competition, he also concluded that it was lawful
and that the application of competition rules in
this area, would compromise the obligations on
the legal profession (particularly independence,
confidentiality and the avoidance of a conflict of
interest).
In Mr Léger’s view, a professional association of
lawyers is permitted to prohibit lawyers from
setting up MDPs with accountants if “…that
measure is necessary to safeguard lawyers’ independence
and professional secrecy. It is for the
national court to decide that”. He therefore
proposed that the Dutch national court should
find that the regulation is not contrary to Article
59 of the EC Treaty (the freedom to provide
services).
In summing up, Mr Léger acknowledged the need
to find a balance between anti-competitive
conduct and the profession’s power of
self-regulation. As such, he determined that a
Member State could grant a professional body
the power to adopt binding measures, as long as
(1) the power to determine the content of the
essential rules of the profession is retained by
authorities and (2) members of the profession are
entitled to seek redress before the courts. It is for
the national courts to determine whether that is
the case in each instance.
Next Steps
The ECJ is expected to give its ruling in the
coming months, however the Court goes
into judicial vacation until 10 September and no
official date has yet been set for delivering the
judgment.
The full text of the Opinion can be found at
the European Court of Justice website
(www.curia.eu.int) in the section dealing with
recent case-law.
EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EU
Journal
FRANCO-BRITISH LAWYERS SOCIETY COLLOQUIUM
THE annual Colloquium of the FrancoBritish
Lawyers Society is being
organised by the Society’s French section and will
be held in Paris on 14 September 2001. The
theme of the colloquium is “On-Line Justice –
Litigation, Mediation, Arbitration and Information
Technology”. This is an exceptional event as it can
be followed either in person in Paris or via the
internet, in both French and English. The presentations
given by speakers will be accessible
from the colloquium website – www.justice-enligne.org.
The programme involves distinguished
speakers from both sides of the Channel,including
Lord Prosser, Paul Motion of Ledingham Chalmers
from Scotland,and from France,Guy Canivent,the
President of the Court of Cassation.
Further information on the colloquium can be found at
the colloquium website. You can also contact the French
section of the FBLs ad 10, Rue Chardin, 75016 Paris,
tel: + 33 (0) 1 41 91 76 72, fax: + 33 (0) 1 41 91 76 77,
email: colloque@justice-en-ligne.org.
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Commission to launch Consultation on Corporate Social Responsiblity
THE Commission’s forthcoming green paper on
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSP), which
was due to have been adopted on 18 July 2001,
will include employment practices, human rights,
socially responsible investment, reporting,
auditing and environmental issues. The green
paper should be considered with reference to
the European Commission’s Recommendation
of 30 May 2001 on the recognition, measurement
and disclosure of environmental issues in
the annual accounts and annual reports of
companies, which was adopted on 11 June 2001.
The Belgian Presidency of the EU intends to
host a conference entitled “Corporate Social
Responsibility on the European Social Policy
Agenda” on 27-28 November 2001 in Brussels.
The consultation process on the CSP paper is
due to conclude at the end of December 2001.
COMPANY LAW
Belgian Presidency encouraged to ask Commission to submit revised Takeover Directive
FOLLOWING the European
Parliament’s rejection of the
proposed Directive on takeover bids
(technically, the 13th Company Law
Directive), the Belgian Presidency has
been called on to salvage the twelve
years of work invested in this
Directive, by submitting a revised
version.With 273 votes in favour and
273 against but 22 abstentions, the
proposal fell.This is a result of rule 83
of the European Parliament’s rules of
procedure, which states that a simple
majority of MEPs present for the
vote would be required for adoption,
combined with rule 128(3) which
foresees that where there is a tied
vote, the text or proposal shall be
deemed to be rejected. The
Directive would have facilitated a
pan-European framework for
takeovers, setting out fundamental
principles and a limited number of
broad requirements to be implemented
by Member States through
more detailed rules. The fallen
Directive would have harmonised
only the key elements of national
regulations, allowing Member States
to implement the Directive in line
with their individual national system
(the subsidiarity principle). The
European Commission had stated
that the vote “…represents an
important set-back for achieving the
targets agreed by the EU’s Heads of
State and Government in Lisbon of
realising an integrated European
capital market by 2005”. Were the
Directive to be revised and
re-submitted, it would be likely to
face a difficult passage via the
co-decision procedure of the
European Union.
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Discussions continue on the Community Patent
AT their meeting of 26 June 2001,
the Parliamentary Committee on
Legal Affairs and the Internal
Market held an exchange of views
on the Community Patent, which
included an update on the current
position and comment on the decisions
of the Internal Market Council
meeting of 30/31 May 2001.
Following the former Swedish
Presidency’s expression of concern
at the lack of progress which had
been made on the Community
Patent, Ministers managed to reach
agreement on some of the
outstanding issues. In particular,
Member States have agreed on the
role of national patent offices
(NPOs), which will involve responsibility
for evaluating the novelty of
patent applications, processing
applications, giving advice and
disseminating information, and
carrying out searches. The Patent
holder would pay an annual fee to
the European Patent Office and a
proportion of this would be distributed
to the NPOs, but the exact
percentage has not yet been
decided. Progress was also made
regarding the judicial regime, with
the Council announcing that the
legal basis for the Patent will be the
new articles 225(a) and 229(a) of
the EC Treaty as adopted at Nice
(although still to be ratified). The
Commission’s proposal foresees a
central intellectual property court
at first and second instance, set up
by the Nice Treaty, which would be
integrated into the existing
European Court of Justice. As
regards the linguistic regime,
despite the Council’s failure to
agree on the Patent’s official
languages, the Commission is optimistic
that progress continues to be
made. The Parliament’s report,
which will require far reaching
debate, is expected to be ready by
October 2001.
UROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE EUROPE
information:
If you would like further information or if you would like to subscribe to any of the services provided by
the Brussels Office (Brussels Agenda, EU Documentation or Enquiry Service) or Guidance Notes
which are all free of charge, please contact us at:
The Law Societies’ Joint Brussels Office,
142-144 Avenue de Tervuren, B-1150 Brussels, Belgium, or DX 1065 BDE Belgium
Tel: 00-32-2-743 85 85 Fax: 00-32-2-743 85 86 and by e-mail: brussels@lawsociety.org.uk
Information is also available from the Society in Edinburgh from Sarah Fleming.
Tel: 0131 476 8132 Fax: 0131 225 4243 E-mail: sarahfleming@lawscot.org.uk
The book is
instead divided
into two parts,
reflecting the
specialisms of
the authors. The
first section
explores the
broad theoretical
framework of the
law of damages.
The second
examines qualification
in more
detail, it is slightly
cumbersome: the reader checking
out loss of employability, for
example, must go to p30 to read
about the principles underlying this
head of claim, and then leaf forward
to p158 for detail on quantification.
The first part thus provides a useful
summary of the principles of delictual
damages, but contributes little
more than what is already on offer
from the established textbooks.
(The discussion of institutional
writings on damages, for example,
concludes by observing that they
“provide some food for thought”,
pp1-3)
The book declares its target
audience to be practitioners, and
indeed practitioners will possibly
find the second part of the
book of most immediate
value. In addition
to an analysis of
authority on quantum,
the authors also offer
practical guidance on the
conduct of claims,
concluding with useful
suggestions on the negotiations
process and an
appendix with style
averments. The work takes
into account recent case law
developments up to and including
the important ruling in Wells v
Wells [1999] AC 345 on quantification
of loss of future earnings and
cost of future care, and also the
landmark House of Lords decision
in McFarlane v Tayside Health Board
2000 SC (HL) 1.
Those who buy this short book
(xxiv + 224 pages including
index) will be unlikely to use
it as a substitute for the far
more detailed treatment
contained in works such
as McEwan and Paton on
Damages in Scotland, for
example, but that is
not its purpose. It is
certainly of value as a
guide to be used alongside
longer texts, and
also as a helpful
starting point for the
less experienced.
Elspeth Reid
Delictual damages
THE last year or so has brought a series of new handbooks on damages, with Bennett’s Personal Injury Damages in Scotland, Conway’s
Personal Injury Practice in the Sheriff Court, and now this text written by a partnership of an academic and a sheriff.The authors
declare their framework of analysis to be underpinned by their reading of Atiyah’s Accidents Compensation and the Law, the sixth edition of which,
by Peter Cabe, also appeared in 1999.The categorisation of different types of damages is thus taken from Atiyah. But this is otherwise a work of
rather narrower range than its English role model, and it does not make it its business to reflect on the grander philosophical issues of the best way
to compensate victims of personal injury.
BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIE
Robin M White and
Michael J Fletcher
Butterworths
ISBN 0 406 14469
Price £50
Journal
Review I will be very happy to receive reviews of books which readers have
enjoyed and feel would be of interest to the profession.
I would also welcome suggestions on areas
of the law which we should tackle.
Journal
Alistair Bonnington
The Law School,The Stair Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ
Tel: 0141 338 2352 Fax: 0141 338 2973
E-mail: alistair.bonnington@bbc.co.uk
W BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW BOOK REVIEW
Of course, this both is and is not a second edition.
The amount of new material which has required to
be added has meant that Margaret Ross (with
some assistance from James Chalmers) has in
effect had to write a substantial book. Key developments
since 1964 are too numerous to
mention. They include, however, the possibility of
proof by hearsay evidence as a result of the Civil
Evidence (Scotland) Act 1988, which in turn generated
a number of international problems. (The
significant case of T v T 2000 SLT 1442 appears to
have been decided too late to be included) That
Act, of course abolished the requirement of
corroboration in civil cases and modernised the
law relating to business records.Also of significance
in the civil sphere are the Civil Evidence (Family
Mediation) (Scotland) Act 1995 and the
Requirements of Writing (Scotland) Act 1995 as
well as certain provisions of the Law Reform
(Parent and Child) (Scotland) Act 1986, the
LR(MP)(S) Act 1990 and the Contract (Scotland)
Act 1997. The criminal sphere has also
seen a fair number of statutory
developments since
1964 (all consolidated in the
Criminal Procedure (Scotland)
Act 1995) including major
reform of the admissibility of
hearsay evidence, evidence
relating to the sexual character of
complainers and the means by
which vulnerable persons may
give evidence. There may have
been significant developments in
many areas, including in relation to
the uses of circumstantial evidence,
especially evidence of distress, the
admissibility of confessions and many facets of
corroboration. Key cases have included Leggate v
HMA 1988 JC 127, Townsley v Lees 1996 SLT
1182 and Thompson v Crowe
2000 JC 123. Finally, on top of
this comes the incorporation
of the European Convention
on Human Rights, and particularly
the right to a fair trial
under Article 6, into domestic
law. This has already attracted
a fair amount of case law, and
of course comes with an
enormous background of
jurisprudence.
One result of the many
changes in the law which have
to be taken on board is that a
significant reordering of material has been
required. So there are 29 chapters in the second
edition, as opposed to 36 in the first, although the
work is certainly not less substantial, the footnotes
in particular have expanded significantly.
Naturally, the four chapters on writ, oath and
proof thereby have disappeared, although
there has been inserted a chapter on
proof by restricted mode, it being the
view of the author that the Requirements
of Writing (Scotland) Act might have the
effect of saving the effect of the old law
in respect of documents executed and
things done prior to August 1 1995.
The chapters on stamping of deeds
and international private law appear
to have been discarded, while the
various issues grouped under the
rather unhappy heading, proof of
miscellaneous matters, are now
discussed at more appropriate points in
the other chapters.
Other chapters reappear in slightly disguised
form, so the slightly clumsy title of proof judicial
admissions – res judicata – judicial knowledge
becomes simply proof –
where evidence is excluded,
and proof in family actions
replaces the chapters on
proof in consistorial causes
and proof in actions of affiliation
and aliment. Some attention
has also been paid to the
order in which chapters
appear, so that, for example,
the chapter on sufficiency of
evidence, chapter thirty in the
first edition, is chapter five in
the second. Developments in
the law have necessitated
one wholly new chapter – on
proof on proceedings concerning children –
public law.Yet, despite the mass of new material
covered, and the partial reorganisation of the
work, the result is still very recognisably Walker
and Walker.The fresh material has been very skilfully
woven into the existing structure, and one
can pay the author no higher compliment than to
say that someone unaware of the previous
edition would struggle to identify the passages
which have been added. This edition is as
comprehensive as the first, both in terms of
leaving no aspect of the subject untreated, and in
terms of the depth of analysis. Moreover, while
the work continues to engage with all the theoretical
problems of evidence, it remains first and
foremost a practical book. Its price would naturally
disqualify it from being regarded as a student
text, and I would not in any case recommend it
as an easy survey of the subject. But students will
surely value it as a work of reference, especially
when they require to carry-out serious research
into the subject. More importantly, however, it
must surely find its way on to every practitioner’s
bookshelf as once again the primary authority on
the law of evidence.
Fraser Davidson
Margaret Ross with
James Chalmers
T&T Clark
ISBN 0567 00562 3
Price £90
WALKER AND WALKER:
The Law of Evidence in Scotland
THIS classic work appeared in 1964 and quickly became regarded as the leading authority on the subject by both the academics and the
profession, and indeed by the bench. Even in recent years, many would still turn to it for its penetrating yet practical insights on the
law of evidence, including many points passed over by later works. However, despite its outstanding virtues, the mere passage of time has meant that
one would inevitably refer to it less frequently, and it had become positively dangerous to suggest that those who might use it in an unreflecting
fashion might like to use it even as a work of reference.Thus it is something of an understatement to say that a second edition was long overdue.
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Penistone Line Express
Issue 62
Summer 2013
Summer Events Guide
From Your Chairman…
A very warm welcome to our summer edition
of the Penistone Line Express, which not
only marks the hard work and dedication
of our volunteers over the past 20 years, but
also highlights some of the many events
and attractions that are accessible from the
Penistone Line.
2013 marks the PLP reaching a milestone
birthday and within this edition
we showcase the many things the PLP has
achieved over the past twenty years. When
the PLP was formed back in 1993 the railways
faced a very uncertain future on the run up
to privatisation as nobody really quite knew
what was going to happen and what we would
be faced with. There was the possibility of
profit-making routes being cherry-picked
and loss-making, less attractive rural and
interurban services being left to closure by
stealth with sparse services and an unsympathetic
management. Luckily this has not
happened and lines such as the Penistone
Line have thrived, seeing passenger numbers
grow year upon year with many Community
Rail Lines producing above average growth…
Back in the 1980s, thanks to the efforts of
the PTEs and the Rail Users’ Association, the
Penistone Line had an eleventh-hour reprieve
from closure and a basic hourly weekday
service introduced until early evening. The
PLP was set up in 1993 by Dr Paul Salveson
and a group of willing volunteers, with the
support of local Railway Management (see
Page 4 for further information on the history
of the PLP).
Guided Walks and Music Trains have
always been the core activity of the PLP,
thanks to the hard work of our volunteers.
However, along the line you will see art work
that has been produced with community
groups and schools, and more recently we
have been working with local attractions to
promote them from the relevant stations.
Earlier in the year, we worked with
groups of University of Huddersfield Textile
Craft Students on two very exciting projects.
The ‘Stitch the Line’ group worked with craft
groups within the vicinity of the Penistone
Line to produce textile crafts that decorated
several stations along the line, including the
Cawthorne Dragon at Barnsley Interchange,
on 5th March. The students involved in the
project manned a stand at Barnsley, and
also travelled along the line to promote the
Leader-funded Arts Directory that included
the Stitch the Line project.
The ‘Craft on the Penistone Line’ group
worked with pupils at Honley High School,
and have set up a website, www.penistoneline.wix.com/craft
to promote the line, and
this summer will see additional art panels
displayed at Honley Station.
The ‘Penistone Line: In the Community’
project is progressing well, and we will have a
busy few months ahead promoting the Penistone
Line and all the great things you can do
in the area at various events. We will also be
working with community groups to promote
the use of the line. ‘Stitching the Line’
The Dodworth Junior Wardens enjoyed
a trip to Beaumont Park in April; luckily the
snow had melted by then, and the sun came
out for them! The children enjoyed doing the
Tree Trail at the park, and letting off steam
in the playground! Remember Beaumont
Park is only a 15 minute walk from Lockwood
Station, and the Friends of Beaumont
Park have an annual programme of events.
And don’t forget the yummy homemade
cakes available in the café on Wednesdays
and Sundays!
Over the years, various groups have
done gardening projects at the stations along
the line. Most recently, the Denby Dale and
district Rotary Club have been our Station
Gardeners! Their small team have really
made a big effort, and both Denby Dale and
Stocksmoor Stations now look fantastic.
Brockholes Village Trust have also been
working hard to improve our views from the
train at their village Station. If you would like
to get involved at your local station, just get
in touch with Rowena (contact details at foot
of page 17).
To celebrate the 20th Anniversary we
have commissioned a mosaic to go at Stocksmoor
Station, which we plan to unveil later
in the year. If you would like to have a go
at mosaic making – join us at the Penistone
Gala on Sunday 9th June!
 What for the next twenty years… Well,
many new exciting railway projects have been
announced such as Trans Pennine and the
Midland Main Line electrification schemes,
plus High Speed 2 with a Sheffield interchange
station to be located at Meadowhall
which will certainly impact on its future role/
use and hopefully pave the way for future
investment in the line and its services for the
benefit of the customers and long term job
security for the staff providing them…
Neil Bentley
Dodworth Junior Wardens in Beaumont Park
(Malcolm Howarth)
Chairman Neil Bentley (2nd right) and Community Rail Officer Rowena Chantler (with pram)
at Denby Dale Station with walkers from the Denby Dale Walkers are Welcome group.
The Penistone Line Partnership was formed as
an experiment in railway social engineering
in 1993. The inspiration came from some
isolated local examples where communities
played an active part in the upkeep of their
station, and also the Devon and Cornwall Rail
Initiative, which brought local authorities,
tourism agencies and BR to actively promote
local rail networks.
The ‘CRP’ approach integrated the two,
suggesting a community-based partnership
along a particular line of route, involving
not just local authorities but a wider range of
groups – such as schools and local businesses
– who might have an interest in the line. A
meeting was held to test out the idea, in Stocksmoor
Village Hall, during Kirklees Council’s
‘Green Transport Week in June 1993. About
50 local people turned up from various
community organisations, together with BR
managers and PTE officers. The upshot was
a decision to ‘just do it’ and form ‘The Penistone
Line Partnership’ (PLP). Officers were
elected and a war chest of about £3 was established
following a collection, once the village
hall committee had been paid!
Though short on finance the PLP was
rich with enthusiasm and ideas. A key part of
the CRP philosophy was to use local talent and
go ‘outside’ the traditional railway mentality.
Two activities were started almost immediately.
The first was a series of short guided
walks from the line, using skilled and knowledgeable
local walks leaders. These were an
immediate success, sometimes attracting as
many as 100 ramblers! The second idea was
more innovative. The Huddersfield area has
a good network of musicians and the idea
emerged to run a trial ‘Folk Train’ on one
of the quieter evening services. To many
people’s surprise, BR managers were hugely
supportive; they even welcomed the provision
of real ale on the train! The first one ran
in September 1993 and was a huge success,
with about 30 people on the train leaving
Huddersfield. Each station supplied more
concert-goers until the train was packed-out
by Denby Dale.
The media loved the idea and the ‘Folk
Train’ was followed by jazz, blues, Gilbert
& Sullivan, story-telling and even a fulllength
musical performed both on-train
and in nearby pubs, all proving immensely
popular and suffering hardly any anti-social
behaviour. There is still a regular demand for
‘special’ music trains for parties. No wonder
The Guardian newspaper in 1998 described
the Penistone Line as ‘Britain’s Number 1
Fun Railway’! But there was serious side to
it – passenger numbers started growing, and
growing.
The PLP’s work expanded into work
with local schools. More ‘events’ trains were
held including the annual ‘Santa Train’ and
an ‘Easter Eggspress’. It was clear that the PLP
needed to complement its growing army of
volunteers with some professional back-up
and the breakthrough came in 1997 with a
successful bid to the Lottery Fund, which
allowed the Partnership to employ a full-time
member of staff.
Maintaining funding to staff voluntary
organisations is a huge challenge and
the Lottery funding was only for three years.
Today the PLP is supported by Rowena
Chantler, a part-time officer. Reduced
professional support has meant a greater reliance
on volunteers, who continue to organise
music trains, guided walks, and a range of
special events. A special feature of the PLP is
Penistone Line – still Pioneering!
the high level of involvement of local railway
staff. The chairman is a Huddersfield driver
for Northern Rail, Neil Bentley, who has won
several awards for his community activities.
Neil has been chairman for five years, and
if he doesn’t actually dream about the line,
he certainly spends a lot of his waking hours
either driving trains along it, or working on
projects to support it. “We’re all intensely
proud of the Penistone Line at Huddersfield
depot,” says Neil. “It’s very much a community
railway, with railway staff and local
people working together to keep it as Britain’s
leading community railway.”
One of the PLP’s most audacious
schemes was to run its own weekend rail-link
bus service – ‘The Holmfirth Branch Line’ -
providing links from trains arriving at Shepley
to the popular tourist centre of Holmfirth.
Using volunteer drivers, the service survived
for six years before a shortage of volunteers
and a huge reduction in concessionary fare
rebates forced it to end.
The Penistone Line Partnership has long
been associated with real ale, and produced
one of the first ‘rail ale trail’ guides. Recently,
it teamed up with The Mallinson Brewery
of Huddersfield to produce a series of ales
named after the viaducts along the line.
Chairman Neil Bentley said, “It is great to be
supporting the micro-breweries of Huddersfield
as well as creating a variety of different
beers that promote the Penistone Line and
the Partnership’s activities.”
The PLP has done valuable work with
local schools, including an on-train poetry
project which led to publication of a collection
of children’s writing. The Partnership
has organised arts projects involving local
schoolchildren and a highly innovative
project to introduce people from minority
ethnic communities to rail travel.
The PLP’s ‘Tracking Lives’ project has
charted the social history of the railway.
Photographs and stories about the line were
supplied by local people and made into a
superb exhibition. Most recently the PLP has
received funding from the Leader Fund (an
EU fund for rural projects), for the ‘Penistone
Line – In the Community’ project. This
focusses on increasing off peak usage of the
line, through workshops and promotional
activities.
Northern has strongly supported the
PLP’s efforts to market the route. Drew
Haley, Northern’s Client and Stakeholder
Manager for West Yorkshire, commented that
“students, ethnic minorities, walkers, shoppers
and music lovers have all been targeted
and this has paid dividends”.
Alongside the PLP, the line has its own
user group – the Huddersfield Penistone
Sheffield Rail Users Association, which
publishes an excellent newsletter, Track
Record. The Association predates the PLP and
campaigned against the threat of closure in
the 1980s. Peter Marshall, who edits Track
Record, says “The Users’ Association and the
PLP have different, complementary roles and
we work together positively and support each
other’s activities”.
Government recognition of the
pioneering role of the PLP came in November
2004, when Rail Minister Tony McNulty
launched the Community Rail Development
Strategy at an event in Huddersfield’s Head
of Steam before travelling down the line to
“... even a full-length musical ...”
Penistone. A key element of the Strategy
was a proposal to ‘designate;’ certain routes
as community railways, allowing different,
more flexible, approaches to be taken
towards their development. The line was one
of the first to be designated as a community
railway, in November 2005. Designation has
allowed some improvements to line speeds
following input by local railway staff in the
consultation process.
The Penistone Line was able to demonstrate
exceptional levels of community
engagement and also growth – use of the
line has more than doubled since the PLP
was formed. These were both central planks
of the Strategy, but achieving the third –
‘reducing costs’ proved more challenging.
On a railway which had seen costs pared to
the bone, and double track reduced to single,
there seemed to be little that could be done.
An opportunity came with ‘tram-train’;
both Network Rail and the Department for
Transport had shown considerable interest
in tram-train operation in Germany and
had visited several German cities to see such
schemes in operation. They came home
convinced it should be tried here – and the
Penistone Line was selected as the national
pilot in March 2008. However, feasibility
studies began to make the early promise
look less appealing. In September 2009 it
was announced that the trial would switch
to the Rotherham – Sheffield route, leaving
the Penistone Line to continue as a conventional
heavy rail operation.
The Penistone Line Partnership and its
supporters are not the sort of people who sit
back and reflect on past glories. Passenger
numbers continue to grow and after the
false start of the tram-train project there is
strong interest in pushing for the line to get
more investment, particularly in stations and
rolling stock.
The two PTEs are key to this process and
their federal organisation, PTEG, recently
published radical proposals for PTEs to have
much greater control over the rail network.
How could this play out on lines like Penistone?
Its relatively self-contained nature offers
potential to test out new approaches to local
franchising, using the successful Merseyrail
models as a template. Kirklees Council is
pushing for major improvements on its section
of the line, from Denby Dale to Huddersfield.
A new development is the proposal by
Alliance Rail for direct trains from Huddersfield
to London King’s Cross serving Penistone
and Barnsley. The intention is to operate four
trains in each direction from 2014, running
via Sheffield (reverse), Worksop, Retford and
the East Coast Main Line using 125 mph nontilt
units. ‘The South Yorkshireman’ returns?
The Penistone Line is good at producing
surprises and this could be the next.
What was ‘the line that refused to die’, is
certain to remain the line that won’t keep quiet.
Northern’s Drew Haley has no doubts: “We
are delighted that the Penistone line continues
to grow and attract passengers. We will carry
1.2 million passengers this year - a reflection
of not only a more punctual service but also
the efforts of the Partnership to promote and
engage with the local communities”.
Many thanks to Neil Bentley, Brian Barnsley,
Drew Haley, Philip Jenkinson and Peter Marshall
for their assistance in preparing this article. Martin
Bairstow’s ‘The Huddersfield and Sheffield Junction
Railway – The Penistone Line’ is an excellent
historical guide to the line.
Paul Salveson
Early promotional stand, with the author centre
From the Train
Operator
Northern are the main supporter of
community rail in the UK. Part of this comes
with our size, part comes with the nature of
our business, but the main reason is it is the
right thing to do for so many reasons.
 We want to build a better railway, we
want more passengers, we want our stations
to look great and we want our communities
to feel connected to the services we offer.
Working with rail partnerships is the key to
delivering these objectives. Partnerships have
their feet in the communities we serve; they
draw on local knowledge, enthusiasm and
experience to build great partnerships.
  Look at how the PLP has done this
over the years - working with schools, businesses,
colleges, walking groups, civic groups
and anybody else that wishes to engage with
them - to help ensure that local stations and
rail service significantly improved. PLP has
promoted and supported positive change over
the years. The line now carries 25,000 passengers
a week and growing; that’s a lot of cars
off the roads in often small congested villages.
Not all those passengers are on  music trains!
Drew Haley
Thank You
For its own part the Penistone Line
Partnership would like to thank Northern
Rail for their continued support. In
particular we would like to thank Drew
Haley, Client and Stakeholder Manager,
and our local Station Managers, Matthew
Gibson and Alan Hope.
‘Stitch the Line’
A unique art project funded by the East Peak
Innovation Partnership and sponsored by the
Penistone Line Partnership and Northern Rail,
saw stations from Stocksmoor to Barnsley
decorated by a range of work produced by the
students and local craft groups.
Crocheted seat covers were spotted at
Penistone; cushions appeared at Stocksmoor
and colourful bunting and quilted panels
popped up at Dodworth.
Themes differed at each of the stations,
with some reflecting local history and the
rural nature of the communities with the
project aiming to raise awareness of local
craft studios and galleries along the route.
See cover and photo on page 2.
SIMON GODFREY
The PLP was saddened to hear of the
sudden death of Simon Godfrey, Customer
Communications Manager at Northern Rail.
Simon was well known to friends and colleagues
having worked in the industry for many years,
firstly with Northern Spirit, then Arriva Trains
Northern before joining Northern with the
start of their franchise in 2004.
A true gentleman, with a kind heart, Simon
had a genuine passion for understanding
what customers want and need, turning
railway jargon into something meaningful.
He was extremely creative and a sharpened
wordsmith. Simon will be sorely missed by
many. RIP.
The Music Train has long been a mainstay of
the Penistone line activities. It all started as
an idea to promote evening services along the
line – prior to 1994 evening trains finished
at 19.30!
The idea was simple: invite a band along
to play in the centre section of the Pacer
trains that ran the service – at the time all
these trains had ‘bus type’ seats with low
backs. Add a real ale bar using ‘bright’ beer
and off you go. The bar sales and collection
covered the bands’ expenses and made a
small profit. In the early days the bar was run
by the Huddersfield Green Party and there
were three trains per month all on Mondays
and featured Folk, Blues and Jazz!
The PLP took over the bar in 1998 and
added the beer trolley – this arrived from
Barmouth in Wales after a clandestine raid
by a well known railway Dr/Prof and the
writer. It was converted from hot water to
cold beer by the ‘nut’ house in Penistone and
has seen years of service on the Music Train
ever since. At the same time it became clear
that the number of music trains being run
was not sustainable in the long term and had
to be reduced to monthly but with a wider
mix of bands.
The Music Train –
attracting new passengers to the Penistone Line
Brian Barnsley
The Pathfinders in action.
Acts that have played the Music train
include Mississippi Malcolm and the Beale
Street Band, Enoch’s Hammer, The Good Egg
Band, The Hade Edge Honkers, Kevin Grunill
(playing a technics theatre organ), the Honley
Gilbert and Sullivan Society, The Pathfinders,
Fishing for Compliments, Gledholt Male
Voice Choir and of course The Train Gang –
still the most popular!
The fame of the Penistone Line Music
Train has spread far and wide and it has
been featured on television in Japan and the
USA. More recently the Music Train has been
covered by BBC’s Countryfile (twice).
The Music Train and the volunteers
that run it make a significant impact on the
public’s awareness of the line and has led in
part to the huge increase in ridership which
we have seen over the last twenty years.
Finally, we must remember that none of
the foregoing could have happened without
the full support of the train operators who
have been BR’s Provincial sector, Northern
Spirit, Arriva Trains Northern and finally
Northern, who continue to support fully the
partnership.
If you haven’t been on a music train – The Train Gang make this the year to do it!
Monday 20th May –
‘The Train Gang’ jazz music
Monday 17th June –
‘The Pathfinders’ ’60s covers band
Monday 24th June – ‘Abba Train’
Monday 1st July –
‘The Train Gang’ jazz music
Monday 5th August –
‘The Train Gang’ jazz music
Monday 16th September –
‘Fishing for Compliments’ alternative/
indie
Monday 30th September –
‘The Pathfinders’ ’60s covers band
Monday 7th October – ‘Abba Train’
December (date tbc) -
Christmas Carol Train
The Penistone Line Music Trains are normal
timetabled service trains on the Penistone Line.
The music, bar and stewards are organised by
the Penistone Line Partnership. The trains are
operated by Northern Rail.
Music trains depart from Huddersfield at 19.18
(calling at all stations to Sheffield).
Music Trains return from Sheffield at 20.41
Music Trains arrive back at Huddersfield at
21.56
The return fare (Huddersfield to Sheffield) is currently
£8.90 (February 2013). If you board at a
station with a ticket office that is open, you must
buy a ticket before you board the train. Otherwise
you can buy your ticket from the conductor
on the train.
For further information visit www.penline.co.uk
or email musictrains@btinternet.com
Music Trains
SUMMER 2013
It has been a busy few months for the In
the Community project. The project aims to
increase off-peak use of the Penistone Line
and to encourage more visits to the local
area by train and receives funding from East
Peak Innovation Partnership (EPIP) Leader
programme that distributes funding from the
Rural Development Programme for England,
which is jointly funded by Defra and the
European Union.
As well as improving signage and information
at stations and at other points in the
community, we have been talking to groups
of families with young children and active
older people and taken them out and about
on the train to try out what the area has to
offer. Their feedback and ideas about what
makes a good day out and on how to spread
the word about the Penistone Line will help
us to compile the rail guide that we are in the
process of writing.
You can come to get your copy, let us
know what you think or just say “hello” at
events across the area over summer, including
Penistone Gala and Penistone Show. For dates
of these community events, and many more,
see the events guide on page 16.
Penistone Line In
The Community
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HPS Rail Users Association Meetings
Annual General Meeting
18th May: 2pm at Stocksmoor Village Hall,
with guest Speaker Richard Allen
from Northern Rail.
Joint Meeting with the PLP
9th November: 10am at Stocksmoor Village Hall
email: hpsrua@btinternet.com
Guided Walks - Summer 2013
Bring along a flask and sandwiches. Suitable footwear and clothing are recommended. Walks are at an easy pace. Take care, walk safe, beware of traffic: walks are carefully planned but you are
responsible for your own safety. On our usual linear walks, which start at one station and finish at another, it is cheaper to buy a return ticket to the more distant station than to buy two single tickets
Saturday 18 MAY –
The Bells! The Bells !
A walk with a ‘woody’ theme as we pass through
places like Shireoaks, Turnerwood, Woodsetts,
Lindrick Dale in our pursuit of “hyacinthoides
non-scripta”.
Start: 10.20am at SHIREOAKS
Finish: KIVETON PARK
Distance: 9 miles. Leader: John Harker
Depart: Huddersfield 08.10, Barnsley 08.58,
Sheffield 09.44, Lincoln 09.25 to SHIREOAKS.
Saturday 1 JUNE – A Bit Of Brigantia!
A moderate walk from Lockwood to Newsome,
Castle Hill, Farnley Tyas, Stocksmoor and Shepley.
Start: 9.45am at LOCKWOOD Finish: SHEPLEY
Distance: 10 miles. Leader: Pete Watson
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to LOCKWOOD.
Saturday 8 JUNE – Oh For The Wings!
A walk along the Trans Pennine Trail from the
site of the onetime Wombwell Central station,
turning west at Aldam Junction onto the Dove
Valley Trail, up the Worsborough Incline, listening
for the ghost of Gresley’s Garratt or the whine of
an EM1 !
Start: 10.10am at WOMBWELL
Finish: Silkstone Common
Distance: 9 miles. Leader: John Musselwhite
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Barnsley 10.01,
Lincoln 07.00, Sheffield 09.36 to WOMBWELL.
Saturday 15 JUNE –
In The Footsteps Of The White Canons!
From the station and up to Dronfield church we
walk into the Cordwell Valley along Rumbling
Street and Millthorpe and up to Holmesfield.
Then across to Beauchief Abbey finishing at Dore.
Start: 10.15am at DRONFIELD
Finish: DORE & TOTLEY
Distance: 10 miles. Leader: David Blackburn
Depart: Huddersfield 08.10,Leeds 09.05, Wakefield
Kirkgate 09.23, Barnsley 09.40, Sheffield
10.04 Lincoln 08.25 to DRONFIELD.
Saturday 22 JUNE –
Close To The Edge!
A walk which will get very close to the Peak
District National Park at an ex-railway station
on an ex-railway line whose closure still attracts
controversy.
Start: 9.40am at DENBY DALE
Finish: PENISTONE
Distance: 12 miles. Leader: John Harker
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to DENBY DALE.
Saturday 29 JUNE – In A Fine Pickle!
A walk to the south of Lincoln via South Common
and the Viking Way with great views of the
city, on to Bracebridge Heath and Branston.
Return to Lincoln on the Water Rail Way riverside
path. Make it a long day and enjoy a look around
the city.
Start: 10.10am at LINCOLN Finish: LINCOLN
Distance: 12 miles (bus opt out 7m, 9m)
Leader: David Cook
Depart: Huddersfield 07.10, Barnsley 07.58,
Sheffield 08.44, to LINCOLN .
Guided Walks - Summer 2013
Bring along a flask and sandwiches. Suitable footwear and clothing are recommended. Walks are at an easy pace. Take care, walk safe, beware of traffic: walks are carefully planned but you are
responsible for your own safety. On our usual linear walks, which start at one station and finish at another, it is cheaper to buy a return ticket to the more distant station than to buy two single tickets
Tuesday 2 JULY – Bagden And Back!
A summer’s evening circular walk (joint with the
Kirklees Countryside Volunteers)
Start: 6.50pm at DENBY DALE
Finish: DENBY DALE
Distance: 4½ miles Leader: Tony Pogson
Depart: Huddersfield 18.24, Sheffield 17.36,
Barnsley 18.03, Penistone 18.27 to DENBY DALE.
Saturday 6 JULY –
To The Windmill On The Hill!
Supporting the Saturdays-only direct train service
from Sheffield to Cleethorpes via Brigg, this
walk follows the River Ancholme to Hibaldstow
and across field paths to finish at the Mount
Pleasant windmill tearooms in ample time
before catching the 16.02 train back to Sheffield
from Kirton Lindsey.
Start: 9.20am at BRIGG
Finish: KIRTON LINDSEY
Distance: 8 miles.   Leader: Stuart Parker
Depart: Huddersfield 06.10, Barnsley 06.58,
Sheffield 08.03, Gainsborough Central 08.57,
Kirton Lindsey 09.10 to BRIGG.
Saturday 13 JULY –
The World Of Wentworth!
Rural villages, meadows, fieldpaths and woodland
treks lead us to the ‘World of Wentworth’
for an extended stay for lunch break and a walk
in the garden (approx. 2 hours). Then onward
across a Palladian bridge to Menagerie House
and a climb back to our destination.
Start: 9.10am at DODWORTH Finish: DODWORTH
Distance: 8 miles. Leader: Geoff Ryder
Depart: Huddersfield 08.10, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to DODWORTH.
Saturday 20 JULY – Full Circle!
A summer walk circling Cawthorne and Cannon
Hall.
Start: 9.15am SILKSTONE COMMON
Finish: Silkstone Common.
Distance: 10 miles Leader: Joy Rawlings
Depart: Huddersfield 08.10, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to
SILKSTONE COMMON .
Saturday 27 JULY –
Two Kirks & Three Tons!
A walk with lows and highs, topographically if not
scenically. We thread the needle between settlements
on paths trodden by generations of mill
workers and farm labourers.
Start: 9.50am at HUDDERSFIELD
Finish: SHEPLEY
Distance: 10 miles. Leader: John Harker
Depart: Lincoln 07.00, Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley
09.01 to HUDDERSFIELD.
Saturday 3 AUGUST –
Up & Down & Round Castle Hill!
Up hill, down dale, through woods, over streams
– then around Castle Hill and so down to Berry
Brow, where there may be time to pop into the
Railway Hotel before the train journey home.
(joint walk with the Kirklees Countryside Volunteers)

Start: 9.35am at SHEPLEY Finish: BERRY BROW
Distance: 9 miles. Leader: Liz Colquhoun
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to SHEPLEY.
More August walks overleaf è
Saturday 10 AUGUST –
The Only Way Is Up!
Up to Hill Top, Dropping Well, through Grange
Park, passing Thundercliffe Grange, Butterthwaite
Farm and Ecclesfield Common.
Start: 9.45am at MEADOWHALL
Finish: CHAPELTOWN
Distance: 10 miles. Leader: John Musselwhite
Depart: Huddersfield 08.13, Barnsley 08.58,
Lincoln 07.00, Sheffield 09.36 to MEADOWHALL.
Saturday 17 AUGUST –
There’s No Tottie On This Walk !
A Brockholes circular taking in Round Wood,
Town End, Shaley Top, Scholes Moor and Strines
Moor. The ‘Kirklees Way’ meanders to Hepworth,
Jackson Bridge, Hole Bottom and New
Mill. A climb to Hill Top takes us onto the ‘Hills &
Hamlets Walk’ and back to the train.
Start: 9.40am at BROCKHOLES
Finish: BROCKHOLES
Distance: 12 miles. Leader: Geoff Ryder
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to BROCKHOLES.
Saturday 24 AUGUST –
Not Quite Midsomer!
A pleasant walk through rolling countryside,
woods and parkland.
Start: 9.35am at SHEPLEY Finish: DODWORTH
Distance: 11 miles. Leader: Judith Parkes
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Lincoln 07.00, Sheffield
08.36, Barnsley 09.01 to SHEPLEY.
Saturday 31 AUGUST –
The Black Horse !
A good countryside walk.
Start: 10.10am at DODWORTH
Finish: Silkstone Common
Distance: 8 miles. Leader: Pete Watson
Depart: Huddersfield 09.13, Lincoln 07.00,
Sheffield 09.36, Barnsley 10.01 to DODWORTH.
A walkers’ paradise
The Penistone Line Partnership is renowned
for its Guided Walks program, which has been
featured on BBC’s Countryfile. The Penistone
Line and surrounding area offers so many
walks, whether it be a station to station walk,
history and heritage walks or a Guided Walk.
If you prefer to take a walk at your own
pace, then there are a wide variety of walks
available within the vicinity of the Penistone
Line. Denby Dale is now an officially designated
‘Walkers are Welcome’ village, and have
lots of walks available for download on their
website http://www.denbydale-walkersarewelcome.org.uk/
You can also find information on our
website on other walks in the area
www.penline.co.uk
Penistone Line Trail
For those who like a challenge, the ‘Penistone
Line Trail’ is a 60 mile station to station walk
between Sheffield and Huddersfield. The
Trail covers varied landscape ranging from
inner urban to woods and farmland, Between
Sheffield and Barnsley the trail follows the
rivers Don and Dearne and enters the upper
Don Valley at Oxspring. It crosses into the
Holme Valley, which joins the Colne Valley at
Huddersfield. Of course you don’t have to do
it all in one go!
The Penistone Line Trail
A station to station walk between
Sheffield and Huddersfield
Price £4-95
(£2-95 to members of Penistone Line
Partnership or Ramblers’ Association)
plus postage/packing £1-20
Contact the membership secretary -
see page 20
Barnsley has
been making
history...
People’s Museum & Discovery Centre
OPENING 27 JUNE 2013
AT BARNSLEY TOWN HALL FREE ENTRY
TH
EXPERIENCE BARNSLEY MUSEUM & DISCOVERY CENTRE
History and Heritage
along the Penistone Line
(see next two pages)
Despite its current rural feel, the East
Peak area has long been associated with a
number of different industries and much of
its landscape has been shaped by industrial
processes connected with textile production,
coal mining, quarrying, iron and steel
production, and glass and paper making. The
area still contains many examples of bell pits,
furnaces, forges, mills and quarries, not to
mention the small scale workshops where
local families made everything from fancy
woollen shawls to iron nails, files and gimlets.
Some of the earliest industry in the
region was undertaken by monks, including
those from Monk Bretton Priory who were
involved in mining and iron making in the
twelfth century. From the sixteenth century
onwards the area’s many river valleys became
home to many new mills and forges, which
used the water power to drive their wheels
and hammers.
As in many places, industrial development
was encouraged by improvements to
transport during the eighteenth and nineteenth
centuries, including the railway that
now forms the Penistone Line. The most
striking local railway features are the Penistone
and Denby Dale Viaducts, constructed
during the 1880s, however earlier features
also remain, including the early nineteenth
century Silkstone Waggonway, which was
built to transport coal from pits along the
valley, and which has been partly restored
in recent years by the Roggins Local History
group.
PLACES TO VISIT
It is essential that before visiting any of the places
listed, you check for accessibility, opening
times and public transport (where applicable)
Tolson Memorial Museum, Huddersfield
Housed in a Victorian Mansion in Ravensknowle
Park, the museum tells the story of Huddersfield,
including the textile industry, the Luddite
uprisings, public transport, natural history and
much more (Approx one mile by bus from Huddersfield
bus station)
www.tolson.museum@kirklees.gov.uk
Beaumont Park, Lockwood
A magnificent Victorian park with ornate
features, cascades, grottos, steep cliffs and
picturesque woodland walks (A 15-minute walk
from Lockwood Station)
www.fobp.co.uk
Castle Hill & Victoria Tower
Over 900ft above sea level, Castle Hill is a
scheduled ancient monument with spectacular
views. The Tower, built in 1899 to commemorate
Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee, is open to the
public during summer weekends (Approx one
mile walk from Berry Brow Station)
www.kirklees.gov.uk
Silkstone Waggonway Trail
Walk from Silkstone Common Station to Silkstone
Village along the route of the early 19th
century horse drawn railway, built to transport
coal from collieries to canal. For further history
and walk information see:
www.visitpenistone.co.uk/walks/silkstonewaggonway
History and Heritage along
the Penistone Line
Monk Bretton Priory:
Ruins of a 12th century Cluniac, later Benedictine,
monastery in the care of English Heritage
and the Friends Of Monk Bretton Priory (By bus
from Barnsley Interchange)
www.english-heritage.org.uk
www.monkbrettonpriory.org.uk
Experience Barnsley
Barnsley’s new museum, Experience Barnsley,
open from 27th June 2013. Housed in Barnsley
Town Hall (A short walk from Barnsley Interchange)
www.barnsley.gov.uk
Elsecar Heritage Centre
Located in former ironworks and colliery
workshops, restored historical buildings now
house an antique centre, craft workshops and
exhibitions of Elsecar’s past. (Change trains at
Barnsley – a short walk from Elsecar station)
www.elsecar-heritage-centre.co.uk
Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet, Sheffield
Life at home and work at a rural scythe and
steelworks dating back to the 18th century
Shepherd Wheel Workshop
Two grinding workshops – examples of many
small industrial buildings once in use all over
Sheffield
Kelham Island Museum
Industrial museum, on a man-made island over
900 years old, representing Sheffield’s industrial
story
(All by bus from Sheffield station)
www.simt.co.uk
Fire & Police Museum, Sheffield:
Housed in a Victorian combined fire and police
station, the museum preserves the history and
heritage of the emergency services
(By bus from Sheffield station)
www.firepolicemuseum.org.uk
LOCAL GROUPS
There are a number of local groups that promote
local History and Heritage.
South Yorkshire Industrial History Society
Established in 1933 the SYIHS has played an
important role in Industrial Heritage activities
across South Yorkshire ever since. The Society
owns a number of industrial heritage sites,
including Wortley Top Forge, Rockley Furnace
and the Hoylandswaine Nail Forge. They also
hold regular lectures and other events (including
guided walks) within the area. For more information
visit their website www.topforge.co.uk
The Society also has a Facebook page with
updates about their recent activities.
Roggins Local History Group
Based in Silkstone, the Roggins Local History
group has spent many years researching the
history of the Silkstone area, an area associated
with (amongst other things) early glass making,
coal mining and iron working. The group is also
responsible for managing the Silkstone Waggonway
project, which has included everything
from researching and producing information
boards and walk leaflets to practical restoration
and reconstructions of the Silkstone Waggonway
(an early horse-drawn railway that runs between
Cawthorne and Silkstone Common). For more
information visit their website www.priorycampus.co.uk/rlhg/roggins.php
Denby Dale Walkers are Welcome
This group has produced a series of guided
walks around the Denby Dale Parish, many
of which highlight the area’s varied industrial
heritage, including its railways and transport
networks, tanning, quarrying, mineral extraction
and textile histories. For more details, and to
browse their guided walks on-line visit their website
www.denbydale-walkersarewelcome.org.uk/
The EPIP Industrial Heritage Programme is a community-based heritage programme that aims to
support and secure the long-term future of Industrial Heritage within the EPIP area. The project is cofunded
by LEADER and English Heritage and will run between December 2010 and November 2013.
It will support local volunteer groups involved with Industrial Heritage, as well as developing new
community projects to improve understanding, interpretation and local involvement with Industrial
Heritage in the EPIP area. For further information contact Tegwen Roberts on 01226 767 365

A Feast of Family Fun
S e ve nt h ye ar for t h is
traditional music, song and
dance, friendly festival in
the Yorkshire countryside.
A growing event dubbed
Village Festival of the Year
2012 by Fatea Magazine.
 Three days, five stages
with music from breakfast-time
until late. On site
camping or bunkhouse
accommodation with breakfast.
Artists for 2013 include
Peatbog Faeries, Flook,
Moulettes, Kan, Martin
Simpson, Nic Jones, Kathryn
Roberts & Sean Lakeman.
You and your family can
enjoy a feast of fun with over
100 hours of music and dance
throughout the weekend on
the main festival site at the
Cricket Club and at venues
throughout the village.
Shepley Spring Festival
17th-19th May 2013
Enjoy a host of activities
for children, with face
painting and storytelling
for younger children, things
to make or ‘Silly Songs’ to
sing. Learn circus skills in
Professor Panic’s little big
top. Whizz down the bouncy
slide, scale the climbing wall
and visit the adventure playground.
Smoking Smith
the Pyrotechnic Pensioner
is back with a show that
grandad should not try at
home!
Sample foods from
around the world or relax in
the beer tent with live music
entertainment.
Free parking or travel
to Shepley by train on the
Penistone Line.
Showground entry just
£5 per day, accompanied
under 12s FREE
Tickets are available
for individual concerts and
dances or buy a weekend
pass for three full days.
www.shepleyspringfestival.com
Did you know that you can
now follow us on Facebook
and Twitter (@PenistoneLine)?
The PLP’s Community Rail
Partnership Officer is
Rowena Chantler
penistoneline@gmail.com
Tel. 07912 753817
www.penline.co.uk
Events Along the Line
Summer 2013
May
Fri 10- Sun 12: Holmfirth Festival Of Folk
Venues around the town. Friendly folk festival
with concerts and ceilidhs.
http://holmfirthfestivaloffolk.co.uk
Sat 11: Mighty Compton Cinema Organ Concert
with Phil Kelsall; Penistone Paramount,
Shrewsbury Road S36 6DY
http://www.penistoneparamount.co.uk
Sun 12: Antique and Collectables Fair
Elsecar Heritage Centre, Wath Rd S74 8HJ.
Approximately 135 stalls.
http://www.elsecar-heritage-centre.co.uk/
Wednesday 15th May: Community Rail In The
City (Manchester Piccadilly)
(for more details contact ACoRP)
www.acorp.uk.com
Fri 17 - Sun 19: Shepley Spring Festival
Folk festival with a family-friendly vibe.
Marsh Lane, Shepley
http://www.shepleyspringfestival.com
Fri 17 – Fri 24 Holmfirth Film Festival
Over 50 screenings at quirky venues
http://holmfirthfilmfestival.co.uk
Sat 18 – Sun 19: Days Out with Thomas
Kirklees Light Railway Denby Dale HD8 9XJ.
Thomas the Tank Engine and his friends make a
special visit.
http://www.kirkleeslightrailway.com
Sat 18: Choral Concert
Millhouse Green Male Voice Choir with The
Dukeries Singers; St. John’s Church, Penistone
http://www.penpictorial.co.uk
Sun 19: Penistone Boundary Walk
Start at Cubley Hall, Mortimer Road, Penistone,
S36 9DF
http://www.facebook.com/
events/411073415639232
June
Sat 8 : Honley Show
Agricultural show and a fun day for all the family.
Moor Lane, Farnley Tyas HD4 6UW
http://www.honleyshow.co.uk/
Sat 8: Mighty Compton Cinema Organ Concert
With Donald Mackenzie. Penistone Paramount,
Shrewsbury Road S36 6DY
http://www.penistoneparamount.co.uk
Sat 8- Sun 9: Penistone Gala
Concerts on Saturday and main Gala day on
Sunday. Penistone Showground, South Yorkshire
S36 6DW
 http://www.penistonegala.co.uk/
Thur 13 - Sun 23 Holmfirth Arts Festival
Venues across the town & the Holme Valley.
Music, art, comedy, theatre, literature & inspiring
things to do.
http://www.holmfirthartsfestival.co.uk
Sun 16: Pennine Tractor Run
ractor fun plus carboot, fair rides, stalls, brass
band. Marsh Farm, Shepley
http://www.facebook.com/
groups/259044688501/
Thur 19 - Sun 23: East Peak Outdoors Festival
Walking, cycling & horse riding activities from
guided walks to expert talks, cultural evenings
and family activities. Various venues
http://www.artinthepark.org.uk/eastpeakoutdoors
Sat 22- Sun 23: Olly Owl’s Big Weekend
Kirklees Light Railway Denby Dale HD8 9XJ.
Family event: trains, fairground rides and stalls
http://www.kirkleeslightrailway.com
Sat 22: Berry Brow Carnival
Recreation Ground, Ladyhouse Lane
https://www.kirklees.gov.uk/community/localorgs/orgdetails.asp?OrgID=4019

Sun 23: Artisan Fayre, Penistone Market HallFood,
craft and vintage stalls plus live music
http://www.penistoneartisanfayre.co.uk/
July
Sat 6: Brockholes Carnival
Stalls, games, live music, pig roast and lots
more. Brockholes Recreation Ground
Sun 7: Wortley Rotary Club 16th Annual Rally
and Gala
Wortley Hall Wortley village nr Sheffield S35 7DB
Sun 7 - Sat 13: Holmfirth Art Week
Holmfirth Civic Hall & venues around the Holme
Valley. In aid of MacMillan Cancer Support.
http://www.holmfirthartweek.org.uk
Sat 13- Sun 14: Huddersfield Carnival
Parade through town centre. This Caribbean inspired
event one of the largest outdoor festivals
in West Yorkshire
http://www.huddersfieldcarnival.co.uk
Sat 13: Mighty Compton Cinema Organ Concert
With Matthew Bason and Peter Jebson.
Penistone Paramount, Shrewsbury Road S36 6DY
http://www.penistoneparamount.co.uk
Sat 20 – Sun 21: Days Out with Thomas
Kirklees Light Railway Denby Dale HD8 9XJ.
Thomas the Tank Engine and his friends make a
special visit.
http://www.kirkleeslightrailway.com
August
Sat 3: Emley Show
A popular traditional agricultural show.
http://www.emleyshow.com
Sat 4: Sheffield City Centre Extravaganza
Details, Sandra Barley 07702 208533 or email
s.barley@moorsheffield.com
Thurs 8- Sun 11: Huddersfield Food & Drink
Festival
St George’s Square, Huddersfield. Fun food
event located right outside the station!
http://www.htcpl.org.uk/foodanddrinkfestival
Fri 16- Mon 19: Days Out with Thomas
Kirklees Light Railway Denby Dale HD8 9XJ.
Thomas the Tank Engine and his friends make a
special visit
http://www.kirkleeslightrailway.com.
September
Thur 12 - Sun 15: Heritage Open Days
Celebrating England’s fantastic architecture and
culture by offering free access to places that are
usually closed to the public or normally charge
for admission. It is a once-a-year chance to discover
architectural treasures and enjoy a wide
range of tours, events and activities that bring
local history and culture to life. More venues will
register over the summer so please check the
website for details.
http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk
Old Water Tower at Huddersfield Station
This newly restored gem, which is now the new
Association of Community Rail Partnerships
(ACoRP) will be opening its doors to the public.
*Please check opening times with the venues
as they may not be open all weekend.
Thu 13 - Mon 17 (Closed Sun): Tuby’s Funfair
Popular fairground and stalls. Penistone Recreation
Ground
http://www.rogertuby.co.uk
Sat 14: Penistone Agricultural Show
Large traditional agricultural show; the showground
is located 200m from Penistone Station.
Penistone Showground, South Yorkshire S36 6DW
http://www.penistoneshow.com
Sat 14 – Sun 15: 8th Annual Steam & Diesel
Gala
Kirklees Light Railway, Denby Dale HD8 9XJ. A
packed train schedule, special services, visiting
engines and machinery, model railways... everything
for enthusiasts and families alike.
www.kirkleeslightrailway.com Tel: 01484 865 727
Sat 28 – Sun 29: Holmfirth Food & Drink Festival
A feast of activities all around the town.
http://www.holmfirthfoodanddrinkfestival.com
Fri 20 – Sun 22: Sheffield Food Festival
Loads of tasty things to do across the city
centre.
http://www.sheffieldfoodfestival.org/index.html
We have tried to include up to date information for
all the events but some information may change. For
up to date information on local events and details of
admission charges and opening times, please check
the websites using the links provided.. 
Why not get involved?
The Penistone Line Partnership is a voluntary organisation which supports and promotes community
involvement along the Huddersfield to Penistone and Sheffield railway and has a good time in the
process! We welcome new members and encourage everyone to be involved somehow or other.
Membership costs £7.00 (£4.00 if you’re a pensioner or unemployed). Family rate for two people or
more at the same address £10.00 (£5.00 concessions). Corporate membership £25.00
Membership Application Form
Name ...............................................................................................................................................................
Address.............................................................................................................................................................
Phone............................... E-mail .....................................................................................................................
I could help with..............................................................................................................................................
Return to Janet Goldsmith, Secretary PLP, 78 Ridings Fields, Brockholes, Holmfirth HD9 7BG
Phone: 01484 660560 E-mail janet.goldsmith@btinternet.com
Easter Eggspress at Penistone
with rail staff in fancy dress
20th Anniversary Year!
A line for all seasons ... walking in the summer A line for all seasons ... a vital link in winter
Operators of the Penistone
line since 2004
1
Issue No. 38 November 2004 – March 2005
Produced by Wigan Heritage Service FREE
 
2
From the Editor
All comments and correspondence should
be addressed to:
Editor, ‘Past Forward’,
Wigan Heritage Service, Observer Buildings,
Wood Street,Wigan WN3 4ET
Email: a.gillies@wlct.org
Firstly, a very big thank you to so
many of you who have played your
part in our recent consultation
process. Your feedback has been
invaluable in helping us improve
our services and plan for the
future (see p20 for further details).
The response to the questionnaire
which appeared in the last issue of
Past Forward was particularly
gratifying, both with regard to the
number of forms returned and all
the encouraging comments which
you had to make about the
magazine. It’s so good to know
that we have a product which is so
much appreciated by so many. It’s
not perfect, of course, and a few
readers did have some constructive
criticisms/suggestions to make; we
will, certainly, be taking a close
look at these comments, and a
more detailed analysis (along with
the result of our prize draw!) will
appear in the next issue.
Also in the next issue, we hope
to bring you some exciting news to
do with the History Shop – watch
this space.
We have a wonderful exhibition
at present in the History Shop.
Wigan Casino: the Heart of
Northern Soul has proved
immensely popular (see pp3,19). A
particular word of thanks to Claire
Hawkins who curated the
exhibition; unfortunately, however,
this was to be her parting
legacy to us, as she has now
returned to her previous authority,
Warrington (see opposite).
As Christmas rapidly
approaches, I would like to remind
readers that the History Shop has
got some very special Christmas
presents with a difference – I can
assure you that you will not be
disappointed. It only remains for
me to wish all our readers –
throughout the world! - a very
Happy Christmas and prosperous
New Year.
Cover: Wigan Casino Club ‘All Nighter’ Poster, 1980.
Wigan Heritage Service
The Heritage Service has three main outlets – the History Shop, Archives and
Leigh Local History. Please note that all telephone numbers have a 01942 code.
If no individual email address is listed, please use leisureheritage@wlct.org
The History Shop
Library Street Wigan WN1 1NU.
Tel: 828128 (general enquiries), 828020 (local history desk – research
enquiries and bookings). Fax: 827645. Email: leisureheritage@wlct.org
Opening hours: Mon 10.00 -7.00; Tues - Fri 10.00-5.00; Sat 10.00-1.00
Archives
Town Hall Leigh WN7 2DY. Tel: 404430 (general enquiries). Fax: 404425
Opening hours: Tues-Thur 10.00 - 4.30 (by appointment)
Leigh Local History
Turnpike Centre Leigh Library Civic Square Leigh WN7 1EB. Tel: 404559 Fax: 404567
Opening hours: Mon, Thur, Fri 9.30-7.00, Tues 10.00-7.00; Wed 9.30-5.00;
Sat. 10.00-3.30
Staff
Alastair Gillies – Heritage Services Manager (and Editor of Past Forward) – Tel:
488468 Fax: 488479. Email: a.gillies@wlct.org
Philip Butler – Visitor Services Manager – 827594 – p.butler@wlct.org
Yvonne Webb – Collections Development Manager – 828123 – y.webb@wlct.org
Heritage Officers
Tony Ashcroft – Local History, Leigh – 404559
Alan Davies – Archives – 404431 – a.davies@wlct.org
Mike Haddon – Industrial History – 828121
Diane Teskey (from 4 Jan) – Community Outreach & Education - 828124
Christine Watts – Local & Family History – 827404
Heritage Assistants
Elizabeth Fairclough – 828128. Hilary Fairclough – 828128.
Stephanie Tsang – 828128
Technical
Len Hudson – Senior Technician & Photographer – 404432
Terry Meehan – Museum Technician
COPY DEADLINE
Please note that the copy
deadline for issue no 39
of Past Forward is
1 February 2005.
WHEN our popular Community
Outreach & Education Officer, Claire
Hawkins, left us at the end of
September it was hard to believe
that she had been with us for over
18 months. These were months of
hard work, yet the time had simply
flown by. We are very happy to
report, however, that much was
achieved during this period.
Anyone who witnessed the holiday
activity sessions in the Wickham
Gallery (the collage footballer, the
Halloween creepy-crawlies or the
miniature museums) or indeed has
visited the Wigan Casino - the
Heart of Soul exhibition in the
Taylor Gallery, will have first hand
experience of some of her work and
influence on the service.
Goodbye and Good Luck!
In October Claire took up her
new post of Local Heritage Access
Officer at Warrington Museum. As
this is her hometown and where
she continues to live, alas we could
not compete. We would all like to
wish Claire well in her future career
at Warrington and thank her for her
time here in Wigan.
3
History Shop Exhibition Review
Wigan on the Map – on now at
the History Shop
A highly colourful and creative ‘map’ (28 giant panels
featuring embroidered, painted and knitted images) was
made by community groups from all over Wigan Borough to
celebrate the new Millennium. The images reflect the best
loved aspects of each area, whether it is the local church,
pub, legends or community organisation.
Talks and tours available by advanced booking for groups
and societies (tel: 01942 828128).
Review - A Feast of Photography!
Our annual celebration of photography and its valuable
contribution to local history and culture was, as usual, a great
success. We began by showing some of the fascinating
pictures in our own extensive archive collections, illustrating
the milestones of our daily lives with events such as
christenings, marriages, first day at school and our first
seaside holiday! This was followed by work from two local
photographic societies, Wigan and Atherton. The creative and
diverse photographs on display represented the culmination
of a year’s hard work by society members. It is always
intriguing to see the world through the eyes of someone else!
Visitors once again, had the opportunity to vote for their
favourite picture in the Wigan show. The result will not be
revealed until next year’s show, so make sure you are there!
Still on the theme of photography, the Heritage Service is
currently investigating the possibility of digitising part of our
photographic archive and making it available on the world
wide web for all. We would be interested to know what you
think, so if you have a view, contact Yvonne Webb (01942
828123).
Current exhibition - Wigan
Casino: The Heart of Soul - Until
26 February 2005
Our final exhibition of the year. This exhibition explores and
celebrates the history of a local dance hall credited by many as
the birthplace of Northern Soul. Built in 1915 the building
firstly named the Empress Ballroom (known in Wigan as the
Emp) became world famous in it’s later incarnation as Wigan
Casino. From 1973 to the early 1980’s the scene was massive,
with soul fans travelling across the country for the regular
“Allnighters”. Dancers from the Casino appeared on Top of
the Pops, American musicians jetted in especially to perform
and the venue won the accolade “best disco in the world” from
the American music magazine Billboard. Eventually
demolished in 1982, Wigan Casino is now the subject of books,
paintings, a touring play, regular articles in the press and
television documentaries. Soul DJs and their network of fans
continue to “keep the faith” with many events, fanzines and
radio programmes. Many local people have memories of the
“Allnighters”, the atmosphere, the unique style of dancing, the
record traders, and the rare 1960’s soul records re-discovered
for a new audience.
The exhibition is proving to be a favourite, especially with
those of you who remember dancing the night away to the
sounds of Northern Soul (see review of the exhibition launch
by Visitor Services Manager Philip Butler on p19). We will be
organising an oral history recording day in conjunction with
experts from the North West Sound Archive to capture
memories of the old Empress Ballroom and Wigan Casino.
The tape recordings will be preserved for future generations
at NWSA headquarters in Clitheroe Castle, and copies kept for
reference at the History Shop. Keep a look out in the local
press for details, and please come along. Otherwise, valuable
information could be lost forever.
The life and death of Wigan Casino.
4
➯
Dear Mr. Gillies
I enclose an article which I
would like you to consider for
publication in Past Forward,
celebrating the centenary of the
visit of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West
Show to Leigh.
Colin Blake
Wigan
LEIGH, OCTOBER 1904. Reports
abounded in the district that a
party of around 100 Sioux braves
and warriors from other allied tribes
was active within a ten mile radius
of the town.
Witnesses described attacks on
cabins in St. Helens. Stagecoaches
were pursued and even a cavalry
regiment was defeated and its
troops massacred. Anticipation ran
high as the Indians were expected
to arrive at the town soon.……
And arrive they did on Sunday 2
October 1904, by three special
trains. The famous Buffalo Bill’s Wild
West & Congress of Roughriders of
the World made a tour of Britain in
1904; it had been at St. Helens on
Saturday 1 October before moving
on to Leigh on the Sunday to
present the show the following day
(3 October).
Col. William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) as
depicted on the poster for the Leigh
performances.
The show featured the reenactment
of ‘Custer’s Last Stand’ as
well as attacks on ‘the Deadwood
Stage’ and a ‘Settler’s Cabin’, which
are the incidents referred to in the
opening paragraph.
Other examples of life in the Wild
West were shown but the show did
not confine itself to depicting these,
as the Congress of Roughriders of the
World demonstrates.
The local press tells us that little
was done on the day of arrival
except to make provision for the
horses, but on the Monday, a tent to
hold some 12,000 people was
erected with other sideshows.
The afternoon show drew an
attendance of 6,000, but in the
evening, special trams were laid on
to bring people in from Atherton
and Tyldesley, many of whom could
not be accommodated.
The Show
The show which the thousands
came to see had changed in many
respects. Annie Oakley was no
longer with the show and the
famous Sitting Bull had been killed
some years earlier. His son, young
Sitting Bull, however, did appear, at
least according to the St. Helens
Reporter of Friday 30 September
1904.
The Indians Are
Coming!
An artist’s impression of the Wild West showground which was set up on the Buck’s Farm Estate in the area, between
present day Bonnywell Road and Pennington Brook, Leigh.
➯
5
However, those attending still
got their money’s worth. The show
started with a grand parade of all
the company, led by Buffalo Bill
himself. Apart from the Indians and
Cowboys, the parade included
horsemen from all over the world.
Mexican Vaqueros rode with Arab
spahis. The U.S. cavalry rode
alongside British lancers. Gauchos
from the Argentine featured, along
with the Cossacks of Russia and
horsemen from Japan. The
appearance of the last two was
particularly remarkable as the two
countries were at war with each
other at the time!
According to the Leigh Journal of
7 October 1904, all the performers
“…..are genuinely what they
represent and not actors .…..” It was
even claimed that some of the Sioux
Indians had actually participated in
the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Be
that as it may, the various riders put
on displays that were worthy of the
cultures they represented.
The equestrian events were not
the only features on show. They
were followed by the various reenactments
of life on the American
frontier and then by various
speciality acts. One of these was the
spectacular 40 foot leap through
space by Mr. George C. Davis, who
performed under the name of
‘Carter, the Cowboy Cyclist’.
The Site
So where in Leigh did this great
spectacle take place. The report of
the show in one paper says:
“it was located in the large field
on the east side of St. Helens Road,
between the railway and the brook”.
The brook is Pennington Brook. The
railway line used to cross St Helens
Road just above Lightbourne Avenue
on the west side and present-day
Bonnywell Road on the east side.
This would put the site of the show
somewhere along the line of
Pennington Road between the
sewage farm and St. Helens Road.
The latter occupied the same site in
1904 as it does today.
Nothing marks the site today
but, if you are lucky, you may see
some horses grazing in the field and
imagine them to be Sioux war
ponies as they were on that day 100
years ago, when the Indians came to
town.
Newspaper illustration of the bicycle leap across 40 feet by ‘Carter, the
Cowboy Cyclist’.
The fields between Pennington Road and Pennington Brook, Leigh. Sioux
Indians grazed their war ponies at (or very near) this spot in Leigh 100
years ago.
6
➯
Marylebone Village 1900-1950
Messrs. Ball & Birchall & families,
owners of Marylebone Stores
LONG forgotten family
papers have come into
my possession referring
to “the sale of valuable
freehold residences,
shops, dwelling houses,
ground rents and other
properties, including
eligible building sites,
situate in Wigan district
to be sold by auction at
the Clarington Hotel,
Wigan, on Wednesday
the 5th day of
September, 1923, at
2o’clock prompt, and
being the estate of the
late Herbert Spencer
Woodcock, Esq.” Having
lived all my 80 years,
apart from war service,
on part of this estate at
Marylebone and Milton
Grove, I will endeavour
to recall some of my
earlier recollections and
current comments on life
from 1923 onwards.
In September 1923 my
grandparents, who came
originally from a farm at
Tunley, Wrightington,
must have gone along to
the sale of these properties
and land and successfully
bid for Lot No.6, being six
dwelling houses and shop
and post office.
Family enterprise
A big decision was
made in the family that, in
order to make a success of
this newly acquired
business and post office, it
would be a good idea to
get family members
involved in the enterprise
and for all to live in the
adjoining cottages to the
shop.
So, it came about that
my family moved from
Halifax, Yorkshire, to live
in one of the cottages. My
father had been badly
gassed in the First World
War and was finding it
difficult to keep to his
trade as a cabinetmaker
because of ill health; this
move obviously solved the
problem of caring for his
family. He did not work in
the family business but
was able to find light work
locally. My mother, on the
other hand, was skilled at
dressmaking and tailoring,
and managed the drapery
department at the shop.
Influx of workers
All this happened
c.1925, with my mother,
brother and myself settled
in the end cottage, which
had frontage onto Wigan
Lane and was surrounded
by trees and gardens; conversion
from privy to
water closets had taken
place by the time we
arrived. One can assume
that the cluster of cottages
and school at Marylebone
had been built some 40
years previous (c.1883),
when privies were part of
village life, to house the
influx of workers to the
mill quite near to
Marylebone at the bottom
of Leyland Mill Lane.
In those days the
famous Laxey Wheel was
made near the river and
had to be hauled up
Leyland Mill Lane by a
team of horses straining
on the cobbles, and with
ropes pulled through rings
fitted into the walls of the
lane to haul various parts
up to Wigan Lane for
transportation to
Liverpool, and then by
ship to the Isle of Man.
Marlyebone Stores
Marlyebone Stores,
meantime, was starting to
expand into quite a big
store with a post office,
grocers, butchery, fruit
and vegetables, pottery
and drapery department.
Two lady assistants
helped my two uncles, my
aunt and my mother in the
store. My uncles took it in
turns to run the butcher’s
shop and deliver orders to
the surrounding districts.
Business and family
pressures were great and
often, as children, we had
to scuttle away from raised,
angry, tired voices.
Apart from my father,
good health prevailed in
the family, and late nights
were spent on the many
chores such as filling
basins with cooked meat
and gelatine, boiling hams,
keeping accounts and
equipment in good order
and clean.
Sunday Parade
On Sunday summer
evenings the butcher’s
shop was scrubbed down
and opened, to sell
homemade ice cream,
sweets and chocolates to
throngs of young ladies
and gentlemen who
paraded up and down
Wigan Lane, from Swinley
to the Cherry Gardens, in
their Sunday best clothes
in the hope of attracting a
suitor.
As there were few
motorcars or garages, this
promenading did not
create any problems and
reasonably good
behaviour was the order of
the day. Most of the
throng had spent part of
the day at a religious
service or Sunday school,
as we did. The religious
festivals were a yearly
pattern to life, with
Walking Days and outings
connected to the church
enjoyed by many families;
an arranged charabanc
outing to the seaside was
a special treat.
Daily life
Meanwhile, the
surrounding cottages and
our school were a hub of
activity as families got on
with their lives, with the
menfolk following their
trades and the women
cooking and keeping their
families and houses clean
with the limited appliances
and cleaning materials
available at this time -
rubbing boards, dolly tubs,
squeezers (used to remove
water from washed clothes
and bedding) - and all
having to be worked by
hand power.
Wigan Town seemed a
long way away from the
7
close-knit community at
Marylebone, with the
mining, cotton and
engineering industries
developing at a great pace
in Lancashire as a whole.
Lots of workers who had
worked on the land got
employment in the mills
that had begun to change
the landscape around
Wigan. Men also found
employment in the many
mines being sunk in the
area, as coal had long
since been found to be
plentiful and was now
needed for the industries
and homes. Work was also
available on the railways
and canals, with
apprenticeships opening
doors to advancement in
most of these industries.
As the professional
families moved into the
area, there were plenty of
jobs in their houses for the
local women.
Electricity had not
come to our cottages in the
early 1930’s and I
remember that gas with
fragile mantles was the
means of lighting in the
home and on the streets. A
man came round at dusk
to turn on the streetlights
and came back again at
dawn to turn then off.
Coke and coal were used
for heating and the air
outside was far from
fresh, especially in the
winter. This led to many
chest complaints and
spitting in the streets with
spittoons, and sawdust
being used in public
places.
School
The school at
Marylebone had a crosssection
of pupils aged 5-11
years. Fields and woodlands
nearby were being
bought by Wigan
Corporation and speculators
to build houses for
doctors, solicitors, dentists,
skilled and semiskilled
workers, and many
other professions, and
some of their children
came to the school.
The school had a
headmistress and two
other teachers who were
dedicated, unmarried and
talented. They were strict
disciplinarians in a pretty
parochial environment, but
with lots of music, play
acting, country dancing
and singing on the lighter
side.
Health
One family in the
cottages developed TB and
it swept through the family
members shortening their
lives. Also, the fever
hospital at Whelley was a
busy place and not a
favourite hospital to be
contemplated by young
minds.
Around this time most
children in Wigan were
vaccinated against
smallpox and if you wore a
red ribbon on your arm it
meant, “keep off, I’ve got a
sore arm”. Payments had
to be made for doctors’
visits and medicines – it
was also quite normal for
families to use herbal
remedies that had been
passed down for
generations to cure their
ills.
Marylebone Stores was
well placed to cater for the
nearby residents and
beyond, and to share their
griefs and joys.
The daily confining
chores of looking after a
family also created a niche
for home visits by my aunt
to collect weekly grocery
orders; as children we were
sometimes allowed to go
along with her on these
visits and watch as the
little attaché case was
opened to take out the
order book and see the
display of new lines of
convenience foods that
had come on the market
and on the shelves of the
store.
The normal diet at this
time was basic and
wholesome, with lots of
potatoes, vegetables and
meat in the winter, and
greens and fruits in the
summer, usually grown
and delivered to the store
from the surrounding
countryside.
Survival of the fittest
On reflection, I suppose
an accurate description of
these early days was
‘survival of the fittest’. But
one marvels at the
dedication and good
character and
thoroughness of the men
and women who worked
on the various committees,
planning and deliberating
to take Wigan and its
surroundings through
these challenging times –
particularly as regards
health, schooling, housing,
and the obvious need for
mass entertainment which
came with the expansion
of the town.
On the roads
In the early 1900’s
trams were well used, and
ran past the rows of
cottages on Wigan Lane on
their way to and from
Wigan and Boar’s Head;
later these were replaced
by buses.
One day, out of the
blue, a young man
appeared on a pedal bike
with a box on the front,
and we children were
introduced to our first
‘Stop me and buy one’ ice
cream man. Massed
produced ice cream had
arrived and it was well
worth saving or begging
pocket money to ‘buy one’.
Horse drawn wagons
were still widely used to
transport coal and other
goods around Wigan, and
milk was brought round by
a farmer with his milk float
pulled by a horse. Ladling
the milk from a huge churn
was not very hygienic;
nevertheless, we used to
put the milk jug on the
doorstep, cover it, and wait
for the daily pint to arrive.
Refrigeration in the home
was a long way off, so
means had to be found to
keep food and milk as cool
as possible, in the shape of
big earthenware pots kept
in the cool pantry.
When the tram service
was replaced by buses, the
walled brick road was
replaced by the present
wide boulevard – which is
still a very attractive
gateway to Wigan town.
Bank House was
demolished and
Marylebone Park created.
Mr. Woodcock’s old house,
‘The Elms’ still stands and
is now used by the NHS.
Also, many of the trees
around Marylebone Park
and Milton Grove belonged
to his estate and are still
standing.
Like me, I’m sure many
Wiganers love this part of
Wigan and we old ones
remember, with great
affection, all the grocers
and merchants who
served our town so
conscientiously.
Mrs P. Rowe
Wigan
8
➯
The Battle of Howe Bridge
1881 THOSE interested in military matters
will be well aware of the Battle of
Wigan Lane in 1651, during the Civil
War. Apart from that skirmish and
other even less important events in
the dark and distant past, we cannot
claim to have many important battle
sites within the borough. Many
readers, perhaps, will not know that
the numbers involved in the Battle of
Howe Bridge in 1881 probably
exceeded those involved at Wigan
Lane, yet the ‘battle’ was of a totally
different nature.
Events leading up to the battle
In 1872 the Lancashire and
Cheshire Miners Permanent Relief
Society (LMPRS) was founded with
headquarters at Wigan. Regular
payments guaranteed compensation
to the men and their families after
injuries or death occasioned at the
pit. The men paid in 75% of the
contributions but the coalowners
made up 99% of the board. This
displeased the men no end, yet they
had no alternative.
In 1880 the Employers’ Liability
Act arrived, forcing employers to
compensate workers for accidents
where the employers were negligent.
The coalowners were furious as the
mining industry traditionally
suffered massively, on a daily basis,
serious injury and death. Wigan coal
owner John Knowles, MP for Wigan
told the House of Commons in 1876
that the Act “would lead to nothing
but carelessness and idleness among
miners”. He was obviously being
very wary, as are today’s employers
of ‘compensation culture’!
Miners could opt out of local
schemes such as the LMPRS, if they
so desired. The coalowners told their
workers that unless they stayed in
the LMPRS they would be sacked on
1 January 1881. As a result
approximately 50,000 men and boys
in the Lancashire Coalfield went on
strike.
Reluctant strikers
Atherton miners working for the
caring Fletcher Burrows and Co had
already locally negotiated a better
wages agreement than those in
nearby mining districts, and had
even achieved the current pay
demand. The company also had
embraced with open arms the
Employers’ Liability Act. Atherton’s
miners still stopped work, thinking
of the wider union cause, but by 26
January the pits were reopened and
most of the men went back.
Meanwhile, angry mobs of
miners roamed the mining districts
aggressively picketing those
working. On 25 January 1881, at
Wharton Hall Colliery, Tyldesley, 18-
year-old collier Samuel Findlay of
Atherton died during fighting .
As things worsened the military
in the form of the 18th Hussars and
the 18th Regiment of Infantry were
called in and sent to Leigh. The
Atherton miners return to work had
infuriated the strikers, and on 28
January 1881 thousands of miners
from Ince, Haydock, St. Helens,
Wigan and Hindley attended a mass
meeting in Leigh.
A jolly romp
The events which took place after
the Leigh meeting are detailed in the
following extracts from the curiously
written account which appeared as a
supplement to the Leigh Chronicle on
5 February 1881. The account is a
strange mixture of fact, humour,
sarcasm about miners’ character and
seeing the event as one great
adventure, plus journalistic licence.
Very much, in fact, how a Sun
reporter of today would approach the
event!
Edited excerpts from the Leigh
Chronicle supplement of 5 Feb
1881
The journalist responsible for this
colourful account is not known. Due
to the length of the piece, only the
more interesting sections are
transcribed below.
“Friday 28 January, 1881, will
be long remembered in the annals of
Howe Bridge. The air was full of
rumour as to coming events, and the
presence of Infantry at Atherton and
of the Hussars at Leigh suggested
many terrible forebodings in the
minds of the more fearful. Great
excitement prevailed in the whole of
the district, especially as crowd after
crowd poured into Leigh from all
directions, many of the lads and
younger men openly brandishing
sticks and carrying stones, and
loudly cheering, bands of music
adding not a little to the din.
So alarmed were the tradespeople
that shortly after noon most of the
shops in the town (Leigh) were
closed, but before this was done,
numbers of men availed themselves
of the opportunity to collect aid in
money and kind, some of them
rather demanded than appealed for
it. In two or three cases they
behaved in the most cowardly and
disgraceful way.
A gang waited upon Mrs. Atkins,
who kept her confectioner’s shop in
Lord Street, and asked her to
contribute to the relief fund. She
gave them some coppers, saying that
she could not afford more, but not
content with her contribution, they
coolly set about plundering her shop
of the confectionery it contained, the
bulk of which they carried off. Much
of the remainder got scattered on the
floor and trampled upon.
In the meantime the
neighbourhood of the Police Court
was not entirely free, many idlers
standing about waiting for
‘something to turn up’. Here were
assembled in the buildings several of
the magistrates for the division,
among them being Jabez Johnson,
Caleb Wright, T. Lee, T.T. Hayes,
Abraham Burrows and Ralph
Fletcher Junior. Captain Allison, the
Assistant Chief Constable for the
County was also present with Supt.
Jackson, and the available force
numbered 50 stalwart men, armed
with truncheons and cutlasses.
At the Courts Hotel the troopers
were paraded and intelligence being
brought that one of the bands of
Medal struck after the Battle of
Howe Bridge (see p10)
9
music had gone towards Atherton
heading a mob, the Police and
Hussars immediately followed,
amidst a very babel of groans and
hootings and more unpleasant
manifestations of dislike in the shape
of stones and sticks. At Howe Bridge
the police turned up the road on the
left leading to the pits, and awaited
events. There were here not only the
Hussars but a Company of the 8th
Regiment Infantry, under the
command of Captain Egerton and
Lieutenant Mellor, from the Salford
Barracks.
As many of the mob were
gradually creeping up the road it
was decided by the authorities to
endeavour to disperse the people
before they came to close quarters.
Sergeant Dunn and his men
thereupon charged at the double
down the road, amidst a shower of
stones, and did terrible execution
among the flying mob, using their
staffs most vigorously. The troopers
simultaneously rode into the fields,
and thus perhaps unintentionally
drove many of the mob into the arms
of the police, by whom they were
warmly received.
Many, in order to get out of the
way, took refuge in the closets and
outhouses behind the neighbouring
cottages, from which they were
hauled by the police and hammered.
The stones flew in all directions,
many of the police being hurt. Some
in the mob indeed showed a reckless
indifference worthy of a better cause.
Having dispersed the crowd from the
colliery road, the constables returned
for a rest, but it was soon clear that
the mob was bent on mischief, a
large number of men taking the road
leading to the Lovers Lane Pit by the
side of Kemp’s public house.
Another charge was thereupon
made, the police clearing the main
road driving the ‘enemy’ across
hedge and ditch into the fields,
amidst some very discreet stone
throwing from behind the cottages.
In spite of these determined charges
by the police, the crowd kept closing
up as soon as their ‘natural enemies’
retired to the road, and after a lull
stone throwing was renewed and the
excited crowd again became defiant.
Captain Burn and Lieut. Van-Notten
Pole, in command of the Hussars,
urged the reading of the Riot Act, as
several of the troopers had been
struck by stones.
Several of the magistrates took
the same view, and at length Mr.
Jabez Johnson, accompanied by Mr.
Burrows and Mr. Marsh,
magistrate’s clerk, left a cab, and
advancing into the highway, faced
the crowd in the field, and turned to
the mob which blocked the highway
on each side. “Go away” said Mr.
Burrows; “the Riot Act is going to be
read.” What the ..…. do we care,”
was the reply, followed up by
stones. Mr. Johnson then read the
short Act in bold and measured
tones. The last word was scarcely
uttered before the Hussars, drawing
their swords, charged in all
directions.
The scene that followed cannot
be described. The strategic
movements of the crowd, east, west,
north and south, anywhere out of
the way, became a subject of general
conversation. The crowd were
driven far and wide but so soon as
the troops returned, the mob began
to creep quietly up again, and for at
least an hour little rushes along the
road were necessary to keep down
the lawless spirit of some of the
mob.
Shortly after three o’clock, when
those working in its pits were ready
to leave for home, the row recommenced.
About a score of men
with black faces made their way
from the Crombouke Pit. They were
hailed as ‘knobsticks’ and freely
stoned. The police then hurried after
them using their truncheons, but the
mob were still threatening, and the
‘knobsticks’ took refuge in the
cottages. The Infantry were then
called out, marched through Howe
Bridge and back again, and the
‘knobsticks’ were escorted home in a
cart, guarded by eight troopers.
The Yankee who treated
everything he came across as a
joking matter is reported to have
drawn the line at a mule’s hind legs
after some practical experience at
close quarters. Some of the choicer
spirits at Howe Bridge were more
determined. Out of the painful
experiences of the miners’ strike
they drew a supply of good, bad and
indifferent humour, which was a
credit to their inventive genius. It is
probably that in no other locality
could such original wit and good
‘story telling’ have been set a-going
as there was in Howe Bridge after
the ‘Battle of Howe Bridge’ was
fought.
The incident is not, in itself,
pleasant to dwell upon. In fairness
to the colliers it should not be
forgotten that the disturbance was
caused by comparatively few out of
a large community, most of the few
being young men and boys, and
nearly all strangers from Wigan and
St. Helens. The charge of the
Hussars over hedge and ditch
nerved many an old competitor at
the Athletic Sports to run as in the
olden days. As told with panting
breath, after all danger was over,
the story was like that of the
Highlander: -
Some say that we ran
Some say that they ran
Some say that we both ran away,
man.
It may be safely asserted that
they did run. The flashing sabre of a
Hussar charging at point is a
wonderful incentive to rapid
Engraving from the Leigh Chronicle of the ‘gallant’ charge of the Hussars. Top
left corner shows the police waiting to take action, with local magistrate Ralph
Fletcher Junior seen holding a pistol.
Continued on page 10
10
progress. Space would fail to
tell.………
Of most disastrous chances;
Of moving accidents by road and
field;
Of hair breadth ‘scapes.
Of being taken by the insolent
foe.
How one amateur rioter boldy
stood his ground and braved the
danger of being made a ‘bored man’
by some luckless thrust of trooper’s
sword. How he escaped because of
his intimate acquaintance with the
Hussar, who had marked him for his
prey.
How an ex-volunteer ran at
dangerous speed across three fields
only to have recalled to his mind that
‘the wicked flee when no man
pursueth’. How an active member of
‘Our Own’, and until April 1880, a
bold exponent of advanced Jingosim,
pitifully pleaded on the lines of the
doctrine of non-intervention, and
claimed immunity from attack on the
score of his long and distinguished
services for Queen and Country. How
yet another took two hours in
travelling from Howe Bridge station
to Atherton Mill, and eventually
returned to Kirkhall Lane via
Chowbent, Little Hulton, Tyldesley
and Little Hulton. How one braver
than the rest ran his head into a
convenient haystack and defied the
world, whilst his less sensitive
companions crept beneath amongst
the rats. How in fact, everyone was
very brave, but very discreet, and,
after running as though for their
lives, returned to Howe Bridge, and
have since narrated long and well
digested descriptions of their
experiences.
From the pit brow much could be
seen, and at times it was vastly
amusing. The troopers made playful
exercise around the heads of those in
their way, and frightened many
scores to the verge of despair. In one
case a man hurrying over a stile was
about to receive a blow from the flat
side of a sword, but swerving at the
moment of attack, received in
addition, a slashing injury to his
garment and a slight cut to himself,
sufficient to compel him for a few
days to ‘sit standing up’. It was,
however, singularly to mark how
uniformly uninjured were those who
displayed the greatest bravery.
This account would not be
complete without mention of the
war-service medal of bold proportion
and goodly pattern, which was
presented by the ingenious inventor
and designer to the officers of the
Hussars, and a few of the more
active participators in the affray.
The medal bears the inscription:
‘Chowbent Battle of Howe Bridge
1881’. Another decoration [a lead
version later to be made at Gibfield
Colliery, AD] is still wanting to
suitably reward those distinguished
non-combatant members of local
society who can conscientiously
declare that they were not
frightened, and that in telling the
story of the retreat from Howe
Bridge, they have kept within the
limits of strict facts.”
In conclusion
The events of 1881 at Howe
Bridge were repeated in most mining
districts in the latter years of the
19th century. Atherton’s miners had
good reason to be content with their
lot and were the envy of miners in
other districts. They were a fair
workforce though, who did not
oppose strike action in every conflict.
That workforce was to show, in 1893
for instance, that they were prepared
to suffer great hardship for sixteen
weeks when they thought their
cause fair. Amazingly Fletcher
Burrows and Co supported their
action and helped them with
additional non-mining work and
food. The majority of Atherton’s
miners supported the 1912
minimum wage strike, and they also
supported the 1921 and 1926 strikes
(albeit being virtually the first in the
country to return to work!).
On another note the supplement
to the Chronicle is a good example of
how the researcher should be very
careful of relying on newspaper
accounts. Within the account lies
fact, waiting to be extracted from the
journalistic colouring. Whatever
your archive source always think of
the context the writer is in and his or
her relationship to the events
recorded.
(Thanks to Ken Wood of Heaton,
Bolton, author of The Coalpits of
Chowbent (1984) for allowing the
use of his transcription of the
Chronicle supplement)
Alan Davies
Heritage Officer (Archives)
The Battle of
Howe Bridge
1881 –––––
Continued from page 9
I have sent this message to a relation in
the U.S. I thought you might like to have
it for Past Forward.
Bob Heaviside
Standish Wigan
When do you say that it’s worth it
For future generations to hear
When do you think it’s interesting enough
And to hear it from this volunteer.
I’ve been around now for a few years
And what I have seen I could tell
All about Queen and her country
And some here at home as well.
We had a war and it was bloody
Though I didn’t stray too far from home
Filling sand bags,wrapping bandages at
the infirmary
Don’t worry this isn’t a tome.
With V.C.s,D.S.O.s and such like
The war soon came to an end
And you coming straight from the U.S.
Of course there was Roosevelt and Lease
Lend.
And now if we disregard T.V.
And getting older we can spout
“What did you do in the war dad?”
Is that what we hear the kids shout?
It’s not the war that matters
Getting on with others,that’s the thing
How we all jell together
And “how long is a piece of string”.
So sit the young ones on your knee pa
And tell them just what;s going on
Don’t let them think we don’t care now
Speak up, you’ve done it all my son!
From all at Wigan
Heritage Service
to all readers of
a Happy
Christmas and a
Prosperous
New Year.
Past Forward
11
Another War in Iraq
THE invasion of Iraq during early 2003, together
with its subsequent occupation by British and
American forces, still fills our daily newspapers.
During that conflict many comparisons were written
with the British invasion of Iraq during World War I,
made in order to liberate it from Turkish occupation.
Most stressed the disastrous surrender of British
forces at Kut, and not too many the triumphant
occupation of Baghdad two years later.
Even less prominently
remembered are the events
which occurred during the
British occupation of Iraq
which covered many years
following the collapse of
the Turkish Empire, as the
victors strove to bring
government, law and order
to the region previously
held down under a
tyrannical regime (who
says that history doesn’t
repeat itself?) If you look
deeply into every great
historical event you will
find human stories which
have been overlooked by
the larger picture but which
mean everything to those
involved.
William Moore DCM
On the Basra Memorial
which commemorates
those British servicemen
who died in the Iraq
(Mesopotamia as it was
then known) theatre of
operations who have no
known grave can be found
the name William Moore
DCM. Moore lived in
Newfold, Orrell, then a
cluster of small cottages in
a small lane near the
present Upholland High
School, now replaced by
modern housing. As a boy
he attended St Lukes
Elementary School before
staring work at Bispham
Colliery as a drawer.
In June 1915 William,
only just 18 years old,
volunteered for the Army.
His service records contain
three numbers: 3513734,
201290 and 89029,
indicating that he was
reallocated to different
units; but in March 1918,
when the Germans
launched their final frantic
attempt to break through
the allied lines, he was
signaller in a service
battalion of he Manchester
Regiment. Outnumbered
by swarms of attacking
storm troopers and
battered by the enemy
artillery, the British
defenders held on and the
line was saved.
There were many
individual examples of
heroism over those few
days, and on 3 September
1918 the London Gazette
recorded a citation which
read:
“201290 Pte. W Moore,
Manchester Regiment
(Wigan). For conspicuous
gallantry and devotion to
duty when he remained in
an open trench at a visual
signal station under heavy
bombardment and by this
action maintained
communication.”
He had been awarded
the Distinguished Conduct
Medal, an honour second
only to the Victoria Cross.
Local people in Newfold
and Billinge Higher End
held a collection and, on
Friday 25 October 1918,
presented William with a
gold watch in appreciation
and recognition of his
DCM. In February 1920 the
Upholland District Council
presented gold medals to
Moore, and also to the
families of two soldiers,
Lance Corporal Fred
Latham and Corporal
Joseph Calderbank who
had been awarded medals
for military distinction
during the war but had
been subsequently killed in
action.
Mesopotamia
After the war William
was unable to settle down
and re-enlisted in the
Army, this time being
posted to the 2nd Battalion
of the Manchester
Regiment. His regiment
was transferred to
Mesopotamia where, under
the terms of the 1918
Armistice with Turkey, a
British force was to remain
in possession. Then, as
now, Iraq was an unruly
place where some tribes
were friendly towards the
occupying powers and
some were hostile.
On 4 June 1920 an
uprising of dissident tribes
took place and a force was
sent to put it down. On 20
July 1920 the 2nd
Manchesters were ordered
to Hillah, on the railway
line 70 miles south of
Baghdad, to relieve 500
Indian troops and to
reassure the friendly
natives in the area. They
marched in temperatures
over 120F in the shade -
although there was no
shade! - and the Medical
officer insisted on a 24
hour recovery period for
the men.
The Manchesters dug in
but four days later they
were surrounded and
attacked by several
thousand well armed
Arabs. After some fierce
fighting the Manchesters
attempted to withdraw.
The noise and confusion
panicked the transport
animals; the enemy closed
in, resulting in fierce handto-hand
fighting. Although
the Arabs were beaten off,
the defenders lost 20
killed, 60 wounded and
300 missing, of whom only
79 were later confirmed as
prisoners.
Lance Corporal William
Moore was among those
killed. He was just 23
years old, and one of
40,000 British and Indian
killed between 1914 and
1921, during the period
when Iraq was liberated
from Turkish rule. Just one
story from the wider
picture.
Fred Holcroft
(research by Carol
Littler)
Photograph of William
Moore, Wigan Observer,
23 Nov 1918, after his
presentation with a gold
watch at Bispham Colliery.
William Moore is standing on the left of the back row in
this photograph dated 27 April 1918 (location
unknown). Written on it are the words “Go one better
boys”, the motto of the 42nd Division, coined by its
General Officer Commanding, Major General Arthur SollyFlood
CB, CMG, DSO.
12
Family History Project news
Local researchers never cease to amaze me with their
energy and enthusiasm for indexing local records.
Recently completed by Freda Chorlton is a much needed
street index relating to all our filmed areas of the census for
1871. Freda has now turned her energies to indexing Wigan
Lower Ince Cemetery registers. Since these cover 1856-1976,
even with the help of another Friend, Gerald Marsden, Freda’s
time should be well taken up for quite some time. Anyone with
time, energy and the inclination to assist Freda and Gerald
should contact Christine Watts on 01942 828020.
As usual Gerry Rigby and his cohorts continue their
dedication to indexing the 1901 census and we have now
received the name index to piece RG 13 3564 (Hindley).
Local researchers have also been heavily involved in
indexing the marriage registers held by Wigan Register Office
for Lancashirebmd. I am told that an untold number of
mistakes exist in the local marriage indexes and more
importantly, complete omissions from the listings. Uploading
the actual data will take a while but I am assured that they will
all be online very soon.
Wigan Websites
Visitors to The History Shop often ask what local websites
are available to assist them in their researches, whether this
is local or family history. I am happy to say that where once
we had little to report, there is now a growing number of sites
devoted to life in the Borough in the present and past. Most
are by local people, some highlight local churches and others,
census records. But all are noteworthy.
www.wiganworld.co.uk
This magnificent site has grown considerably over the past
year and is steadily amassing a staggering amount of
information. Currently there are over 5,200 local photos, in
both colour and black and white, illustrating life from the
Victorian era to the present day. Added to these is a fairly
large selection of local directories. Also of interest are the
forums for genealogy and for Wigan ex-pats in general wishing
to make contact locally.
Other delights include a section for local walks, complete
with photos, and local events (currently St. George’s Day
Parade). There are also three new linked pages for The
History Shop, Wigan Family History Society and Fred Dibnah!
This last page has a link for Astley Green Colliery Museum.
The pages for The History Shop, besides showing
wonderful colour photos of the building, inside and out, also
list our microfilm holdings for local churches, whilst those for
Wigan Family History Society give members’ interests and
contact details, plus a name index to the 1841 Census. There
are also links to our own web-site at www.wlct.org (see below)
Brian Thurston and his son Richard are to be
congratulated for the quality of their photos and the web site.
If you haven’t already done so, take a look at wiganworld.
www.wlct.org
This is Wigan Leisure and Culture Trust’s own website and
gives the usual details of opening hours and contact details.
More to the point, clicking on culture and then heritage brings
up the Heritage Service page and lists sources available for
research at our three venues along with details of exhibitions
at the the History Shop. There are no original sources on the
site, however, and the site needs updating a little.
Additions to The Taylor Gallery
Donations
St Anne’s C.E., Shevington; Index to Burials 26 July 1889
– 22 August 1914
St Thomas, UpHolland; Marriage Index August 1837 –
February 2004
1901 census index, Hindley RG13 3562-4
Hawthorne, Ian The Ghosts of UpHolland 133.129
Hayes, G Collieries and their Railways in the Manchester
Coalfield 385.54
Hilton, John The Empty Plinth: Wigan’s Missing Boer War
Memorial
Matrix Archaeology Nos 1-3 Sandy Lane, Orrell:
photographic record 942.736
Genealogy
Grenham, John Tracing your Irish Ancestors (2nd ed.)
Ward, Margaret The Female Line
CD ROMS
Nadin The Chronology of British Coal Mining (including The
Price of Coal)
General
Aspin, C The Water Spinners 338.4767721
Dell, S The Victorian Policeman 363.2
Shannon, Paul British Railways Past and Present –
Manchester and South Lancs 940.5
Holwell, Colin David Brown Tractors: a British Legend
629.2252
Nowell, David Too Darn Soulful: the Story of Northern Soul
781.644
Clays, J & S Wigan Journey 82
King-Clark, Rex Forward from Kohima 940.5
Griffiths, Trevor The Lancashire Working Classes c.1880-
1939 942.7
Shaw, Dave Casino 942.736 ➯
 
13
www.cmhrc.co.uk
This is Ian Winstanley’s coal mining deaths data base and
lists 90,000 names for those who were killed in mines (also
women and men who were killed on the surface) during the
years 1850-1914. New material, recently added in 2003, has
updated Lancashire and other Northern counties up to 1946.
There is a list also of Ian’s publications available for
purchase. A must for coal-mining ancestor research.
www.communigate.co.uk/lancs
A lovely site for those interested in Abram with information
on the Maypole Pit disaster and coal mining in general in the
district alongside Abram’s traditional Morris dancers,
directories for the area and old Abram Charities, plus lots
more.
www.billinge-history.com
www.standish.org.uk
www.standish-history.org.uk
The above three sites concentrate on the history of Billinge
and Standish and in the case of the Billinge site have a
phenomenal number of photographs of the area in black and
white and colour, ready for downloading to your computer to
save or print. All sites are by local people, ie Billinge Local
History Society and for Standish, Steve Bradburn in
association with Standish Community Forum. Congratulations
to all concerned.
www.a2a.org
This much underused site gives researchers, as its title
suggests, Access to Archives online. The site indexes archive
collections throughout England and Wales, and especially
Wigan’s own Archive at Leigh Town Hall, Lancashire and
Cheshire Record Offices and of course other smaller local
archives.
You can search the whole database or, region or specific
archive, by subject or even for an individual name or family
name. The site will then load all references to the subject
requested and since Quarter Sessions papers and wills are
held by local archives, the details given can illuminate an
area, possibly not explored previously.
A major site for all researchers (see also p18)
HIRE OF
MEETING ROOM
The History Shop has a Meeting Room, with a
capacity for 36. This is available for hire by local
groups and societies at a very reasonable cost:
SOCIETY RATE
£8.25
PER MORNING/ AFTERNOON SESSION
£12.35
PER EVENING SESSION
COMMERCIAL RATE
£20.00
PER MORNING/AFTERNOON/EVENING SESSION
If you are interested, contact Philip Butler
Tel (01942) 828128
Who Do You Think You Are?
The new series of Family History Workshops will begin at the
History Shop on 26 January 2005. As in previous seasons the
workshops will take place on Wednesday afternoons every
fortnight. Additional sessions can be arranged at other times
for anyone who finds the dates/times inconvenient.
Date Time Location
26 January 2005 1.30 & 3.00pm History Shop, Wigan
9 February 2005 1.30 & 3.00pm History Shop, Wigan
23 February 2005 1.30 & 3.00pm History Shop, Wigan
9 March 2005 1.30 & 3.00pm History Shop, Wigan
23 March 2005 1.30 & 3.00pm History Shop, Wigan
6 April 2005 1.30 & 3.00pm History Shop, Wigan
There will be slight changes to the format and delivery, but
in essence the principle of each participant on the workshop
getting one-to-one attention from an experienced genealogist
and advice as to the next steps will be continued. The general
sessions are aimed at beginners, but more advanced
workshops can be arranged, please ring with your
requirements. Other changes include booking and payment
(£2.50) in advance (now essential) and the issuing of a
Family History pack before the session.
As always a big thank you to the Friends of Wigan Heritage
Service for agreeing to run these for us; without them we
would not be able to offer the service. For more information
on the Friends, see p20 or contact the History Shop.
For further information and booking please ring the
History Shop on 01942 828128.
Information received from Mrs Doris
Crook of Higher Ince
After seeing the letter ‘Some of the Best’ from A E Smith in
the last issue of Past Forward Mrs Crook wanted to tell us about
her father Jack Alker.
Jack was born in Little Darlington Street, off Manchester
Road, at Higher Ince in 1907. His claim to fame was winning a
Lonsdale Belt in the middleweight division in the 1930’s. Doris
did have a photograph of her Dad with the belt, a prised
possession indeed, but
unfortunately it went
missing within the family
and she now has no clues
as to who may have it. The
only photograph she does
have is reproduced here of
the wrestler in a typically
imposing stance.
Linking in with the letter from Mr Smith, Doris knows that her
father used to wrestle and train at Belshaws, travel to wrestling
matches at Belle Vue and Hardwick,and was possibly trained for
a while by Burgie Ben himself.
Jack became something of a local celebrity and a popular
local character. We can only guess at the number of drinks
earned through his party piece of showing the belt to interested
regulars at the Engineers Arms or the Belle Green Hotel.
Note from Ed. If anyone reading this does know the
whereabouts of the photograph of Jack with the belt please let us
know, Doris would be delighted to see it again, and we would
love to print it.
14
RESEARCHING my family
tree, I was fortunate to find
two particularly interesting
newspaper cuttings.
Stalwarts of Methodism
The first of these was
from the Daily Telegraph in
1924 under the headline
"Brothers Proud Record -
Stalwarts of Methodism."
The article went on to print
a remarkable record of
service in the Primitive
Methodist church held by
six Lancashire brothers
named Wright whose
combined ages at that time
were 432 years.
The brothers who where
born in Glazebury were my
great uncles and my maternal
grandfather. The eldest,
John Wright, had been on
the church plan for over 60
years and was one of the
most popular preachers
and lecturers in South
Lancashire. The Rev James
Wright began his ministerial
career as a missionary
in Queensland where he
served for 10 years. On his
return to England he
became Superintendent
Minister in several indusFamily
History
Continued from page 13
trial areas of Lancashire.
Peter Wright, professionally
employed as foreign
correspondent with
Pilkingtons, had been a
local preacher for over half
a century and filled all the
offices in the church open
to a layman.
Joseph Wright served
the church in various ways
including that of choirmaster
for more than 34 years,
while David Wright was
Superintendent of the
Methodist Sunday School
at Glazebury. William, my
maternal grandfather,
served as Sunday school
Superintendent, Church
Treasurer, Circuit Steward
and Society Steward.
Gardner’s band
The second of the two
newspaper cuttings, dated
31 May, 1935, showed a
photograph (top right) of a
father and mother and their
eight sons who comprised
what was claimed to be my
home town's first orchestra
known as "Gardner's
Band." The family were
responsible for the foundation
of orchestral music in
St.Helens, home town of
Sir Thomas Beecham and
where I was born in 1922.
The Gardner family
were reputedly musicians
of high standing. They had
more than a local
reputation in St. Helens as
their musical performances
were frequently acclaimed
in Birmingham and
Manchester. The father, my
paternal great grandfather,
played the clarinet; his
sons John, Joseph, and
William played the violin;
Benjamin played double
bass; Thomas, the flute
and Jim the cornet.
My father, Edmund
Gardner Wright, the
younger son of Walter and
Mary Jane Wright, only
daughter of the Gardner
family, was a well known
and respected tenor singer
in St.Helens and district.
He frequently gave
individual singing recitals
as well as being a member
of the choral group known
as the Good Comrades
Songsters, a leading tenor
in the St. Helens Amateur
Operatic Society, and
deputy conductor of his
church choir, thus carrying
on the musical tradition of
the Gardner family.
His father, Walter
Wright and his wife and
their three children
immigrated to America in
1893 where my paternal
grandfather thought he
could make a better life for
himself and his family. He
was a glass-blower by
trade and they ended up in
Fisher's Patch, about halfway
between the two
Pennsylvanian cities of
Shendoa and Mahanoy. It
was here that my father
was born in 1896.
As there was little or no
glass industry in the
immediate vicinity, my
grandfather went to work
in the local coal mines.
Tragically he was kicked by
one of the mules in the
mine, receiving a head
injury rendering him
epileptic and unfit for work
again. He died in 1901 at
the age of 39 after
returning to St. Helens.
Unfortunately I never
met my paternal
grandfather, who died
before I was born. I met my
paternal grandmother on
only one occasion that I
recall, when I was very
young. My memory is of a
small woman dressed in
black and wearing a black
bonnet in the house. She
presented a somewhat
forbidding appearance to a
small boy.
Love of the theatre
Although I won several
singing competitions as a
boy soprano, my life-long
love has been of the theatre
and after retiring from my
professional employment
with BlCC Ltd, in Leigh, I
gained the London
Academy of Music and
Dramatic Art (LAMDA)
gold medal. For many
years I was a member of
Wigan Little Theatre, and
also performed in theatres
in St. Helens, Leigh and
Bolton.
Eric S Wright
Lowton Warrington
The Wright
family
Edmund Gardner Wright
in one of his many
The six Wright brothers outside their church in Glazebury. operatic roles.
15
and coal miner at various
times during his lifetime.
Little is known of her
early childhood and we
next come across her
when she comes into
contact with Arthur J
Munby (1828-1910).
This gentleman kept a
diary during his lifetime
and Derek Hudson wrote
a book titled ‘Man of Two
Worlds’. Munby was an
educated man, a civil
servant, artist, author
and poet. His role as a
civil servant brought him
into contact with Ellen in
the late 1860’s and mid 1
870’s, when he was
looking into the role of
working women,
especially in the coal
industry, and he travelled
the country in this work,
some of which led to
changes in the
employment of women.
On p343 of the book is
the following report of
one such meeting of
Munby and Ellen who at
this time was living as a
boarder with the Green
family at 7 Coldwell Fold
Scholes Wigan.
“Thursday 11th
September 1872 Wigan I
[Munby[ was lodging at
the Royal Hotel Wigan
and I went to see Mrs.
Little, photographer and
cab owner’s wife. I
inquired about Ellen and
was informed that she
had arrived. Ellen herself
came out of the kitchen
and she was dressed in
her pit clothes as she had
promised. She looked
vastly bigger in her
working clothes than she
had done last night in her
Sunday clothes. She wore
her wadded bonnet, the
front part tied tight over
the forehead and the
hood encircling her head
like an aureole, her loose
blue patched cotton
bedgown made her full
bust and broad shoulders
look larger still, below it
came her striped skirt,
Continued on page 16
Grounds Family Newsletter Extract from
Issue No. 7, September 2004
Dear Editor
About two years ago a photograph appeared in Past
Forward of a pit brow lass named Ellen Grounds and, since
this is my own family name, it made me search my own
database to see if I could piece together something about
her. I have attached the details I have and with some
acknowledgements, I hope you find it of some interest.
Note that the photographs are taken from a book and I am
not sure where the originals are held.
Jack Grounds
Atherton Nr Manchester
Ellen Grounds, aged 17, a collier at Rose Bridge Pits,
Wigan 1866.
Pit Brow Lass
I first came across
Ellen Grounds a few
years ago when her
photograph appeared in
an edition of Past
Forward, a free
publication by Wigan
Heritage Service.
Although I had many
Grounds names on my
database it was a while
before I built up a family
tree for her. A little while
ago Alan Davies, Wigan
Heritage Service’s
Archivist, based in Leigh,
informed me about a
diary of Arthur J Munby,
which was in Leigh
Reference Library and
contained some
information on Ellen.
Tony Ashcroft, Local
History Officer for Leigh,
let me read the book that
Derek Hudson had
written about Munby.
Ellen came into the
world at lam (according
to her birth certificate) on
12 November 1849 and
she was the 5th daughter
and 10th child of Richard
Grounds and Ellen
Clitherow. Her parents
had been married at
Wigan All Saints on 13
February l837 and
resided at Birkett’s Bank,
Scholes. The baptism of
Ellen was at St.
Catherine’s Church,
Scholes on 25 November
1849, and a month later
her mother registered her
birth at Wigan. Various
other members of the
family were christened at
St. Catherine’s, which is
on a hill above Birkett’s
Bank. Her father,
Richard, was a labourer
 
16
gathered up around the
hips and under that her
breeches, the pair she
showed me last night and
with her iron shod clogs
on, Ellen had forgotten to
bring her topcoat, and
first tried on a coat
belonging to Mrs. Little’s
son, a big lad, but it was
too small for her. Mrs.
Little coat, a rough one
like her own was tried
and it fitted her well.
Then she was
furnished with a spade,
to represent her great
coal shovel. She
shouldered the spade in a
workmanlike fashion,
buttoned her coat and
stood readily and well as
I posed her, and she was
first taken in that guise
and then without the
coat. I standing beside
her, to show how nearly
she approached me in
sire. Indeed the bigness of
this bonny Ellen struck
me more than ever and
she seemed to fill the
lobby and the Portrait
shed with her presence.
She was as big as Mrs.
Little and her daughter
together and she strode
about the room in her
sounding clogs and
laughed and chatted with
the two women in a
kindly and respectful
way, but with the air of a
strong man speaking to
feeble folk. She did
everything just as she
was told and enlivened
the proceedings by jest at
her own expense, and
hearty good humoured
talk”.
The photograph above
is of Ellen in her Sunday
best and previously
referred to in the
narrative. The
photographer was a
Robert Little situated in
Clarence Yard, just off
Wallgate, Wigan, and
there is still a place with
that name yet. The Royal
Hotel was on
Standishgate. Her parents
had continued to live in
the Schofield Lane area of
Scholes, and were still
living there when Ellen
married Charles Hanson
at All Saints Wigan on 22
March 1875, although
she herself was living in
Hallgate, and still a
colliery labourer. Both
Charles and his father
were gunsmiths
according to their
marriage certificate.
Ellen’s mother died in
1885, but not before
seeing Ellen’s first three
children. Richard, her
father, died in 1893 and
he was alive for two more
grandchildren. Their
children were Elizabeth
(1880), Richard (1883),
James (1885), Sarah E
(1888) and Samuel
(1893). By the start of
the 20th century the
family were living at 6
Cumberland Street,
Wigan; Ellen was no
longer working at the
colliery, and Charles was
a Blacksmiths striker, as
was their son Richard.
James was a labourer in
the coalmine and
Elizabeth was employed
as a cotton spinner. At
present I have not found
out when she died, but it
would be interesting to
find out how her family
fared.
Grounds
Family
Newsletter –––––
Continued from page 15
PARISH VIDEO
STANDISH
presents
The History of Coalmining
in the Borough of Wigan
Titles include
Nothing Too Serious?
(The last working year and closure
of Bickershaw Colliery)
Blue Scars, Black Diamonds
(A History of Mines and Miners
in the Wigan area)
(in two parts)
Also available
The Standish Chronicles
Part 1, Part 2
(A General History of Standish)
For more details: 01257 422108
Ellen Grounds in her Sunday dress.
17
THE COLE FAMILY
My parents, John (Jack) Cole and
Miriam (nee Pardoe) were both born
in Warrington, as I was, but moved to
Wigan when I was four years old -
first Fir Grove and then Guildford
Crescent, Beech Hill. I have many old
documents concerning my father in
World War I. After he was
commissioned, he served in
Mesopotamia where he caught
dysentery and malaria before being
transferred to India. He worked in
Wigan dole office until I was about 16
when he transferred to the Admiralty
in Plymouth.
When World War II started, the
whole family, except me, was in
Malta. I joined the RAF and my
mother, brothers and sisters were
evacuated from Malta to Camborne in
Cornwall - the ship containing all their
furniture and belongings was sunk.
My father remained in Malta and
donned uniform again, helping to
man the anti-aircraft batteries.
Eunice Taylor and I were married
in the middle of the war at St
Michael's, Wigan which was the
Taylor's church (see photo below).
Our best man should have been
Ronnie Walker from Guildford
Crescent but unhappily he had been
shot down over Holland and I believe
was killed fighting with the Dutch
Resistance. Our son David was born
in Wigan the following year. Four of
my parent's eight children were born
in Wigan including a son, David, who
died aged two in Wigan Infirmary -
our son is named after him.
THE HULSE FAMILY
The group photo (centre top) is of
the Hulse family during World War I.
The eldest son, Charlie, was not on it
as he was away in the trenches. In the
centre-rear is George and extreme
right is my wife's mother, Edna. The
youngest, Jack, was at Dunkirk in
World War II. Mr. Hulse worked at the
Plantations at Haigh.
The photo below was taken at
Wigan Carnival in 1911 when Mrs.
Hulse, her sister Elizabeth and a lady
called Seddon (dressed in men's
clothes) won first prize. The Hulse's
house in Gidlow Lane was opposite the
top of Fir Grove where I lived as a boy.
At that time there was a large area
containing a pond between the Hulse's
house and a row of three shops - a
butcher's, a chip shop and Ashton's
Confectioners. Beyond this area was a
large field where I used to play cricket
with the Hulse boys and others. Since
then, that whole area was taken over
by a Tupperware factory - good for
jobs but bad for the kids.
THE TAYLOR FAMILY
Mathew and Edna (nee Hulse)
Taylor lived in Gidlow Houses,
alongside other members of the Taylor
family, from the time when they were
built. Gidlow Houses were called by
some in those days Brimelow Houses
- we don't know why!
When my wife Eunice's mother
Edna was expecting her, Mathew was
buried by a rockfall - I think it was at
John Pit. His face was badly disfigured,
and he suffered from it for the rest of
his life, but received no compensation
in those days. He never ventured
underground again. Below is a
photograph of Coal Board employees -
Mathew is second from left on the
back row. The locomotive behind them
used to travel from Taylor Pit and
Giant's Hall to a coal wash on the other
side of Gidlow Houses.
My wife had two sisters - the
middle one, Brenda and her husband,
who was on submarines when they
married, eventually joined the
diplomatic service. This led to a very
interesting life for both of them,
travelling and living all over the
world. Her younger sister, Avril and
her husband immigrated to Canada.
She recently put her name and
address on the Internet and received a
reply asking if she was the Avril
Taylor who lived in Gidlow and had a
dog called Belle. It turned out to be her
cousin Dorothy's son, Tony Wyatt,
who had lived in Gidlow and used to
play with our son David when they
were little! Tony's father, Jack Wyatt,
was a Wireless Operator/Air-gunner
like me but unfortunately did not
survive the war.
THREE WIGAN FAMILIES
Dear Sir
Thank you for printing my letter in Past
Forward 36, p20. As a result, I have
been contacted by several Wiganers. I
enclose some illustrated articles for
your consideration, relating to three
Beech Hill and Gidlow families - the
Taylors, Hulses and Coles.
Cecil E Cole
Clevedon Somerset
18
Ephemera from the Archives
Where are the
Leigh - Worsley
canal records held?
Most users of our archives
think that all local records will
be held by us at Leigh. Far
from it! Many people without
special knowledge would
never expect, for instance,
Northampton Record Office to
be holding records related to
the building of the canal from
Worsley to Leigh or land in
Tyldesley and Pemberton.
Thomas Egerton of
Brackley, Northamptonshire
was the Lord Chancellor
1603-1617. His son John, the
1st Earl of Bridgewater,
inherited the Brackley
(Northampton ) estate from
his father-in-law the Earl of
Derby in 1594. The Earls and
Dukes of Bridgewater held
estates in Brackley Kings
Sutton, Syresham and
Crowfield, Wollaston,
Tyldesley and Worsley and
Stetchworth
(Cambridgeshire). So through
this family connection at
Northampton Record Office,
in the Egerton family of
Brackley deposit, we will find
material relating to Tyldesley,
the Worsley to Leigh canal and
Pemberton.
Enter A2A
A major initiative by the
Public Record Office and
regional archives agencies
called Access To Archives (or
A2A) has been in progress
since 2001. This involves
Archives Services all over
England copying their paper
catalogues and sending them
off to be transcribed by typing
slaves chained to computers.
Once that information is on
computer, it can be searched
instantly using keywords,
printed out, emailed, or used
in other documents. Compare
how long the process of
searching took back in the
days of only having the paper
catalogues. Since 2001 a
staggering 5 million searches
and over 10 million catalogue
downloads have taken place!
A2A allows you to search
and browse for information
about archives in England up
to the present day which are
held in local record offices
and libraries, universities,
museums and national and
specialist institutions across
England. The long term aim is
to get all catalogues held by
repositories online, plus there
are projects in hand to tackle
the many uncatalogued
collections archives held.
Until recently, to find out
whether archives held are of
interest to you, it was
necessary to consult a paper
catalogue or other finding aids
such as index cards written by
archivists with illegible
handwriting similar to
doctors! A2A allows you to
search across catalogues
from over 340 repositories in
England. The database is
regularly updated as more
and more catalogues are
copied and sent into the A2A
transcription team, so you
need to revisit the website
often to include newly added
catalogues in your search.
Because the overall task is
so enormous, depending on
the region and locality,
specific aspects of the area’s
archives are currently being
asked for first under project
titles. We have just copied all
our church, parish and local
government catalogues for the
current ‘Community Spirit’
project, being co-ordinated by
Greater Manchester County
Record Office. As many of our
older catalogues had nearly
faded away, with no masters
to fall back on, they had to be
overwritten to be legible. This
process took nearly three
weeks. Access to catalogue
descriptions of this type from
all the repositories around the
North West will soon be
possible.
Browsing for coal
Go to the website
www.a2a.org.uk and click
on the phrase “search the
catalogue”. Here you can type
in keywords or names or
localities. This search will
access all the catalogues
currently on A2A, so it is
better to go into “extended
search” after you have opened
“search the catalogue” and in
the dialog box “location of
archives” bring up Wigan
Archives Service. Your search
will now only include our
catalogues. Type in coal and
see what comes up.
You can now see how
useful A2A is for us at the
Archives. I can now answer a
query on coal, coalmining or
the coal industry and email
back all the catalogue
references on the subject
instantly, or better still tell the
enquirer how to access them!
No archivist, no matter how
enormous his or her brain
power, can hold in their
memory a collection of
millions of documents. The
cross referencing power of a
computer unlocks the
collections in a way never
possible before. Unless a
person was prepared to
plough through all our
catalogues over a period of
weeks on the off-chance of
spotting a reference to coal,
they only scraped the surface
potential of our collections.
Don’t go mad!
Please be careful when
using A2A. You may be
researching, for instance, the
Davies family (a very worthy
cause!) and, after going on
A2A, you find 3500 references
to Davies’s in our area
in all manner of sections of
the collections. A request for
photocopies of all these
entries from the original documents
would not be welcomed
for obvious reasons,
and would also cost you
£52.50!
The information on A2A
more often than not will be
adequate for you and a copy
will not be required. Some of
the documents A2A brings up
may be very fragile or of great
age and importance, so a
large order would mean the
Archivist spending a great
deal of time checking the condition
of many documents
beforehand.
Limitations
A2A is a great step
forward, but only as good as
our catalogues and index
cards - some of these are very
basic, while others are very
detailed, and some even
illegible! We were unable
sadly to include our
Wrightington Deed collection
index cards, as many were
virtually illegible to both us
and the A2A team. This is
such an important collection,
with over 3000 documents
dating back to the late 12th
century. Very long term the
answer will be searchable
digitisation of archives
themselves. A computer
‘anorak’ friend of mine tells
me that already there are
programs which can scan
archives or illegible index
cards, even archives in
obscure early hands and by a
learning process convert the
content into text. This may
happen sooner than we think.
Alan Davies
Heritage Officer
(Archives)
A2A unlocks the Nations and
(more importantly) our Archives
 
19
HISTORY SHOP NEWS
The sound of Wigan
Casino at the History
Shop
On 21 October the History Shop was
the venue for a party to mark the opening
of the exhibition, Wigan Casino – The
Heart of Soul. It was actually a private
view of the exhibition by invitation as a
thank you to all those who had contributed
to its development and supported the
History Shop in its execution. The party
did get started though, in a real way, later
at the Last Orders in town when everyone
from the opening event was invited down
to Russ Winstanley’s regular Thursday
evening Northern Soul disco.
It was a great turn out for the private
view with over 80 people in all coming
through the doors, some still arriving as
the doors were about to close at 8pm.
Saying a few words about the Casino club
were the Radio 2 DJ and TV personality
Stuart Maconi and DJ Russ Winstanley.
The exhibition features the story of the
Empress Ballroom in Wigan, opened in
1915 and destroyed by fire in 1982. It also
charts the development of the Northern
Soul movement at the venue from the first
all-nighter in 1973 to the last in December
of 1981. The story for Northern Soul goes
on with the dedication to the music and
the friends made being now as strong as
ever. For the ‘Emp’, though, Wigan’s
greatest dance hall and the world’s best
disco, the story came to a sad end.
Come and relive those youthful
memories or take a look at what your
parents really got up to in the ‘70’s. The
exhibition continues at the History Shop
until 19 February 2005.
A CD, ‘Wigan Casino Soul Club -
30 Years of Northern Soul Memories’
- is on sale from the History Shop @
only £9.50 plus p&p.
Black History
Month
A big event occurred at the History
Shop on 8 October 2004, when the
Council wide ‘Black History Month’ was
launched. This was combined with a
meeting of the Community Cohesion
Forum, a specially prepared multi-cultural
buffet featuring some truly wonderful
food, and exhibitions from the Rafiki
group and the ‘Kick Racism out of
Football’ campaign. The speakers
included our own Council Chief Executive
Steve Jones, the Mayor Cllr. John Hilton,
and Milton Brown and ‘Afrikan’ from
Huddersfield! The event went extremely
well and showed just how many people
could be catered for at the History Shop
with a lot of organisation and hard work.
Exhibition
Programme 2005
Planning for next year’s
programme is well under way.
We start the year with a
travelling exhibition from the
National Coal Mining Museum,
and if your ancestors were coal
miners, you have just got to
visit it! ‘Routes to Your Roots’
looks at ways to trace the family
history of coal miners and the
more general history of coal
mining itself. It will be
supplemented by material
which is specific to our local
area. It is aimed at beginners,
but the more seasoned
researcher will also find it of
interest.
We continue with Wigan and
Atherton Photographic Societies
exhibitions - A Feast of
Photography!
Finally, we end with an
exhibition that looks at the
people who have come to live
and work in the Wigan area
from other parts of Britain and
the world, since the 19th
century to the present day. We
will explore the reasons why
they came, what happened to
them and the effects of the
resulting mix of culture and
peoples. We will also look at
how this is represented in the
historical record, which could be
useful for those with ancestors
from distant parts of Britain or
overseas.
As always, workshops and
events will accompany the
exhibitions, so watch out for
our new leaflets, posters and
press releases. See you next
year!
Yvonne Webb
Collections Development
Manager
Wigan Heritage Service
DJ’s Russ Winstanley and Stuart Maconi
listening to some Casino favourites at
the exhibition launch.
20
HISTORY SHOP NEWS
Friends
Over the summer work has continued
on our indexing projects. The subjects
covered are wide ranging and should
appeal to most people wanting to get
involved in heritage work in Wigan. This
includes the indexing of census returns,
church records, local newspapers and
important local book collections. There is
always more to do; in the past we have
worked on indexing maps, and in the not
too distant future we plan to tackle the
huge task of cataloguing and indexing our
photographic collection while making the
images more accessible in a digital
archive. We are still looking for people
who can spare time to devote to these
Friends projects. If this does not appeal,
then voluntary work can be organised
through the Heritage Service and not the
Friends, helping with the Archive
collection in Leigh.
Focus Groups
At the last Friends meeting one of the
many items covered was what the
Friends, all regular visitors, thought of the
History Shop. Those present were asked
the questions on the current History Shop
visitor survey and their answers were
quite revealing. Take a look at their
comments and then please let us know
what you think.
• Better signage, both to the building
from the town and once in the building
• Better access to the first floor, some
sort of lift
• Upgrading of the equipment, the need
for new readers
• Acquiring more resources, wider GRO
coverage
• More consistent staff training and
knowledge
• Earlier opening times, 9.30 or even
9.00am
Their conclusions were very focused
on improvements that could be made to
the venue and the facilities. As this group
is made up of regular visitors this is much
as you would expect.
Elsewhere in this issue you will find
other results from our surveys, the
Citizens Panel and interim reports from
the last Past Forward questionnaire and
History Shop visitor survey. What do you
think, do you agree or disagree? All views
are very welcome, please send to P Butler
at the History Shop, Library Street, Wigan
WN1 1NU.
Citizens Panel
As I’m sure interested residents of our
borough reading this will know, Wigan
Council prides itself on being one of the
more progressive local authorities in the
country. As such over two years ago a
‘Citizens Panel’ was set up to gain the
thoughts of a broad range of residents on
varied issues. The panel, consisting of
1500 people drawn at random from the
voting list and changing over on a regular
basis, was asked in April 2004 questions
relating to the Heritage Service.
The main findings were as follows:
• 52% of respondents had heard of
Wigan Heritage Service
• 21% had used the service in one form
or another
• of these 82% found the staff friendly
and/or knowledgeable
• in total 88% wanted to visit the History
Shop
• 71% wanted to see temporary
exhibitions on local history, 62% about
family history
This survey also made some effort to
find out about the general accessibility of
the service:
• 79% agreed with the statement that
the venues were easy to access
• 74% agreed they were easy to find
• 70% agreed they were welcoming
• 74% agreed they were easy to get
around
Some of these results are quite
surprising, especially in relation to the
History Shop. The project to improve and
refurbish this venue should improve these
figures further.
When asked about opening times
‘what opening times would you be likely
to make most use of?’ the panel gave
some interesting responses:
• Afternoon visits represented the most
cited visiting time but only slightly
• Saturday afternoon was seen as the
most likely, 38% for the History Shop
and 35% for the archives
• Sunday was seen as the least popular
day, 20% for Sunday mornings and
33% for Sunday afternoons
• Sunday also got the highest number of
respondents saying they wouldn’t visit
on this day 20%
• Evening openings were not given a
high status with 27% for weekday
evenings and only 8% for weekends
Factors suggested to increase use of
the service included:
• 54% Family History Workshops
• 38% Local History Talks
• 35% Guided Tours
• 31% Children’s Activities
FRIENDS OF WIGAN HERITAGE SERVICE
Name .......................................................................................................................
Address ....................................................................................................................
................................................................................................................................
Interests ...................................................................................................................
................................................................................................................................
Please enclose £5 subscription for one year’s membership. Cheque/P.O. payable to
Wigan Leisure & Culture Trust. Please return to the History Shop, Library Street, Wigan
WN1 1NU.
Remember your subscription entitles you to a priority mailing of Past Forward three
times a year, starting with the currrent issue unless you request otherwise.
N.B. If you do not wish to cut this coupon out, a cheque along with your details on plain
paper is fine.
➯
21
HISTORY SHOP NEWS
Visitor Survey – interim
Any regular visitors to the History
Shop will have noticed that there is a
survey being held there too! All we can
say is we do hold great store by public
consultation and surveys are a great way
of getting your views. We promise that
this apparent overload on surveys will
not go on forever and once the current
questionnaires are all in we will spend
time analysing the results. As with the
Past Forward questionnaire the final
date has not passed on this survey, so
the following results are just a taster
prior to a full report next time.
The questionnaire covers all Heritage
venues and these figures are combined.
However, over 75% of respondents
visited the History Shop.
• 74% of visits were for research
purposes
• of these 91% visited for family
history, 16% for local history
• the most used resources among this
group were the microfilms at 75%
and the microfiche at 30%
• 77% of this group rated their visit as
excellent
• 96% of all respondents rated the
venue, the facilities and the staff
either good or excellent and a similar
figure rated their satisfaction with the
visit as good or above
• 68% rated the staff excellent
• demographics show that 88% are in
the over 40 age brackets while 51%
are over 60
• 67% of visitors from within WN
postcodes, with 91% from the wider
North West region
These results are very encouraging,
but do indicate that so far we have only
reached the research visitors. It is far
more difficult to consult with exhibition
viewers and general browsers through
this sort of passive survey. However, we
have visitor books and comment books
in the venues and visitor comments from
specific shows, such as ‘Wigan Casino’,
are likely to be valuable feedback
sources.
A Big Thank You
Thank you to everyone who replied to
our consultation in the last issue of Past
Forward by returning the questionnaire,
we were quite literally overwhelmed. As
the currency of the survey actually
extends beyond the copy date for this
issue, we are only able to publish a few
highlights from your replies. In the next
issue hopefully we will have a full analysis
of the results ready so will share them
with you.
Despite the fact that all the
questionnaires are not yet in, we have
looked at each and every one so far
submitted. The overall picture is
extremely positive. It seems you do
genuinely love the Past Forward
magazine and look forward every four
months to its arrival. You find it difficult
to fault either the format, layout, legibility
or content, surely there is something we
can improve upon!
Comments from some of the forms so
far include:
‘I have found it a wonderful reminder of
my youth…’
‘Excellent – a credit to the
town/community’
‘Past Forward and the History Shop are a
credit to the Borough’
‘The Past Forward magazine is unique, a
winner for any Heritage Service’
‘Excellent value’
‘Through it (Past Forward) I am now in
contact with an old work mate of almost
70 years ago and through her receiving
news of yet another. My annual fiver to
you is well worth it!’
‘I derive a great deal of pleasure from
reading Past Forward’
‘The Heritage Service is great’
‘I forward the magazine to friends in New
Zealand, who also pass it on, the
feedback and compliments you receive is
quite extraordinary’
‘Wonderful memories of Wigan and
people, keep on printing’
‘Thank you all at Past Forward and the
History Shop’
‘Keep up the good work’
‘Past Forward is a delight’
‘Congratulations on producing such a first
class magazine’
‘A super publication. Always welcome in
this house’
And we have many, many more.
However we are not perfect and not all
the returns are without criticism, and we
will take on board where we can any
suggestions for further improving the
magazine.
************
As you can see we had more than a
few comments on the History Shop and
the Heritage Service in general. Another
vital reason for us reading every single
returned questionnaire is to make sure
that any requiring an answer were dealt
with promptly.
For example Mr Miller from Bristol
returned his questionnaire (thank you Mr
Miller) and took the opportunity to ask
about an enquiry he had made some time
earlier regarding a book we have for sale.
We replied and received a very nice thank
you letter from him with an order for the
book included. Mrs Lawton from Waltonle-Dale
returned her questionnaire (thank
you Mrs Lawton) and whilst saying she
enjoyed a recent visit to the History Shop,
found it ‘great and very interesting’, she
was not satisfied with the service she
received while trying to get some
information. A letter supplying the
information she had been seeking was
dispatched and again solicited a very
complimentary reply.
We feel that this part of the process is
very important. If you have put anything
in the comment section that we feel
merits a reply we will get back to you.
Thank you again for your response,
and look out in the next issue for a full
report.
Christ Church
Pennington
is celebrating its
150th anniversary
A booklet, which provides a
brief history of church is
available from both Leigh
Library and the History Shop.
The title is
‘150 YEARS OF SERVICE’
and costs £2.50.
22
25 Doorways
A DRAWING AND QUIZ
FEATURING
25 DOORWAYS
IN WIGAN
by
GERALD RICKARDS
Gerald’s centre spread for this issue is
one with a difference. A number of
historic cities in the British Isles have
already produced well-known posters
illustrating their doors, so here is
Gerald’s contribution for Wigan. Better
still, it’s done in the form of a quiz (a very
challenging one, ideal for pondering over
the Christmas holidays); and best of all,
it will also help an extremely deserving
cause. Gerald hopes to resume his
popular series of local drawings in the
next issue. Ed.
THE QUIZ
The drawing of 25 'Wigan doorways'
is presented in the form of a quiz.
Most of the doors are in the centre of
the town. The area covered stretches
from the edge of Mesnes Park to the
Wallgate and Chapel Lane railway
bridges. Number 23 is the only door
on the out of town side of the dual
carriageway Riverway and Central
Park Way.
Hopefully it will give enjoyment to all
and at the same time raise money to
help the Hospice.
ENTRY FORMS
These can be sent in several ways; by
submitting the question page (or
photocopy) as printed in Past
Forward; handwritten answers or on
one of the question sheets available at
various centres, including the History
Shop, the Hospice, Hospice Shops,
several libraries, the artist and at
CCArt picture framers and gallery in
Hallgate, Wigan.
HANDING IN OF FORMS
Entry forms can be sent to Wigan and
Leigh Hospice, Kildare Street, Hindley,
Wigan WN2 3HZ or handed in at the
History Shop, Hospice Shops, some
libraries, the artist, or CCArt in
Hallgate, Wigan.
THE PRIZES
Prizes will be of signed prints in
frames (alternative if desired of two
signed unframed prints).
CLUES
With numbers given in five rows, reading from left to right, top to foot of design.
1. I'll bet you get this one ...........................................................................
2. Eat and enjoy the view ...........................................................................
3. First a pharmacy, later a bank. Now? ......................................................
4. Next door is more genuine ......................................................................
5. Handshakes no longer here after a 100 years .......................................
6. A musical instrument can sing like Bing Crosby ..........................................
7. Not the main entrance ......................................................................
8. Looks like a door but it isn't .....................................................................
9. Two white roses .....................................................................................
10. The door that leads to an aisle .................................................................
11. Definitely Italian ...................................................................................
12. Blithely climb we up the hill' ..................................................................
13. Said to be the grandest building in town ..................................................
14. Two occupants come from another house ..................................................
15. Queues outside before 9 a.m ..................................................................
16. No longer furnished .............................................................................
17. Through the door and open wide ............................................................
18. Go in here for a break ............................................................................
19. Lengthy history to this place ...................................................................
20. Next door is not quite so genuine ............................................................
21. Do they still serve 'Barkers' here? ..............................................................
22. Some choices limited here.......................................................................
23. Plays a part in entertanment ...................................................................
24. Now bricked over for Tender Loving Care ...................................................
25. Bigger than the other one ........................................................................
26. Extra prize and tie breaker: Suggest another doorway with appropriate clue
(no more than 10 words)
..........................................................................................