- 11 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing: Plastic/Rubber Molding
Company 
Name
DANANG RUBBER JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CAO SU ĐÀ NẴNG
In Abbreviation CAO SU DA NANG (DRC)
Cao Su Da Nang is a superior plastic molding company. In near future, to grow as a corporation and to survive the chaos 
established  by  downhill  world  economic,  we  believe  that  dealing  worldwide  in  addition  to  dealing  nationally.  Because  of  such 
prediction and belief, we acquired 4 different types of quality control standards: ISO, JIS, DOT, and EMARK. We believe our products 
are high quality and worldly acknowledged. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Rubber Molding Tire 5
2 Rubber Cutting Tire 6
3 Rubber Glueing Tire 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008 5S
DIN JIS X Other DOT ; EMARK
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Mixer 80
External Mixer 70
Internal Mixer 10 China, Russia, Italia
Curing Machine 60 China, India
Company Profile
Company Name
in English DANANG RUBBER JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CAO SU ĐÀ NẴNG
in Abbreviation CAO SU DA NANG (DRC)
Capital Share State-Owned (%) 50.5% Private (%) 49.5% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.drc.com.vn/
Office
Address No.01, Le Van Hien, Khue My, Ngu Hanh Son, Da Nang
Tel 0511-384-7408 Fax 0511-383-6195
Factory
Address No.01, Le Van Hien, Khue My, Ngu Hanh Son, Da Nang
Tel 0511-384-7408 Fax 0511-383-6195
Person
Name Mr Dinh Ngoc Dam Title General Director
Tel 0913-401-603 Email damdng@drc.com.vn
Language English Japanese Other Russia
Capital (USD) 35,000,000 Turnover (USD) 150,000,000 Employees 1,526
Main Customer Dan Chu Ha Noi, Binh Loi Quang Ninh, Truong Hai Auto
Import - Export
Import Country:India, Korea, Japan  Product / Material: Chemicals, synthetic rubber, steel…
Export Country:Asean, Latin America, Europe, Africa  Product: Tubles and ties for automobiles, motobikes, bicycles
- 12 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Injection Molding
Company 
Name
DAI KIM JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN ĐẠI KIM
In Abbreviation DAI KIM
Dai  Kim  is  a  private  enterprise  with  two  outstanding  technologies:  injection  molding  and  polyurethane  molding.  Injection 
molding technology is mainly used for manufacturing Printer parts, bicycle parts, etc. polyurethane molding technology is mainly used 
for manufacturing cushions (mainly chairs) from ordinary furniture to high quality furniture. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Polyurethane Forming 5 Mold Manufacturing For Injection Molding
2 Urethane Block 6
3 Plastic Forming Erectric Parts, etc 7
4 Injection Mold Erectric Parts, etc 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008 5S
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Injection Molding Machine Taiwan
Styrene Block Forming Taiwan
Coordinate Measuring Machine Holland
Polyurethance Forming Japan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English DAI KIM JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN ĐẠI KIM
in Abbreviation DAI KIM
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100 Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.nhuadaikim.com/
Office
Address No 2 Kim Giang, Kim Giang, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi
Tel 04-3858-4583 Fax 04-3858-3721
Factory
Address No 2 Kim Giang, Kim Giang, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi
Tel 04-3858-4583 Fax 04-3858-3721
Person
Name Ms Pham Thi Dinh Title Chief Accountant
Tel 0912-318-839 Email dinh_dk@yahoo.com
Language English Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 400,000 Turnover (USD) 1,150,000 Employees 100
Main Customer
Import - Export
Import Country:Taiwan  Product / Material: Equipment
Export Country:Japan  Product: 
- 13 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Injection Molding
Company 
Name
DONG A PLASTIC COMPANY LIMITED
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN NHỰA ĐÔNG Á
In Abbreviation NHUA DONG A
DAG is a plastic material providing company. Our selling points are one, possessing a technology to sandwich plastic 
product with aluminum sheets to increase the resistance to fire. Two, facility is famous for equipped with 12 lines of ejection 
molding lines. Three, we have been dealing with foreign countries; including Asian, Europe and North America are also our 
important dealing partners.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Manufacturing Machine 5
2 Carrying Devices 6
3 Packing Wrappers 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Compressors 2 Hitachi, Sawan Japan
Machine Profile 4 Jwell, Krausmaffie
Pouch Machine 13 Taiwan, Vietnam
Chiller 2 Fusheng Taiwan
Generator 4 Mitsubishi Japan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English DONG A PLASTIC COMPANY LIMITED
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN NHỰA ĐÔNG Á
in Abbreviation
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.dag.com.vn/
Office
Address No 535, Kim Ma, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3734-2888 Fax 04-3771-0789
Factory
Address Chau Son IZ, Ha Nam
Tel 0351-384-8788 Fax 0351-384-8988
Person
Name Mr Nguyen Phu Thang Title Vice President and Facility Director
Tel 0913-083-183 Email gdnm.nda@nhuadonga.com.vn
Language English Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 2,900,000 Turnover (USD) Employees 145
Main Customer
Import - Export
Import Country:Japan, Germany, China  Product / Material: 
Export Country:Cambodia, Laos, India  Product: 
- 14 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Injection Molding
Company 
Name
FOLIN COMPANY LIMITED
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN PHONG NAM
In Abbreviation PHONG NAM (FOLIN)
FOLIN (Phong Nam) has been dealing with Japanese corporations for many years and because of such reason, most Japanese companies 
treat us with respect and consider us as a world “trust.” We can deliver products with quality which customers asked, or can deliver even 
higher quality of products. This is possible because of our technicians are determined not to deliver products with quality which technician 
cannot agree with. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Injection Molding Electric Parts, etc 5
2 Meal Processing Mechanical Parts 6
3 Mold Manufacturing 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008 5S
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Injection Molding Machine (20-700ton) 22 Sunwoo, Haitian Taiwan, Korea
CNC Milling Machine 4 Lifan Taiwan
Dill 3 Sunwoo Taiwan
Saw 1 Sunwoo Taiwan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English FOLIN COMPANY LIMITED
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN PHONG NAM
in Abbreviation PHONG NAM (FOLIN)
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.phongnam.vn/
Office
Address Lot 40G, Quang Minh IZ, Me Linh, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3813-4559 Fax 04-3813-4558
Factory
Address Lot 40G, Quang Minh IZ, Me Linh, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3813-4559 Fax 04-3813-4558
Person
Name Mr Nguyen An Phong Title Sales Director
Tel 0985-699-028 Email phong.nguyenan@gmail.com
Language English Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 2,200,000 Turnover (USD) 4,300,000 Employees
Main Customer GSK Vietnam, VAP Automobike And Motorcycle Parts Manufacturing, Interseat, etc
Import - Export
Import Country:Korea, China  Product / Material: Plastic Beads, Mechanical Parts
Export Country:Japan, Belgium  Product: Plastic Products
- 15 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Rubber Molding
Company 
Name
GIAI PHONG RUBBER COMPANY LIMITED
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN CAO SU GIẢI PHÓNG
In Abbreviation CAO SU GIAI PHONG
Cao Su Giai Phong is located in Hong Yen specializing in plastic molding. Have 6 years of worth experiences dealing with 
Japanese companies and, as a results, we are strict about deadlines and milestones. Our facilities are equipped with modern technologies, 
such as 5 axes processing machine, allowing us to support and answer customers needs and demands. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Assembling (CNC) 5 Rubber Forming
2 Vacuum Molding 6
3 Plastic Mold 7
4 Rubber Mold 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Rubber Presser (350T, 200T, 150T, 100T, 50T ) 17 South Korea, Japan...
Plastic Extrusioner (125T, 75T, 50T) 5 Taiwan
Rubber Plant 1 China
5 Axis CNC Milling Machine 1 Japan
CNC Milling Machine 2 Japan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English GIAI PHONG RUBBER COMPANY LIMITED
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN CAO SU GIẢI PHÓNG
in Abbreviation CAO SU GIAI PHONG
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.giaiphongrubber.com/
Office
Address Tan Quang IZ, Van Lam, Hung Yen
Tel 04-3677-0567 / 04-3677-0568 Fax 04-3677-0565
Factory
Address Tan Quang IZ, Van Lam, Hung Yen
Tel 04-3677-0567 / 04-3677-0568 Fax 04-3677-0565
Person
Name Mr Le Anh Duc Title Plant Executive
Tel 0988-886-844 Email leanhduc@caosugiaiphong.com
Language English X Japanese X Other
Capital (USD) 1,000,000 Turnover (USD) 2,000,000 Employees 120
Main Customer Ha Noi ASTI, Nippon Seiki Viet Nam, Chiuyi Viet Nam 
Import - Export
Import Country:South Korea, Japan  Product / Material: Rubber Ingredient, Rubber Chemical, etc
Export Country:   Product: 
- 16 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Injection Molding
Company 
Name
HA NOI MOULD TECHNOLOGY COMPANY LIMITED
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN CÔNG NGHỆ KHUÔN MẪU HÀ NỘI
In Abbreviation HA NOI MOULD
Our  company  manufactures  plastic  molds.  We  deal  with  Japanese  companies  and  ship  our  products  to  Japan  consistently. 
Currently, our factory is not a large one; however, we are preparing to manufacture and deliver products to each company around the 
world. To show our efforts, we acquired 5S quality control standard, as well as, to employee a worker who can understand and speak 
English fluently to support any English inquires from foreign enterprises. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Injection Molding Many Kind of Parts 5
2 Mold Manufacturing For Injection 6
3 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO Number of ISO 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
CNC Milling 3 Japan
Wire Cutting 1 China
Flat Grinding 1 Japan
Discharge Machining 1 Japan
Horizontal Milling Machine 1 Japan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English HA NOI MOULD TECHNOLOGY COMPANY LIMITED
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN CÔNG NGHỆ KHUÔN MẪU HÀ NỘI
in Abbreviation HA NOI MOULD
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.hanoimould.com/
Office
Address No 262 Hoa Lo, Xuan Phuong, Tu Liem, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3764-8305 Fax 04-3764-8306
Factory
Address No 262 Hoa Lo, Xuan Phuong, Tu Liem, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3764-8305 Fax 04-3764-8306
Person
Name Mr Le Thanh Hung Title Director
Tel 0912-308-979 Email hnmould@yahoo.com
Language English Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 100,000 Turnover (USD) 600,000 Employees 25
Main Customer Sumitomo Electrolic, P&Q, VTC
Import - Export
Import Country:Japan    Product / Material:Steel
Export Country: Japan    Product:Mold
- 17 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Injection Molding
Company 
Name
HA NOI PLASTIC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN NHỰA HÀ NỘI
In Abbreviation HPC
Hanoi Plastics is a motocycle parts manufacturing company. Our specialty is manufacturing plastic related products. Our business 
relationships with Japanese companies began during year of 1996 as a part of business expansion program. Our mold department and 
forming department are equipped with top end machines giving us a power to answer all of our customers’ needs. If you have any 
questions regard to plastics, feel free to contact our customer representative. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 5
2 6
3 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2000, 9001:2008 5S X
DIN X JIS Other X
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Plastic Injection Molding Machine 82 Toshiba, JSW, Mitsubishi, etc Japan, Korea
Metallic Mold Manufacturing Machines 23 Japan, USA, UK, SWISS
Company Profile
Company Name
in English HA NOI PLASTIC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN NHỰA HÀ NỘI
in Abbreviation HPC
Capital Share State-Owned (%) 81% Private (%) 19% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.hanoiplastics.com.vn/
Office
Address Group 19, Phuc Loi, Long Bien, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3875-6885 Fax 04-3875-6884/04-3875-7385
Factory
Address Group 19, Phuc Loi, Long Bien, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3875-6885 Fax 04-3875-6884/04-3875-7385
Person
Name Ms Pham Thanh Hien Title Vice President
Tel 0913-270-816 Email hienhpc@vnn.vn
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 7,700,000 Turnover (USD) 27,000,000 Employees 1,050
Main Customer Honda, Toyota, LGE, Nikoh, Sanko, Shoden, VMEP
Import - Export
Import Country:Japan, USA, England, Korea, Taiwan  Product / Material: Plastic, Ingection Molding Machinary etc
Export Country:Japan  Product: Plastic, Additive For Plastic.
- 18 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Composite boat
Company 
Name
HAI LONG ENGINEERING JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CÔNG NGHỆ HẢI LONG
In Abbreviation HLE
Our company specilizes in processing composite materials for ship-building.We have participated in many intensive courses on 
composite materials in Denmark and currently the US. We also focus on research and innovation. Our product has been exported to 
Poland , Japan. As we get technical instruction from Japanese companies, customers can be assured about our product’s quality.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Plastic Molding Resuce Boat 5
2 Plastic Molding Tourist Boat 6
3 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO Number of ISO 5S
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Company Profile
Company Name
in English HAI LONG ENGINEERING JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CÔNG NGHỆ HẢI LONG
in Abbreviation HLE
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.hailongcorp.com/
Office
Address 57 Ton Duc Thang, An Dong, An Duong
Tel 031-383-5825 Fax 031-357-1208
Factory
Address Km9, Quan Toan, Hai Phong
Tel 031-353-4837 Fax 031-353-4838
Person
Name Mr Nguyen Quyet Thang Title Director
Tel 0903-434-413 Email thangnq@hailongcorp.com
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 300,000 Turnover (USD) 1,000,000 Employees 26
Main Customer Shigi Shuibuilding, Hung Phat International, DMP, Thanh Tin, Weihei Xigan Yacth
Import - Export
Import Country:    Product / Material:
Export Country: England, Denmark  Product:Composite Boat
- 19 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Plastic and Styrofoam
Company 
Name
HAMIN VIETNAM HOLDING COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN HAMIN VIỆT NAM
In Abbreviation HAMIN
We, Hamin, are plastic and styrofoam manufacturing specialists are becoming recognized as a top brand name for plastic plastic and styrofoam 
manufacturing in the nation. Our main EPS product use for electric and Electronic equipment, our Plastic products are plastic parts and technical plastic 
accessories use for electric and electronic. Recent years, main corporations began to expand their businesses overseas. We are one of those companies; however, 
because of acquiring 2 different types of ISO, we believe we are superior. In addition to current trend, many different Japanese companies began to offer us 
works. Such Japanese companies are growing each year and to answer each inquiry, we are working to have customer support team with fluent in Japanese. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Manufacturing Plastic parts Electric Parts, etc 3
2 Manufacturing Styrofoam Packaging for electric parts 4
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008, 14001:2004 5S X
DIN JIS Other UL 94
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Injection Molding Machine TTI-90F2 1 Weltec Hongkong
Injection Molding Machine TTI-130F2 2 Weltec Hongkong
Injection Molding Machine TTI-320F2 2 Weltec Hongkong
Injection Molding Machine TTI-450F2 2 Weltec Hongkong
Injection Molding Machine TTI-650F2 2 Weltec Hongkong
Shape molding machine K13517 4 Kurtz Germany
Shape molding machine K810 5 Kurtz Germany
Pre-expander machine 1 Kurtz Germany
Company Profile
Company Name
in English HAMIN VIETNAM HOLDING COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN HAMIN VIỆT NAM
in Abbreviation HAMIN
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.hamin.com.vn/
Office
Address Lot C6-2, Que Vo IZ, Bac Ninh
Tel 0241-363-4398 Fax 0241-363-4299
Factory
Address Lot C6-2, Que Vo IZ, Bac Ninh
Tel 0241-363-4398 Fax 0241-363-4299
Person
Name Tran Le Huyen Title Sales Manager
Tel 0195- 555-676 Email lehuyen@hamin.com.vn
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 1,000,000 Turnover (USD) 7,434,000 Employees 120
Main Customer Brother, Panasonic Home Appl, Ferroli Indochina 
Import - Export
Import Country:Malaysia, Taiwan  Product / Material: Plastic Materials
Export Country:France, USA, Japan  Product: Plastic parts and Styrofoam
- 20 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Injection
Company 
Name
HANEL PLASTICS JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN HANEL XỐP NHỰA
In Abbreviation HANEL PLASTICS
Hanel Plastic was established in 1994 and a manufactures plastic. Since 2000, we have been dealing with Japanese companies. Because of such 
long relationship, we established a trust to the point where when you think about plastic, you will contact Hanel Plastic on first hand. Our company had 
already met the acquired ISO of quality and enviroment. We have 3 factories in Sai Dong B, Long Bien. Our main customer are Korean and Japanese 
companies such as Canon, Brother, Jaguar, Samsung, LG, TOTO, Panasonic, Vietnam Airlines...
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Plastics Injection Part of Printer, Vacum Clearer 5
2 EPS Injection Styrofoam Packings 6
3 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Plastic Injection Production Lines 2
EPS Porus Production Technology 20 Germany
CNC Machine Center Plastic Press 30 Hong Kong
Production Lines 3
Company Profile
Company Name
in English HANEL PLASTICS JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN HANEL XỐP NHỰA
in Abbreviation HANEL PLASTICS
Capital Share State-Owned (%) 56% Private (%) 44% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.hanelplastics.com.vn/
Office
Address Industrial Road No 6, Sai Dong B I.P, Long Bien Dist, Hanoi
Tel 04-38753213 Fax 04-38752436
Factory
Address B9, B15, Road 6, Sai Dong B .I.P, Long Bien, Ha Noi
Tel 04-38753213 Fax 04-3875-2436
Person
Name Mr Pham Quoc Nam Title Sales Manager
Tel 0904-197-521 Email sales@hanelplastics.com.vn
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 2,500,000 Turnover (USD) 12,000,000 Employees 380
Main Customer Canon VietNam, Brother Industry, Panasonic , Samsung Electronic, ToTo, Vietnam Airlines
Import - Export
Import Country:Malaysia, Korea, Hong Kong etc  Product / Material: Materials( PP, PE, ABS, HIPS etc)
Export Country:EU  Product: Parts of Electronic, Precision, Motorcycle
- 21 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Motorcycle Parts
Company 
Name
SHORAI VIETNAM COMPANY LIMITED
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY TNHH SHORAI VIỆT NAM
In Abbreviation SHORAI VIETNAM
Our company specializes in plastic processing,coating and printing for motorbike and car manufacturers. We are Vietnam-Japan 
joint venture company, our director is Japanese. We plan to provide a large quantity of our products for Honda in September 2012 and 
for Toyata in May 2013. We are able to fully meet the high requirements of Japanese companies.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Injection Molding Automobike Plastic Parts 5
2 Printing 6
3 Plating 7
4 Mold Manufacturing Mold for Plastic 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO Number of ISO 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Injection Machine 3 Nikko Japan
Injection Machine 3 Mitsubishi Japan
Injection Machine 3 Niigata Japan
Milling Machine 2 AMADA, Takao Japan
Lathe 2 Yamazaki Tekko Japan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English SHORAI VIETNAM COMPANY LIMITED
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY TNHH SHORAI VIỆT NAM
in Abbreviation SHORAI VIETNAM
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.shorai.com.vn/
Office
Address Block 2, CN 8, Minh Khai Industrial Park, Tu Liem, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3765-8875 Fax 04-3765-8875
Factory
Address Block 2, CN 8, Minh Khai Industrial Park, Tu Liem, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3765-8875 Fax 04-3765-8875
Person
Name Mr Nguyen The Hiep Title Sales Department
Tel 0167-870-9680 Email thehiep.nguyen1707@gmail.com
Language English X Japanese X Other
Capital (USD) 480,000 Turnover (USD) 570,000 Employees 65
Main Customer VMEP, TAICO, VEAM
Import - Export
Import Country:Korea   Product / Material:Materials
Export Country:   Product: 
- 22 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Plastic Bottles
Company 
Name
TROPICAL PLASTIC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN NHỰA NHIỆT ĐỚI
In Abbreviation NHUA NHIET DOI
Our company specializing in producing gears, plastic bottles, processing plastic equipments.With plastic bottle manufacturing,we 
complete all the stages until the bottle gets labeled. Our equipments are made in Japan, xylon is also imported from Japan. Therefore 
customers don’t have to worry about the quality of our materials.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Blow Molding Cosmetic Bottles 5
2 Blow Molding Pharmaceutical Bottles 6
3 Injection Molding Gear, etc. 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO Number of ISO 5S
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Blowing Machine 6 Japan
Blowing Machine 6 Taiwan
Injection Molding Machine 3 Taiwan
Injection Molding Machine 2 Japan
Plastic Recycling Line 3 Germany
Company Profile
Company Name
in English TROPICAL PLASTIC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN NHỰA NHIỆT ĐỚI
in Abbreviation NHUA NHIET DOI
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.troplast.vn/
Office
Address Phung Industrial Zone, Dan Phuong, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3363-7236 Fax 04-3363-7241
Factory
Address Phung Industrial Zone, Dan Phuong, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3363-7236 Fax 04-3363-7241
Person
Name Mr Nguyen Quang Tuan Title Director
Tel 0915-084-880 Email quangtuan@troplast.vn
Language English X Japanese Other German
Capital (USD) 500,000 Turnover (USD) 2,500,000 Employees 100
Main Customer Pharmaceutical Companies; Cosmetic Companies; Railway, Plastic Components Companies
Import - Export
Import Country:    Product / Material:
Export Country:   Product: 
- 102 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing   Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Composite Product
Company 
Name
ASIA KINH BAC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN ASIA KINH BẮC
In Abbreviation ASIA KINH BAC
We  are  leading  company  in  manufacturing  plastic  twist  tube  by  using  extrusion,  manufacturing  composite  meter  cabinets.
Composite Cabinets is 10% higher in price than other kinds made of medal but have many superior properties in durability, insulation, 
stainlessness. They’re suitable for outdoor and beach use.Besides, we also produce electricity panels, solar generators, wind power 
generator..etc.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Extrusion Molding Composite Pipe 5
2 Injection Molding Electric Box 6
3 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 4427:1996, 9001:2008 5S
DIN JIS Other IEC 600668, IEC 60439-1, KCS 8455:2005
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
HDPE Accordion Hose Processing System 7 Korea
Injection Molding System 6 Korea
Electric Equipment Processing System 6 Taiwan
Switch Processing System 2 Korea
Truck 3 Korea
Company Profile
Company Name
in English ASIA KINH BAC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN ASIA KINH BẮC
in Abbreviation ASIA KINH BAC
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.asiakinhbac.com/
Office
Address Lot 16, Khac Niem Industrial Zone, Bac Ninh city, Bac Ninh
Tel 0241-628-6855 Fax 0241-371-7342
Factory
Address Lot 16, Khac Niem Industrial Zone, Bac Ninh city, Bac Ninh
Tel 0241-628-6855 Fax 0241-371-7342
Person
Name Mr Vu Dang Hanh Title General Director
Tel 0985-107-456/0968-667-999 Email hanhvd@asiakinhbac.com.vn
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 1,200,000 Turnover (USD) 1,800,000 Employees 143
Main Customer EVN NPC, Electricity Investment and Development, Song Hong Capital Costruction and Trading
Import - Export
Import Country:Japan, Korea, China  Product / Material:Resin
Export Country:   Product: 
- 103 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Plastic Molding
Company 
Name
AVIATION HIGH-GRADE PLASTIC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN NHỰA CAO CẤP HÀNG KHÔNG
In Abbreviation APLACO
Hang khong Plastic is a plastic processing company mainly delver our products to an aviation industry. Currently, we only dealt 
with well known major Japanese companies and we would like to begin deal with other Japanese enterprises to expand our company’s 
view. We also have experiences dealing with other foreign enterprises in the past which give us a confidence to answer any inquiries 
in any languages. 
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Injection Molding 5
2 Vacuum Molding 6
3 Trading 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008, 14001:2004 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Hydraulic Punching
2-Colour Jet Presses
Film Blowing Machine
Vacuum Machine
Printer on a Circular Plastic Products
Company Profile
Company Name
in English AVIATION HIGH-GRADE PLASTIC JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN NHỰA CAO CẤP HÀNG KHÔNG
in Abbreviation APLACO
Capital Share State-Owned (%) 30% Private (%) 70% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.aplaco.com.vn/
Office
Address Bo De, Long Bien, Hanoi
Tel 04-3873-2470 Fax 04-3873-0769
Factory
Address Bo De, Long Bien, Hanoi
Tel 04-3873-2470 Fax 04-3873-0769
Person
Name Mr Nguyen Van Sy Title Head of Marketing
Tel 0912-351-245 Email nguyenvansy1975@gmail.com
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 6,800,000 Turnover (USD) 22,000,000 Employees 450
Main Customer Ford, Canon, Vinamilk 
Import - Export
Import Country:    Product / Material:
Export Country: Sweden, Australia, etc  Product:Household Plasticproducts, etc
- 104 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic/Rubber Molding  Main Processing:Plastic Molding
Company 
Name
QUAN SON PLASTIC COMPANY LIMITED
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN NHỰA QUÂN SƠN
In Abbreviation NHUA QUAN SON
Quan Son is a unique company having 3 different molding techniques: ejection molding, blow molding, and vacuum molding. 
Out of 3 molding techniques, election molding is our company’s strength and we have been manufacturing motorcycle parts, rice 
cooker, varied botle and household electronic parts with it. More than half of our annual sell comes from dealing with foreign owned 
corporations.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Injection Molding 5 Mold Manufacturing Die-Casting Mold
2 Blow molding 6 Assembling
3 Vacuum molding 7
4 Mold Manufacturing Plastic Mold 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO Number of ISO 5S X
DIN JIS Other
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Injection molding machine 11 Puchesin + Huyndai Korea
CNC machine 1 Japan
Bottle blowing machine 2 Ontong
Milling machine + Mixer machine Japan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English QUAN SON PLASTIC COMPANY LIMITED
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY TRÁCH NHIỆM HỮU HẠN NHỰA QUÂN SƠN
in Abbreviation NHUA QUAN SON
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website http://www.nhuaquanson.vn/
Office
Address No 60/306 Tay Son, 8B Group, Nga Tu So, Dong da, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3563-6713 Fax 04-3563-7984
Factory
Address 345 Lane, Khuong Trung, Thanh Xuan, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3563-6713 Fax 04-3563-7984
Person
Name Mr Nguyen Van Quan Title Director
Tel 0913-223-460 Email nhuaquanson@yahoo.com
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) Turnover (USD) Employees 170
Main Customer Chiuyi Viet Nam, Toyota Boshoku Ha Noi, Export Mechanical tool Stock Company…
Import - Export
Import Country:Hong Kong, Korea  Product / Material:Plastic Resin
Export Country: Japan   Product:Plastic Product
- 152 -Type of Bussiness:Manufacturing  Sector:Plastic Molding  Main Processing:Injection Molding
Company 
Name
BAC VIET TECHNOLOGY JOINT STOCK COMPANY
In Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CÔNG NGHỆ BẮC VIỆT
In Abbreviation BVIT
Bac Viet is a company specialized in continuous manufacturing from metallic mold designing to ejection forming located in 
Bacninh. Metallic molds we manufacture always been popular with our customers and those customers, who are pleased with our 
products, usually become repeating customers. One of the features, which customers are pleased with, manufacturing metallic mold by us 
operating Makino millers under strict tempter control condition. If you are seeking for resinous products, feel free to contact us.
Kind of Processing
No Processing Note No Processing Note
1 Injection Molding  Many kind of products 5
2 Mold Manufacturing For Injection Molding 6
3 Steel sections  Many kind of products 7
4 8
Corresponding Standards 
ISO X Number of ISO 9001:2008, 14001:2004  5S X
DIN JIS X Other X
Main Machinery / Equipment of Factory
Name Quantity Maker’s Name Country of Origin
Injection Molding Machine (60, 75, 100, 160, 230) 33 Toshiba Japan
CNC Machine 4 Makino,Millstar,DMG Singapore, Taiwan
Wire Cut DU064, EDM EDGE3 2 Makino Singapore
3D Measuring Machine, Measuring equipments 68 OGP, Zoller, ZEISS, Mitutoyo USA, Germany, Switzerland, Japan
Milling machines, Lathe machines 10 Jessy, Quick Jet, Acman, Supertec Taiwan
Company Profile
Company Name
in English BAC VIET TECHNOLOGY JOINT STOCK COMPANY
in Vietnamese CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CÔNG NGHỆ BẮC VIỆT
in Abbreviation BVIT
Capital Share State-Owned (%) Private (%) 100% Joint-Venture (%)
Contact
Website
Office
Address No 53, Duc Giang, Long Bien, Ha Noi
Tel 04-3655-9257 Fax 04-3877-3648
Factory
Address Km 7, Highway 18, Phuong Lieu, Que Vo, Bac Ninh 
Tel 0241-361-7936 Fax 0241-361-7579
Person
Name Mr. Tran Anh Vuong Title President
Tel 0913-201-999 Email vuong@bacvietsteel.com
Language English X Japanese Other
Capital (USD) 2,000,000 Turnover (USD) 3,000,000 Employees 250
Main Customer Muto, Canon, Foster, Panasonic, Seowon, Korg VN, Siamp Monaco, Toho, Nissei Technology
Import - Export
Import Country:Japan   Product / Material:Plastic products / plastic resin
Export Country: Monaco  Product:Plastic Mold
お問い合わせ(Contact):
日本貿易振興機構(ジェトロ)ハノイ事務所(JETRO Hanoi office)
Email : VHA@jetro.go.jp
Tel : +84-4-3825-0630
Fax : +84-4-3825-0552
禁転載Proposal Cover Sheet
Project Name  Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology 
Co-op/Intern Experiences at Miami University Regional 
Campuses
Project Location/s  Primarily Butler/Warren/Hamilton Counties, but also serving 10 
higher education institutions across Ohio, including Columbus 
State, Edison, James A. Rhodes State, North Central State, 
Northwest State, Shawnee State, Southern State, Zane State, 
Terra, and Washington State.
Project Start Date  January 2013
Interns/Co-ops Start Date  January 2013
Lead Applicant –Must be 
public higher education 
agency 
Miami University 
Oxford, Ohio 45056
Chief Contact
Individual must be 
authorized to sign agency 
grant contract and legally 
responsible as agency 
representative. 
Anne P. Schauer, Director ofResearch & Sponsored Programs
(schauerap@muohio.edu)
Miami University 
102 Roudebush Hall, Oxford, OH 45056
Voice: (513) 529-3600 FAX: (513) 529-3762
Project Director(s)-Key 
Personnel(s)
Dr. Shelley Cassady,  Career, Co-op & Internship Services
Miami Hamilton 
Rentschler Hall, 123
Hamilton, OH 45011
cassadss@miamioh.edu
(513) 785-3113
Amount of state money 
requested
$153,118
Match money committed   $173,737
Number of internships/coops proposed
27
JobsOhio key industry/ies 
impacted
BioHealth, Energy, Automotive, Advanced Manufacturing, 
Polymers, Aerospace & Aviation, Food Processing, Financial 
Services, Information Technology, and Consumer Products.
Are any of the applicants 
represented by a member of 
the Advisory Committee?
No 
Legal Applicant
Name:  Miami University
Address:102 Roudebush Hall
City: Oxford   Zip: 45056 
Phone: (513) 529-3600    Fax: (513) 529-3762  E-Mail: schauerap@muohio.edu
CEO Name: Dr. David Hodge
1)  Certification by Authorized Official: 
To the best of my knowledge and belief, data contained in this application are true and correct. The 
document has been duly authorized to comply with the required assurances. 
Signature of Authorized Official:            
Typed Name and Title:  Anne P. Schauer, Director ofResearch and Sponsored Programs
Date: __10/12/2012_______________________________________________
2)  Administering Entity
Agency Name: Miami University
Address:102 Roudebush Hall
City: Oxford     Zip: 45056  Phone: (513) 529-3600  Fax: (513) 529-3762 
Contact Person: Anne Schauer   Title: Director ofResearch and Sponsored Programs
E-Mail: schauerap@muohio.edu
3)  Business Partners (please submit separate information for each partner)
Company Name  Musson’s Industrial Service, Inc.
Address  1976 Jackson road
City Hamilton  Zip 45013 
Phone (513) 889-5474  Fax (513) 889-5475 
Contact Person Shelly 
Musson
Title Vice President  E-Mail mussonshelly@yahoo.com
Company Name  gh Package &Product Testing and Consulting, Inc.
Address  4090 Thunderbird Lane 
City Fairfield  Zip 45014 
Phone (513) 870-0080  Fax (513) 870-0017 
Contact Person Ronald 
Sorrell
Title Test Engineer  E-Mail rsorrell@ghtesting.com
Company Name  Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Address  3333 Burnet Avenue
City Cincinnati  Zip 45229-3039 
Phone (513) 636-4420  Fax (513) 636-7151 
Contact Person Nicole 
Robinson
Title Assistant Vice 
President
E-Mail Nicole.robinson@cchmc.org
Company Name  IOS Consultants, LLC
Address  7770 West Chester Road Suite 150
City West Chester  Zip 45069 
Phone (888) 870-1780  Fax (513) 282-0946 
Contact Person 
Franceene McKinney
Title   E-Mail 
mckinneyf@innovativeofficesolutions.net
Company Name   eMerge Health Solutions
Address  7264 Columbia Road
City Mason  Zip 45039 
Phone (513) 204-5600  Fax 
Contact Person Trent 
McCracken
Title President/CEO  E-Mail trent@emergehealth.com
Company Name  E-technologies Group
Address  5230 Mulhauser Road
City West Chester  Zip 45069 
Phone (513) 771-7271  Fax (513) 771-7316 
Contact Person Stuart  Title HR Director  E-Mail 
Herman
Company Name   Valeo Climate Control 
Corp
Address  3620 Symmes Road
City Hamilton  Zip Ohio 
Phone (513) 682-6100  Fax (513) 682-6148 
Contact Person Ryan 
Jones
Title Human Resources 
Generalist
E-Mail ryan.jones@valeo.com
Company Name  Win Wholesale Inc.
Address  3110 Kettering Blvd.
City Dayton  Zip 45439-1972 
Phone (937) 294-6878  Fax (937) 293-9591 
Contact Person Steven 
Hangen
Title Chief Information 
Officer
E-Mail slhangen@winwholesale.com
Company Name  Ascendum Solutions
Address  10290 Alliance Road
City Cincinnati  Zip 45245 
Phone (513) 792-5100  Fax (513) 792-5105 
Contact Person Paul 
Watts
Title Director of 
Recruiting
E-Mail Paul.Watts@ascendum.com
Company Name  tekWorx
Address  4242 Airport Road
City Cincinnati  Zip 45226 
Phone (513) 533-4777  Fax (866) 869-5965 
Contact Person Anne 
Duncan
Title Marketing Manager  E-Mail anne.duncan@tekworx.us
Company Name  Advanced Drainage Systems, Inc. 
Address  2650 Hamilton-Eaton Road
City New Miami  Zip 45011 
Phone (513) 863-1384  Fax  
Contact Person Randy 
Kolbet
Title Manufacturing 
Engineering Manager
E-Mail
Company Name  EPIC Technologies
Address  1151 W. Mason-Morrow Road
City Lebanon  Zip 45036 
Phone (513) 494-5550  Fax  
Contact Person Tracey 
Dykes
Title Human Resources  E-Mail tracey.dykes@epictech.com
5)  Educational Partners (please submit separate information for each partner)
The Miami Regionals Campuses have partnerships with 10 distance campuses 
across Ohio. This project may serve these distance students, but the campuses 
themselves are not currently partners on this proposal.  
ABSTRACT
The Miami University Regional Campuses in Middletown and Hamilton are commuter 
campuses that serve approximately 7,100 students. Co-op and internships are available to all 
students through the Regional’s Office of Career, Co-op & Internship Services (CCIS).
This project focuses on co-ops and internships for students in Engineering Technology
(ENT) and Computer Information Technology (CIT). The ENT subdisciplines of focus include: 
electrical and computer ENT(AD), mechanical ENT(AD and BS), electromechanical ENT(BS), 
and in particular a new BS degree in electrical and computer ENT(beginning fall 2013). The 
CIT subdisciplines of focus include computer information technology (AD), and in particular a 
new BS degree in health information technology (HIT)(began in 2011). While this project 
will add co-ops and internships to all these degrees, the two new degrees have never had a coop/internship program. This project will jumpstart partnerships with businesses in the JobsOhio 
West region to create work-based learning experiences that will be paid, available for credit, and 
increase student skills and success, while matching businesses with high-quality, cost-effective 
talent.
According to the Brookings Institute, there were 6,593 positions open in computer 
science and 2,721 in engineering in Jan/Feb 2012 in the US. These occupation areas were first 
and third respectively on a list of occupations with most openings. The Ohio Job Outlook for 
Southwest Ohio, 2008-2018 anticipates that Southwest Ohio employment will grow at the 
second highest rate in the state at 5.1% during 2008-‘18. Many fields in which our CIT and ENT 
graduates may be employed were listed as New and Emerging Occupations in 2006 and 2009. 
According to the JobsOhio website, Ohio ranks 10th in the US for employment in 
computer systems design and related services. Within the IT field, HIT in particular has high 
growth potential in Ohio and across the US. Electronic Health Records (EHR) healthcare reform 
legislation was launched in 2004. Incentives for full adoption of EHR by 2014 fuel the urgency 
across all healthcare environments to train and employ HIT professionals.
With the new HIT BS degree and electrical computer ENT beginning in fall 2013, the 
CCIS Office has been working to secure new C/I positions for students in these fields. As a 
result of the OMIC proposal to cover half the wages of new C/I placements, new businesses 
have responded quickly to request C/I positions in both our new and existing degrees. The 
CCIS Office has lined up approximately 27 new C/I positions, representing an approximate 
increase of 64% in C/I placements for Regional students (baseline is an average of 42 C/I 
placements per year in ENT/CIT.) The new C/I jobs will start in January, offering an immediate 
high ROI. We anticipate new co-ops/internships of: 4 to 6 in CIT, 8 in ENT for distance students
(see below), 5 in HIT, 4 in electrical and computer ENT, and 6 in electromechanical ENT. 
In addition to increasing the numbers and variety of co-op and internships available to 
Miami students, this project will also create a novel Winter Term curriculum related to co-op 
and internship. It will also serve all 10 of Miami’s engineering technology distance partner 
campuses(Columbus State, Edison, James A. Rhodes State, North Central State, Northwest 
State, Shawnee State, Southern State, Zane State, Terra, and Washington State) with coop/internship opportunities, with special efforts at the highest-enrollment four campuses. 
Our budget is logical and prudent. It requests $153,118 from OMIC in total costs. For the 
27 projected new C/I jobs, that is a cost of $5,671/student. The private funds match totals 
$81,000, and the Miami match totals $92,737, for a total match of $173,737, or 113% of the total 
OMIC request (direct + indirect funds).
Miami places high quality students at key industries in substantial, meaningful jobs, and 
they are hand-placed using the kind of “high-touch” recruitment and placement effort preferred 
by the National Association of College and Employers. The OMIC funds are becoming available 
at the perfect time for the Miami Regionals CCIS Office because of the growing number of 
bachelor degree students, and the project will therefore provide a high and immediate ROI and 
a good use of public dollars.  
PROPOSAL NARRATIVE
PROGRAMMATIC
1. Business attraction and retention: Helps attract businesses to Ohio and/or retain them 
by closing skills gap, aligning curriculum and providing talent pipeline
Through the proposed project, the Miami University Regionals’ Office of Career, Co-op & 
Internship Services(CCIS) will increase the number of information technology and engineering 
technology students undertaking cooperative or internship work experiences. As an incentive to 
businesses to make additional co-op/intern hires, grant funds will be used to subsidize 50% of 
the wages for new co-op/intern positions in 2013. The CCIS Office assists any qualified student 
who is interested in doing a co-op or internship with a local/regional employer; however, the 
focus of the proposed project is students in the following degree programs: electrical and 
computer engineering technology (AD), mechanical engineering (AD and BS), 
electromechanical engineering (BS), health information technology (BS), and computer 
information technology (AD). Two new degrees have recently been developed with curricula 
aligned to industry needs. The health information technology BS degree, begun in January 
2012, was developed as part of a large regional collaborative project funded by a $4.9 million 
US Department of Labor grant. A BS degree in electrical and computer engineering technology 
will begin in fall 2013. All co-ops/internships in these two majors will be new in this project.
A gap exists in Southwest Ohio in the number of bachelor’s degree holders vs. the number 
of job openings requiring a bachelor’s degree. The Brookings Institution’s August 2012 report 
entitled Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America clearly illustrates 
this gap in the greater Cincinnati metropolitan area as shown in the following table:
Brookings Institution, 8/2012; http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2012/08/29-education-gap-rothwell#M17140
Another perspective on this data from Brookings is the number of job openings the average 
unemployed worker could apply for in 2011: 
•  All education levels: 1.6 job openings
•  Bachelor’s degree or higher: 5.6
•  Associate’s degree or some college: 2.2
•  High school diploma or less: 1.2
A shortage of IT workers is clearly documented by the number of H-1B visas issued for IT 
positions. (H-1B visas are used for hiring foreign workers in specialty occupations requiring a 
bachelor’s degree.) According to the Department of Labor Office of Foreign Labor Statistics, 8 of 
the top 10 worker positions certified are in IT, and Ohio issued the sixth highest number of 
positions in the 2012 fiscal year to date (through 9/16/12). Also according to the Department of 
Labor Office of Foreign Labor Statistics, engineers (other than Computer Science Engineers) 
are the third most requested occupation in both the H-1B and the permanent worker certification 
(PERM) programs nationwide. By successfully preparing more Ohio students to enter the IT and 
engineering workforce, we will clearly provide advantages to companies doing business in Ohio 
and reduce our state’s reliance on foreign workers.
Miami University Regionals are preparing students to enter these fields through the degree 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 1 of 40
programs listed previously, which are offered through the Engineering Technology (ENT) and 
Computer and Information Technology (CIT) Departments. These degrees were developed 
in collaboration with area industry and are guided by advisory boards comprised of industry 
STEM professionals. This close affiliation with our industry colleagues allows our faculty to 
develop curriculum that is directly relevant to students’ potential employers in Ohio. In addition 
to their coursework, students can strengthen their education and skills through cooperative
education. While co-ops/internships (C/I) are not required for graduation, they are encouraged
because they integrate academics with industry employment relating to students’ majors. 
Before doing a C/I, students are encouraged to take ENT/CIT 221 (Professional 
Development), the classroom-based, professional skill-focused component of the C/I
experience. In this class, students learn the necessary skills to make informed choices about 
their career field and gain the professional skills they need to be successful as co-ops/interns in 
the workplace. Students also learn to prepare competitive resumes, improve interviewing skills, 
and understand the job search process as it relates to career development and life-long 
learning. Some of the topics covered in the course are Ethics in the Workplace, From Student to 
Professional, and Developing a Life-long Career Strategy. 
Working with industry stakeholders to provide students with meaningful C/I experiences 
provides benefits to students, who receive higher pay than they would normally be able to earn
along with valuable job skills, and to industry, who reap the benefits of well-prepared C/I
students and recruit talented permanent employees through this mechanism. In addition, all 
stakeholders benefit from the close interaction the program provides, which often leads to finetuning of the curriculum to directly prepare our students for jobs with our industry partners.
2. Student attraction/retention/completion: Helps attract students to higher education & 
Ohio and/or retain them to post-secondary credential
The following table provides enrollment data and degrees awarded for ENT and CIT majors. 
Enrollment
# degrees
awarded*
Degree
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2011-2012
Electrical and computer engineering technology (AD)  50  48  44  7
Mechanical engineering technology (AD)  92  93  104  14
Mechanical engineering technology (BS)  112  112  134  13
Electromechanical engineering technology (BS)  173  150  151  36
Computer information technology (AD)  107  120  128  16
Health information technology (BS)  NA  NA  95  NA
* in 2011
As recognized in the Ohio Means Internships & Co-ops (OMIC) Request for Proposals, 
research has shown that students who complete C/I experiences graduate college at higher 
rates. This may be especially true for first generation, ethnic minority, and economically 
disadvantaged students. (Ishitani, 2006) Miami’s regional campuses serve large numbers of 
students in these categories. Therefore, by increasing the number of C/I offered, we anticipate 
that the graduation rates will also increase. Data on our regional campus students supports this 
as the following example illustrates:
•  For students who enrolled in 2007 in all majors, the graduation rate is 23%. 
•  For students who enrolled in 2007 in ENT/CIT majors, the graduation rate is 25%. 
•  For students who completed a C/I in 2007, the graduation rate is 93%.
3. Student post-credential employment: Helps students become employed in Ohio
The CCIS Office tracks co-ops/interns to full-time hire placements; this is recorded in the 
Work/Learning Evaluation form completed at the end of each C/I term. Approximately 65% of 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 2 of 40
the C/I students in engineering and information technology fields are offered full-time positions 
at the company where they completed a C/I. Miami Regional graduates who co-op/intern 
historically have shown a 40% higher rate for full-time job offers in their field than students who 
do not. Approximately 94% of the Miami Regional students who co-op/intern remain in the 
local/regional area after they graduate and are employed with a local/regional company.
4. Plans & budgets for sustaining the program beyond state money
The co-op and internship program of Miami’s Regional campuses will be sustained though 
university support, an increasing number of bachelor degree students, the addition of Winter 
Term credit-bearing courses, and the addition of a C/IScholarship fund.
The Regional Campuses of Miami University began a formal co-op and internship program 
in 1992 with a Title VIII Federal Co-op/Internship grant. Although co-op or internship is not a 
degree requirement at Miami, the fact that the CCIS Office is funded as a student service (and 
not by student fees) demonstrates the University’s support of this kind of educational 
experience. Miami is committed to sustaining its C/I program into the future, and the attached 
letter from the Dean of the Regional Campuses states that he will continue to fund the salary for 
the new C/I Job Placement Coordinator proposed for this project into the future.
Organizational change at Miami is underway. In 2013, the regional campuses will no longer 
be simply separate campuses—they will be a division of Miami University. This change will 
make it much easier for the Regionals to design and produce new four-year degrees. In fact 
health information technology (HIT) has already been implementedand electrical and 
computer engineering technology (ECET) is slated to begin in 2013. These new degrees will 
greatly increase the number of students interested in and eligible for C/I at the Regional 
Campuses. The Regionals Division has also committed to adding five additional bachelor 
degrees over the next five years, which will add even more students into Miami’s C/I pipeline. 
Another organizational change at Miami is the beginning of a new short “mini semester” in 
the month of January, tentatively called “Winter Term,” starting with the 2013-2014 academic 
year. This WinterTerm will provide opportunities to enrich students’ academic experiences
through activities such as studying abroad, conducting research, or taking an additional oncampus or on-line course. Miami will be the first public university in Ohio to offer a Winter Term.
The Winter Term will be the perfect time for busy students to fit something extra into their 
schedule—something they couldn’t normally do. The CCIS Office is investigating the addition of 
several activities which would take place during this Winter Term. Activities might include:
•  Converting the existing semester-long Professional Development course into the shorter 
Winter Term format and adding a Co-op/Internship Ambassador Program in which 
students who have completed co-op or internship will mentor students who have not.
•  Offering short courses of interest to students preparing to work, such as Quality 
Assurance in the Workplace or Working in an International Office. 
•  Working with businesses to offer courses designed to jumpstart C/I student training, 
such as a short AutoCAD or Unigraphics course. Not only will this help cut training costs 
for employers, it will make students highly employable.
•  Arranging short-length, but 8-hour day internships or co-ops—especially if the work will 
continue during the spring or summer semester. This will add to the time the business 
benefits from a fully trained co-op or internship employee.
The final strategy for sustainability of the co-op/internship program is to create a coop/internship scholarship fund. While there are four existing Regional Campus scholarship 
funds earmarked for ENT and CIT students, there is no scholarship specifically for students who 
complete a co-op/internship. This OMIC request includes $5,000 to start a co-op/internship 
scholarship, with a pledge to raise another $5,000 from former C/I alums and others. This 
scholarship will help encourage more students to do a C/I and may enable some of them to 
choose a for-credit option when they might otherwise have chosen a transcription-only option.
Our post-award budget for 2014 includes continuing the salary and benefits for the new C/I 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 3 of 40
Job Coordinator hire; working to raise $5,000 to add to the C/I Scholarship fund; and continuing 
to support the entire budget of the CCIS Office.
5. Includes financial & performance metrics to reporting system to Regents
The project director will ensure that required reports are submitted through the standard 
reporting template or system. The Start of Project/Baseline Report, End of Project Report, and 
Post-Project Report will be compiled by the project director, and the Budget Season reports will 
be submitted by Miami’s Grants and Contracts Office. The project director will oversee staff 
members’ efforts to collect and record data on theC/I students, including but not limited to 
number of students placed in C/I above the baseline, students’ post-secondary area of study, 
names and numbers of businesses participating, number of hours and period of time the 
students worked, rate of pay, number of students who completed their C/I and number who 
completed their degrees, and number of students offered and accepting jobs at their C/I
employer. The regional campus data analyst will assist in this process as needed. 
6. Includes logical and prudent budget that provides high and immediate ROI and good 
use of public dollars
Miami places high quality students at key industries in substantial, meaningful jobs, and they 
are hand-placed using the kind of “high-touch” recruitment and placement effort preferred by the 
National Association of College and Employers (NACE). The OMIC funds are becoming 
available at the perfect time for the Miami Regionals CCIS Office because of the growing 
number of bachelor degree students, and the project will therefore provide a high and 
immediate ROI and a good use of public dollars. 
The dollars earned by students now is significant (average per student in the last three 
years is $10,758), and many C/I students graduate debt-free. Approximately 12% of C/I
students receive credit hours paid for by their employers (average value to student 
approximately $1,980). Miami also currently awards approximately $7,000 annually in 
scholarships earmarked for ENT and CIT students. Our graduates are also well-compensated 
on average. In fact SmartMoney.com just ranked Miami University as “11th in the nation when it 
comes to return on (tuition) investment.” Further, Miami continues to rank first among public 
universities in Ohio for best salary potential after graduation, according to a recent survey of 
employees by PayScale.com, a global compensation data website. 
With HIT newly added as a bachelor’s degree and ECET scheduled to begin in fall 2013, the 
CCIS Office has been working to secure new C/I positions for students in these fields. As a 
result of our proposal to OMIC to cover half the wages of new C/I placements, new businesses 
have been responding quickly to our request for C/I positions for these new degrees and our 
existing degrees. In preparation for this proposal the CCIS Office has lined up approximately 27 
new co-ops or internships, which represents an approximate increase of 64% in the number of 
C/Iplacements for regional students. (Baseline is an average of 42 C/I placements per year in 
ENT/CIT.) The new C/I jobs will start in January, offering an immediate high ROI. We anticipate 
the following new co-ops/internships: 4 to 6 CIT, 8 ENT distance students, 5 HIT, 4 ECET, and 
6 electromechanical. The hours to be worked and the hourly pay will be set at the start of the C/I
experience and recorded on the Work/Learning Evaluation form. (See form and draft employer 
agreement letter in the Appendix.) Businesses will pay the salaries for the new C/I positions
upfront. At the end of a C/I experience, the business will submit an invoice for half the salary 
paid and Miami will reimburse the business using grant funds.
Our budget is logical and prudent. It requests $153,118 from OMIC in total costs. For the 27 
projected new C/I jobs, that is a cost of $5,671/student. The private funds match totals $81,000, 
and the Miami match totals $92,737, for a total match of $173,737, or 113% of the total OMIC 
request (direct + indirect funds).
7. Includes feedback loop among employers, educator & students
Once placed, the student and the work site supervisor develop goals and objectives for the 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 4 of 40
position which are entered on a Work/Learning Evaluation form. The student and the CCIS 
Office director meet three times during the semester and a site visit is done toward the end of 
the semester for evaluation of the student’s progress. Co-op/internship students are evaluated 
by the work site supervisor on such skills as knowledge of the job, quality of work, attitude, 
judgment, reliability, adaptability, human relations, attendance, punctuality, and personal 
appearance. The student is required to keep a journal about the work activities and write a short 
paper on the experience which is evaluated by the CCIS Officedirector and the academic 
department chair. The evaluation form and director’s site visit provide a critical feedback loop for 
the employer, student, director, and academic faculty. Faculty often use the feedback 
instrument to see what skill gaps the academic curriculum may have compared to the 
business/industry it serves. Students can also provide feedback on the form to the academic 
faculty and the employer regarding what new training they have received from the employer and 
how it applies to their academic curriculum and career goals. (See the Appendix to view the 
Work/Learning Evaluation form.) 
8. Demonstrates positive impact to key industry and the local, regional or state economy
According to the JobsOhio website, Ohio ranks 10th in the US for employment in computer 
systems design and related services (52,400 jobs). In fact, the annual IT budgets of the top 20 
IT organizations in Cincinnati combined exceeds $3 billion. Ohio has a “strong network of 
business incubators, mentors, and angel/venture capital groups for peer mentorships, funding 
opportunities, and product innovation services” (JobsOhio 2012). For instance, in Southwest
Ohio, start-up IT ventures are supported by CincyTech. This nurturing environment, combined 
with substantially lower tax rates, promises strong growth for this sector. (JobsOhio, 2012)
Within the IT field, HIT in particular has high growth potential in Ohio and across the US. 
The Electronic Health Records (EHR) healthcare reform legislation was launched in 2004. 
Incentives for full adoption of EHR initiatives by 2014 fuel the urgency across all healthcare 
environments to train and employ HIT professionals. In 2010, 2011, and 2012 the annual 
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan forecasted that the lack of skilled staffing
will present a significant barrier to successful implementation of EHR and related integration of 
e-health systems. An article titled “Health IT Jobs Outlook Bright,” published by
InformationWeek in February 2010, reported that the HITsector will add 50,000 to 200,000 new 
jobs by 2015. According to the US Department of Labor, “The adoption of e-prescribing, 
electronic health records and other IT platforms’ tools will spur demand for computer systems 
design services.” (U.S. Department of Labor, 2011) In Ohio the sense of urgency is 
compounded by the talent war that is escalating between the vast traditional IT industry and 
healthcare organizations competing for the scarce commodity of trained HIT professionals. 
Our ENT graduates are prepared to work in many of the JobsOhio industries, particularly 
advanced manufacturing, automotive, and aerospace. Butler County, home to Miami University, 
is in the JobsOhio West area. The JobsOhio West website identifies the aerospace and food 
processing industries as leading employers in the area. The site points to the Dayton area as 
having “companies of all sizes advancing manufacturing—from entrepreneurs starting 
companies to create and manufacture metals to seasoned companies supplying end users with 
high quality materials and equipment.” And according to businessclimate.com, “access to a 
skilled workforce and an abundance of training facilities and programs coupled with major 
transportation assets have made the [Ohio-Pennsylvania] region a desirable locale for 
advanced manufacturing.”
EMPLOYER
1. Capacity: Businesses have capacity to meet proposed program requirements for 
students, educators & parents
As evidenced by the letters of commitment from our industry partners, openings are 
currently available for our students in the CIT and ENT majors. The next section provides some 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 5 of 40
examples of the types of openings our partners have. Because Miami C/I is voluntary, it is 
challenging to plan ahead and guarantee that we’ll have students to fill openings. However,
strong partnerships and industry’s high esteem for Miami students leads to their high demand. 
2. Provides substantial, meaningful work assignments that align to a JobsOhio industry 
cluster
One of the key factors contributing to the success of this proposal is that Southwest Ohio 
employers provide substantial, meaningful C/I work assignments in IT, engineering technology, 
and HIT to our CCIS Office on a daily basis. For example in IT, Excalibur Technology in West 
Chester is looking for programming and web development C/I students with knowledge in net 
programming, html, xml, Java script, and Adobe Photoshop. CoupSmart from Cincinnati is 
looking for C/I students in digital design who can work with Illustrator and Photoshop as well as 
HTML and CSS programming. Seapine Software in Mason is looking for IT C/I students who 
can edit, test, and fix software such as Java and C++. Glass Coatings and Concepts in Monroe 
is looking for C/I students who can do data analysis using Excel and Access for light 
programming in Visual Basic applications.
In ECET, E-Technologies group is looking for C/I students in applications engineering where 
students will assist in business intelligence, automation, machine process and validation. They 
will need PLC programming and HMI (Human Machine Interaction) experience. Northrop 
Grumman Xetron in Cincinnati needsC/I students in software development in Windows and 
Unix/Linux. AK Steel in Middletown wants C/I students in automation engineering where the 
student will develop and modify computer systems, software, and networks that provide real 
time supervisory control over large scale industrial processes. Students will get experience in 
HMI as well as programming and networking technology and webpage development. 
Intelligrated Inc. in Mason is seeking electro-mechanical C/I students who can design in 
SolidEdge and CAD as well as test conveyers for friction, roller vibrations, and movement.
Miami C/I students in companies like these will work alongside industry mentors who will train 
the students in technologies that complement their academic curriculum and enhance their 
opportunities for employment with those or similar companies in the region. 
3. Positions are paid
The C/I positions developed for this proposal will be paid positions. CIT and ENT students’ 
average hourly wage in 2012 was $13.95. Wages vary depending upon the academic discipline 
and what year of student the co-op/intern is at in. The CCIS Office has historically worked only 
with paid positions, following the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the salary 
recommendations for co-ops and interns provided by the National Association of Colleges and 
Employers (NACE; Miami Regionals are a member of NACE).
4. Includes positions in more than 1 functional area in the workplace
The variety of majors included in the project will ensure that the C/I positions span functional 
areas. In fact, students in the same major are likely to be hired in various function areas. For 
example, one employer who’s come on board for the proposed project has indicated an interest 
in HIT C/I students for both sales and operations positions. Examples of our C/I students’ titles
in the past have included Test and Validation Technician, Assistant Engineer, Web Developer, 
IT Help Desk Support Assistant, PLC Technician, Java and HTML Programmer, Manufacturing 
Engineer, Process Control Engineer, Cold Strip Mill Support, Systems Engineer, AutoCAD 
Designer, Materials Planner, Materials Tester, Production Engineer, IT Engineer, Accountant, 
MIS Assistant, Solid Software Engineer, Network Technician. 
5. Demonstrates and documents demand for talent in industry
According to the Brookings Institute website, there were 6,593 positions open in computer 
science and 2,721 in engineering in January/February 2012 across the U.S. These occupation 
areas were first and third respectively on the list of occupations with the most openings.
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 6 of 40
The Ohio Job Outlook for Southwest Ohio, 2008-2018 anticipates that Southwest Ohio 
employment will grow at the second highest rate in the state at 5.1% during the period 2008-2018. Many fields in which our CIT and ENT graduates may be employed were listed as New 
and Emerging Occupations as recently as 2006 and 2009, including the following: Software 
Quality Assurance Engineers and Testers, Computer Systems Engineers/Architects, Network 
Designers, Web Developers, Web Administrators, Validation Engineers, Electrical Engineering 
Technologists, Electromechanical Engineering Technologists, Electronics Engineering 
Technologists, Industrial Engineering Technologists, Manufacturing Engineering Technologists, 
and Mechanical Engineering Technologists.
The Ohio Means Jobs/Ohio Labor Market Information website shows that more than 80 
openings (combined) annually are projected in the fields our ENT graduates are prepared to 
enter: Electrical and electronic engineering technician, electro-mechanical technicians, 
mechanical engineering technicians, and computer software engineer-systems software. The 
general field of “architecture and engineering” is predicted to grow 2.3% in the period 2008-2018, according to Job Outlook 2018. 
Our CIT associate’s degree graduates are prepared to be computer support specialists. This 
career is designated as a high-employment prospect occupation, with annual openings of 140 in 
Southwest Ohio and 652 statewide. The average wage for this occupation in Southwest Ohio is 
$46,446. Job Outlook 2018 projects strong growth in this occupation with annual Ohio openings 
of 899 and an average wage of $20.07 (2009 dollars). The general field of “mathematical and 
computer occupations” is predicted to grow 17.5% in 2008-2018 (Job Outlook 2018). 
The HIT field is so new that this career path does not seem to be listed in Ohio Means Jobs 
at this time and the job titles and job projections for Healthcare Information Technology-specific 
occupations have yet to be defined and tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupations 
under which HIT positions may be listed include computer systems analyst and network and 
computer support specialist. The average salary for a computer systems analyst in Southwest
Ohio is $80,018, with 137 openings annually in Southwest Ohio and 730 across the state. The 
average salary for a network and computer support administrator in Southwest Ohio is $67,184, 
with 109 openings annually in Southwest Ohio and 523 statewide. The prospect for growth in 
computer systems analyst is promising with Job Outlook 2018 projecting 676 annual Ohio 
openings and a wage of $37.42 (2009 dollars). 
INSTITUTION OF HIGHER EDUCATION
1. Capacity: Institutions have capacity to meet proposed program requirements for 
employers, partners & students
The Dean of Miami’s Regional Campuses and the faculty chairs of the ENT and CIT 
departments are committed to providing administrative direction and support for the proposed 
project. (See Appendix for letters of support.) The Dean has committed to continued support for 
the CCIS Office after the Regents financial assistance ends, because of the CCIS Office longterm benefits to the students, the community, the region, and the Ohio workforce. 
Dr. Shelley Cassady is Regional Director of Miami’s Office of Career, Co-op & 
Internship Services and has been working in co-op, internship and placement for over 20 
years. She is the president of the Butler/Warren Ohio Employer Council and a member of the 
Hamilton Chamber of Commerce Business and Education Collaborative, the Butler/Warren 
Society for Human Resource Management, and a member of the Ohio Cooperative Education 
Association. She served on the local Workforce One and WIA Boards of Butler and Warren 
Counties. She has developed strong C/I partnerships with local and regional companies as
evidenced in this proposal and the letters of support. Dr. Cassady serves on the School of 
Engineering and Applied Sciences Employer Advisory Board for ENT and CIT and works very 
closely with the Dr. Ayo Abatan, ENT Chair, and Dr. Cathy Bishop-Clark, CIT Chair, 
regarding C/I placements of their students and in the development of this proposed project. Drs. 
Abatan and Bishop-Clark will continue in this collaborative role in the funded project. They are 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 7 of 40
committed to increasing C/I for their students and will lead their faculty in encouraging all 
students to consider C/I. (See Appendix for letters of support.) The ENT department offers a 
distance-learning program with partner institutions across the state, including Columbus State, 
Edison, James A. Rhodes State, North Central State, Northwest State, Shawnee State, 
Southern State, Zane State, Terra, and Washington State. At these distance-learning partner 
institutions, many students work full time and therefore aren’t eligible for co-ops or internships. 
However, the new Co-op/Internship Job Coordinator (described below) will be working to 
establish new C/I opportunities and business partnerships for those distance ENT students who 
do seek C/I work experiences. 
Greg Gibbs, the ENT Distance Programs and Recruiting Coordinator, provides ongoing 
support to the distance sites in recruitment and retention activities. Mr. Gibbs will work with Dr. 
Cassady in efforts to build C/I relationships in the distance campuses’ communities. Mr. Gibbs 
graduated from Miami’s ENT program with a BS degree, and completed a co-op as part of his 
education. He is familiar with the current C/I program and will assist Dr. Cassady and the new 
Co-op/Internship Job Coordinator in developing and implementing the proposed project.
Through the proposed project, a full-time Co-op/Internship Job Coordinator will be hired 
and trained. This staff member will work in the local and regional business community, including 
the ENT distance learning sites, to develop co-ops and internships; coordinate and implement a 
yearly C/I job fair on the regional campuses and distance sites as needed; and assist the 
director in coordinating the marketing of C/I to students, particularly in new degrees. Adding this 
new staff member will allow many more students and employers to participate in the Miami 
University Regional co-op/internship program. A Senior Program Assistant, Linda Vogt, will 
continue to support the efforts of the office.
2. Positions are transcripted or available for credit
Students who co-op or intern through the CCIS Office are registered in ENT/CIT 220, 
according to their academic discipline. The course can be taken for 0 to 2 credit hours each 
semester for up to 6 credit hours over their academic career and applies directly to the student’s 
academic degree. Typically, if a student is working 19 hours a week or less, he/she signs up for 
1 credit hour. If the student is working 20 credit hours or more, they sign up for 2 credits. If a 
student works during the summer and is not taking any classes, they are typically enrolled in the 
course for 0 credit hours. Whether a student takes the course for 0, 1, or 2 credits hours, it 
appears on their official transcript as verification of their work experience. 
Many students who choose to co-op for 0 credit hours may be working an alternating co-op.
By taking 0 credit hours, they are still officially enrolled at the University but do not have to pay 
course fees, thus lessening their financial burden while they are pursuing their degree and 
ultimately lessening their student financial debt after graduation. This has worked well for Miami 
Regional students in the past and this system will be retained for all future co-ops/interns who 
are placed during the 2013 grant funding period.
3. Includes outreach to populations traditionally underrepresented in the proposed areas 
of co-op and internship program
The Regional Campuses are open admission commuter campuses with student populations
that reflect the diversity of the surrounding communities and have large proportions of 
economically disadvantaged members. The following table delineates the demographics of 
students in ENT and CIT degree programs.
% Racial or 
Ethnic Minority
% Female
% Students 
Receiving Pell 
Grants
Electrical and computer engineering 
technology (AD)
23.5  21.0  42.1
Mechanical engineering technology (AD)  16.6  6.4  35.5
Mechanical engineering technology (BS)  13.2  10.3  36.7
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 8 of 40
Electromechanical engineering 
technology (BS)
11.1  5.4  29.7
Computer information technology (AD)  14.7  16.3  45.7
Health information technology (BS)  18.1  55.9  61.8
The number of students receiving Pell grants demonstrates the need and potential benefit of 
C/I experiences for our students. The income received from C/I work may well keep these 
students enrolled and graduating with lower student debt.
ENT and CIT advisors encourage women and minorities to explore careers in ENT during 
registration. All students who inquire or express an interest in engineering take ENT 137, Intro 
to Engineering Technology. During the semester, guest speakers from engineering firms offer 
in-class presentations including speakers who are women and minorities. 
4. Includes improvements to existing or creation of new high quality academic programs 
with a cooperative education or internship component
Miami’s many academic programs are of high quality, and the two new degrees on the 
Regional Campuses are no exception. The bachelor’s in health information technology (HIT), 
registered its first students in January 2012. HIT is a bachelor’s completion degree that 
addresses the technology and processes used by health care providers and related 
organizations. The program provides instruction in the technology used to acquire and direct the 
flow of information between the clinical, administrative, and financial systems in the healthcare 
industry as well as general principles of IT. This program prepares students for jobs that 
integrate healthcare and technology in the evolving US healthcare system. Students who 
complete the program will obtain a strong background in technology including database, 
problem-solving, systems analysis, and project management skills as well as a foundation in the 
culture of the healthcare system. 
The second new bachelor’s degree is a concentration in the field of ENT called Electrical 
and Computer Engineering Technology (ECET). This degree concentration is a completion 
program for the associate’s degree in ECET and will complement two existing bachelor 
concentrations in ENT (Electro-Mechanical and Mechanical Engineering Technology). The 
ECET program will produce graduates who analyze digital and analog electrical and electronic 
circuits, identify problem areas, and maintain these systems. They will also function effectively 
as electrical and computer engineering technicians in state and regional industries. The first 
students will register for classes in this degree in fall 2013.
The Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.abet.org) has 
accredited the following Miami Regionals ENT programs: Electrical & Computer Engineering 
(AD); Electro-Mechanical Concentration (BS); Mechanical Concentration (AD); Mechanical 
Concentration (BS).The new ECET bachelor’s degree will be accredited in the future. Within the 
last four years, the ENT Department also added two classes at the request of industry—
computer-aided drafting with AutoCAD and 3D solid modeling using SolidEdge. 
Miami has also committed to adding five new bachelor degree programs over the next five 
years. It is not known whether these degrees will have a co-op/internship component, but 
bachelor degrees on the Regional Campuses tend to be applied subjects with a high degree of 
relevance to business and technology industries—perfect for co-ops and internships. 
5. Includes plan to connect employers and students via web, communications & 
marketing
Marketing the Miami CCIS Office to both potential employers and potential C/I students is 
important in order to maintain a steady labor supply for business and a steady supply of jobs for 
students. Examples of marketing efforts include:
•  The CCIS Office sends about 4,000 program brochures to employers and companies 
each semester to advertise our students’ skills/degrees. The office also produces a 
student brochure that is distributed by the admissions department and at all campus visit 
programs. Faculty members are knowledgeable about the program and help recruit 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 9 of 40
throughconversations with students and distributing the brochure.
•  The CCIS Office maintains a website for use by employers and students. Employers 
post available jobs and obtain forms for evaluating students. Students search for jobs, 
register for professional training, get information on resume writing and interviewing, and 
access a wealth of links to companies and job search engines. The website has links to 
both OhioMeansJobs.com and OhioMeansInternships.com, and students learn how to 
use the sites in the Professional Development course. 
•  Email is used to reach students regarding professional training opportunities, and 
students can register for a job listserv that alerts them to “hot” newly-posted jobs. The 
office also uses academic department listservs to reach students and faculty.
•  Networking is employed by the CCIS Office. The office director serves on local 
workforce boards and councils to stay connected to the community and gives class 
seminars to ENT and CIT students each semester.
•  Regional campus students participate in the Oxford Campus Career Services Job Fair 
and Co-op and Internship Fair.
6. Program provides opportunities to students with small, mid-size & large business 
enterprises
Historically, the C/I program at Miami’s Regional Campuses has placed students in paid, 
credit bearing, academic related work experiences in small companies such as Musson 
Industrial Services, Industrial Controls, Air Solutions Inc., Force Control, Terry Asphalt 
Materials, Stantec Consulting, re-Think Engineering, and Plas-Tanks Industries; mid-sized 
companies such as Barco Inc., Advanced Drainage Systems, OPW, Valeo Climate Control, 
Intelligrated, Flagg Inc., XTek, Sonitrol, Mubea, Premier Systems Integrators, City of Hamilton 
and City of Fairfield, Fusite, Prestige Technical Services, Air Solutions, Cardinal Solutions, Ariel 
Corporations, Cincinnati Test Systems, and Champion Factory Direct; large companies such as 
GE, P&G, Paramount Kings Island, Burrows Paper Company, AK Steel, Luxottica Group, Duke 
Energy, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Prudential Paramount Properties, and Cargill. New 
companies that have expressed interest in providing ECET and HIT C/I include Med Plus, ETechnologies, Northrop Grumman, WinWholeSale Inc., Ascendum, Cincinnati Children’s 
Hospital Medical Center, CincyTech USA, Lincoln Electric, and Innovative Office Solutions.
Miami Regionals Budget Narrative
The budget for the Miami Regionals OMIC request includes the following: 
Regents Funds- We request $153,118 from the Regents, consisting of:
•  Salary and benefits (benefits calculated at 36.94 %) for one year for a new position = 
total request is $54,776. 
•  Fuel costs to drive to distance ENT campuses to encourage C/I = $1,000
•  Create new scholarship fund for co-op/internship students = $5,000
•  Subsidy of ½ the salary for C/I jobs. Calculated at $15/hr x 25 hrs/wk x 16 wks semester
x 27 new C/I = $81,000
•  Indirect costs of 8% = $11,342. 
Miami Match Funds– Miami will provide $92,737 as the following match funds:
•  Salary for 20% of Project Director salary in 2013 = $13,960
•  Salary for 15% of C/I Assistant salary in 2013 = $5,420
•  Salary for 10% of Distance Coordinator salary in 2013 = $4,691
•  Salary for 100% of new C/I Job Coordinator in 2014 = $40,000
•  Benefits (calculated at 37.6 %) for all above positions = $23,667
•  Contributions to the new co-op/internship scholarship fund = $5,000
Business Match
•  One half of the salary for any new C/I generated in 2013, calculated as $15/hr x 25 
hrs/wk x 16 wks semester x 27 new C/I = $81,000
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 10 of 40
APPENDIX
Budget
References
Letters of Commitment
Shelly S. Musson, Vice President, Musson’s Industrial Services, Inc.
Ronald Sorrell, Test Engineer, gh Package & Product Testing and Consulting, Inc. 
Nicole Robinson, Assistant Vice President, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Franceene McKinney, IOS Consultants, LLC
Trent McCracken, President/CEO, eMerge Health Solutions
Stuart Herman, HR Director/Corporate Counsel, E-technologies Group
Ryan Jones, Human Resources Generalist, Valeo Climate Control Group
Steve Hangen, Chief Information Officer, WinWholesale, Inc.
Tracey Dykes, Human Resources, EPIC Technologies, LLC
Paul Watts, Director of Recruiting, Ascendum Solutions
Anne Duncan, Marketing Manager, tekWorx
Randy Kolbet, Manufacturing Engineering Manager, Advanced Drainage Systems
G. Michael Pratt, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of Regional Campuses, 
Miami University
Ayodele Abatan, Chair and Professor, Engineering Technology, Miami University
Cathy Bishop-Clark, Chair and Professor, Computer and Information Technology
Ellen Paxton, Senior Regional Director of Advancement, Miami University
Goals, Objectives, and Evaluation
Program Snapshot
Marketing Materials
Fact Sheet for Employers
Fact Sheet for Students
Work/Learning Evaluation Form
Draft Employer Agreement Letter
Shelley Cassady Bio
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 11 of 40
Activity Level of Effort (LOE) Total Regents Funds Private Funds
Applicant 
Funds
Education 
Partners
Other
Other 
Public
Source of 
Other Public
Personnel
a) Project Director Shelley 
Cassady (FT/MU)
20% (annual sal $69,798)
$13,960 $13,960
b) Assistant Linda Vogt 
(FT/MU)
15% (annual sal ($36,130)
$5,420 $5,420
c) Distance Site Coordinator 
Greg Gibbs (FT/MU)
10% (annual sal $46,908)
$4,691 $4,691
d) Co-op job Coordinator 
(new position; FT/MU)
100% (annual sal $40,000)
$80,000 $40,000 $40,000
e) Fringe benefits 36.94% Miami personnel full 
time (FT/MU) $38,443 $14,776 $23,667
Supplies
Purchased Services
Travel To new businesses $1,000 $1,000
Scholarships To co-op students $10,000 $5,000 $5,000
Employer Salaries
$15/hr x 25 hrs/wk x 16 wks 
sem x 27 new co-ops $162,000 $81,000 $81,000
Other Employer 
Contributions
Other (Describe)
Sub Total Direct Costs $315,513 $141,776 $81,000 $92,737
Admin 
Indirect costs 8% or less $11,342
Sub total $11,342
Total (Project; Request) $315,513 $153,118 $81,000 $92,737
Total match $173,737
Cost per student re: Regents 
funds $5,671
(All non Regents funds must be supported by a signed commitment letter.)
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 12 of 40
REFERENCES
Brookings Institution. Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America. 
August 2012. http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2012/08/29-education-gaprothwell#M17140
Ewald, K. A Statistical Dilemma: New and Emerging Occupations. A report from the Ohio 
Bureau of Labor Market Information. 2010.
Hospitals & Health Networks. American Hospital Association Environmental Scan, 2010, 2011, 
2012. http://www.hhnmag.com/
Ishitani, T.T. Studying Attrition and Degree Completion Behavior among First-Generation 
College Students in the United States. The Journal of Higher Education, Vol. 77, No. 5 
(Sep.-Oct. 2006). http://www.jstor.org/stable/3838790
JobsOhio website. Jobs-ohio.com. jobs-ohiowest.com. 2012.
National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). April 2012. 2012 Internship & Co-op 
Survey. NACE; 62 Highland Avenue • Bethlehem, PA 18017-9085; 610.868.1421; 
www.naceweb.org
Office of Foreign Labor Certification, U.S. Department of Labor. Office of Foreign Labor 
Certification Annual Report October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010.
http://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/OFLC_2010_Annual_Report_Master.pdf
“Oh-Penn Region is a Hub for Advanced Manufacturing.” Businessclimate.com. 2012.
Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services. Ohio Job Outlook 2018: Employment 
Projections. 2009. http://ohiolmi.com/proj/Projections/Ohio/OhioJobOutlook.pdf
U.S. Department of Labor Office of Foreign Labor Certifications. H-1B Temporary Visa Program 
- Selected Statistics, FY 2012 YTD. September 2012. 
http://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/h_1b_temp_visa.pdf
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Career Guide to Industries, 2010-11 
Edition, http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/cgs033.htm
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 13 of 40
mnussoN's 0NDUST|RIAL sERv[GE,  fl  N@"
October 7L,2OL2
Mr.  Jim  Petro
Chancellor
Ohio Board  of  Regents
Columbus,  Ohio 432L5
Dear  Mr. Petro:
Musson's  Industrial  Service, Inc. is  very interested in  the co-op/internship  program  at Miami  University
Regional  Campuses. Our company has  provided  instrumentation,  process  control  and  boiler control
services  to businesses  in the area  for  twenty  years.  We are looking for interns  with  electrical
engineering skills,  as well as  computer  and autocad experience. Any assistance  the State  can  provide  for
support in  expanding  this co-op/internship  program  should be made available  to Miamito  help local
employers further  develop their  workforce  and expand  and  grow  their services.
Our current intern  has been  such an  asset to our company that we have offered  him  full-time
employment  after  graduation.  Musson's Industrial Service  is  looking forward  to building  more new coop  partnerships  with  Miami Regional Campuses in  Engineering  Technology; it's  a  great  fit  for our
business.  We believe  that co-op opportunities are  important  to building a better  workforce  in Ohio.
We  are very  pleased  to  participate  in this business/education collaborative  and hope  that it will receive
the financial  support it has  requested.
Sincerely,
$-Uc-eO':' 
(Y\e->az""r
Shelly S. Musson
Vice President
Musson's  Industrial  Service, Inc.
1976 
Jackson 
Road 
- 
Hamilton, OH 45011 
- 
513-889-5474 
- 
FAX  513-889-5475
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 14 of 40
October 11, 2012
Mr. Jim Petro
Chancellor
Ohio Board of Regents
Columbus, Ohio 43215
gh Package & Product Testing and Consulting, Inc is very interested in starting a new co-op/internship 
program with Miami University Regional Campuses beginning in the spring of 2013.
Our company provides various testing for packaging systems for transportation. We do certification on 
hazardous materials and high explosives for shipment in USA and abroad, plus ISTA & ASTM testing with 
temperature testing for shipment of pharmaceuticals. With this rang of testing we need well rounded 
educated employees in electronic and mechanical engineering fields. Miami University Regional
Campuses has filled these needs in past. I myself am a graduate from Miami University Regional 
Campuses as well as both of our current laboratory Technicians and one of our salesmen as well. 
Any assistance the State can provide for support of this co-op/internship program should be made 
available to Miami to help local employers to further develop their workforce and expand more services 
locally, regionally and internationally. We really are looking forward to exploring more co-op/internship 
partnerships with Miami Regional campuses to help expand our business at gh Testing. 
We are very excited to participate in this business/education collaborative and hope that it will 
receive the financial support it has requested. 
Thank you for your time
Sincerely, 
Ronald Sorrell
Test Engineer
gh Package & Product Testing and Consulting, Inc
4090 Thunderbird lane
Fairfield, Ohio 45014
Phone: (513) - 870-0080 ext. 112
Cell: (937) - 301-9920 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 15 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 16 of 40
IOS Consultants, LLC
 7770 West Chester Road Ste. 150 , West Chester, Ohio 45069 
 Phone: 888.870.1780 Fax: 513.282.0946 
 Website URL: www.innovativeofficesolutions.net
October 8, 2012 
Mr. Jim Petro 
Chancellor 
Ohio Board of Regents 
Columbus, Ohio 43215 
IOS Consultants, LLC is very interested in engaging in a new co-op/internship program with Miami 
University Regional Campuses beginning in the spring of 2013. IOS Consultants offer clients the ultimate in 
IT solutions. 
We specialize in identifying and eliminating inefficiency by streamlining internal operations and 
automating manual processes. Our services empower you and your staff to focus on and take full advantage 
of opportunities that might otherwise be missed. We work directly with clients, vendors and support staff to 
ensure successful implementation and execution of a process improvement plan tailored to fit your 
business’ specific needs.
IOS works with different industries with a focus in HIT (Healthcare Information Technology). Any 
assistance the State can provide for support of this co-op/internship program should be made available to 
Miami to help local employers further develop their workforce and expand their services locally, regionally 
and internationally. 
We are proud to participate in this business/educational collaborative and hope that it will receive the 
financial support it has requested. 
Kind Regards, 
Franceene G. McKinney 
IOS Consultants, LLC. 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 17 of 40
7264 Columbia Rd Suite 600 Mason, OH 45039 513.204.5600 www.eMergeHealth.com 
October 9, 2012 
Mr. Jim Petro 
Chancellor 
Ohio Board of Regents 
Columbus, OH 43215 
Mr. Petro: 
eMerge Health Solutions is very interested in starting a new co-op/internship program with Miami 
University Regional Campuses beginning in the spring of 2013. Our company is a medical software 
company that provides hands-free intra-operative documentation and workflow solutions for the 
healthcare industry. Any assistance the State can provide for support of this co-op/internship program 
should be made available to Miami to help local employers further develop their workforce and expand 
their services locally, regionally and internationally. 
We are proud to participate in this business/educational collaborative and hope that it will receive the 
financial support it has requested. 
Warm Regards, 
Trent McCracken 
President/CEO 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 18 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 19 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 20 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 21 of 40
EPIC Technologies, LLC
1151 W. Mason-Morrow Road Lebanon, OH 45036 (513) 494-5550
www.epictech.com
October 09, 2012 
EPIC Technologies is interested in participating in a new co-op/internship, program with Miami 
University Regional Campuses beginning in 2013. 
Our company has been in business for more that 50 years in the Lebanon, Ohio area. Webuild low to 
mid volume, high quality, custom fit, circuit boards in the Lebanon/Mason area. 
We have quite a few Miami University grad’s here at EPIC, where their talents and experience gained 
helps our company to excel and shine in our local communityand around the world. 
Any assistance the state can provide for support of this co-op/internship program should be made 
available to Miami to help local employers further develop their workforce and expand their services 
locally, regionally and internationally.
I look forward to hearing that Miami University will receive financial support it has requested. 
Sincerely,
Tracey S. Dykes
Human Resources 
EPIC Technoloiges, LLC.
Ohio Valley Operations 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 23 of 40
4242 Airport Road • Cincinnati, Ohio 45226    Page 1 of 1 
4242 Airport Road  Cincinnati, OH  45226
Phone: 513-533-4777  Fax: 866-869-5965
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 24 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 25 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 26 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 27 of 40
October 8, 2012 
Jim Petro, Chancellor 
Ohio Board of Regents 
University System of Ohio
30 East Broad Street, 36th Floor 
Columbus, Ohio 43215 
Dear Chancellor Petro:
I am writing to demonstrate my support for the Miami University Regional Campus Co-op/Internship & 
Placement Office and my belief in the importance of work-based experience for our students. The 
proposed project will create more co-op opportunities for students and build the capacity of the office.
I am especially supportive of their office because I am Chair of the Computer Information Technology 
Department, and we have recently created and initiated a new bachelor’s degree in Health Information 
Technology (HIT). The new degree is proving to be popular—the degree started with 0 declared majors in 
January and we have over 100 students with a major declared in HIT today. To date, however, HIT 
students have not participated in co-ops/internships. 
Applying for these funds has given the HIT co-op/internship program a real jumpstart. I found six 
businesses that were very interested in hiring an HIT co-op or intern and very interested in our promised 
subsidy of half the student’s salary from your grant funds. I anticipate once these businesses hire a Miami 
co-op or intern, they will continue a co-op program with us as long as they can. I commit to continuing to 
work to locate more businesses and employers who can provide co-ops or internships for HIT students at 
Miami Regionals. 
I am excited that our students will now be able to take advantage of the experiential learning benefits of a 
co-op/internship. I believe it will increase their retention and completion rates, and I’m confident it will 
help our students become valuable additions to the Ohio workforce in the future.
Sincerely,
Dr. Cathy Bishop-Clark
Chair and Professor
Computer Information Technology
Miami University Regionals Campuses
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
1601 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD 4200 NORTH UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
HAMILTON, OHIO 45011-3399  MIDDLETOWN, OHIO 45042-3497
(513) 785-3132    (513) 727-3380
(513) 785-3183 FAX    (513) 727-3450 FAX
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 28 of 40
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 29 of 40
GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND EVALUATION
Six goals are described in the OMIC request for proposals (RFP) document. The table 
below provides a snapshot showing how Miami’s proposal meets all six goals, along with 
corresponding objectives and evaluation method.
Key Program Goals  Objectives  Evaluation
1. Greatly increase 
number of students 
participating in 
meaningful workbased learning 
experiences with 
Ohio’s businesses. 
Increase the number of students who are 
registered and placed in a C/I by 27 
placements in Year 1.
Number of new co-ops 
or internships
Increase the number of academic 
programs/concentrations served by coop/internship by 2
Number of co-ops for 
new degrees in HIT and 
ECET
Work to develop a new co-op curriculum 
during Miami’s new Winter Term (in 
2014) to attract more students
Progress towards
Winter Term C/I 
activities
Increase the number of employers 
served 
Number of new 
businesses
Develop capacity in the Miami Regionals 
co-op/internship placement office to 
serve increased numbers.
Hire one new staff for 
co-op/internship
2. Increase number 
of students 
completing a postsecondary 
credential/degree. 
New degrees in HIT and ECET will 
create new pipeline of bachelor degreed 
students
Numbers of students 
enrolled in HIT and ECET
in 2013 as 
compared to 2012
Increased numbers of co-ops will 
increase degree completion
Numbers of degree 
completion in 2018 as 
compared to 2012
3. Increase number 
of students 
interested in key 
occupations and 
industries. 
The new degrees in HIT and ECET are 
designed to serve key occupations and 
industries
Numbers of students 
enrolled in HIT and ECET
in 2013 as 
compared to 2012
4. Retain more 
graduates in OH 
and attract former 
OH and non-OH 
residents to the 
state.
Increase numbers of C/I in Ohio to
increase numbers of graduates retained
Number of new C/I in 
companies where the 
program objective is to 
hire the C/I student at 
the end of the rotation
5. Align curriculum 
offered by Miami 
with the needs of 
business to close 
the jobs skills gap 
Continue to solicit input on employer 
feedback forms, and from existing 
Workforce Advisory Boards for ENT and 
CIT
Data from feedback 
forms and advisory 
boards
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 30 of 40
6. Reduce costs to 
businesses for 
recruiting, training 
and retaining talent. 
Subsidize co-ops in Year 1  OMIC funds ½ of every 
new co-op salary in 
Year 1
Start C/I in Winter Term, which extends 
the time an employer may have the 
trained student employee working
Work with employers to 
create a C/I Winter 
Term 
Explore offering Winter Term course that 
reduces training costs to employers, 
such as Introduction to AutoCAD,
SolidWorks, or Unigraphics NX. 
Work with employers to 
create useful Winter 
Term training program 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 31 of 40
Program Snapshot
Number or 
amount
JobsOhio Key Industry or Industries  10
Number of co-ops/internships created Number that meet High Demand 
Occupations
27
Amount of state money requested  $153,118
Amount of match money obtained  $173,737
Total state money requested divided by number of co-ops & internships 
created (in whole dollars)
$5,671
Total match money obtained divided by number of co-ops & internships 
created (in whole dollars)
$6,435
Total money (state plus match) divided by number of co-ops & internships 
created (in whole dollars)
$11,686
Number of business partners  11
Number of higher education partners
[Miami Regionals Campuses have partnerships with 10 distance campuses 
across OH. This project may serve these distance students, but the campuses 
themselves are not currently partners on this proposal]
10
Number of other partners  0
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 32 of 40
Date
Employer Address
Dear XYZ Employer:
Congratulations on hiring a new Miami co-op/intern student this semester. As we discussed during the 
application and hiring process, Miami University will be subsidizing 50% of the student’s salary this 
academic semester. Your payroll department will need to submit the payroll stubs for John Smith at the 
end of the term (which should be in accordance with the work/learning agreement form that states the 
number of hours the student will work and the hourly wage he/she is paid).
It is important to understand that we are adding many new co-op/intern employers this fiscal year and 
that we will only be able to pay for what is agreed upon by you, the student, and the university at the 
beginning of the co-op/intern experience. If the student works more hours than the original agreement 
form states, we will not be responsible for subsidizing those extra hours. 
Again, we want to thank you for hiring a Miami co-op/intern this semester, and we look forward to 
working with you in this new business/education partnership.
Sincerely,
Dr. Shelley Cassady
Regional Director
Career, Co-op & Internship Services
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 33 of 40
FACT SHEET           www.regionals.MiamiOH.edu/jobs
Career, Co-op & InternshipServices        122 Rentschler Hall (MUH) &  135 Johnston Hall (MUM)           513-785-3113    513-727-3205              for                 Engineering, Business, Criminal Justice,
Information Technology, Integrative Studies, 
Nursing, and Liberal Arts Students 
Why Do a Co-op or Internship?    
•  Earn MoneyWhile You Learn
•  Get Professional Experience
•  Improve Employment Opportunities
•  Build Self-Confidence And Esteem
•  Extend Classroom Learning
•  Network/Meet Professionals In Your Field
•  Receive Academic Credit In Some Majors
Co-op/Internship Requirements for Miami Students
•  Register online with the office
at www.regionals.muohio.edu/jobs
•  Completed at least 12 credit hours
with at least 9 hours in your major
•  Keep an updated resume on file
•  Must have at least a 2.5 GPA in major 
•  Must have at least an overall 2.2 GPA
•  Finish all interview training requirements
Bachelor Degree seeking students can also register
with Oxford’s Career Services as well as find jobs  Co-ops
at www.muohio.edu/careers.  Are always paid, usually sequential, closely aligned to the 
student’s academic field, and may be taken for academic credit.          
Internships are  Internships 
May or may not be paid, may not be directly related to the 
student’s academic field, may be a one-time experience only, 
which historically happens in the summer, and may or may not 
be taken for academic credit.
Salaries vary depending upon academic disciplines and 
generally range from $10 to $20/hourly. 
Office Staff
Dr. Shelley Cassady, Regional Director
cassadss@MiamiOH.edu
Linda Vogt, Sr. Program Assistant (MUH)
vogtlm@MiamiOH.edu
Carol Caudill, Administrative Assistant (MUM)
caudilcw@MiamiOH.edu
Cooperative education (Co-op) and internships integrate 
classroom study with employment that relates to a major. 
This is a big advantage in today’s job market. Employers vary 
from small, local, and regional firms to large corporations and 
non-profit organizations.
The Office staff assists students with resume preparation, 
interviewing, and job correspondence letter writing. The staff 
uses a flexible, individualized approach with each student.
Students will interview with employers for positions and make 
the final decision (if offered a position) about whether or not to 
accept a job offer. Students may choose either an alternating 
(work full-time one semester, attend college full-time the next) 
or parallel co-op (work full-time or part-time and attend college 
part–time).  Students compete in the co-op/internship market 
for these opportunities just like in the job market. It is highly 
recommended that students consider taking BTE/ENT/CIT 221
Professional Development to better prepare for the 
co-op/internship workplace.
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 34 of 40
FACT SHEET for Employers          www.regionals.MiamiOH.edu/jobs
Career, Co-op & InternshipServices                       for      
Engineering Technology, Business
Technology, Criminal Justice, Nursing,
Computer Information Technology, Health 
Information Technolgy and Integrative Studies  
Why Hire a Co-op or an Intern?    
•  Provides cost-effective, pre-professional labor
•  Gives early assessment of future hires
•  Reduces recruiting/training costs and time
•  Reduces Labor turnover 15 to 20%
•  Releases trained personnel from basic tasks
•  Provides access to faculty and staff 
•  Provides opportunities to give input on 
college/university curriculum development
Some of the Skills MiamiCo-op/Interns Have
•  Accounting, marketing, sales
•  CADD, CNC, Electronic Circuit Analysis, 
Network Maintenance, Hardware/Software
Interface, Circuit Analysis & Design, PLC, CNC
•  Programming in Java, C++, Visual Basic, 
Object-Oriented, Operating Systems, Networking 
•  Database Management, Project Management,
Foundations in Healthcare Systems, Record 
Tracking and Management
•  Law Enforcement, Probation/Parole Work,
Public/Private Security     
•  Healthcare/Nursing, Homecare   Co-ops
Are always paid, usually sequential, closely aligned to the 
student’s academic field, and may be taken for academic credit.          
Internships are  Internships 
May or may not be paid, may not be directly related to the 
student’s academic field, may be a one-time experience only, 
which historically happens in the summer, and may or may not 
be taken for credit.  We abide by the Fair Labor Standards Act.
Salaries vary depending upon academic disciplines and 
generally range from $10 to $20/hourly. 
Office Staff/Contact Information
Dr. Shelley Cassady, Regional Director
cassadss@MiamiOH.edu
Linda Vogt, Sr. Program Assistant (MUH)
vogtlm@MiamiOH.edu; 513-785-3113
Carol Caudill, Administrative Assistant (MUM)
caudilcw@MiamiOH.edu; 513-727-3205
Cooperative education (Co-op) and internships integrate 
classroom study with employment that relates to a major. 
This is a big advantage in today’s job market. Small, medium and 
large employers benefit financially from work/learning 
partnerships with local colleges and universities.
The Office staff assists employers by posting their positions and 
sending qualified students’ resumes for the positions. The Office 
staff provides a flexible, individualized approach with each 
employer to meet their specific workforce needs. 
Once an employer has reviewed the resumes, he/she can call 
the student to arrange an interview. If the employer makes a job 
offer and the student accepts, then he/she needs to inform the 
Office staff that a selection has been made.
The student will then sit down with the employer to fill out a 
work/learning agreement form to complete the process. Toward 
the end of the semester, the employer will be asked to review 
the student’s performance using a single page evaluation form 
which is returned to the Office upon completion. Student and 
employer can continue on with the co-op/internship if it is 
mutually agreeable to both. 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 35 of 40
MIAMI UNIVERSITY REGIONALS
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
ENT/CIT/BTE 220 
Variable (0-2) 
Instructor:  Shelley Cassady, Ph.D.
Miami University Regionals Career, Co-op & Internship Services Director
Office: 122 Rentschler Hall, Hamilton Campus
Phone: 513-785-3113   E-mail: Cassadss@MiamiOH.edu      Sept 2012
DESCRIPTION:
Students participating in the co-op or internship program are required to register for this course during their work term. This course 
provides a structured, formal connection between the student’s co-op/internship job and her/his academic program of study. For each 
work session, students will keep a portfolio of work activities then reflect on and place into context the work experience and 
academic program. It is expected that students who enroll in BTE/CIT/ENT 220 over multiple semesters (no more than three {3} 
semesters or total of six {6} credit hours) will experience increasing sophisticated work assignments. Credit may only be granted during 
the semester in which a student is working AND registered for BTE/CIT/ENT 220. No credit will be awarded for past work 
experiences.
Prerequisite: Approval from co-op/placement office and instructor.
GENERAL COURSE OBJECTIVES:
•  Provide a forum for students to engage with other co-op/internship students and reflect on their jobs as learning experiences;
•  Increase the student’s technical skills;
•  Provide context to their academic curriculum;
•  Develop and refine interviewing skills and career success skills;
•  Assist the student in solidifying her/his commitment to their academic program of study.
ASSIGNMENTS:
TEXT:  JOB CHOICES, a publication by National Association of Colleges and Employers (Available on either Campus)
CLASS: To be held viaBlackboard. Meeting times will be arranged by the instructor. 
1.  Must review the “What Now” interviewing tape before interviewing with an employer. (Available on website) 
2.  Develop three (3) specific goals to accomplish this semester. These goals will help to establish a learning environment 
between you and your employer. These goals must be approved by the faculty member at the beginning of the semester.
3.  Maintain a portfolio of projects on which you worked, new technologies you experienced, things you learned, etc. Be 
prepared to incorporate this information into an end of semester reflection (term) paper.
4.  Meet at least three (3) times during the semester. Once at the beginning to discuss your goals and plans with all students 
enrolled in BTE/CIT/ENT 220; once during the semester with your faculty member and supervisor (preferably a work 
site visit); once at the end of the semester to review and reflect on your experience. These meetings may be accomplished 
through e-mail, Internet, video conferencing, telephone, or in-person.
5.  Prepare a term paper (2 to 3 pages) in which you reflect on what you accomplished during the semester in relation to goals 
that were set; what you learned; how/what you did this semester fits into your academic program and personal career goals.
Must be completed and turned in one week before final exams.
METHOD OF EVALUATION:
1.  Credit earned – satisfactory completion of above assignments and satisfactory performance evaluation from your employer.
2.  Credit not earned – failure to meet all conditions as stated above.
NOTE: This outline is subject to change as needed.
Miami University Learning Community
Miami University is committed to fostering a supportive learning environment for all students irrespective of individual differences in gender, race, national 
original, religion, handicapping conditions, sexual preferences, or age. Students should expect, and help create, a learning environment free from all prejudice. 
Disparaging comments, sexist or racist humor, or questioning the academic commitment of students based upon these individual differences are behaviors that 
undermine our learning community. If such behaviors occur in class, please seek the assistance of your instructor or department chair. 
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 36 of 40
Student Co-op/Internship Work/Learning Evaluation Form ENT/CIT/BTE220 Page 1    Miami University Regionals; Career, Co-op & Internship Services
Hamilton: 513-785-3113: Fax: 513-785-3178   Middletown: 513-727-3205; Fax: 513-727-3223  
Academic area: BTE/CIT/ENT220; Indicate number of credit hours  (0-2)    Criteria for Credit Below
Met with Co-op Director on:                 Maintained Portfolio   Turned in Paper 
Student Name          H M   Banner I.D. Number    
Phone     Cell Phone    E-mail      
Major       B.S.   B.A.   B.I.S.   A.S.    A.B.   A.A. 
Company Name     Phone
Company Address             
Supervisor’s Name & Title      E-mail     
The Cooperative Education/Internship Program is based on learning from experience. This work/learning agreement 
represents a joint effort by the student, employer, and university co-op Director to document how the student will learn 
from work experience and how the co-op/internship experience will be evaluated.
Co-op/Internship Learning Goals:       Student Evaluation of Goals Section
1.         Not Met     Met  Exceeded
2.         Not Met    Met  Exceeded
3.         Not Met    Met  Exceeded
Student’s Comments regarding experience; Signature      Date
Co-op Director’s Comments regarding the experience; Signature     Date 
Agreement regarding working conditions for the student:
Job Title     Salary     Start Date    
Academic Term     Hrs/Week    Ending Date
We, the below signed, agree with the suitability of the working/learning goals and academic credit (if indicated). 
Student        Date
Supervisor        Date 
Co-op Director        Date 
Please use Page 2 for Supervisor’s Evaluation of the student.
Important: Please return this form (page 1) to the Office within two weeks after you begin your co-op/internship.
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 37 of 40
Student Co-op/Internship Work/Learning Evaluation Form ENT/CIT/BTE220 Page 2
Miami University Regionals; Career, Co-op & Internship Services
Hamilton: 513-785-3113; Fax: 513-785-3178  Middletown: 513-727-3205; Fax: 513-727-3223  
Student Name         H M   Banner I.D. Number
Company Name          Supervisor’s Name    
Company Address             
Supervisor’s Overall Comment Section regarding the student’s goals:
Please rate the student on the following professional skills:
Attendance, Punctuality, Personal Appearance  Excellent  Good    Average   Fair Poor Not Relevant
Reports to work regularly     5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Arrives to work on time    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Arranges for lateness or time off in advance   5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Isappropriately dressed for work    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is properly groomed     5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Knowledge of the Job    Excellent  Good    Average  Fair Poor Not Relevant
Grasps instructions quickly     5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Applies math/physics principles to ENT problems  5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Desires to increase knowledge of job  5   4  3   2  1  __  Is willing to ask questions    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Uses applied skills to identify, evaluate & solve  5   4  3   2  1  __ 
complex technical problems 
Uses engineering computer software to facilitate 5   4  3   2  1  __  engineering problem solving 
Quality of Work    Excellent  Good    Average  Fair Poor Not Relevant
Produces work that is accurate and neat  5   4  3   2  1  __  Shows thoroughness in work   5   4  3   2  1  __  Produces the expected volume of work  5   4  3   2  1  __  Isefficient in use of time     5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is able to set priorities    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Prepares well-written technical reports  5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Attitude     Excellent  Good    Average  Fair Poor Not Relevant
Shows initiative     5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is enthusiastic about work    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is willing to work with and for others  5   4  3   2  1  __  Accepts suggestions/criticism    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Asks for additional work when tasks are complete 5   4  3   2  1  __  Pursues life-long learning    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Judgment, Reliability, Adaptability  Excellent  Good    Average  Fair Poor Not Relevant
Is able to think independently    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Makes good decisions    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is able to work under pressure    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Meets deadlines     5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is adaptable to changes in the work environment  5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Demonstrates expected standards of ethical conduct 5    4  3    2  1  __ 
Human Relations    Excellent  Good    Average  Fair Poor Not Relevant
Cooperates with supervisors and co-workers  5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Is courteous and friendly    5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Controls emotions    5   4  3   2  1  __  Speaks well and shows good choice of words   5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Verbally communicates ideas well   5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Functions in team-oriented activities   5   4  3   2  1  __ 
Please circle. Overall student performance is    Excellent  Good    Average  Fair Poor 
Supervisor’s signature         Date    
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 38 of 40
SHELLEY SEIM CASSADY, Ph.D.
775 Oakwood Drive  E-mail: Cassadss@MiamiOH.edu  513-785-3113 (Work)
Hamilton, OH 45013      513-867-9794 (Home)
EDUCATION      Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration, Iowa State University, Ames, IA    Minor Emphasis -- College English, 1980-1985, GPA 3.85
Ph.D. Dissertation: "The Importance and Implementation of Management Functions and Activities in English     Departments at Four-Year, State-Supported Colleges and Universities" 1985
M.Ed./English Minor, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 1973-1975, GPA  3.75
B.A. in English, (Secondary Teaching Certificate), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 1970-1972,     GPA  3.46
A.A. in Liberal Arts, Cottey College, Nevada, MO, 1968-1970 GPA  3.45    
EDUCATIONAL HONORS/AWARDS/PROMOTIONS      Recognized for 15 years of Dedicated Service to Miami University  2004 
Member of Phi Kappa Phi (Iowa State University) and Phi Theta Kappa (Cottey College)
Outstanding Student Services Award 1991 from Miami University
Recognized for 20 years of service in the Ohio Cooperative Education Association, 1995 to present
Outstanding Female Citizen Award (Senior Year) -- Thomas Roberts High School, Decorah, Iowa, 1968
Graduated with academic honors in the top 10 students (senior year of H.S.) GPA 3.82
Promoted from Placement Coordinator to Regional Director for Co-op/Internship and Placement, Miami University,     Over 25 years of service.
WORK EXPERIENCE
Regional Director for Career, Co-op&Internship Service, Miami University,   3/26/2009 to present
•  Direct and Coordinate Co-op, Internship, and Career Services for Miami’s Regional Campuses
•  Supervise, evaluate and train staff
•  Teach BTE/ENT/CIT 221 (Professional Development) 2006 to present
•  Teach ENT 220, BTE 220, and CSA 220 Professional Practice 2000 to present
•  Member of the Ohio Cooperative Education Association 1993 to present
•  President of the Butler/Warren Ohio Employer Council 2003 to present 
•  Member of B/W Society for Human Resource Management 2001 to present
•  Member of the Hamilton Chamber Business and Education Collaborative 1996 to present
•  Co-Director of the Butler County Annual Job Fair 1996 to present
Co-op/Internship & Placement Director, Miami University Hamilton, 1999 to 2009
•  Directed the Academic Co-op/Internship and Placement Program for the MiamiUniversity Hamilton
Campus
•  Directed student graduate placement on the Hamilton Campus
• Taught BTE 221 (Professional Development) for Co-ops/Interns and graduates) for the Hamilton 
Campus, 1995 to 2006
• Taught BTE/ENT/CIT 221 Professional Development 2006 to 2009
• Taught ENT 220, BTE 220, & CSA 220 Professional Practice 2000 to 2009
•  Member of the Ohio Cooperative Education Association  1993 to 2009
•  President of the Butler/Warren Ohio Employer Council 1996 to 2000; 2003 to 2009
•  Member of the Hamilton Chamber Business & Education Collaborative 1996 to 2009
•  Member of the Workforce One Job Center Board 1996 to present; VP of the Ohio Two-Year College 
Placement Association 2004 to 2006; Treasurer 2002 to 2004
•  Supervised and evaluated the School-to-Work Coordinator 1996 to 2000
Co-Director of the School-to-Work Program for Butler-Warren Counties, 1996 to 2000
•  Applied for a School-to-Work Local Implementation Grant, 1995
Awarded 1.15 million dollars; Received $950,000 for a four-year program for Butler and Warren 
Counties (15 school districts, three vocational districts, and the two regional campuses of Miami 
University), 1996   (Joint initiative with the Middletown Campus)
•  Administered the Co-op and School-to-Work budgets, 1992 to 2000 (Total: $1,248,000) 
•  Supervised/evaluated personnel involved with the Co-op/Internship and STW programs, (1992 to 2000). 
Chaired the Co-op Advisory Board, 1992 to 1997
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 39 of 40
SHELLEY SEIM CASSADY, Ph.D.  page 2
775 Oakwood Drive  E-mail: Cassadss@MiamiOH.edu  513-785-3113 (Work)
Hamilton, OH 45013      513-867-9794 (Home)
•  Co-Chaired the School-to-Work Subgrant Committee, (Over $600,000 awarded to18 local school and 
vocational districts over a four-year period) 1996 to 2000
•  Worked with the Greater Hamilton Chamber STW Advisory Board to help facilitate career development 
activities for K through 12 public school children, 1997 to present
•  Attended the National Cooperative Education Association Conference (1996-2000)      Cooperative Education/Internship Director; Placement Coordinator for Miami University Hamilton, 1992 to1999
•  Applied for Title VIII funding for cooperative education, 1990 & 1991
Awarded $300,000 grant; Received $298,000 for a four-year Co-op Program for the regional campuses 
of Miami University, 1992 (Joint initiative with the Middletown Campus)
•  Attended the National Cooperative Education Association, 1992-1996
Placement Coordinator for Miami University Hamilton, 1989 to 1999
•  Assisted students, graduates, and alumni in the job search process
English Instructor for Miami University Hamilton, Hamilton, OH, 1987-89
•  Taught Freshman English Composition 111 and Developmental English 001 and 002
•  Counseled and advised students in the Learning Assistance Center
Assistant Director of the Educational Placement Office at Iowa State University, Ames, IA,  1980-1982
•  Counseled teacher candidates and education graduate students about the job search process.
•  Supervised office staff and graduate interns
•  Coordinated campus recruiting and interviewing schedules
English Instructor for Tidewater Community College, Virginia Beach, VA, 1979-1980
Lead Instructor at Capital Business College, Olympia, WA, 1977-1979
•  Taught English, Technical Writing, and Human Relations
•  Supervised all faculty, chaired staff meetings, and scheduled classes
UNIVERSITY MEMBERSHIPS
•  Administrative Council 1996 to present
•  Student Services Staff 1989 to present
•  Engineering Advisory Board 1989 to present
•  SEAS Advisory Board 1997 to present
•  Engineering Senior Design Judges Panel (yearly)
•  Business Advisory Board 1989 to 2003
•  Greater Hamilton Chamber of Commerce Business and Education Collaborative 1996 to present
•  Miami Middletown Unclassified Staff Forum
•  Miami Hamilton Adjunct Faculty
Increasing Engineering Technology and Information Technology Co-op/Intern Experiences, 
Miami University, page 40 of 40
 davido.extraxim@gmail.com