NRCF (Natural Resources Consultative Forum)
CBNRMF (Community­Based Natural Resource Management Forum)
UNZA (University of Zambia)  
ACF (Agricultural Consultative Forum) and  
FSRP (Food Security Research Project)
NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, FOOD
SECURITY, AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
IN ZAMBIA: MOVING FROM
RESEARCH EVIDENCE TO ACTION
PROCEEDINGS OF THE PUBLIC FORUM
By
Phyllis Simasiku,
Antony Chapoto, Robert Richardson, Mwape Sichilongo
Gelson Tembo, MichaelWeber and Alimakio Zulu
WORKING PAPER No. 44
FOOD SECURITY RESEARCH PROJECT  
LUSAKA, ZAMBIA  
February, 2010  http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/index.htm)ii
NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, FOOD SECURITY AND
RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN ZAMBIA:
MOVING FROM RESEARCH EVIDENCE TO ACTION
PROCEEDINGS OF THE PUBLIC FORUM
03 December, 2009
Taj Pamodzi Hotel, Lusaka, Zambia
By: Phyllis Simasiku,
Antony Chapoto, Robert Richardson, Mwape Sichilongo
Gelson Tembo, MichaelWeber and Alimakio Zulu  
Collaborating Partners
NRCF (Natural Resources Consultative Forum)
CBNRMF (Community­Based Natural Resource Management Forum)
UNZA (University of Zambia)
ACF (Agricultural Consultative Forum) and  
FSRP (Food Security Research Project)  Acknowledgements
The Food Security Research Project (FSRP) is a collaborative program of research, outreach, and 
local capacity building, between the Agricultural Consultative Forum (ACF), the Ministry of 
Agriculture and Cooperatives (MACO), and Michigan State University’s Department of 
Agricultural Economics. 
We wish to recognize that the research and outreach work outlined in this report was made 
possible through close collaboration, and with important contributions from the Natural 
Resources Consultative Forum (NRCF),  the Community‐Based Natural Resource Management 
Forum (CBNRMF) and the University of Zambia (UNZA).   
In addition to contribution from all of the collaborating partners identified above, we also wish 
to acknowledge the financial and substantive support of the Swedish International Development 
Agency and the United States Agency for International Development in Lusaka.  Research 
support from the Global Bureau, Office of Agriculture and Food Security, and the Africa Bureau, 
ffice of Sustainable Development at USAID/Washington also made it possible for MSU 
esearchers to contribute to this work.   
O
r
  
The views expressed in this document are exclusively those of the authors. 
Comments and questions should be directed to the Country Director, Food Security Research 
Project, 86 Provident Street, Fairview, Lusaka:  tel 234539;  fax 234559; email: 
kabaghec@msu.edu  
iiiEXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Natural resource use, including land, and rural population location is an important topic for 
Zambia's development strategy. Among other efforts, the Government of Zambia (GRZ) has 
designated 22% of total land area, as Game Management Areas (GMAs) for human settlements 
and wildlife conservation. Other GRZ programmes seek to improve food security and 
agricultural productivity, including the use and improvement of conservation farming 
techniques.  GRZ is currently reviewing policies in the agricultural, forestry, fisheries, wildlife 
and land sectors.  Research in these fields has much to contribute to effective management of 
GMAs, increased agricultural productivity and improved welfare, especially for the rural 
population. 
The Agricultural Consultative Forum/Food Security Research Project (ACF/FSRP), the Natural 
Resources Consultative Forum(NRCF), the Community Based Natural Resources Management 
Forum (CBNRMF) and the University of Zambia (UNZA) jointly organised a one‐day public 
outreach forum on the 3rd
 of December, 2009 at the Taj Pamodzi Hotel in Lusaka. The forum 
“Insights on Natural Resources Management and Rural Development in Zambia: Moving from 
Research Evidence to Action” was intended to reach out to many stakeholders and create 
awareness about the effect and performance of policy and programmes in natural resources 
management and rural development.  
Participants were drawn from a cross section of stakeholders within and outside government, 
Chiefs, community based organisations, private sector, cooperating partners, government 
fficers and Members of Parliament. The Minister of Tourism, Environment and Natural 
 .
o
Resources officially opened the forum
The objectives of the outreach were: 
 To share research findings on studies related to natural resources management in Game 
Management Areas (GMAs) and Access to land in Zambia and how these relate to rural 
welfare in Zambia. 
 To  contribute  to  the current policy  and legislation review processes in the  relevant 
natural resources sectors 
 To  provide input into the formulation of the Sixth National Development Plan 
 To collaborate in identifying and distributing Zambia‐ specific research and outreach 
publications related to the issues covered by this forum 
The one day programme consisted of three plenary sessions. Sessions I and II had three 
presentations, each followed by questions, clarifications and discussions in plenary. Session III 
was a guided discussion held in plenary which focused on selected topics arising from the 
iv
presentations.  
The first three presentations were on research studies conducted to evaluate the impact of 
wildlife management policies on communities’ welfare and conservation in GMAs. Data for these 
studies were obtained from a survey entitled “ Impact on Game Management Areas and 
Household Welfare (IGMAW)” conducted by CSO in 2006. It covered 14 GMAs in areas around 
four park systems namely: Bangweulu, Kafue, Lower Zambezi, and Luangwa. Interviews with 
139 Community Leaders and 2,769 households were conducted. 3 areas outside the GMAs were 
selected as control areas. Reports from private sector and ZAWA, as well as animal population 
census results from ZAWA and cooperating partners were some of the literature used for 
analysing commercial and ecological aspects.  The first study by NRCF sought to evaluate the impact of wildlife management policies on 
communities by analysing the commercial, ecological and social performance of the wildlife‐
based tourism industry. The study also assessed impacts on conservation by analysing the 
status of the habitat and the animal population trends in relation to the objectives of GMAs as 
buffer zones for the protection of wildlife, which in turn provides benefits to resident 
communities. 
Results showed that the commercial performance of the hunting industry was declining as 
shown by various factors which included revenues from hunting and trophy sizes of major 
species such as lion and leopard. Revenues from hunting disbursed by ZAWA to CRBs have 
declined since 2004. Incomes fell by K170 million in 2005 (from K3,836,419,397 to 
K3,665,535,264) and  by K50 million in 2006 (K3,617,228,394). Trophy sizes for major species 
harvested between 1983 and 2006 are becoming smaller. An assessment of the ecological status 
of GMAs was also negative. The wildlife population trends showed sharp declines after 1998. 
Habitats have been degraded because of human land use practices as seen from satellite 
imagery analysis. The key conclusion drawn was that GMAs have not achieved the purpose for 
which they were intended, which reflects failure of current GMA policy. 
In the other two studies, also using the IGMAW data, household welfare was studied using 
separate variables to examine household consumption and household incomes. 
Results from the household consumption  study included the following:  1) that on average, 
households in GMAs had more diversified economic activities, including tourism, but possessed 
fewer assets; 2) There were no significant consumption differences between households in 
GMAs and non‐GMA households; 3) however, the GMA institution accounted for 66% of per 
capita consumption in households that are located in GMAs; and 4) within the GMA, 
participation in community resource boards (CRBs) and village action groups (VAGs) accounted 
for 44 percent of household consumption.  
Results from the income assessment showed that GMA households on average had lower 
average income compared to non‐GMA households. However, households in prime GMAs had 
17% higher income than households in other rural areas. The presence of a tourist lodge in the 
community contributed another 18% of household income.  
Sources of income in GMAs were broadly categorised into two groups: 1) wage employment; 
and 2) self employment. Households in prime GMAs were 7.8% more likely to be employed and 
expected to earn more (116%) from wage employment while households in secondary or 
specialized GMAs were 7.4% more likely to report wage income. Households in prime GMAs 
were more likely to report income from self employment (6.9%). Household size (number of 
children and adults) and infrastructure also contributed to self‐employment income 
The study concludes that prime GMAs and tourist lodges contribute positively to rural 
household income; however households in GMAs are expected to incur greater losses from crop 
damage (average = Kw 30,079). The effect is greater in prime GMAs.   
Importantly both studies demonstrated that gains from the GMAs accrued primarily to 
v
relatively wealthier households.  
The fourth presentation was a study that examined access to land for small scale farmers. 
Limited and restricted access to land by small scale farmers is perceived as a problem. It is an 
increasing impediment to the achievement of poverty reduction goals. The majority of small 
scale farmers cultivate small parcels of less than a hectare, and agricultural productivity is also low. Yet there remains a great deal of unutilized land in Zambia, much of it under customary 
tenure. Transfer of land from customary to state tenure is seen as an option to make more land 
available. Views are divergent on this matter. Opposing views see land transfer as a threat to 
authority of chiefs and a disadvantage to the poor. Chiefs would lose power and the poor would 
lose access to land. Supporting views cite increased tenure security and reduced land conflicts 
as advantages. 
Those rural residents far away from towns, who have more land and are related to a headman 
perceive that land is still available for allocation where they live. It is seen to be unavailable 
mostly by female‐headed households and those closer to towns and roads. Research evidence 
shows great disparities in farm sizes within communities. About 25% of the rural poor have 
mean farm sizes of cultivated plus fallow land of 0.62 ha and 50% of smallholders have on 
average 1.28 ha.  
Farm blocks are a policy option to offer bigger and secure farms but proposed new farm block 
are remotely located, in areas with few people and therefore far from markets and services. 
Government investment in farm blocks could marginalize the small scale farmers who comprise 
the majority of rural households. Also, the policy to prioritize financial support to maize does 
not seem to be helping reduce poverty. The bulk of the 2009 budget funds, 8.2% Food Reserve 
Agency (FRA) and 35.3% Fertiliser Support Programme (FSP), went to support maize 
cultivation. Despite these maize support programmes, maize productivity has remained almost 
constant while rural poverty has remained high. Increased access to land is an opportunity for 
reducing poverty when complemented with a balanced financing plan for complementary 
factors. 
The study concluded that limited access to land, current policy for land development and small 
holder farming practices are positively associated with high levels of poverty and therefore 
have implications for rural poverty reduction strategies inside and outside GMAs.
The presentation on conservation farming CF addressed the phenomenon of land degradation 
and soil fertility loss with the associated challenges to increase productivity. Conservation 
farming was defined as minimum tillage founded on 3 key principles: minimising soil 
disturbance, maximising soil cover and diversifying cropping patterns. CF was compared to 
other conventional tillage practices in terms of labour intensity, weed occurrence, land 
disturbance and productivity, 
Results show that the perception that CF is not being adopted because it is labour‐intensive 
compared to conventional tillage is not supported by research evidence. Research has shown 
that in the first year CF has slightly higher labour input of 40 to 50 standard person days (SPDs 
/ha)  but this is reduced from year 2 onwards to 30 to 35 SPDs/ha which is the range for labour 
under most conventional farming practices. CF minimum tillage does not demand more labour 
and does not increase weed pressure. Conversely it has demonstrated a lot more advantages 
over conventional tillage. Disturbed area is less than 10%. Productivity is higher. 
Adoption is estimated at 270,000 farmers on portions of their land. This includes 2006/20077 
baseline of 93,000 farmers. Low rates of adoption may be attributed to lack of programme 
consistency by major NGOs, poor delivery of input packs, misperceptions of the benefits, and 
vi
poor training by implementers. 
The final presentation was about an innovative approach which integrates conservation with 
improvement of household welfare ‐ the COMACO (Community Markets for Conservation) model. 
COMACO is a limited company by guarantee that works as a Public Private Partnership (PPP) 
with local people in GMAs. COMACO’s strategy is to engage in business partnerships with communities that agree to conserve natural resources, mainly wildlife, forests, land/soils and 
water. 
COMACO targets activities that threaten conservation objectives, such as poaching and charcoal 
production, and aims to build capacity for groups that engage in these activities. These groups  
are trained in alternative livelihood skills like vegetable growing, beekeeping and carpentry, 
and given tools to start new forms of livelihood. Farmers are trained in conservation farming as 
part of efforts to improve crop production. Emphasis is on food security but excess produce is 
purchased by COMACO and sold to retail outlets in urban areas. 
  
Measures of success include improved human welfare and positive trends in wildlife 
populations for 30% of the species monitored (including elephants).  Other benefits from 
COMACO include a huge saving of government resources related to law enforcement, public 
safety, better food security and income generation. The challenge is how to conserve land, soils 
water and forests particularly in watershed areas on the plateaus of Eastern Zambia where 
serious soil erosion threatens the survival of the Luangwa river system and the tourism 
industry. 
  
Session III  plenary discussion ended with a resolution for a team of experts to analyse in detail 
some of the issues that were raised and formulate recommendations which would form part of 
the forum proceedings. The output of these consultations was a summary of policy 
recommendations whose main features are presented below   
1. Governance of Natural Resources
Service delivery at all levels of governance needs to be restructured and strengthened  in order 
to promote  and improve  economic development and management of natural resources in both 
open and protected areas.  New strategies based on appropriate resource management systems 
are needed which promote broad‐based participation and address household benefits. Such 
changes are more likely to be appreciated and offer incentives for more effective community‐
based natural resource management. 
2. Policy and Law Review Processes
Efforts  are  needed  to  be more  transparent  and  inclusive when  reviewing  policies  and  laws. 
Formation   of   a  technical  committee  of  qualified  experts  knowledgeable  about  wildlife 
management issues in game management areas to advise MTENR should be considered.  
3. Public­Private Sector Partnerships
Efforts are needed to facilitate pooling of resources and interests among the public sector, 
private sector, non‐governmental organizations and communities to stimulate investment. 
Likewise active but regulated participation is needed in the management of natural resources 
including formulation of appropriate policies and legislation. 
4. Business Oriented Approach from a Strengthened Private Sector Involvement
More progress is needed to adopt business‐oriented natural resource management approaches, 
to explore and fully exploit a wide set of available opportunities, including the virtually 
unexploited field of medicinal plants through well streamlined donor and private sector 
investment and contributions for research, marketing and regulatory mechanisms. 
vii
5. Land Access and Security of Tenure for Improved Smallholder Food Security
Efforts are needed to devise more effective ways to improve access and secure rights to land 
and other natural resources for various stakeholders particularly for smallholder farmers. 
Regional and local integrated land use plans with defined resource rights for institutions, 
individuals and communities can facilitate regulation and reduce land use conflicts. Wildlife viii
habitats and areas used for agriculture must be clearly mapped out in order to strengthen 
protection of animal habitats, while also finding ways to improve smallholder food security and 
welfare.  
There is likewise a need to more adequately develop approaches to raise productivity of 
mallholders’ agricultural land through greatly expanded applied research and extension, and 
hrough complementary infrastructure improvements.  
s
t
Several t
themes
issues were proposed for further investigation. These have been grouped into subjec
as follows.  
i. CBNRM, natural resources management and food security: appraisals of current 
practices in and outside government;  
ii. Land access and security of tenure: ways to improve  land tenure security, access and 
user rights for other natural resources on customary land. 
iii. Conservation farming: improved extension services to increase adoption of innovative 
and more productive practices in agriculture and natural resource management, and to 
ensure effective transfer of technologies in these sectors such as in conservation 
farming. 
iv. PPPs and business environment: current government policies acknowledge the 
importance of partnerships yet an implementation challenge remains of turning policy 
into action.  
The forum further proposed a continuation of dialogue with government through a smaller 
group of stakeholders which should comprise people who understand issues and research done 
n and about GMAs in order to facilitate empirically‐based policy recommendations being 
onsidered in the ongoing policy and legislative reviews.    
i
cix
Appendix 2   Background Papers ............................................................................................................................ 28 
Appendix 3   Downloadable Resource Directory.............................................................................................. 29 
Appendix 4   List of Participants ............................................................................................................................. 34
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ...............................................................................................................................................iii 
.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................. iv 
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................................................ x 
PROGRAMME .................................................................................................................................................................... xi 
1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................................................................1 
2.0 PANEL SESSION I: COMMUNITY‐BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT..........................2 
2.1 The Impact of Wildlife Management Policies on Communities and Conservation in          
Game Management Areas in Zambia, by Alimakio Zulu ...........................................................................2 
2.2 Household Consumption and Natural Resource Management around National Parks in 
Zambia, by Gelson Tembo .....................................................................................................................................3 
2.3 The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation policies on Rural Welfare in Zambia, by Robert 
Richardson...................................................................................................................................................................5 
2.4 Summary of discussions on wildlife conservation/natural resource management......................6 
2.5 Policy recommendations and other suggestions from session I: Panel on Community      
Based Natural Resources Management. ..........................................................................................................9 
3.0 PANEL SESSION II: LAND USE AND INTENSIFICATION OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. 11 
3.1 The Challenge of Integrating the Goals of Productive Land Use and Broad‐Based   
Agricultural Development in Zambia, by Antony Chapoto................................................................... 11 
3.2 Conservation Farming and Related Natural Resource Policies for Sustainable         
Agricultural Intensification, by Peter Aargard .......................................................................................... 13 
3.3 Insights from COMACO Model, by Dale Lewis............................................................................................ 15 
3.4 Summary of Plenary Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 16 
4.0 GUIDED PLENARY DISCUSSION....................................................................................................................... 18 
5.0 SUMMARY OF POLICY IMPLICATIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS........................................................ 20 
5.1 Governance of Natural Resources ................................................................................................................... 20 
5.2 Policy and Law Review Processes................................................................................................................... 21 
5.3 Public‐Private Sector Partnerships (PPPs) ................................................................................................. 21 
5.4 Business‐Oriented Approach from a Strengthened Private Sector Involvement ........................ 22 
5.5 Land Access and Security of Tenure for Improved Smallholder Food Security........................... 23 
6.0 OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS .......................................................................................................................... 24 
6.1 Issues for Further Investigation....................................................................................................................... 24 
6.2 Awareness/Outreach............................................................................................................................................ 25 
6.3 Outstanding Issues ................................................................................................................................................ 25 
6.4 Suggested Studies .................................................................................................................................................. 26 
7.0 CONCLUSION AND WAY FORWARD .............................................................................................................. 27 
List of Appendices ......................................................................................................................................................... 28 
Appendix 1   Power point Presentations ............................................................................................................. 28 x
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
ACF    Agricultural Consultative Forum 
M   CBNR F Community‐Based Natural Resources Management Forum 
CBU    Copperbelt University 
CFU    Conservation Farming Unit 
AC   COM O Community Markets for Conservation 
CP    Cooperating Partners 
CRB    Community Resource Boards 
CSO    Central Statistical Office 
FAO    Food and Agricultural Organization 
FSRP   Food Security Research Project 
GRZ    Government of the Republic of Zambia 
NRCF   Natural Resources Consultative Forum 
PPP    Public Private Sector Partnership 
UNZA   University of Zambia 
VAG    Village Action Groups 
ZAWA    Zambia Wildlife Authority xi
OUTREACH FORUM PROGRA
   
a , Dece , Taj Pamodzi Hotel, Lusaka
MME
DATE:  Thursd y mber 3, 2009
8:30 – 9:30hrs    Registration 
9:30 –9:55hrs    Welcome Chance Kabaghe (FSRP) 
9:55 – 10:10hrs  Opening Remarks:  Catherine Namugala MP,  Minister of Tourism, 
Environment and Natural Resources 
10:10 – 11:10hrs   Panel Session I: Community‐Based Natural Resource Management 
PRESENTATIONS:
Alimakio Zulu (NRCF) and Mwape Sichilongo (CBNRMF): The impact of wildlife 
management policies on communities and conservation in Game Management Areas in 
Zambia   
Dr. Gelson Tembo, (UNZA) “Household Consumption and Natural Resource Management 
around National Parks in Zambia”
Dr. Robert Richardson, (FSRP/MSU) “The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation Policies on 
Rural Wel  Zambia” fare in
11:10 – 11:45hrs   Plenary Discussion 
11:45 – 12:00hrs  B R E A K
12:00 – 13:30hrs  Panel Session II: Land Use and Intensification of Agricultural Production 
PRESENTATIONS:
Antony Chapoto (FSRP), “The Challenge of Integrating the Goals of Productive Land Use 
and Broad‐based Agricultural Development in Zambia  
Peter Aagard (CFU), “Conservation Farming and Related Natural Resource Policies for 
Sustainable Agricultural Intensification” 
Dr. Dale Lewis (Wildlife Conservation Society), “Wildlife Conservation Society: Insights 
from COMACO Model” 
13:35 – 14:30hrs   Buffet L U N C H
14:30 – 15:30hrs   Plenary Discussion 
15:30 – 1730   Guided Plenary Discussion  
g
Topics:    
1) Integrated land use planning and community‐based natural resource mana
2) Land access and poverty reduction 
ervation Society’s COMACO model 
ement 
3) Conservation farming and Wildlife Cons
17:30 – 17:45hrs:   Conclusions and adjournment    
Downloadable Resource Directory on Natural Resources, Food Security and Pro‐Poor Tourism  
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/resources/index.htm    1
1.0  INTRODUCTION
The Agricultural Consultative Forum/Food Security Research Project(ACF/FSRP),the Natural 
Resources Consultative Forum(NRCF), the Community Based Natural Resources  Management 
Forum (CBNRMF) and the University of Zambia jointly organised a one day outreach public 
forum on the 3rd
 December, 2009 at the Taj Pamodzi Hotel in Lusaka. The forum, “Insights on 
Natural Resource Management  and Rural Development in Zambia: Moving from Research 
Evidence to Action” was intended to reach out to many stakeholders and create awareness 
about impacts and effectiveness of policies governing natural resources management, food 
security and rural development. Participants were drawn from a cross section of stakeholders 
ng Chiefs, Community Based Organisations, the Private 
nt Ministries and Members of Parliament. 
within and outside government; includi
Sector, Cooperating Partners, Governme
The objectives of the outreach were to: 
i) To share research findings on studies related to natural resources management in Game 
Management Areas (GMAs) and Access to land in Zambia and how these relate to 
rural welfare in Zambia; 
ii) To  contribute  to  the current policy  and legislation review processes in the  relevant 
natural resources sectors; 
iii) To  provide input into the formulation of the Sixth National Development Plan; and  
iv) To collaborate in identifying and posting to the web the important Zambia specific, and 
general research and outreach publications in the areas covered by this forum (see 
Appendix 3 – Downloadable Resource Directory. 
Zambia has designated vast land, 22% of total land area, as Game Management Areas (GMAs). 
These are buffer zones surrounding national parks and serve as important areas for human 
settlements and wildlife conservation. Over the years, GMAs have increasingly come under 
immense pressure due to population increase and economic growth.  Natural resources provide 
a basis for sustainable tourism development because tourism is a vehicle for economic growth 
due to its potential to generate employment and foster rural development. Government also 
places great importance on agriculture.    It is therefore vital to improve the management of 
GMAs in order to improve the livelihood of the people living in those areas, the habitat and 
wildlife resources. Government is currently reviewing policies in the forestry, fisheries and 
wildlife sectors.  Research in the field of natural resources and rural welfare can assist 
government to make well informed decisions that will contribute to effective management of 
GMAs, increased agricultural productivity and improved welfare for the people 2.0  PANEL SESSION I:
COMMUNITY­BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Th  firs
ba d n
e t panel session focused on Game Management Areas (GMAs) and addressed community‐
se atural resource management. Three presentations were made. These were 
i. The Impact of Wildlife Management Policies on Communities and Conservation in Game 
Management Areas in Zambia, by Alimakio Zulu (from the NRCF secretariat); 
supplementary discussion by Mwape Sichilongo (from CBNRMF secretariat) 
ii. Household Consumption and Natural Resource Management around National Parks in 
Zambia, by Gelson Tembo (from the University of Zambia, School of Agricultural 
Sciences, Department of Agricultural Economics) 
iii. The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation Policies on Rural Welfare in Zambia, by Robert 
Richardson (from Food Security Research Project, Michigan State University) 
2.1 THE IMPACT OFWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT POLICIES ON COMMUNITIES AND
CONSERVATION IN GAME MANAGEMENT AREAS IN ZAMBIA. BY ALIMAKIO ZULU
GMAs­ why they were established
GMAs were established to act as buffer zones to National Parks (NPs) in order to protect 
wild animals and their habitats and to support a viable wildlife‐based tourism industry, 
which contributes significantly to the national economy and to the welfare rural 
communities in GMAs. The National Parks and Wildlife Policy and the Wildlife Act of 1998 
administered by the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) instituted the concept of 
community based natural resource management (CBNRM) and legally established 
community resource boards (CRBs) as local level community‐based institutions for 
managing wildlife. This was driven by the increasing threat to the survival of natural 
resources and the realization that future generations would face increased risks of hunger 
and poverty which would compel them to further diminish their natural resources. After ten 
ears of implementing the wildlife legislation, it appears that GMA governance through 
RBs is failing to achieve the purpose for which GMAs were established. 
y
C
The study
A study was undertaken to evaluate the social, commercial and ecological impacts of the 
community bas  the GMAs. The study looked at the 
GMA status from
ed natural resources management policies in
–
3 perspectives: 
– As 
Social:  the welfare of communities in GMAs 
Commercial:  the trends in the wildlife based businesses in the GM
– Ecological:  population of wild animals and the status of  habitats
Data were collected through the Impact of Game Management Areas on Household Welfare 
(IGMAW) survey, conducted in October, 2006 by the Central Statistical Office (CSO). Households 
in 14 GMAs and 3 control areas were surveyed. A total of 2,649 households were interviewed. 
ata were analysed by researchers at the University of Zambia. Poverty assessments were 
upplemented by data from the living conditions monitoring survey reports by CSO. 
D
s
2
Ecological data and commercial performance data were drawn from literature review.  Trophy 
quality, animal population, bed capacities and revenue data were obtained from reports from 
the private sector and from ZAWA.  Maps showing settlement patterns are based on GIS 
information derived from satellite imagery analyses.  Results
Social: welfare of communities
The study found that on average, households in GMAs gain from living in GMAs, but benefits 
accrue to households that are relatively already well off. This is supported by audit reports 
of CRBs in the Kafue National Park system which revealed that a larger proportion of the 
xpenditure went to allowances, accommodation and meetings. More detailed analyses of 
ocial impacts are presented later in the papers by Tembo and Richardson. 
e
s
Commercial: trends in wildlife based businesses
Commercial performance was evaluated in terms of revenues earned from safari hunting, 
which is the largest source of revenue to ZAWA and the CRBs. Hunting revenues disbursed 
by ZAWA to CRBs have declined since 2004.  Revenue fell by K170 million in 2005 (to K3, 
665,535,264) and by K50 million in 2006 (to K3, 617,228,394).  Declining trends of trophy 
quality game have been manifested for major species such as lion, leopard, sable, roan and 
buffalo harvested between 1983 and 2006. Declining trends of quota utilization have also 
been manifested in these major species from 1995 to 2005. Regarding non‐consumptive 
tourism, only 3 GMAs have developed bed capacities to a meaningful magnitude for this 
purpose. A comparative analysis of Zambia’s hunting revenues with that of other countries in 
Southern Africa showed that Zambia’s revenue is far below what is realized by countries in this 
region. 
Ecological: population of wild animals and the status of habitats
Animal population data from Lupande GMA and South Luangwa National Park were used to 
graphically depict the trends. After 1998, the year that the Wildlife Act was enacted, the 
populations appeared to be sharply declining (case of South Luangwa National Park and 
Lupande GMA). A special case was noted for lechwe, where population trends are nearly stable 
but with a remarkable difference between the Kafue and Bangweulu wetlands.  In the Kafue 
area, populations appear to be declining while in the Bangweulu an upward trend was evident.  
Habitats are threatened in most GMAs as most of them are increasingly settled. Some GMAs like 
Bbilili south of Kafue National Park are almost fully settled. Land clearing for extensive 
agricultural practices and settlement and tree felling for charcoal production are major causes 
of habitat loss. 
The status of GMAs based on ZAWA’s classifications of hunting blocks shows that the general 
trend is towards under‐stocked and depleted. 
Conclusion
Data available shows that, on average, social, ecological and wildlife based commercial trends in 
MAs are on the decline. The analysis of this scenario points to policy failure. The key 
onclusion then is that GMAs are not meeting the purpose they were meant for.
G
c
2.2.HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AROUND
NATIONAL PARKS IN ZAMBIA. BY GELSON TEMBO
3
Introduction
Nature tourism development is regarded as a potential growth frontier in Zambia. The CBNRM 
program in GMAs aims to achieve two “mutually reinforcing” objectives: 1) wildlife 
conservation through patrols by village scouts and land use plans, and 2) rural development 
through provision of infrastructure and employment.  Objectives of the study
The objectives of the study were to: 
1. Determine the welfare effects of the GMA institution and participation in natural resource 
management through CRBs and Village Action Groups (VAGs). 
2. Determine the distributional effects by examining if poor households benefit more. 
The study used data from the IGMAW survey, conducted by CSO in 2006. 139 Community and 
2,769 household interviews were conducted in areas around four park systems namely: 
Bangweulu Kafue, Lower Zambezi, and Luangwa.
A community is equivalent to CSO’s Standard Enumeration Area (SEA). Approximately 60% of 
the sample was located in GMAs while 40% was non‐GMA as control areas. Consumption 
expenditure was used as the measure of household welfare. 
Estimation Methods  
Impacts of the GMA institution and of participation in natural resource management through 
CRBs and VAGs were determined by Treatment Effects Regression, which entails joint estimation 
of outcome and treatment relationships. The same procedure was used to determine impacts on 
sub‐samples across park systems and household wealth status  See the main study document 
for details of methods used. 
Results
Effect of GMAs on household welfare
Households in GMAs are more likely to participate in CRBs and VAGs; they have more 
diversified economic activities, including tourism but have fewer assets and are more likely to 
be female‐headed, less‐educated and further away from all‐weather roads. There were no 
significant consumption differences between GMAs and non GMAs. However, the GMA effect is 
significant and accounts for 66% of per capita consumption in GMAs. The CRB/VAG effect is also 
positive and significant, accounting for 44% of per capita consumption expenditure. However, 
the benefits accrue only among wealthier households and in remote park systems with limited 
alternative economic opportunities. 
Distributional effect
Impact was also assessed by wealth category. Poor and non‐poor households are equally likely 
to participate in natural resource management activities, but level of participation varies by 
wealth stratum.  The non‐poor are more likely to participate at the CRB level which is directly in 
charge of funds from ZAWA whereas the poor participate at VAG level, where resources are 
limited and participation is more loosely defined. This and evidence from past studies (e.g., 
Mulenga et al 2003) and ZAWA administrative records suggest that elite capture cannot be ruled 
out. Surprisingly, GMAs in Kafue and Lower Zambezi have more recent infrastructure 
development, but household level benefits are not significant. 
Conclusion
The CBNRM program is beneficial to household welfare as measured by consumption 
expenditures, but only in GMAs with limited economic opportunities and among wealthier 
households.  
Infrastructure development is evident, but cannot be attributed to the GMA institution and does 
not translate into household level gains.  
4Suggestions   
) Impediments to effective participation by the majo
i) There is a need to review the incentive structure. 
i rity need to be understood and addressed. 
i
2.3 THE IMPACTS OFWILDLIFE CONSERVATION POLICIES ON RURALWELFARE IN
ZAMBIA. BY ROBERT RICHARDSON
Introduction
Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) shares hunting license revenues and wildlife management 
responsibilities with communities through Community Resource Boards (CRBs) and Village 
Action Groups (VAGs). Community‐Based Natural Resource Management has dual objectives of 
wildlife conservation and rural development. This is achieved through employment of village 
scouts and implementation of development projects. 
The ud
The ud
St y
 st y seeks to answer three research questions 
1. What is the effect of GMAs on household income? 
2. What are the sources of income that generate the GMA effect? 
3. What are the effects of GMAs on crop losses from wildlife damage? 
ied benefits are rural 
elopment projects 
The study analyses impacts in terms of benefits and costs. The identif
employment, revenue sharing, meat distributed after hunting and dev
Costs are crop damage and opportunity cost of alternative land uses. 
Data and methods
Data were obtained from the IGMAW survey conducted by CSO in2006.   Income was used as the 
measure of household welfare. Two statistical methods were used: ordinary least squares (OLS) 
regression was used to estimate the determinants of household income, and two‐stage 
regression was used to estimate the sources of income, and the probability and value of crop 
losses from wildlife damage. 
Results
Effect of GMAs on household income
The GMA effect on household income is a function of household and community characteristics 
(such as education, size of household, assets, and infrastructure).In general GMA households 
have lower average income, are more remote, have less education and fewer assets However, 
households in prime GMAs have 17% higher income than households in other rural areas, 
controlling for other factors.  The presence of a tourist lodge in the SEA contributes another 
18% of household income.  
In the analysis, households were stratified into quintiles to examine how the GMA effect is 
distributed. Gains from living in a prime GMA accrue to the wealthiest 40% of the 
population.The poorest 40% (and 60%) of the sample are not significantly affected by GMAs. 
The wealthiest 40% of the sample are significantly and positively affected by GMAs. Income 
ains from living in a GMA are likely to be captured by non‐poor segments of the population 
ith better access to financial and human capital. 
g
w
5Sources of income that generate the GMA effect
Two‐stage regression was used to estimate the probability of earning income from wage 
employment and the determinants of wage income. The same approach was used for self‐
employment income.  
Results showed that households in prime GMAs were 7.8% more likely to be employed. 
Households in secondary or specialized GMAs were 7.4% more likely to report wage income.  
Households in communities where there was a tourist lodge were 6.6% more likely to report 
income from wage employment. 
Furthermore, households in prime GMAs can be expected to earn 116% more on average from 
wage employment than households in the control areas.  
Households in prime GMAs were 6.9% more likely to report income from self employment. The 
effect was positive and significant, but less than for wage income. Household size (number of 
children and adults) and infrastructure also contributed to self‐employment income. 
Effect of GMAs on crop losses from wildlife damage
Households in prime GMAs are 16.1% more likely to experience crop losses from wildlife 
damages. Households in secondary or specialized GMAs are 12.2% more likely to report crop 
damages. Households in GMAs are expected to incur greater losses from crop damage (average 
= Kw 30,079).  The effect is greater in prime GMAs.  
Conclusions
Prime GMAs and tourist lodges contribute positively to rural household income.  Gains accrue 
primarily to non‐poor households. GMA effect is positively associated with income from wage 
and self employment. The results suggest a need for policies to build capacity for participation 
by poor households. 
Households in prime GMAs are positively associated with both probability and value of crop 
damage losses. The results suggest a possible broader role for village scouts to curb crop 
damage, as well as consideration of a mechanism for compensating farmers for losses. 
2.4 SUMMARY OF DISCUSSIONS ONWILDLIFE CONSERVATION/NATURAL RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT
he discussions on natural resource management from the three plenary sessions are 
onsolidated and presented below.  Sub headings have been created for easy reference. 
T
c
(1)  Opportunity for assessment and baseline for evaluation of future changes
CBNRM Forum secretariat regarded the GMA study as a baseline for assessing the efforts being 
made in CBNRM.  The CBNRMF therefore sought proposals, from the forum, for ways to 
influence policy and turn recommendations into action in order to improve CBNRM 
performance and reverse land degradation. 
(2)  Study Limitations
The GMA study was found to have limitations. It did not present a balanced view of GMAs and 
did not consider many other factors that affect the status of GMAs. It was perceived by some to 
being overly negative and painting a gloomy picture when positive achievement could have 
been cited.  Further that good examples exist that could be shown as lessons for moving 
67
forward. These include activities of other development organizations within CBNRM who are 
equally working in GMAs to achieve the same objectives.  
In response to the observed limitations, the main explanation cited was the type of data used. 
Data available for use in the studies was collected at both household and community level but 
did not analyse the effect of investments in community physical infrastructure such as schools, 
health centres and roads on household welfare. This was accepted as one of main limitations of 
the studies on GMA welfare. ZAWA resource distribution and effects on the household benefits 
need further exploring. The studies presented showed that GMA activities are beneficial to 
households but there are challenges being faced as well. Issues were being brought out in the 
context of the study though incentives, rights and capacity building of the communities 
including participation in decision making which need to be attended to. 
The findings from the two studies presented were based on empirical data and it was the role of 
the forum provided by the workshop to help resolve the issues that have been discovered. Since 
implementation of the GMA activities is at the VAG and not household level, there was a view to 
examine whether service delivery was failing somewhere or the whole system needed 
restructuring. The CRB structure had some support from others who attributed its weakness to 
failures at implementation level. It was also observed that the CRBs are voluntary organizations 
and hence there may be a serious problem of lack of management capacity . 
(3)  Determining Household and community benefits:
The focus on household welfare does not capture the benefits from CRBs accurately since 
money realised in the GMAs goes into community projects and not directly into households. It 
was suggested that the study should have translated or quantified the investments into direct 
benefits to assess the contribution made by the developmental projects and whether people 
have benefited. 
(4)  Appreciation of difficulties faced by ZAWA
There were also views that the study had not considered several factors which were important 
for understanding the difficulties faced by ZAWA and the current status of the GMAs. 1998 was 
the year that Parliament passed the current Zambia Wildlife Act. This set the stage for the 
establishment of the Zambia Wildlife Authority. The institutional transformation process left a 
lean staff which could not cope with protecting the wildlife.  The funds committed by donors to 
inance ZAWA, the new wildlife institution were withdrawn.  Consequently there was 
nadequate manpower and less law enforcement. 
f
i
(5)  Political interference in the hunting industry
Safari hunting contributes the bulk of revenues for ZAWA and the CRBs. In the period 2001 to 
2003 there was a Presidential ban on hunting and therefore ZAWA was deprived of its main 
source of income. 
(6)  Historical development of GMAs
Important to this study too is the historical development of GMAs, how the Parks and GMAs 
were drawn.  Before Independence GMAS were designated as controlled hunting areas reserved 
specifically for hunting.  Around the Kafue National Park, unlike the South Luangwa National 
Park there were initially no settlements supposed to be in the adjacent lands, GMAs.  These were 
bordered by open areas which were sparsely settled. The open areas have been lost to human 
settlements, now the GMAs are quickly being lost and parks are being encroached upon. (7)  Participation in CRBs and VAGs
The conclusion that only the rich seem to participate was challenged. A contrary observation 
was that a person may be educated and poor but can participate as a CRB member. It was also 
observed that participation by CRB members cannot be separated from participation by VAG 
because CRB members are drawn from VAGs.  
(8)  Review of Government policies
Government policies are being reviewed in the natural resources sectors. Government is not 
going to proceed with formulation of a protected areas policy as envisaged in the 
Reclassification Project but government has instead opted to revise the wildlife policy and Act.  
(9)  Perceived lack of benefits for poor GMA residents
It was unfortunate that resident communities in GMAs do not seem to benefit when reports 
from Kenya and Uganda reveal that people derive significant benefit from living alongside 
wildlife. A call was made for a comparative study to show how wildlife management in other 
African countries has benefited their rural communities.  
(10)  Need for holistic approach in country comparative studies
Comparative country studies need to acknowledge differences in economic and business 
environments in the countries being compared. There is need to look critically at the factors 
that drive the industry in South Africa when comparing income earned from hunting in the 
region. We must realise that South Africa has many game ranches which are free to set own 
prices while Zambia uses a quota and prices are set by ZAWA. For example, there are about 
5,000 game ranches in South Africa while Zambia only has about 35 safari operators and is 
therefore quite disadvantaged in terms of benefits accruing from wildlife conservation efforts. 
There is need to look broadly at the entire supply chain and not only farm‐gate prices taking 
into account accessibility to markets, political bans and the fact that new entrants into the 
sector need a learning curve among others. 
(11)  Human/Animal conflict:
eaths of human beings and livestock are critical economic costs to communities residing in 
MAs. They deserve to be reported on. 
D
G
(12)  Governance in local structures
Questions were raised concerning  governance in the local structures, the CRBs and VAGs. 
Should the local governance structure be redefined if they are seen to be not conducive? Is the 
VAG the more participatory unit as it was intended?  Should the entire system be redesigned? 
Are there other things that can be done to improve delivery?   
Sympathy expressed for the weak performance of community structures; that the forum should 
realise that the issue of institutional capacity is complex. Great responsibilities are placed upon 
community structures but no capacities have been given to them to match their legal 
responsibilities. 
(13)  Evaluation of CRB and CBNRM performance  
There has been tremendous increase in community participation since the launch of the CBNRM 
policy in 1998 but it is not known whether empirical evidence is available as to whether wildlife 
8
numbers increased or decreased following this. 
While it is acknowledged that there are tremendous improvements in relations between GMA 
residents and ZAWA it was difficult to establish whether there was, as a result, any progress 
achieved in increasing animal populations.  This is worsened by the absence of animal surveys in recent years.  It is difficult at this stage for ZAWA to confidently establish progress because it 
has not done country‐wide wildlife surveys. The first of such surveys was only done in 2008 and 
this will be used as a baseline for the ones to come later. It is, however, important to note the 
effect of other factors such as GMA encroachments as well as donor funding. While such a stock 
could be useful, some felt that there are many other variables that would affect the performance 
of wildlife management under the CBNRM programme.  
(14)  Effect/Impact of other policies on GMAs
The forum was cautioned not to rush to conclusion that policy failure is responsible for 
degradation of GMAs because there are other policies like forestry, water and land impacting on 
activities in a GMA. 
2.5 POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS AND OTHER SUGGESTIONS FROM SESSION I: PANEL
ON COMMUNITY BASED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT.
1. Ex lo p re partnerships such as public­private­community partnerships:
a) The success of PPPs requires improvements to existing policies and legal frameworks.  
b) Legislation should have a clear incentive framework to stimulate communities to 
appreciate the objectives of PPPs. 
c) Furthermore, it should provide for a clearer definition of communities’ rights to natural 
resources. Security of tenure would be legally enshrined in the agreements and policies.  
2. Adopt business­oriented approaches.
a) Donors will continue to support some activities, BUT such investments are rarely long‐
term and do not allow methodologies to mature and local capacity to be installed.  
b) Therefore business‐oriented approaches should be adopted in order to guarantee 
continued investments in community development activities.  
c) Local people must be encouraged to engage in businesses. The recently enacted law, the 
Zambia Citizen’s Empowerment Act, is expected to enhance local participation in 
business. 
3. Le l ga ize Community Structures.
a) Community structures should be registered under the relevant legislation to grant them 
legal status enabling them to deal with other entities as equal partners and enter into 
legally binding agreements.  
b) Resource ownership should only be given upon a community showing proof of interest, 
capacity and the means to assume responsibility for the management of the resources. 
As such, communities must define their boundaries, membership, roles and 
responsibilities, produce action plans and define benefit‐sharing mechanisms.  
c) Devolved rights should include adequate authority and responsibility for the 
management, benefit and disposal of resources within agreed frameworks as well as the 
right to exclude others who are not defined participants.  
94. iv D re sify away from wildlife.
a) A new wildlife management policy must address communities’ access to other, non‐
wildlife, natural resources, which the majority of poor households depend upon. This 
will expand the horizon of opportunities. 
b) The government has prioritized the agricultural sector as a vehicle for reducing rural 
poverty and is providing incentives for agricultural development. The agricultural 
expansion however should be implemented in a manner that does not compromise the 
objectives of the GMAs.  
5. Po ti si on ZAWA as regulator and advisor rather than implementer  
a) Managing a wildlife estate of 19 national parks and 36 GMAs covering more than 30 
percent of the country’s territory is overwhelming.   
b) ZAWA faces challenges in maintaining the national parks. The task given to ZAWA is too 
ambitious for a single institution unless its function evolves from hands­on to regulatory 
c) ZAWA’s staff comes from a culture of conservation and wildlife management rather than 
community development. Consequently, ZAWA tends to allocate its resources to the 
most pressing conservation needs, i.e.  Surveillance of its national parks. 
6. Compensate farmers for losses caused by wild animals
7. Engage village scouts in patrols to curb crop losses and other human­animal conflict  
Other suggestions for consideration
1. A study to compare the benefits at household level in Zambia with other countries 
would be useful. 
2. Review governance aspect of the CRB and link it to incentives. 
3. Review policies to incorporate capacity building for participation by poor households? 
4. Suggest broader roles for village scouts to curb crop damage 
5. Devise mechanisms for compensating farmers for losses? 
6. Explore ways to determine the impact of development projects themselves, recognizing   
limitations of data.  
7. Now is the time to make a decision/choice:   Is it wildlife or is it people to prioritize in 
GMAs? 
103.0  PANEL SESSION II:
LAND USE AND INTENSIFICATION OF AGRICULTURAL
PRODUCTION
3.1 THE CHALLENGE OF INTEGRATING THE GOALS OF PRODUCTIVE LAND USE AND
BROAD­BASED AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN ZAMBIA. BY ANTONY CHAPOTO
The study addresses access to Land and its implications for rural poverty reduction at the 
national‐level, which includes households both  inside and outside GMAs.  It also examines 
implications of finding for current policy for land development. Data was drawn from nation‐ 
ide Supplemental Surveys, conducted as a complement to Post Harvest Surveys conducted in 
001, 2004, and 2008  by CSO and FSRP respectively. 
w
2
The P or blem
1. Land constraints, among others, are increasingly impeding achievement of poverty 
reduction goals inside & outside GMAs 
2. Land productivity is far below potential – in part due to inadequate investment in land 
and related factors for smallholder farming areas  
3. There remains a great deal of unutilized land in Zambia: 
Obje iv
(sm ho
ct es of the study are to discuss the extent of land pressures within customary land
all lder) sector in order:
1. To show how land disparities within the smallholder sector affect agricultural growth 
and poverty reduction goals 
2. To report traditional authorities’ views about transfer of customary land to the state & 
other issues 
3. To consider alternative land policy options for addressing the goals of broad‐based rural 
development and food security 
Data and methods
The nationally representative empirical data base on small holders in Zambia is from rural 
household surveys conducted by CSO and FSRP in 2001, 2004 and 2008. Data were 
supplemented in 2008 by information gathered from nationally representative interviews with 
village headmen. 
Findings
Leaving the relatively small number of commercial Zambian farmers aside, most rural farmers 
own small farms. But there is considerable variation in access to land and household income 
performance among smallholders.  For example, in 2004, the top 50% of maize sales from 
smallholders came from 2.5% of the farmers who have an average farm size of 4.6 hectares (ha). 
The rest came from 26% of the small holders whose cultivated farm sizes averaged 2.0 ha. 
However the majority (72%) of smallholder farmers did not sell maize, and these households 
cultivate an average farm size of 1.3 ha. And many among this majority live on much smaller 
farms.  In the 2008 survey, the middle category increased slightly to 28% and average farm 
sizes decreased to 1.9 ha. The population of small holder farmers who do not sell maize declined 
to 68%, and average farm size was 1.2 ha. The top category selling 50 % of the national 
smallholder maize crop increased to 3.2% while their average farm size increased to 4.8 ha. 
11Overall the poverty incidence in the rural population is still very high‐‐about 80% compared to 
34% for the urban population in 2006 based on studies from CSO.
What have we learned about tradition leaders’ views on the transfer of land from customary 
tenure to State land? Of the 1053 headmen who were interviewed in 2008, 82% responded that 
they believe it would be bad policy to transfer land from the traditional sector to the State. The 
remainder (18%) said it would be a good policy because it would provide security of tenure and 
reduce land conflicts. The 82% who were opposed argued that traditional authorities would 
lose power and the poor would lose access to land. 
In the first Supplemental Survey, households were asked directly about their perceptions of the 
availability of unallocated land in their communities. Those who indicated that unallocated land 
was available were more likely to already have more land, were related to the headman, and 
were farther away from roads and towns. Those who answered no to the availability question 
were more likely to be among female‐headed households, were located nearer to towns and 
roads, and were more likely to have lived longer in the village.  
One option is for Government policy to try to favour the development of farm blocks but these 
are remotely located, in areas that have few people and without effective private sector 
involvement. Farm block development will be difficult to implement and sustain.   
If GRZ puts significant money into farm blocks, this could leave out the majority. What is the 
right way forward on this issue? 
There are disparities in funding in the agricultural sector budget. For example, the 2009 public 
budget for the sector shows that 8.2% is allocated to the Food Reserve Agency (FRA) and 35.3% 
to the Fertilizer Support Programme (FSP). Both support maize production with public sector 
subsidies that lower input prices and raise output prices. With relatively few resources for other 
roductivity enhancing investment like research and extension raises questions of whether 
 this funding pattern.  
p
agriculture is going to achieve sustainable improvements with
A Result of this prior funding approach ov
•
er the years is that:
• Productivity has remained almost constant despite the maize support programme 
Rural poverty has remained high 
• Production per hectare from fertilizer users is almost static and for non fertilizer users it 
is declining. 
There is an opportunity with greater access to land 
• There is unutilized productive land in Zambia – how best to utilize it and what to do to 
help the 1.5 million smallholder farms in Zambia (roughly 60% of  the population) is the 
challenge  
The Land Bill of 1995 outlines the following land development proposals: 
• Encouraging chiefs to transfer land from customary system to state land. The State then 
provides title to entrepreneurs to make productive use of the land 
• Farm Blocks  development–. The State plans to invests in infrastructure (roads, dams, 
electrification, main irrigation facilities). This is likely to be a major plank of the Sixth 
National Development Plan for the agricultural sector. Some investment in settlement 
schemes and then 
• Encouraging Private investment in farmblock and settlement schemes 
12 Most locations of Farm Blocks  are somewhat distant. So far, the State has not involved the 
private  ector in design of new Farm Block schemes. The public‐private partnership concept has 
not been implemented. 
s
Sum ar m y and conclusions
1. Land constraints and low productivity of smallholder agriculture are leading to high 
rural poverty.  Despite urban migration the absolute number of rural households in 
poverty continues to grow 
2. Rural settlement follow closely public investment in rural infrastructure  
3. Land constraints in a land‐abundant country is not a paradox because economically 
viable arable land requires access to basic services, water, schools, roads, and markets in 
the customary system, where land could be allocated  
4. The basic public investments to make additional settlement economically viable have 
yet been made in many areas of Zambia  
5. Complementary investments in land productivity enhancements (research, extension, 
etc.) are underfunded 
Policy im
The stud
plications/suggestions
•
y suggests a review of the agricultural policy in the following dimensions: 
Address land constraints for small holders 
• Consider additional investment for land development targeted at existing small scale 
farmers 
•  Consider greater investment in  public goods to improve the foundation for productivity 
growth  e.g. infrastructure, extension, research 
• Land use and productivity improvements need to be addressed carefully, and jointly . 
3.2 CONSERVATION FARMING AND RELATED NATURAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR
SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION. BY PETER AARGARD
Introduction
The rationale for CF (conservation farming) research is motivated by the prevailing 
tillage/farming practice among smallholder farmers of  abandoning pieces of land  when 
productivity is lost after several years of use. This raises challenges to (i) increase productivity 
and (ii) identify markets for the crops produced.. 
CF in Zambia combines practices of improved reduced tillage (IRT) and/or conservation tillage 
(CT), with a practice of combinations of crops wherein about 30% land farmed should be 
occupied by legumes. 
CF research has been flexible, accommodating a wide range of planting configurations, many 
different crops and cropping systems, including rotations, inter‐crops, relays and agro‐forestry 
trees. It can accommodate non‐organic and organic supplements or combinations of these.  The 
key principles of CF are to:  i) Minimise soil disturbance to the extent possible, and ii) Maximise 
soil cover to the extent possible and iii) Diversify cropping patterns to the extent possible. 
Conservation Agriculture (CA) is simply conservation farming with the establishment and 
survival of a minimum of 50 Faidherbia albida trees per hectare. Faidherbia albida also known 
locally as Musangu is being used in trials to improve soil fertility. 
13
The presentation focused on two main issues:  
(i) The perception that Conservation Farming (CF) is labour intensive and (ii) The perception that adoption of CF is low among Small Scale Farmers 
Findings
(i) The perception was discussed that Conservation Farming (CF) is labour intensive. 
sed in 
y. 
Conventional tillage practices were compared with CF in terms of  labour intensity expres
Standard Persons per Day per hectare (ha). A Standard Person Day equals six hours per da
CF is a dry Season Hoe Tillage option in Zambia which involves digging basins measuring 
12x30x20cms deep.Work can commence in May/June. Labour is thus spread over several 
months. Soil movement is 80 tons/ha in first year. CF has slightly higher labour input of 40 to 50 
SPD /ha from the second year onwards, when labour is reduced to 30 to 35 SPD’s/ha. In the 
conventional option of dry season overall hoeing, labour required  is 100 to 116 SPD/ha. In the 
option of  Wet Season Overall Hoeing in Zambia labour required is 25 to 35 SPD/ha. 
(ii) The perception that adoption of CF is low among small scale farmers 
Adoption is estimated at 270,000 farmers on portions of land. This is based on a 2006/7 
baseline study of 93,000 farmers. This level of adoption is seen to be a commendable 
achievement when compared to Zimbabwe with 50,000 beneficiaries and adoption at about 
30,000 farmers. Elsewhere in East Central and Southern Africa promotion is negligible. Reasons 
for low rates of adoption are lack of consistency by major NGOs and poor delivery of input packs 
and poor training. 
Factors associated with low productivity
Important factors identified with low productivity are land degradation caused mainly by the 
conventional method of repeated ploughing and soil compaction, and late planting. 
With the above practice, a compact soil layer develops  at about 12‐14cms, degrades land. In 
these drier season’s panned soils, root development is stunted, causing severe moisture stress. 
Rainfall cannot infiltrate the soil, and soil is also washed away. In wetter seasons, compacted 
soils cause water logging from impeded drainage. When soils are exhausted farmers migrate
and encroach on primary or rejuvenated woodlands to exploit accumulated fertility. Top soil 
loss is the reason for farmers migrating from the grain belts of Zambia, particularly from the 
Tonga plateau of Southern Province. 
In ox ploughing areas, late planting is a result of farmers having lost animals from animal 
diseases. They now queue to wait for hire of oxen. This delays their farming (especially planting 
dates) and leads to losses.  An estimated 1.7 million hectares are planted and then abandoned 
because of late planting. The cost of hiring oxen to plough is between ZMK 225,000 to ZMK 
275,000 per hectare. Late ploughing results and crops fail even in years with good rainfall.
There is no weed invasion benefit. 
Conclusions
Results have shown that CF minimum tillage does not demand more labour, and does not 
increase weed pressure compared to other conventional tillage practices in Zambia.  The 
success of CF is reflected in increased yields and small scale farmer’s improved welfare. 
Indicators of improved welfare are more money in farmer’s pockets which enable, farmers to 
eet their basic needs and send children to school, better housing, better fed and better clothed 
amilies.  
m
f
143.3 INSIGHTS FROM THE COMACOMODEL. BY DALE LEWIS
Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) is a limited company by guarantee which 
works with local people and other stakeholders, local government and chiefs.  COMACO’s 
strategy is to engage in business partnership with communities that agree to conserve natural 
resources, mainly wildlife, forests, land/soils and water. Areas of operation include Chama, 
Mambwe, Serenje, Chinsali, Nyimba and Luangwa districts.  
Issues
COMACO operates as a company but targets threat groups such as poachers and charcoal 
producers for their transformation. It works as well with farmers who are food insecure and 
practice unsustainable farming methods. The programme works with traditional rulers and 
headmen to identify target families. These are given training in alternative skills. Trained 
members of the group are given tools for livelihood skills. Farmers are trained in conservation 
farming as part of efforts to improve soil fertility and intensify food production. Emphasis is on 
household food security first but excess produce is purchased by COMACO and sold to retail 
outlets in urban areas as processed, value‐added products or to commodity markets as raw, 
unprocessed commodities.  
On the plateau, watersheds are degraded by agricultural practices and charcoal production. 
Zambia is losing tons of soils from erosion in these areas, which is contributing to a range of 
related, downriver costs borne largely by Government.  COMACO helps to reduce these costs. 
Indicators of success
Success is viewed from conservation perspective and household welfare. Results of aerial 
surveys done in the Luangwa valley showed that except for eland, populations for species 
targeted are either improving or stable..Other benefits are saving for government – huge saving 
of resources which would be spent on arresting poachers, saving lives, better food security, and 
better income for rural poor to support health and education needs.  Organic products are now 
sold in major retail outlets in towns and cities providing better income per household. Families 
are able to take their children to school 
Challenges  
The challenge is how to integrate human welfare with goals of conserving land, soils, water and 
forests. Water and watershed management requires urgent attention. Many tributaries of the 
Luangwa are at risk of drying up.  Zambia is losing tons of soils from erosion, a loss that needs to  
be determined in monetary terms. Should the current trends continue the Luangwa River will 
be at risk of drying up for periods long enough to threaten wildlife and tourism.  When food and 
income security is addressed farmers can then reflect on matters such as conservation, which is 
what COMACO is able to do. then discussions on how to improve conservation can become more 
creative and acceptable. 
15Conclusion:
The COMACO Company demonstrates new potential solutions for conservation by linking food 
security and markets to conservation and farming.  The approach is at a relatively early phase 
and is attracting considerable interest and research to help strengthen the approach further.  
3.4 SUMMARY OF PLENARY DISCUSSION
Issue: Synergies between wildlife conservation and farming in GMAs  
Some participants did not see the linkage between land issues and GMAs, and requested to 
know the relevance of discussing land and conservation farming issues in relation to wildlife 
and matters relating to GMAs? One observation was that there was normally limited time in 
discussing land issues in the perspective of wildlife and GMAs as land issues are not a mandate 
for ZAWA. The forum offered such an opportunity. COMACO has seen synergies for campaigns 
with regard to land issues and is working with ZAWA to address some pressing issues in this 
regard within its catchment areas, though more still has to be done. COMACO inculcates within 
its clientele that GMAs need to be run as businesses, that money can be created from natural 
esources and that farmers and wildlife are complimentary rather than opposites as both 
epend on land.
r
d
Issue: Conservation farming in Zambia is now growing.  
Would it be reasonable to say that most of agriculture in Zambia will be under conservation 
farming by say 2020, or there is still space for other types of agriculture one asked? Of land 
under conservation in the world only 0.4% is located in Africa. There are currently about 
240,000 farmers practicing conservation farming in Zambia and it is expected that the number 
of adopters will increase to between 400,000 and 450,000; but it should be borne in mind that 
conservation agriculture is not for everybody. At the moment, about 60 to 70% of the farmers in 
umbwa use conservation agriculture and these farmers are better off for example in terms of 
sset ownership. 
M
a
Issue: Concern for Small scale farmers’ use of herbicides  
Herbicides in conservation agriculture can be done away with according to some experts. The 
forum was informed that herbicides usage per se has no adverse effects. The problem that is 
being faced is improper and ineffective use of these products, especially by smallholder farmers. 
About 5 hours need to be invested to train a farmer on proper herbicide use. Farmers in the US 
have been using herbicides for over 130 years without side effects, according to advocates of CF. 
Issue:  High capital costs in the COMACO approach
The COMACO model is operating its marketing activities with a working capital of about US$ 1 
million.  Questions were raised concerning sustainability of such expensive operations and 
some sought to know what type of exit strategy COMACO has in place. COMACO incurs high 
transaction costs in its marketing activities. The high transaction costs are linked to bad roads, 
training and small volumes of trade but the company competes with established companies 
which are big, multinational and have less transaction costs through economies of scale. 
However, COMACO as a company is growing with the communities who are regarded as 
partners. COMACO looks at its future in terms of its sustainability/as a business rather than an 
exit strategy. The ultimate goal is to make farmers better producers (self employment) through 
reliable and increasingly diversified conservation‐friendly production and markets plans, and to 
plough back money in the community. In this way it is hoped that in the long run the company 
would recover its investments in the communities and ultimately exit from donor support. 
16Issue: Rural poverty reduction and land tenure
Rural poverty reduction in Zambia is closely linked to the dual land tenure system where state‐
land has title while customary land does not, and therefore can not be used to secure 
investment funding. It was suggested that a solution could be to allow traditional leaders to 
issue certificates of title to customary land which would be bankable. This proposal is currently 
being considered by the National Constitution Commission. However an observation was made 
that once customary land was made bankable then it could potentially be sold by financing 
institutions and be eventually lost by traditional authorities.  
In addition, there are concerns with security of land tenure in GMAs due to conflicts and 
displacements. Sometimes mining and/or exploration licenses create conflicts just as much as 
settlements and farming. 
174.0  GUIDED PLENARY DISCUSSION
Moderators led guided plenary discussions of the issues outlined in the research presentations 
by posing questions that emerged from the research findings. Questions and summaries of the 
discussion are presented below. 
Discussion question: Is there need for an umbrella body and one natural resource apex? Consider
legislative content and institutional capacity for implementation
The forum discussed possibilities of bringing together the natural resource agencies under one 
institution for improved coordination. The forum resolved that this was unnecessary, that there 
were  adequate  provisions  in  existing  structures  to  decentralize  management  of  natural 
resources,  from  provincial  through  district  to  sub‐district  levels with well  spelt  out  roles  for 
chiefs. Current  legislation  in place affected development at  the sub‐district  level as  it does not 
clearly spell out the roles of  local  leaders and hence their authority is quite often undermined. 
Traditional  leaders  or  chiefs  need  to  be  involved  in  the  formulation,  implementation  and 
monitoring and evaluation of programmes affecting their communities.
Discussion question: Management focus is on protected areas.What about management of na
resources in open areas?
Government’s role should be legislation and effective enforcement of protection of natural 
resources in open areas but active management should be devolved to local communities. One 
suggestion was to have provincial and district land use plans. Open areas could be delegated to 
chiefdoms with more active participation of communities. Resources to protect should not only 
be wildlife but all common property resources. However, legal backing is needed for effective 
protection of these resources. 
tural
Discussion question: How can broad­based community participation be enhanced?  
How do chiefs feel about power to control, for example, charcoal burning or any other resource 
use? Some chiefs  have banned charcoal burning and are involving officers from the Forestry 
Department to do this but most chiefs are not aware how far the development of the Forestry 
Policy is  in terms of assigning them rights as proposed  previously in joint forestry management 
since they have not been involved in the process of developing it. The chiefs advised that chiefs’ 
roles should be spelt out clearly within the policy from the outset. 
According to the Forestry Department (represented in the meeting), the Forestry Policy review 
was advanced and a draft 2009 policy document had already been produced. A suggestion was 
made to the forum to send resolutions from the meeting to the consultant finalising the 
document for possible inclusion. Another proposal was to empower local courts to address 
basic natural resources use regulation such as farming on steep slopes, illegal tree cutting and 
snaring. Emphasis was placed on the need to educate communities to develop a sense of 
ownership of community property resources. Community members need to appreciate the 
benefits for them to cooperate. 
Discussion question: To what extent should natural resource rights be devolved to commu
based organisations in the CBNRM?
Conservation is not a new concept according to some traditional leaders, as it has been 
practiced traditionally since time immemorial.   Abolishing the Chiefs and Natives Act and 
 enforce 
nity
18
replacing it with the Local government Authority Act removed the chief’s authority to
natural resources conservation. The result was high levels of degradation 
The Forestry Act of 1972 was repealed in 1998 when joint forestry management was 
introduced, but still chiefs do not have sufficiently effective authority because the policy was not 
implemented. Natural resources management was best left to the communities with 
Government providing a regulatory framework. Discussion question: How can we improve access to land for the poor majority?
An accepted National Constitutional Conference proposal is to recognise ownership of land in 
villages and recommends that chiefs be given authority to sign documents of ownership. 
Ownership would revert to the chief when this land is no longer used by those to whom it was 
given. Parliament is expected to enact the legislation as soon as the constitution is amended and 
adopted. Land will then be bankable but sensitisation is necessary at the traditional level for 
transparency and to avoid land selling. The new law being developed is also going to make land 
speculation illegal. 
Discussion question: How best can access to land for settlements, agriculture and other land uses
be regulated in GMAs to allow for social and economic uses of all natural resources while
maintaining the ecological functions of GMAs?
Zoning was recommended as a way of separating areas for protected natural resources away 
from those for conservation farming. People living in GMAs should also be supported to grow 
their own food. Fences may be considered to fence out wildlife in order to minimize conflicts 
with humans. People in GMAs must really see the benefits from wildlife conservation if it is to be 
appreciated.  Government efforts include the Reclassification project which is trying to identify 
other areas for conservation instead of current GMAs where there are conflicts.  Another option 
considered is to move animals to un‐inhabited areas. 
Discussion question: Is conservation farming an answer to increasing productivity for small
holders and attaining conservation of the soil?
CF is an answer to increasing small scale farmer’s productivity. It is cheaper. While conventional 
ploughing takes 120l diesel/ha while minimum tillage only takes 25‐30 l/ha. Another advantage 
is that it does not destroy the soil (no oxidation of organic matter). Present farmers and other 
people need to be taught its principles and practices. 
Discussion question: Can the marketing institutions (CTCs) in the COMACO model be sustained?
Can the model be adopted by community­based organisations (CBOs)?
Using CRBs as an example, the COMACO approach can be linked to CBOs but CBOs would need 
capacity building and infrastructure development as well as Zambian professional staff. 
Commodities need to be pooled from single CTCs in order to reduce transaction costs. The 
model needs another 4‐5 years before it can really be shown off. The idea of mainstreaming the 
model into line ministries was not favoured as the COMACO model is a business partnership 
with the local communities and should be viewed as such. 
195.0  Summary of Policy Implications and
Considerations  
5.1 G CE OF NATURAL RESOURCES
5.1.1   Discussion: Economic growth and urbanisation in Zambia coexist with persistent high 
levels of rural poverty and food insecurity that have increased demands on natural resources 
and contributed to accelerated environmental degradation. Service delivery at all levels of 
governance needs to be restructured if the promotion of economic development and 
management of natural resources is to improve. Improved broad‐based human welfare and 
environmental outcomes are possible. New strategies based on appropriate resource 
management systems which promote broad‐based participation and address household 
benefits are more likely to be appreciated and offer incentives for more effective community‐
based natural resource management. At present, benefits are captured mostly by non‐poor 
membe
OVERNAN
rs who dominate the membership in local‐level management structures.  
ecommended Actions:  
(a) Build more local‐level capacities to effectively participate in decision‐making, 
rivate‐
5.1.1   R
benefit‐sharing, and natural resource management. This may be done in public‐p
NGO‐community partnerships;  
   ;
(b) Review and strengthen the incentive structure for community‐based natural 
resource management. This calls for a restructuring of the benefit sharing schemes
(c) Carry out comparative country studies on the impact of the CBNRM model, and 
effectiveness of participation by poor households. 
5.1.2   Discussion: Stakeholders are strongly concerned about the weak performance of 
government agencies with respect to effective development as well as enforcement of laws and 
regulations. The Forest Department was identified as one good example of such failure as 
charcoal production and trade seems to be taking place with almost no controls. In fact, at the 
moment, the only sub‐sector where some policing is evident is wildlife. 
ecommended Actions:   
(a)  Improve management capacity and to strengthen enforcement of laws and 
regulations in relation to all natural resources.  This may entail training, increased 
awareness, increased human and financial resource allocation, improved coordination 
r 
5.1.2   R
with other institutions, and harmonisation of legal and policy frameworks among othe
possible actions.   
(b)   Explore more innovative approaches to resource development and enhancement 
through partnerships.  This will require creating an enabling policy environment for 
other stakeholders (NGOs, private sector, communities) to effectively participate in 
managing natural resources. Some rights of ownership need to be gradually devolved. 
5.1.3   Discussion:  Resources in open areas (land, watersheds, biodiversity) have been neglected 
as they are considered common property. Soil erosion, gully formation, deforestation, and 
cultivation on hill slopes and watershed areas are not checked or controlled. No institution 
eems responsible for managing land and the environment in general. Some chiefs do not reside 
n their lands and hence have no authority on how its resources are used.  
s
o
5.1.3   Recommended Actions:   
(a) Strengthen options for custodianship of natural resources in open areas by local 
chiefs and their communities. This may entail legislative changes and their strict 
implementation. 
20(b) Promote farming practices that do not degrade the environment and natural 
resources. This requires significant strengthening of extension as well as stricter 
monitoring in key resource use areas. The MACO and the MTENR will need to draw upon 
each other’s synergies and work together if this is to be achieved. There is need for a 
government agency under the MTENR that is tasked to monitor land‐use practices and 
that reinforces leadership by provincial government authorities to help lead and 
coordinate provincial land use plans. Such monitoring can be implemented in 
partnership with local government and community‐based institutions to contribute local 
land use planning efforts.  
5.2 P LAWREVIEWPROCESSES
5.2.1   Discussion:  Policy review processes are argued not to be transparent enough. For 
example, some chiefs have expressed ignorance of the just‐ended wildlife and forestry policy 
review processes. The House of Chiefs and the private sector are among the stakeholders whose 
interests are argued to be undermined by weak enforcement of laws in the natural resource 
sector. 
OLICY AND
ecommended Action:  
(a) Be more transparent and inclusive when reviewing policies and laws. The just‐ended 
reviews of the forestry and wildlife policies should be re‐opened and subjected to 
further consultations with a wider set of stakeholders, who feel left out. Engage with the 
house of c
5.2.1   R
hiefs when conducting reviews of policies. 
5.2.2   Discussion:  Lease agreements for hunting concessions will expire in 2012. There are 
clauses in the concessions that are linked to the Wildlife Act. Reviewing the Act may lead to 
some of the clauses being legally unsupported. Thus, the review of the Wildlife Policy and Act 
must be completed in good time to allow for tendering and drafting of new concessions and 
marketing before the existing ones expire. New leaseholders must have enough time to market 
their areas to avoid loss of revenue to ZAWA. 
ecommended Action:  
(a) Commence the review of the Wildlife Policy and Act soon to allow preparations of 
the tender process and lease agreements. A technical committee of qualified experts 
knowledgeable about wildlife management issues in game management areas should 
advise MTENR on how to i)) restructure the safari hunting industry to better support 
conservation and community needs and ii) reduce the cost of wildlife management by 
ZAWA 
5.2.2   R
21
5.3 P rivate Sector Partnerships (PPPs)
5.3.1   Discussion:  Capacity to manage natural resources is limited at many levels. Communities 
are limited in terms of technical knowledge and their abilities to understand investment 
initiatives and to negotiate effectively with investors and programme implementers. The 
capacity of CBOs to adopt business approach requires a lot of training to transfer 
entrepreneurship skills. Public resources, both human and financial, are limited, rendering the 
government incapable of effectively managing the natural resource estate on its own. Increased 
capacity to manage natural resources requires substantial financial resources, which often is 
more easily mobilised by the private sector and NGO partners. Therefore, one of the strategies 
commonly advocated in recent years is to facilitate pooling of resources and interests among 
the public sector, private sector players, non‐governmental organizations and communities. If 
well‐designed and well‐managed, these partnerships could generate useful synergies.  
ublic­Pecommended Actions:  
(a) Expedite and facilitate participation of all stakeholders in the legislative review 
l 
5.3.1   R
processes. The success of PPPs requires improvements on existing policies and lega
frameworks.  
(b) For new legislation, consider more innovative models of conservation and rural 
development. For example, models that foster private sector investment in forestry 
establishment and wildlife conservation should be considered.  
(c) The public sector needs to find more and effective ways to position itself as a 
facilitator, monitor and regulator, while encouraging active but regulated participation 
of other key stakeholders, including the communities, NGOs and private sector.  
5.4 BUSINESS­ORIENTED APPROACHES FROM A STRENGTHENED PRIVATE SECTOR
INVOLVEMENT
5.4.1   Discussion:  Natural resources management at the moment relies heavily on support from 
the government, the private sector and donors. However, private sector and donor support are 
short‐term and largely uncoordinated and unpredictable. There is need to streamline private 
sector investment and contributions. 
ecommended Actions:   
(a)  Pool and coordinate private sector support and contributions. Zambia can learn 
from innovative approaches used by other countries. South Africa, for example, pools 
5.4.1   R
resources from banks and other private contributors under the Tourism Enterprise
Promotion (TEP) initiative.   
(b)   Undertake comparative studies that involves visiting and learning from other 
countries. This should be undertaken by a multi‐disciplinary team comprising 
professionals comprising researchers, business individuals and houses, and the 
government.  
5.4.2   Discussion:  There is a lot of emphasis at the moment on wildlife resources in GMAs. Other 
natural resources are not given as much attention and their potentials are virtually unexplored 
such as medicinal plants. Phytotrade estimates a potential regional value of US$ 3 billion for 
eight oil producing species of wild fruit, from recent surveys, provided reliable markets can be 
established.  Some of these species are found in most forest types of Zambia 
 Business‐oriented natural resource management needs to explore and fully exploit a wide set of 
available opportunities. 
5.4.2   Recommended Actions:   
(a) Revamp and enhance research that is aimed at identifying nature‐based business 
opportunities and ways to exploit them.   
(b) Proactively cultivate an enabling business environment, including increased avenues 
for accessing financing at low interest rates, and tax incentives. This is especially 
important for local entrepreneurs with no access to cheaper external funding but would 
like to venture into natural resource‐based enterprises. 
(c) Undertake marketing and promotion activities for the nature‐based products, as a 
country. For example, South Africa markets the Victoria Falls as if it were within its 
borders. Zambia needs to be more aggressive in penetrating markets for her natural 
resources. 
225.5 LAND ACCESS AND SECURITY OF TENURE FOR IMPROVED SMALLHOLDER FOOD
SECURITY
5.5.1   Discussion:  Zambia is generally regarded as a land‐abundant country. Yet research 
evidence indicates that the majority of smallholder farmers own and cultivate very small 
portions of land, and farm sizes are decreasing with time. Research also shows that smallholder 
households with larger portions of land are better off, and those with small portions are 
generally poor. Moreover, land productivity is generally very low among smallholder farmers. It 
appears, therefore, that poverty reduction in rural areas is closely related to land access among 
other factors. Even when one has access to land, they typically do not have security of tenure 
and other complementary land‐enhancing and settlement productivity services are often 
lacking. Displacements to give way for large‐scale investors and wildlife are common 
occurrences. Ability to secure funding with land as collateral is even further fetched. 
ecommended Actions:   
(a) Devise more effective ways to improve access to land on the part of smallholders.  
Complement the policy of farm blocks with more localized programmes. Zoning, for 
5.5.1   R
example, has been proposed to increase land access for smallholder households in 
GMAs.   
(b) Raise the value of land in these remote areas by improving infrastructure such as 
roads, and communication facilities. Doing so would also attract private‐sector 
investment and improve settlement of existing farm blocks in GMAs. 
(c) Find more effective ways of securing individual (smallholder) household tenure and 
communal rights to land and other natural resources. The idea of traditional certificates 
of title from chiefs is being considered by the National Constitution Review Commission 
(NCC), and was proposed during the outreach forum. 
(d) Develop enhanced approaches to raise productivity of smallholders’ agricultural 
land through greatly expanded applied research and extension.  
5.5.2   Discussion:  Co‐existence with wildlife cannot be without human‐wildlife conflicts. These 
need to be minimized to the extent possible. GMAs still have land parcels where agriculture can 
be promoted. However, migration into wildlife habitats and other protected areas must be 
strictly controlled.  Animal habitats and area that have to be placed under agriculture must be 
clearly mapped out. Now is the time to prioritise conservation areas and strengthen protection 
of animal habitats, while also finding ways to improve smallholder welfare. 
ecommended Actions:   
ttlements.  
ents.  
(a) Review and analyse the status of GMAs in view of expanding human se
5.5.2   R
(b) Develop more effective ways to safe‐guard animal habitats with legal instrum
(c) Develop and implement regional and local integrated land use plans.   
(d) Define resource rights for institutions, individuals and communities to make 
regulation easy.   
(e) Coordinate with local government to resolve land conflicts among chiefs so as to 
increase land access by historically displaced groups. 
(f) Assist communities to invest their land in wildlife use with reciprocal rights to own 
majority shares or revenue benefits that might accrue from PPP ventures. 
236.0  OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS
6.1 ISSUES FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION
Issue: CBNRM, Natural Resources Management and Food Security
i. Undertake a comprehensive assessment of benefits to communities from ZAWA funds 
and from other CBNRM programmes being implemented in GMAs. 
ii. Undertake a comparative country study of wildlife based CBNRM, examining issues such 
as community incentives, rights, capacity building, impediments to broad based 
participation,  
iii. Explore the effectiveness of governance structures since service delivery is failing for 
both wildlife management as well as community development. Consider possibilities of 
restructuring governance of natural resources. 
iv.  Monitoring and evaluation of  the CBNRM programme  are essential. Evaluate the 
current programme to establish whether animals have increased and communities have 
benefited since the establishment of CRBs.  
v. Law enforcement and/or monitoring for natural resources are generally weak but worst 
in the forest sector. Evaluate the possibility of devolving management to a new 
institution or to local authorities, local communities in view of the poor performance of 
Forest Department as evidenced by the uncontrolled charcoal industry.  
vi. Consider reducing ZAWA’s roles and functions.  ZAWA is inadequately funded and 
cannot cope with managing Parks and GMAs. In some areas the private sector 
(concession holders) is responsible for supporting anti poaching activities e.g. Lumimba 
GMA is reported to have only four village scouts. 
vii. Human/Animal conflicts: crops, livestock and human losses are high. Explore ways of 
reducing these conflicts and facilitate agricultural production for residents in GMAs and 
around national parks. Pay more attention to food security as a policy matter and 
upport that with actions e.g. consider crop protection as an additional responsibility for 
illage scouts. Devise means of compensating individuals for their losses. 
s
v
Issue: Land access and Security of tenure
i.  Insecurity of tenure and limited access to land on customary land perpetuate poverty. 
Villagers often displaced in some GMAs after considerable investment has been made by 
poor people. Lack of collateral for village land discourages investment. Historical 
displacements still have effects for some communities that have no proper land 
boundaries legally defined for them  which has continued and lead to conflicts e.g. 
Kabulwebulwe in Mumbwa GMA.  Government needs to resolve these conflicts. 
ii. Unclear resource rights in GMAs, makes regulation difficult or leads to common 
property syndrome – land, lakes, rivers, forests in GMAs. Some chiefs do not reside on
their lands and hence have minimal say on how it is used 
iii. Poor infrastructure in rural areas/GMAs – roads are bad, no electricity, crop storage 
facilities are limited or do not exist in most areas.  Hence areas are unattractive for 
investment. Crop marketing is difficult.  
Issue: Conservation Farming/ Improper and ineffective use of techniques
24
i. Technological transfer: Training of farmers for proper use of agricultural chemicals such 
as herbicides must be enforced to avoid environmental hazards. 
ii. Provide  information on any  comprehensive assessments of CFU that have been done so 
far which give a balanced view. If none have been done, carryout such assessments. iii. Productivity‐more re  is 
tin
search on the agronomic as well as economic potential of CF
needed, especially under on‐farm conditions, as well as under research station set
i
gs. 
v. Marketing‐  in view of the prevailing market conditions should this be part of the 
package or do farmers have to sort it out themselves? 
v. Extension services.‐ how promotion and training can be scaled up, who bears the cost 
etc? 
Issue: Natural resource management legislative and Institutional capacity  
i. Is decentralisation the solution – District, sub district levels with well spelt out roles for 
chiefs to manage natural resources? Currently legislation does not spell out roles of local 
level structures hence their authority is undermined. 
ii. Inadequate funding to institutions managing natural resources 
iii. Lack of or poor institutional coordination. The problem of unharmonised laws and 
policies persists 
iv. Mainstreaming, linking conservation and development how can planning for various 
land uses or integrated planning for GMAs be best achieved?  
Issue: PPPs and Business Environment
Policies seem to acknowledge the importance of Partnerships. How much is being done? What 
else should be done to facilitate implementation of PPPs? 
6.2  AWARENESS/OUTREACH
There is need for broader dissemination of the research results presented in this forum 
i. Find ways to communicate resolutions from this forum to current policy formulation
processes in Government. 
ii. Impart skills in Forestry management including charcoal production techniques and 
tree planting.  
iii. Empower CBOs with entrepreneurship skills. Expertise  to build capacity in business 
management for CBOs is needed such as training on value adding, pricing, marketing, 
packaging, and lobbying for their interests 
6.3OUTSTANDING ISSUES
Th foll e  owing issues were not discussed thoroughly due to lack of time.  
i. How can broad‐based community participation be enhanced?  
ii. To what extent should natural resource rights be devolved to community based 
organisations in the CBNRM? 
i
i
ii. How can we improve access to land for the poor majority? 
v.
v. rly the issue of compensation 
Land tenure conflicts in GMA 
Human animal conflicts  in GMAs particula
vi. Access to game meat by residents of GMAs
256.4 SUGGESTED STUDIES
6.4.1 Natural Resources Conservation
i. There is lack of data on the impact of development projects in the CBNRM. Carry out 
inventories and assess impacts of such projects. 
ii. Collect current data on animal populations to show trends  
iii. Carry out studies to show  the real economic value of wildlife (this is necessary  if the 
Zambian  people are to be enticed to conserve wildlife) 
iv. Identify positive indigenous knowledge values on conservation of natural resources and 
consider adopting them into modern conservation systems  
6.4.2. Land Access  
i. Conduct land audit type studies to show how much land is still under customary 
tenure/how much of it has been converted into State land 
ii. Address tenure conflicts between mining rights and conservation in GMAs 
iii. Identify and designate open areas suitable for wildlife conservation and consider 
degazetting  GMAs that are currently heavily settled 
iv. Seek and consider other means  of  ensuring security of tenure on customary land 
2627
7.0  CONCLUSIONS AND WAY FORWARD
The Director FSRP on behalf of all the organizing institutions thanked all participants for the 
success of the forum. Special tribute was given to the Traditional Leaders and the members of 
parliament for responding to the invitation and participating with great enthusiasm. The 
plenary discussion ended with a recommendation for a team of experts to analyse raised issues 
in detail, consolidate them and in consultation with other concerned policy makers  formulate 
recommendations. The recommendations which would form part of the forum proceedings
should then be submitted to the Minister of Tourism, Environment and Natural Resources.  
The institutions proposed for the team were Forest Department, CBNRMF, NRCF, House of 
Chiefs chairperson, Conservation Farming Unit, UNZA, Zambia Land Alliance, ZAWA, FAO, 
COMACO and World Bank. The FSRP performed secretarial and coordination functions.  Not all 
representatives were able to attend follow up meetings but some contributions were received 
‐mail by e  and by telephone.  
1. The output of the consultations was a summary of policy recommendations which forms
part of this proceedings report. 
2. A draft proceedings report was circulated to all participants for comments before being 
finalized and circulated to all forum participants.   
3. The Forum  suggested that  there be continuity in discussing the issues raised until they are 
fully considered in the policy formulation process 
Due to lack of time no discussions were held for short term actions that  could be contributed to 
the Sixth National Development Plan .28
LIST OF APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1 POWER POINT PRESENTATIONS
Appendix 1 a.  The Impact of Wildlife Management Policies On Communities And Conservation In 
Game Management Areas Of Zambia. Downloadable at: 
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/AZ_GMA_STUDY_IMPACT_OF_POLICIES.pdf   
Appendix 1 b.  Household Consumption and Natural Resources Management Around National 
Parks In Zambia. Downloadable at: 
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/GTGMA_Consumption_Impact_03Dec09.pdf  
Appendix 1 c.  The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation Policies on Rural Welfare in Zambia. 
Downloadable at: http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/RRNRM_outreach_forum_presentation.pdf  
Appendix 1 d.  The Challenge of Integrating the Goals of Productive Land Use and Broad‐Based 
Agricultural Development in Zambia. Downloadable at: 
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/AC_Zambia_Land_NRForum_Dec3_2009.pdf  
Appendix 1 e.  Conservation Farming Unit. Downloadable at: 
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/PH_FSRP_NATURAL_RESOURCES.pdf  
Appendix 1 f. Improving the lives of poor farmers, rewarding farming practices that protect nature: 
COMACO.  http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/Dales_Lewis_Presentation.pdf  
APPENDIX 2 BACKGROUND POLICY BRIEFS
Appendix 2 a.  The Impact of Wildlife Management Policies On Communities And Conservation In 
Game Management Areas Of Zambia: Message to Policy Makers. Downloadable at: 
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/resources/Final%20_NCRF.pdf  
Appendix 2 b.  Impact of Natural Resources Conservation Policies on Household Consumption 
around Zambian National Parks. Downloadable at: http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/ps35.pdf  
Appendix 2 c.  The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation Policies on Rural Welfare in Zambia. 
Downloadable at:   http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/ps33.pdf   
Appendix 2 d.  Access to Land and Poverty Reduction in Rural Zambia: Connecting the Policy 
Issues. Downloadable at:  http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/ps34.pdf  
Appendix 2 e. Enhancing Food Security through Conservation Farming and Conservation 
Agriculture. Downloadable at: 
http://www.conservationagriculture.org/assets/images/media/20070329_121608_Brief4‐
CF&CAandFoodSecurity.pdf  
 Appendix 2 f.  Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) Scaling up Conservation Impact 
through Markets that Change Livelihoods. Downloadable at: 
http://www.aec.msu.edu/fs2/zambia/Community_Markets_for_Conservation.pdf
Appendix 2  g.  The COMACO Model for Increasing Small holder Farm Productivity and Decreasing 
Wildlife Poaching in the Luangwa Valley in Zambia. Downloadable at: 
http://www.ecoagriculture.org/documents/files/doc_62.pdf29
APPE IX ND 3 D N OW LOADABLE RESOURCE DIRECTORY
NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, PRO‐POOR TOURISM, FOOD 
SECURITY AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO LOCATE AND MAKE ACCESSIBLE RESOURCE MATERIALS 
NRCF (Natural Resources Consultative Forum)  
CBNRMF (Community-Based Natural Resource Management Forum) 
UNZA (University of Zambia)  
ACF (Agricultural Consultative Forum)/FSRP (Food Security Research Project)  
FSRP Policy Briefs Top
 Impact Of Natural Resource Conservation Policies On Household Consumption Around Zambian 
National Parks. Gelson Tembo, Sushenjit Bandyopadhyay and Jean‐Michel Pavy. Number 35, 
October 2009. 
 Access To Land And Poverty Reduction In Rural Zambia: Connecting The Policy Issues. T. S
Ballard Zulu, Gear Kajoba and M. T. Weber. Number 34, Sept 2009.  

 ,Jayne .
The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation Policies on Rural Household Welfare in Zambia. Ana 
Fernandez, Robert B. Richardson, David Tschirley, and Gelson Tembo. Number 33, September 
2009. 
 The Impact of Wildlife Management Policies on Communities and Conservation in Game 
Management Areas in Zambia:  Message to Policy Makers. Phyllis Simasiku, Hopeson I. Simwanza, 
Gelson Tembo, Sushenjit Bandyopadhyay and Jean‐Michel Pavy. Published by the Natural 
Resources Consultative Forum NRCF). June 2008 Policy Brief posted by FSRP.  
FSRP Research Publications  Top
 Wildlife Conservation in Zambia: Impacts on Rural Household Welfare. Ana Fernandez, Robert B.
Richardson, David Tschirley, and Gelson Tembo. Working Paper No. 41. September 2009. 
 Access to Land, and Poverty Reduction in Rural Zambia: Connecting the Policy Issues. T.S. Jayne, 
Ballard Zulu, Gear Kajoba, and M.T. Weber. Working Paper No. 34. October 2008.  
FSRP Outreach Presentations Top
 The status of customary land and how it affects the rights of indigenous local communities.
Submission by FSRP to the Parliamentary Committee on Agriculture and Lands Study, January 
2010. 
 Insights on Natural Resource Management and Rural Development in Zambia: Moving From 
Researc aborating Partner Public Forum. Pamodzi Hotel, 03 December, 
2009  
h Evidence to Action. Coll
 Forum Final Programme 
 Opening Comments ‐ Honorable Minister of Minister of Tourism, Environment 
Natural
 Forum Summ
and 
Resources  
 Suggestions for Action for SNDP and Beyond   
nd LANDS
ary Document and
 Recommendations for Policy Leaders in MTENR, MACO, Livestock a

 Panel P
Proceedings Document 
resentations on Community‐Based Natural Resource Management  
 The impact of wildlife management policies on communities and conservation in 
Game Management Areas in Zambia. Alimakio Zulu(NRCF)and Mwape Sichilon
(CBNRMF) 

go 
Household Consumption and Natural Resource Management around National 
Parks in Zambia. Dr. Gelson Tembo, (UNZA)  30
 The Impacts of Wildlife Conservation Policies on Rural Welfare in Zambia. Dr. 
Robert Richardson, (FSRP/MSU)  
 Panel P
and pot
resentations on Land Use and Intensification of agriculture/livestock production
ential for productivity enhancements  
 The Challenge of Integrating the Goals of Productive Land Use and Broad‐Based 
Agricultural Development In Zambia. Dr. Antony Chapoto (FSRP)  
 Conservation Farming and Related Natural Resource Policies for Sustainable 
Agricultural Intensification‐Two Key Issues. Peter Aagaard  
 Improving the lives of poor farmers, rewarding farming practices that protect 
nature: COMACO. Dr. Dale Lewis, Wildlife Conservation Society  
  Supplemental Paper: Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO): 
Scaling up Conservation Impact through Markets that Change Livelihoods.
Dale Lewis.  
 The Impact of Wildlife Conservation on Rural Development in Zambia. Robert B. Richardson, Ana 
Fernandez and David Tschirley. Presented at Regional Science Association International (RSAI). 
San Francisco, CA. November 19, 2009. 
 Measuring the Effects of Natural Resource Conservation Policies on Household Welfare. Robert B. 
Richardson and David Tschirley. Brown Bag Seminar Series Department of Agricultural, Food and 
Resource Economics. November 10, 2009. 
 Integrating the Goals of Productive Land Use and Broad‐Based Agricultural Development. T.S. 
Jayne. FSRP. Presentation at USAID/Zambia. November 9, 2009. 
 Household Consumption and Natural Resource Management around National Parks in Zambia. 
Gelson Tembo, UNZA. Presented at the Workshop Research and Outreach Towards Game Park 
and Natural Resource Management to Improve Rural Household Welfare in Zambia. October 27, 
2009 
 The Impact of Wildlife Conservation Policies on Rural Welfare in Zambia.  Robert Richardson, 
FSRP/MSU. October 27, 2009 
 Smallholder Land Access Research ‐ Possible Interactions with Natural Resource & GMA Issues.   
See also Table 1 and 2 handouts.  Michael Weber, FSRP/MSU. Oct 27, 2009 
 Tourism and Wildlife Conservation in Africa: Measuring the Impacts to Rural Households. Robert 
B. Richardson and Ana Fernandez. Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics 
(AFRE) Brown Bag Seminar Series. November 18, 2008. 
Background Publications – Zambia Specific  
Natural resources and/or pro-poor tourism 
 The Impact Of  Wildlife Management Policies On Communities And Conservation In Game 
Management Areas In Zambia:  Message To Policy Makers. June 2008.  by Phyllis Simasiku, 
Hopeson I. Simwanza, Gelson Tembo, Sushenjit Bandyopadhyay and Jean‐Michel Pavy.  Natural 
Resources Consultative Forum of Zambia.  
 Creating and Protecting Zambia’s Wealth:  Experiences and Next Steps in Environmental 
Mainstreaming.  2009. by Lubinda Aongola, Stephen Bass, Juliana Chileshe, Julius Daka, Barry 
Dalal‐Clayton, Imasiku Liayo, Joseph Makumba, Maswabi Maimbolwa, Kalaluka Munyinda, Nosiku 
Munyinda, David Ndopu, Imasiku Nyambe, Adam Pope and Mwape Sichilongo.   
 Household Consumption and Natural Resource Management around National Parks in Zambia.
2009. Sushenjit Bandyopadhyay and Gelson Tembo  World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 
4932.  
 Opportunities and challenges for sustainable management of miombo woodlands: the Zambian 
perspective. 2008. Fabian M. Malambo and Stephen Syampungani. Copperbelt University, Schoo
of Natural Resources.  Working Papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute 98: 125–130.  

l 
Economic and Poverty Impact of Nature‐based Tourism. Zambia. 2007. World Bank Report
43373‐ZM. (14 MB)  

 No. 
Contribution of dry forests to rural livelihoods and the national economy in Zambia. 20
Charles B.L. Jumbe, Samuel Mulenga Bwalya and Madeleen Husselman. CIFOR.   

07. 
Review And Synthesis Of Lessons Learned Concerning Optimum Forms Of Community 
Management Structures For Multiple Resource Management In Zambia And Southern And 
Eastern Africa. 2008.  Development Services And Initiatives (DSI)  31
 ADMADE  
 Lessons Learned Papers  
 African College for CBNRM.  Around 2000‐2004.   
 Next Generation Approaches to CBNRM Institutions in Zambia: Building on a 
Decade of Experience
 An Evaluation Today and the Future: Policy Issues and Directions. Paul Andre DeGeor
1992. 

ges. 
Fisheries in Zambia:  An undervalued contributor to poverty reduction. Musole M. Musumali, 
Simon Heck, Saskia M.C. Husken and Marcus Wishart. 2009. World Fish Center and The World 
Bank.  
 Inventory and Analysis of Community Based Tourism in Zambia. Louise Dixey. Production, 
Finance and Technology (PROFIT). Nov 2005. 
 Community Based Tourism in Zambia: Lessons and Recommendations. Louise Dixey. Productio

n, 
Finance and Technology (PROFIT). Nov 2005. 
Luangwa Safari Association Tourism Study. Adam Pope. WHYDAH Consulting Ltd. April 2005.  
 A Financial and Economic Analysis of the Costs and Benefits of Managing the Protected Area 
Estate. UNDP/GEF Funded Project on Reclassification and Sustainable Management of Zambia’s

Protected Area Systems. 2004. 
A Study of the Nature‐Based Tourism Supply Side in Zambia ‐ 2005  WHYDAH Consulting LTD.  
 Livingstone Tourism Survey. DCDM Consulting. Ministry of Tourism, Environm

ent and Natural 
Resources. 2006. 
Nature Based Tourism Demand Survey Report ‐ Nov 2005. Goodson Sinyenga  
 Economic Impacts Of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline Of Tourism In The 
Kavangozambezi TFCA. Helen Suich, Jonah Busch and Nathalie Barbancho.  Conservation
International South Africa. 2005.  
 A Preliminary Examination of Public Private Partnerships in National Park Management in 
Zambia. June 2006. by Adam Pope. WHYDAH Consulting LTD.  
Land access and land use management
 Zambia Land Alliance Recommendations To The Land And Environment Committee Of The 
National Constitutional Conference.  2009. 
 Land Policy Options for Development and Poverty Reduction Civil Society Views for Pro‐poor 
Land Policies and Laws in Zambia. 2008. Zambia Land Alliance. 
 Civil Society Position on Zambia’s draft Land Policy of October 2006. October 2007. Zambia Land 
Alliance
 Zambia
  .
o
's Integrated Land Use Assessment 2005‐2008  
ILUA Final Report
o Use of Integrated Land Use Assessment (ILUA) Data for Environmental and Agricultural 
Policy Review and Analysis in Zambia. 2008.  
o Training Workshop Report.  2003 
 Hungry People on Fertile Land. In Zambia Institute for Public. 2007. Malcolm McPherson, Policy 

Analysis (ZIPPA) Journal, July‐September 2007.  
Draft Land Administration and Management Policy ‐ 2006. Ministry of Lands, Republic of Zambia.
 Contestation, Confusion and Corruption:  Market‐based land reform in Zambia.  2005. by Taylor 
Brown. Chapter 3 in Competing Jurisdictions: Settling Land Claims in Africa, Sandra Every, Marja 

Spierenburg and Harry Wels. (eds) ‐Afrika‐Studiencentrum Series, Vol 6. Leiden 
Baseline Survey on Women's Access to Agricultural Land in Zambia. Final Research Report. 2005.  
 A Poverty and Social Impact Analysis of Three Reforms in Zambia: Land, Fertilizer, and 
Infrastructure. 2005. by Steen Lau Jorgensen and Zlatina Loudjeva.  Poverty and Social Imp
Analysis(PSIA)The World Bank. 

act 
Landscape Conservation and Land Tenure in Zambia: Community Trusts in the Kazungula 
Heartland.  2005. by Simon Metcalf, WWF  
 Land Tenure, Housing Rights and Gender ‐ National and Urban Framework: Zambia. 2005.  United 
Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐HABITAT).  
 Land tenure policy and practice in Zambia: issues relating to the development of the agricultural 
sector. Draft. January 2003. by Martin Adams. Mokoro Ltd  32
 Zambia Liveihood Map Rezoning and Baseline Profiling. 2004.  Final Report by the ZAMBIA 
Vulnerability Assessment Committee.  
 Chileshi, A.  2005. "Land tenure and rural livelihoods in Zambia: Case studies of Kemena and St. 
Joseph," PhD dissertation, University of the Western Cape, South Africa.  
http://www.uwc.ac.za/library/theses/Chileshe_r_a.pdf  
 Multi‐Sector Country Gender Profile for Zambia. 2006. African  Development Bank. 
 Land Tenure, Land Markets,and Institutional Transformation in Zambia. LTC Research Paper 124, 
1995. ed  of Steven G. Smith. Land Tenure Center, 
Univers
ited by Michael Roth with the assistance
o
ity of Wisconsin  
Download entire document (10 mb file) 

o Download individual chapters chapters  
Title Page and Table of Contents  
 Chapter 1: Legal Framework and Administration of Land Policy in Zambia  
 Chapter 2: Land Administration: Processes and Constraints  
 Chapter 3: Agrarian Structure, Land Markets, and Property Transfers  
 Chapter 4: Land Valuation and Taxation  
 Chapter 5: Land Tenure and Agric

ultural Development in Customary Areas: 
Results from Eastern and Southern Provinces  
Chapter 6: Settlement Programs  
 Chapter 7: Land Use Patterns and Growth in Commercial Input Use, Productivity, 
and Profitability by Farm Size Category  
 Chapter 8: Zambia's Agricultural Data System: A Review of the Agricultural Time 
Series Data, with Annexes  
Climate Change Effects on Natural Resources, Agriculture and Food Security
 The Impact of Climate Variability and Change on Economic Growth and Poverty in Zambia. 2009. 
by James Thurlow, Tingju Zhu, Xinshen Diao.  IFPRI Discussion Paper 00890.  
 The economic impacts of climate change on agriculture in Zambia. 2006.  Centre for 
Environmental Economics and Policy in Africa (CEEPA). University of Pretoria.   
Background Publications – General  
 The Realities of Community Based Natural Resource Management and Biodiversity Conservation 
in Sub‐Saharan Africa. Paul Andre DeGeorges and Brian Kevin Reilly.   Sustainability 2009, 1, 734‐
788. 
 Rural Poverty and Natural Resources: Improving Access and Sustainable Management. David R. 
Lee and Bernardete Neves,and others. Background Paper for IFAD 2009 Rural Poverty Report.   
 Towards defining a pro‐poor Natural Resources Management Strategy in the CGIAR:  Conclusions 
and recommendations from the CGIAR‐NGOC Consultation on Natural Resources Management. 
October 22‐23, 1998. Washington D.C. Edited by Miguel Altieri and Marco Barzman, University of 
California, Berkeley. CGIAR‐NGO Committee.   
 Natural Resources and Pro‐Poor Growth: The Economics and Politics. DAC Guidelines and 
Reference Series. A Good Practice Paper. OECD 2008   
 Community‐based natural resource management in the southern Africa region: An annotated 
bibliography and general overview of literature, 1996–2004. 2007. Whande, W.  Programm
Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS), University of the Western Cape.)   

e for 
Rural Livelihoods, Poverty Reduction, And Food Security In Southern Africa: Is Cbnrm The 
Answer.  2007. Jaap Arntzen, Tshepo Setlhogile, and Jon Barnes.  USAID .  
 Investment in Sustainable Natural Resource Management for Agriculture. Module 5. World
AgInvestment Sourcebook.   

 Bank 
Mapping Climate Vulnerability and Poverty in Africa. Report to Dfid by ILRI (International 
Livestock Research Institute) in collaboration with TERI (The Energy and Resource Institute) and 
ACTS (The African Centre fro Technology Studies. 2006. 
 Issues in Poverty Reduction and Natural Resource Management.  2006.  Summary of a training 
program by NRIC operated by Chemonics International for USAID 
 From Exclusion to Ownership? Challenges and Opportunities in Advancing Forest Tenure Reform. 
2008 by The Rights and Resources Initiative, a global coalition  33
 Livelihoods and Climate Change: Combining disaster risk reduction, natural resource 
management and climate change adaptation in a new approach to the reduction of vulnerability 
and poverty. 2003.   A Conceptual Framework Paper Prepared by the Task Force on Climate 
Change, Vulnerable Communities and Adaptation . 
Background Presentations – Zambia Specific  
 Forest Monitoring for REDD: "A Case Study of the Integrated Land‐use Assessment (ILUA) ‐ 
Zambia". Abel M.Siampale, Senior Forestry Officer ‐ ILUA . 2008
 Monitoring, Reporting and Verification Update for Zambia. A UN REDD Programme U

pdate for 
Zambia. 2009. Bwalya Chendauka ‐ Principal Forestry Officer  
National Nature‐Based Tourism Supply‐Side Study. World Bank Funded. 2005‐2006 
 Summary of Zambia Tourist Survey – preliminary results. Kirk Hamilton, The World Bank .  
August 2006 
 The Economic Impact of Nature Tourism in Zambia. Based on work by Goodson Sinyenga, Besa 
Muwele and Kirk Hamilton.  A Government of Zambia‐UNDP‐DANIDA‐World Bank study. 2007 
Background Presentations – General 
 The challenge of improved natural resource management practices adoption in African 
agriculture: A social science perspective. 2000. by Chris Barrett, Frank Place, Abdillahi Aboud, 
and Doug Brown.  ICRAF ‐ Nairobi  
Recommended Web Site Resources – Zambia Specific  
 ZAWA –(Zambia Wildlife Authority)  
 ZLA – (Zambia Land Alliance)  
 MTENR – (Ministry of Tourism, Environment and

 Natural Resources ‐ Environment and Natural 
Resources Projects  
ZARI (Zambian Agricultural Research Institute)   
 COMACO (Community Markets for C

onservation ‐ Zambia).   
CFU – (Conservation Farming Unit) 34
Appendix 4  List of Participants
Name  Title and Organisation Phone  Address and e‐mail 
1. Indra Ekanayake  Senior Agriculturalist 
World Bank 
World bank Zambia 
office 
iekanayake@worldbank.org o
rnet.zm
r 
iekanayake@coppe   
2. Nsama Nsemiwe  Zambia Land Alliance  0211‐222432  nsemiwensama@yahoo.com 
3. Ballard Zulu  USAID  0977‐811700 or 0211‐
234350 
bazulu@usaid.sov  
4. Mwape Sichilongo   ZCBNRMF  0966‐442540 or 
 0211‐250404 
mwapesichilongo@yahoo.co.uk  
5. Pat Mupeta   University of Florida  0976212999  pcmupeta@ufl.edu
6. Dr Patrick Nkanza   AIBT  0955‐735624  Patrick@aibt.co.zm  
7. Dr D. M. Lungu   UNZA  0979‐549230  dlungu@unza.zm  
8. Nkweto Kapekele   ZANIS   0211‐255255  Nkwetok@gmail.com  
9.   Mubukwanu G/A  MACO (AGRIC)  0977‐426276  akamuchi@yahoo.com  
10.  Shindo Nalishebo Head National Accounts, 
CSO 
0211‐251377 snalishebo@zamstats.gov.zm
11.  Blackson P. Jeke  Vice Principal‐NRDC  211 283698  bjeke@nrdc.biz  
12. Mukwiti Mwiinga  Lecturere ‐ UNZA  0977‐797683 mukwiti.mwiinga@unza.zm  
13.  Amos D. Zulu  Reporter‐NAIS  0977‐982320  amosdglas@yahoo.com  
14.  Chiyanika William  Cameraman‐NAIS  0977413716  chiyanikaw@yahoo.com  
15.  Snr. Chief 
Chibesakunda 
Mutambo Royal 
Establishment 
0977‐826539  subsahawabolo@yahoo.co.uk  
16.  Brian P. Mulenga  Graduate Student‐ 
UNIVERSITY OF MALAWI 
0978‐641473  pingulani@yahoo.com  
17.  Masiliso Sooka  CSO  0977‐871175  msooka@zamstats.gov.zm  
18.  Pumulo 
Harrington 
C.R.B  Box 830180 
19.  Gear M. Kajoba  Lecturer‐ UNZA  0977‐876763  gmkajoba@hotmail.com  
20.  Felix Mvula   CRB   0979‐056138  Box 1 Luangwa 
21.  Innocent 
Mafulauzi 
CRB  0976‐088230  Box 1 Luangwa 
22.  Kalobwe Soko  Senior Planne
try of La
r ‐ 
Minis nds 
0979‐511196  kalobwes@yahoo.co.uk  
23.  Tobias Muyaba  Farm Zambia  0977‐969743  muyaba@yahoo.com  
24.  Brighton Mulonga  FAO  0966‐219281  mulongabk@yahoo.com or 
Brighton.Mulonga@fao.org  
25.  Oceans Mfune   Lecturer ‐ UNZA  0978‐528771  omfune@yahoo.com  
26.  Dr Harris Phiri  Chief Fisheries Resear
Officer  
ch  0977‐649148  Box 350100, Chilanga
r@iwe.com
 or 
harrisph   
27.  Hon P. Chanda, 
MP 
National Assembly of 
 Zambia.
0966‐823333  Lusaka 
28.  Sylvia Bwalya Times of Zambia  0967‐223495  Lusaka 
29.  Steven Daka   Progr
Emba
am Advisor‐G
ssy of Japan 
GP  0977‐794028 
0211‐251555 
or   P.O.Box 34190, Lusaka or  
smdaka@gmail.com  
30.  Patrick 
Chibombamilimo 
JICA  0966‐860221  Box 30027 Lusaka 
31.  Hamphrey 
Fandamule 
FSRP  0975‐255446  fandamule@yahoo.com  
32.  Agnes K. Ngolwe  Embassy of Sweden  0211‐251711  agnes‐kasaro‐
ngolwe@foreign.ministry.se
33. Eva  Ohlsson  Embassy of Sweden  0211‐251711  Eva.ohlsson@foreign.ministry.se  
34.  C. Nkonde  UNZA  0977‐848424  chewe.nkonde@unza.zm  
35.  J. Fynn Consultant World Bank  0977‐806319  jfwfynn@hotmail.com  
36.  J.M.  Pavy   World Bank   0977‐533706  jpavy@worlbank.org  
37.  Inutu  
Mushambatwa
Ministry of Tourism 
onment and Natural 
es 
Envir
Resourc
0964‐ 001158  inutum@mtenr.gov.zm  
38. Shadreck Saili  ZDA  0966‐947852  ssaili@zda.org.zm  
39.  Hara Lumbiwe  WECSZ  0211‐251630  wecsz@coppernet.zm  
40.  J. Hudson  WLPAZ COMMITTEE  0211‐263896  P.O.Box 30395 or  
jghudson@zamtel.com  35
         41.    J. Pope CFZ  0211‐254076  Box 320172 or  
cfz@microlink.zm  
42. B. Msimuko  Extension Officer, ZAWA 0955‐795297  bettymsimuko@yahoo.com  
43. J. Zindoga  Chairman CCRB Chiawa  0977‐515785  CCRB 360330 
44. Diana Nyabanga  RMC CCRB  0978‐306267  CCRB 360330 
45. Angela Lwanga WWF  0211‐250404  alwanga@wwfzam.org
46. Simfukwe Thomas   UNZA 0977‐319438  mfukwe@yahoo.co.uk  
47. Susan Chipeta  UNZA  0977‐660087  susanchiona@yahoo.com  
48. Charles Mulombwa  ZDA  0977‐803087  cmulombwa@zda.org.zm  
49. Brian Lukutaika  Chairperson CRB  0978‐370560  Mulendema CRB ZA
Mumbwa 
WA 
50. Lloyd Kabulwebulwe  Community Member 
Mumbwa 
0978‐394360  P.O.Box 830001 or 
kabslloyd@yahoo.com  
51. Joseph Mutemwa  C.S.O 0977‐750705  P.O.Box 31908 Lusaka 
52. Evaristo Kapungwe  UNZA  0977‐561539  P.O.Box 32379, Lusaka 
53. Phaides Toka  CFU  0976‐272403  P.O.Box 830069 Mumbwa 
54. Chali Alfred  Kabulwebulwe CRB  0975‐893581  P.O.Box 830180 Mumbwa 
55. Stephen Syampungani  CBU  0955‐914623  P.O.Box 21692 Kitwe or 
syampungani@cbu.ac.zm  
56. Doreen Mukwanka  National Assembly Chief 
of the Clerk 
0955‐763544 or  
0211‐292425 
dmukwanka@parliament.gov.zm
57. Auster Norton  PHAZ  0966‐766718  alnbushmaster@yahoo.com  
58. Singongolo Sakvota  Student  0977‐506738  singongolo@yahoo.com  
59. K.I Asherwood  Chairman SHOAZ   0211‐256310  ashy@zamtel.zm  
60. N. Chikonde  Reporter Hot fm  0211‐234329  natashavoice@yahoo.com  
61. M. Sakala  Executive director HTTI  0211‐239633  moses.sakala@httifaiview.co.zm  
62. D. Lewis  Country Director WCS  0977‐790286  dlewis@wcs.org  
63. Yikihiko Nakanura  Second secretary
Embassy of Japan 
,  0977‐990286  yukihikonakanura@mofa.go.jp  
64.Victor M. Siamudaala  Director‐ ZAWA  0977‐856876 or  
0211‐278335 
vsiamudaala@yahoo.co.uk  
65. Dutch Gibson  CFU  0966‐749238  gitcoll@zamnet.zm  
66. Geoffrey Chomba  Manager CEEC  0977‐174389  chombag@ceec.org.zm  
67. Mary Lubinga  Assistant Director ‐MLGA  0977‐780768  marykataya@yahoo.com  
68. Iris Dueker  Tourism Specialist‐ 
World Bank Zambia 
0968‐480487  idueker@worldbank.com  
69. Rasford Kalamatila  Principal Agriculture 
Specialist‐ MACO
0977‐606600  rkalamatila@maff.gov.zm  
70. Judith Lungu  Dean Agriculture UNZA  0977‐861584  dean‐agric@unza.zm  
71. Benson H. Chishala  Senior Lecturer  0977‐889076  bchishala@unza.zm  
72. Flavian Mupemo  Technical Officer 
REMNPAS project ZAWA 
0977‐753422  fmupemo@yahoo.com  
73.  Margret Mtonga  Journalist, The Post   0977‐678338  maggiemtonga@yahoo.com  
74.  Lexina Mulenga Journalist, Newvision 
Newspaper 
0977‐111023 newvisionzambia@yahoo.com  
75. Shula Mwamba  Programme coordinator 
climate focus 
0968357205  climatefocusn@yahoo.com  
76. Duncan Musama  Senior natural resources 
officer 
0955790575  dmusama@mtenr.gov.zm  
77. Alimakio Zulu  Coordinator NRCF  0977704114  alimakio_zulu@yahoo.com   
78. Patrick Shawa  WECSZ  251630/0977780770  wecsz@coppernet.zm  
79. Sinya Mbale  CFU  0977760364  sinya.mbale@iconnect.zm  
80. Gelson Tembo  Lecturer,UNZA  0966284638  tembogel@unza.zm  
81. Phyllis Simasiku  FSRP  0977674371  phyllissimasiku@yahoo.co.uk  
82. C. Kambole  ACF  0977429686  christopherkambole@yahoo.com
83. Peter Banda  Tourism development   
and research officer 
0977874106  Peterband 72@gmail.com  
84. Luwita Changula  Environmental council  0977676567  lkchangula@necz.org.zm  
85. Sitwala Wamunyima  PEO, FORESTRY DEPT  0977978868  sitwalaw@yahoo.com  
86. Dan Griffiths  USAID  0978790503  dgriffiths@usaid.gov  
87. F. Sinyangwe  Parliament  0977799592  fsinyangwe@parliament.gov.zm  
88.  Hon. P.  Sichamba, MP  Parliament  0977‐968443  Paul.Sichamba@yahoo.com   
89.  Ignatius Makumba  Acting director 
ENRMD/MTENR 
0966‐746841  imakumba@mtenr.gov.zm
inmakumba@yahoo.com   
90.  Justina Wake  Director Tourism 
Department 
0211‐229420  tinawake@mtenr.gov.zm  36
91. Anna C. Masinja Director forestry 
Department 
0211‐223161 
92. Hon. Catherine 
Namugala 
       PM 
Minister of tourism 
environment and natural 
resources 
0211‐225463 
93. Kapotwe Paul  Director PAM  0977‐689172  kapotwep@yahoo.com  
94. Modesto Banda  Deputy Director CSO  0977‐328190 mfcbanda@zamstats.gov.zm  
95. Michael Isimwaa  Chief analyst MACO/PPD  0969‐291902 mnisimwaa@maff.gov.zm  
96. Hon. Request  
       Muntanga, MP. 
National Assembly of 
Zambia 
0977777002  rmuntanga@parliament.gov.zm  
97.  Chance Kabaghe  Director,  FSRP  0976133133  kabaghec@msu.edu  
98.  Peter Haagard  Conservation Farming  0966861481 
99.  Mike Weber  MSU/FSRP  Project 
Advisor 
webermi@msu.edu  
100.  Antory Chapoto Research Coordinator, 
FSRP 
0979987851  chapotoa@msu.edu  
101. Stephen Kabwe  Research Associate, FSRP  0955335928  skabwe@coppernet.zm  
102.  Mungunzwe                      
Hichaambwa 
Research Fellow, FSRP 0977867610  mungunzwe@coppernet.zm  
103.  Sonile Ngwenya  Office Manager, FSRP  0977481908  fsrp@coppernet.zm
104.  Patrick Kabi  Driver, FSRP 
105.  Maybin Shimuza  Driver Chief Shakumbila 
106.  Sibangani Gift  Retainer Chief 
Shakumbila 
107. Rashid Mwale  Driver Chief Mazimawe 
 davido.extraxim@gmail.com